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Posts Tagged ‘fairy door’

Saturday, 8 April 2017

With some workable weather, I was determined to get some at home gardening done, and doing the five assorted sizes of driveway beds seemed the best choice to finish in a day. (And the weather felt too windy and variable and rather cold to endure weeding on the beach approach in Long Beach.)

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before, little bed by the front fence

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I was sad that the wind had broken my Fritillaria imperialis.

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after

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square bed right next to driveway, before

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after

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snails congregate on the bamboo poles for some reason! (Allan’s photo)

I was able to collect many snails in a jar for re-homing.

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Pieris at east end of front garden (Allan’s photo)

Allan walked to the post office and back:

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fern unfurling across the street at the J’s

He took with him an doll house that he built from a kit when his child was young.  Now it has gone to Thandi, Mike, and baby Celestine’s home two blocks west of us.

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If it were yellow with twin dormers, it would look like their house.

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a baby gift for Celestine

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post office planter

When some serious rain came, I retreated inside, thinking the rest of the afternoon would be reading time.

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I knew I could read this in an afternoon.

A foray into Facebook resulted in seeing a photo that satisfied some curiosity I’d been having about our old garden at a local assisted living place.  This photo shows a friend, whose identity I have masked, filling a bird feeder outside her mum’s room, in what used to be one of our four garden beds.

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Two of the beds show in the photos, and as you can see, they have gone to weeds, with just a couple of tulips struggling through.

Here was the same area last April under our care.

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just poised to bloom with lilies, irises, and more

We never did get to see the lilies and iris bloom there last spring as we had been ousted by then.  I can tell by this week’s photo that tall horsetail has been allowed to take over that garden bed.  REALLY INFURIATING to see the state it is in. We did it for the lowest price possible, too.  We were laid off from the job so that the new manager could hire a “young man” because “it is hard for young men to find jobs here at the beach.”  You can see what a fine job has resulted.

The rain had stopped and in order to keep my head from exploding, I put down my book and returned to my weeding.  As always, it was therapeutic enough so that I stopped fuming.

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long middle driveway bed, before

That long bed was a tiring one because of mats of grass that don’t show in the before photo.

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after photo from the different angle

Not shown: some weeding around the edges of the former debris pile and some tidying of the tiny triangle shaped bed at the very south end of the driveway (which belongs to Nora/Alycia’s house next door where a friend now resides).

As I weeded, we had two sets of visitors.

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The J’s!

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One of the J’s, Junior

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Carol and her daughter Julia.

Carol, Julia, and I walked all through the garden.

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tulips in the garden boat

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grape hyacinth

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plant table

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center bed

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branch from the storm

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more branches

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a speared branch (Allan’s photo)

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tarp blown off the crab pot stack next door

Our walk through the garden inspired Allan to trim a sword fern that was obscuring one of the fairy doors.

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Although it was difficult to tear myself away from the garden at 6:40, we had a social engagement for which we were about ten minutes later.  Since three days after my birthday party, four out of five members of our North Beach Garden Gang have been sick with colds.  Dave had it worst of all of us.  We’ve been missing out on our weekly meetings till now.

The Cove Restaurant

The Cove is open for dinners again on Fridays and Saturdays.  Chef Indus, formerly the sous chef, produced scrumptious food.

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Cove entry garden (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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North Beach Garden Gang

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refreshing Caesar salad

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Allan had Sondra’s lasagne.

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ahi tuna steak

My only error with dinner was accidentally eating almost the whole ball of wasabi at once.  Oops.  Lynn, our truly great server, said “I thought you were more experienced than that!”

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Melissa’s delicious pasta.

Back at home, I was able to erase “driveway” from the at home gardening list.

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Wednesday, 20 April 2016

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My Tulip ‘Leo’ at home.

It took me awhile at work to realize I had a big spot on my camera lens.

Red Barn Arena

Allan did a project with some edging blocks provided by Amy.

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before

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Using a curved beam for a straight edge

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Allan’s photo as he gathered tools to fill in a depression

I borrowed this wheelbarrow from the barn to wheel some soil from one area to another and fell in love with the handles.  There is none of that letting go and moving of one’s hands to a different position when dumping; one’s hands just slide around the loop.

