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Posts Tagged ‘Eryngiums’

The sprinkler system at Jo’s, where we dug out some boring perennials from an old section of the garden, is fixed at last.  Today was planting day for her usual set of annuals and some new perennials for the re-done area.  Of course, the reason the former perennials were boring ones is that they were thuggish, some kind of lysimachia and a not very obedient plant that does not want to go away, so they are already trying to sprout back from deep down roots.  This will make it an ongoing process of removing any sprouts of the unwelcome returnees.

Fred from The Basket Case had kindly dropped off the annuals in Jo’s garden at 7 AM (!!).  We went to The Planter Box for some cosmos and painted sage and over to the Basket Case to add some more Eryngiums and other plants from a new shipment.  Fortunately the two nurseries are close together because we often go back and forth between the two.

Fred counts up our plants.

Basket Case Fred counts up our plants.

The latest shipment of Eryngium 'Jade Frost' is about to flower.

The latest shipment of Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ is about to flower.

We don’t make any profit on the plants that go to our clients;  plants are so expensive as it is.  What keeps us earning is the labour time spent planting them.  (I have been advised many times to have a nursery rather than a garden maintenance business, but the idea of having to keep hundreds of plants in pots alive is daunting to me!)

ready for planting at Jo's

ready for planting at Jo’s

Jo’s gardening mission this year is for her garden to look like our back garden did on last year’s tour.   The problem is that we have three huge beds, but at Jo’s we just cleared out two rather small spaces.  The irony is that one of the reasons I moved from my old shady garden to the new sunny one is because I wanted MY garden to look more like Jo’s!  I could not achieve the glorious colour of her west side L shaped bed without more sunshine.

I planted the perennials, as many as I could fit, in the area pictured above and spread some more throughout the west side of the garden.  The soil is much improved by the mulching with two yards of cow fiber from The Planter Box.

planted

planted

My plant choices:  Nicotiana langsdorfii, Cosmos, different Agastaches, assorted Sanguisorbas (because I have a thing for them, ever since I heard Piet Oudolf speak and show slides featuring sanguiborbas).  Painted sage, Eryngiums ‘Sapphire Blue’ and ‘Jade Frost’, Verbascum ‘Clementine’.  Agapanthus ‘Stormy Skies’.  A sidalcea.  Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’.  Verbascum ‘Violetta’.

Meanwhile, Allan planted the usual run of red and pink geraniums along the entry sidewalk.  Even though I rarely choose to plant geraniums, I also find that they look great here by Jo’s design.  Pink and red are staggered and alternating.

lined up for planting

lined up for planting

all in, including windbowboxes

all in, including windbowboxes

I’m sure I have mentioned before that I do not enjoy planting.  I particularly do not like planting at ground level.  Planting in containers can be moderately enjoyable if there are just a few; a full day of planting in the Long Beach planters can be wearing.  I often can delegate all the planting to Allan while I weed and prune, but today was pretty much all planting all the time so I couldn’t weasel out of it.

Jo's impatiens

Jo’s impatiens

Jo always likes impatiens under this rhodo (above).  Behind the fountain is a truly dead flowering currant.  I think Jo’s spouse accidentally sprayed it with weed killer instead of fungicide.  I must ask her if we can just cut it to the ground; she could put a large planter there instead or some sort of rustic shelf.

Jo’s is a garden I have admired and worked in for 19 years, and her mother, Maxine, was my first gardening client on the Peninsula and taught me useful things like how good it is to pinch back cosmos and godetia to make them bushier.

The area I planted is behind this arbour.

The area I planted is behind this arbour.

one side of the west L shaped garden

one side of the west L shaped garden

looking in the gate as we departed

looking in the gate as we departed

We both felt the planting task took a very long time and I had moments of despair that we would never get done in time to plant the ten plants that I had  for the Boreas Inn gardens…but we prevailed and got to the Boreas in time.  (It’s right across the street to the north.)

looking east to the Boreas

looking east to the Boreas

To take the above photos I stood just where the trail to the beach begins.  I need something to fill in those two circles; the daisy divisions will not get big enough this year.  It was wonderful to plant here today in the soil all deliciously loosened by the big project we did earlier this spring.  (The one where I almost lost my mind.)  Hmm, I think I LIKE planting in brand new lusciously mulched beds.

