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Posts Tagged ‘Euphorbia myrsinities’

Monday, 4 August 2014

I almost felt that we could take Monday off, till I strained to remember something we were supposed to do and…oh, yes, the Depot rhododendron pruning. I forgot yet another one-off job in Long Beach that I had agreed to awhile back; that’s what happens when I neglect making a job list on the white board.

We knew the Depot would create some debris that would have to be dumped; finally, I would have time to get some rock for my scree garden! In order to make the dump trip worthwhile, I had the idea to get some of the blackberry canes off the west side of Larry and Robert’s lawn.

Larry and Robert’s garden

clipped canes at Larry and Robert's

clipped canes at Larry and Robert’s

I forgot to take a before photo. The difference was not dramatic because we found the blackberry vines covered with berries and figured there might be a possibility that Larry or Robert or friends of theirs were planning on a pie! However, as soon as berry time is over I want to cut those canes WAY back. The neighbours to the west have been cutting on their side so it would be a good time to reveal new lawn area or maybe a place for a new shrub.

draping canes covered with berries

draping canes covered with berries…and there is a fuchsia hiding under there.

On the east side of the house, the garden boat looks full and happy with the addition of some new plants last week (Cosmos ‘Antiquity’, chocolate cosmos, and Verbena bonariensis, which I fancy will grow tall like a boat mast).

east

looking south


Depot Restaurant

I was ever so pleased when Chef Michael said he did not want the rhodo against their “office” house pruned hard. I don’t like to fight a shrub’s natural form for no good reason other than to make it smaller. He just wanted it cut to make a better passage for mowing and so that it did not touch the house.

before

before

after

after


 

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We dumped our debris at Peninsula Landscape Supply and admired their selection of VERY large river rock.

rock treasures

rock treasures

rock

All we wanted was some pea gravel and a bit of slightly larger river rock to make a tiny scree garden at home. Well, ok, I WANT some of those really big river rocks but don’t have the energy to deal with them. Maybe this winter!

We loaded up with a half yard of pea gravel and a few buckets of the slightly bigger rocks. It is always suspenseful to carry a heavy load like that in our little trailer. Again, we made it!


at home

The scree garden would be next to the garden boat (The Ann Lovejoy). I had several inspirations:

1. Beth Chatto’s Gravel Garden and her scree garden photos on her website.

an excellent and inspirational book

an excellent and inspirational book

2. A little scree garden that we saw on the Gearhart garden tour last year:

scree garden

scree in the Vernon garden, Gearhart

3. Robert Nold’s blog (where he points out that a mix of rock sizes is good in a scree garden).

4. The Tucker Garden in Seattle that we saw recently on the Hardy Plant Study Weekend tour.

very Beth Chatto

very Beth Chatto

5. The John Kuzma garden we had just toured in Portland, where Sean Hogan of Cistus Nursery used decomposed granite for the courtyard and perhaps the same sort of gravel for a vast gravel garden. Here, we cannot get washed gravel, so pea gravel is our only choice for a scree bed; gravel with fines would pack down and be too hard. (Anyway, that’s the theory I have.)

My scree garden is ridiculously small compared to even this small part of the Kuzma garden

My scree garden is ridiculously small compared to even this small part of the Kuzma garden

6. My Rock Garden by Reginald Farrer, one of the first serious garden books I read. I own a battered old copy. I recall Farrer being the one who said that rock gardens should not look like currant buns.

books

My own little scree patch is a bit laughable compared to those that inspired me.

before (sadly, the red poppies had to go as I had gotten impatient)

before (sadly, the red poppies had to go as I had gotten impatient)

after

after (two days later, I added some rocks from the size between pea gravel and the slightly large ones)

There is horsetail in there...the little scrimmy kind...hope it won't be too hard to pull through the gravel.

There is horsetail in there…the little scrimmy kind…hope it won’t be too hard to weed through the gravel.

This looks like a scree plant...but it is a Lost Tagii from the Hardy Plant sale so I am not sure!

This looks like a scree plant…but it is a Lost Tagii from the Hardy Plant sale so I am not sure!

scree

scree

Euphorbia myrsinites (donkey tail spurge)

Euphorbia myrsinites (donkey tail spurge)

and my little yellow penstemon

and my little yellow penstemon

and in the back, Eryngium agavifolium courtesy of Todd Wiegardt

and in the back, Eryngium agavifolium courtesy of Todd Wiegardt

Now to collect more scree plants, but not too many. There’s a little “tiny bun” dianthus at Wiegardt Gallery that I might be able to snick a piece of. If I could just figure where to put the strawberry patch that is on the other side of the boat, I could expand this whole idea.

And I could now cross off the last at home project from the work board…

erased!

erased!

but I had better start adding other work and home projects to it (like battling the bindweed back out of the east side of the bogsy woods) before I forget them all.

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