(Added today:  Agastaches, Eryngiums, more Nicotiana langsdorfii because the three I planted last time did quite well.)

We then had time to plant two more Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ and some more of the Nicotianas in the Fifth Street Park in Long Beach, along with a Rose mutabilis at the very back of the garden.

And we planted an Eryngium and a Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ at the new-this-year Port of Ilwaco garden by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle

planting at Queen La De Da's

planting at Queen La De Da’s

The Queen must have watered  because despite the lack of rain the garden felt damp underneath.

Finally, we planted some Eryngiums, Gaura and Agastache to finish off the boatyard garden’s newest area.  Now we just need some cosmos and painted sage there and any other very special drought tolerant addition that we might find.

Ilwaco boatyard garden

Ilwaco boatyard garden

The Stipa gigantea is starting to flower.

The Stipa gigantea is starting to flower.

With all this accomplished, not only did we amaze even ourselves but I can, even though I should not, take the day off tomorrow to try to get my own back garden dealt with before it becomes an intolerable mess.  Allan will put in some time at Discovery Heights gardens while I weed at home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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And so the planting continues.  I got off lightly as till the last job I just planted in containers and did pruning and weeding while Allan got the plants into the ground.

First:  Larry and Robert’s garden.  This satisfying project from last year, just half a block from our house and across Pearl from the Hornbuckle garden,  is looking very nice indeed, and got some of my two favourite perennials, Eryngium and Agastache, as well as three of one my favourite annuals, Nicotiana langsdorfii.

Larry and Robert's garden boat

Larry and Robert’s garden boat

narcissi

narcissi

corner garden

corner garden

I am so happy to see that their brand new Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’ (background, above) has tiny new leaves coming out (as does mine at home).

Muscari 'Ocean Magic'

Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’

Then we added some plants to the Port Office garden:

Allan planting at port office

Allan planting at port office…foreground: Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

We did some weeding in the Howerton Street curbside gardens, including Time Enough Books:

Time Enough Books garden boat

Time Enough Books garden boat

tulips in the boat

tulips in the boat

Fuchsia magellanica about to bloom in the boat...already!

Fuchsia magellanica about to bloom in the boat…already!

early tulip by Howerton Street

early tulip by Howerton Street

Down the block we added some plants (Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and three different santolinas) to the gardens by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle and The Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

Allan planting again

Allan weeds while I set the plants out 

Tulips by Queen La De Da's; these were just in bud last time...

Tulips by Queen La De Da’s; these were just in bud last time

Narcissi with tiny cup

Narcissi with tiny cup

how the garden related to Queen La De Da's

how the garden relates to Queen La De Da’s

Then we took some plants to Nancy’s fine new garden border.  The sun was all brighty-shady, hard to get a good photo of the whole thing.

Nancy's garden

Nancy’s garden

halfway up

halfway up

Narcissi with pale apricot cups

Narcissi with pale apricot cups

tulips

tulip

Because of all the exciting new plants and especially the tulips, Phil has built a handsome fence around the garden.  I will remember to photograph the fence next time.  Today the spring bulbs distracted me.

Next we put some blue and red plants into the garden at Veterans Field in Long Beach:  Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ and Lobelia tupa.  The Lobelia tupa tag says it wants a sheltered location, and this is pretty exposed, so I am only trying four of them here.

veterans field

Veterans Field

I bet the builders are feeling the pressure to get the stage building done before dedication day on  May 5th.

Veterans Field

Veterans Field from the entrance point off the main LB street

Above:  Allan is walking toward me because we have a brief non-gardening mission: to get a treat from a new shop.

Sweet Celebrations, new shop just south of the LB Pharmacy

Sweet Celebrations, new shop just south of the LB Pharmacy

We had delicious cupcakes, me tiramisu and Allan 'smores flavour.

We had delicious cupcakes, me tiramisu and Allan ‘smores flavour.

At the entrance garden to Veterans Field, we planted a blue potato vine (Solanum crispum ‘Glasnevin’).   Once upon a time a huge one grew here.

baby blue potato vine

baby blue potato vine (Can you see it?)

once upon a time...

once upon a time…

Yes, that plant above is a blue potato vine reaching the very top of the Funland buildings wall.  It was a showstopper.  The Big Blow of 2007 took it down.

Back then the darn Phormiums were not huge in this garden.  I would love to have them removed but I believe the garden belongs to Funland, not the city.

huge and accursed Phormiums

huge and accursed Phormiums

I really do like the way I pruned the tree, though; it was sticking branches out over the sidewalk.

well behaved tree now

well behaved tree now

After hurriedly eating our scrumptuous cupcakes we hastened to The Anchorage Cottages and planted two more blue potato vines in the spots were two Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’ roses had grown till last year.  Those roses want to cover a building and were instead on low railings around the courtyard, constantly sending poky branches into the walkways, suffering from blackspot, and looking amazing only for their brief period of bloom.   Rose branches also loved to jump forward to the corner chairs where guests were trying to lounge in peace.

Allan planting the replacements

Allan planting a replacement for the rose

potato vine in the other corner

potato vine in the other corner

I am sure they will do well, as once I had this Solanum up and over the center courtyard arch but it had to be cut back severely for the arch to be re-stained and then it died.

Meanwhile, I planted a few plants in the containers around the entrance and in the courtyard and enjoyed the tulips while exercising care to not snap any off.

office courtyard

office courtyard

pinky green bud

pinky green bud

deep luscious red

deep luscious red

aglow

aglow

I had a desperate urge for more Lobelia tupa and Sanguisorbas so rushed off next to The Basket Case, but first detoured to see a tree whose beauty had been recommended by Theresa from The Planter Box garden centre.

just wow

just wow

Basket Case, middle greenhouse

Basket Case, middle greenhouse

At the Basket Case, we got our perennials and could see the big middle greenhouse with many annuals coming on.  Between here and The Planter Box we will acquire the plants for Annuals Planting Hell starting around Mother’s Day and going frantically till it is done.

I needed to figure out how to end the gardening day and decided on a project which turned out to be much easier than I thought it would be.  In three of the Long Beach planters grew six large Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’, a lovely feathery flowered plant that had turned out to be much taller than I had expected and thus tended to flop into the street.  I wanted to move them into the rather moist Fifth Street Park.  They came out like a dream!

two of the six pink elephants

two of the six pink elephants

Then into the park they went, along with some of the other cultivars I had gotten at the Basket Case.

Fifth Street Park, one area

Fifth Street Park, one area

I think they will do very well with Cosmos in this park.  It looks tatty now with lots of spent crocus foliage but does look well in summer (and earlier when the crocuses are in bloom).

I adore Sanguisorbas and have done ever since I saw them in a slideshow by Piet Oudolf at the Northwest Flower and Garden show some years ago.  Back then they were hard to find.  I ordered some from Dan Hinkley’s Heronswood when the cultivar names were just DJH (his initials) and a number.  Now I can get several cultivars from the Basket Case via Blooming Nursery and that makes me very happy.

While passing through Long Beach today I saw one of the regulars there, a fellow who walks around town during the day.  He waved, I waved, and I suddenly felt quite swept with joy at what a fun job we have working in a cute little beachy tourist town.

On the way home we stopped by Nancy and Phil’s again and they gave us some clams which, as I write this, Allan is cooking per Nancy’s instructions, and again we will be eating at about 10 PM.  The earlier part of the at-home evening was spent refurbishing a Facebook page for the Water Music Festival so blogging got a late start.  How I will manage to blog when the daylight time gets longer I do not know.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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