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These work great!! Must find!

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almost done (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s garden

While Allan worked, and when I ran out of weeds and deadheading and deadleafing of bulbs, I went next door to work on Diane and Larry’s garden.

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My good friend Misty (camera shy)

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Misty under the back porch

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Tulip ‘Green Star’

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lovely small cupped narcissi

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Stipa gigantea

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I do believe the stipa is blooming extra early this year.

Red Barn

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all done

Basket Case Greenhouse

Up Sandridge Road at the Basket Case, we got some plants for the next project.

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Me and Basket Case Nancy

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our good friend Shadow

Anchorage Cottages

Next project of the day: to plant up the new summer window boxes that Beth had built.  The window boxes with the early spring display of bulbs will be stashed behind the office for the summer and then put back out in winter.

Much to my delight, Beth has made two new sets of boxes, so that we don’t have to use the little plastic liners anymore.  They were too small.

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bulbs are going away

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The brackets will be replaced tomorrow.

The project was unexpectedly complicated by two things:  The brackets are going to be redone (as they are pretty awful), so we could not set the new boxes in place, and the other set of two window boxes still had tulips blooming, so we left for the weekend guests to enjoy.

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new boxes (Allan’s photo)

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We also redid two old terracotta planters into new green lightweight ones.  Our good friend Mitzu supervised.

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the variegated vinca had gone down through the planter hole and INTO the pavers.

I have totally gone off planting variegated vinca anywhere due its rampant behavior!

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after

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after

I salvaged the excellent Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ for the center, and used the violas and orange diascia which had been intended for the second set of windowboxes…and was very glad it worked out that way or I’d have been short of plants.  We left two newly planted window boxes in tones of blue flowers (to go with the blue sign) sitting on the patio to be installed when the new brackets are up.  I got to take home the old terracotta pots (with the tops falling apart, but still a good three fourths of the pot useable) to live out their last years in my garden.

Long Beach

Long Beach city hall and some planter deadheading and deadleafing finished out our work day.

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city hall, west side (Allan’s photo), Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and Tulip ‘Greenland’

The planters are in that awkward stage when there is lots of ugly dying bulb foliage and yet it is too early to plant most annuals.

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Tulip ‘Green Wave’ in a planter

Our friend Wendy walked by and told us she had found a little fairy door on one of the Bolstad approach planters.  We went to check it out.

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Allan’s photo

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someone’s brilliant gift to a planter! (Allan’s photo)

Allan realized later that the “flower pot” is a piece of broken beer bottle and pronounced it genius.

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beach lupine (Allan’s photo)

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an allium (?) emerging (Allan’s photo)

The Depot Restaurant

Because Allan had a social engagement on Thursday, we had our weekly dinner with Dave and Melissa tonight at burger night at the Depot Restaurant.  The day of projects had taken its toll on our energy, and the conversation kept us entertained and so distracted that neither Allan or I thought to take a photo of the tasty occasion.

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from the Depot website

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

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from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1998 (age 74):

April 20:  11:30-5:00!  warm  I finished planting all the berries.  After I put stuff away I found another flat of plants.  I added them to the last row.  I have worked 17 hours planting 11 wide rows of plants.  I replanted the onion plants that I dug out so that Ron could till that area.  After all the above I washed more than 30 trays.

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from the program (the garden of Frank Jagodnik and Liz McCall):  Shakespearean Cottage Garden:  The owners’ passion for theatre inspires old-world wonder introduced by a dramatic front arbor spilling over with vigorous Clematis evergreen and sausage vine.  Unique fragrant lawn of Roman chamomile tolerates low traffic and dogs.  A nursery garden to the west includes lavender, asters, forgot-me-nots, peonies, sweet peas and anemones.  Chinese wisteria entwines hydrangea vine to frame the front porch.  A woodland haven of sweet woodruff,  Brunnera, ferns and bluebells lures you to the back garden inspired by flora-filled scenes of Ophelia, Oberon and the like.  Beds and bowers display English daisies, nine daylily varieties, blue potato vine, chocolate vine, climbing roses, honeysuckle, creeping Jenny, nasturtiums, Dianthus, leopard’s bane and sea thrift, bordered by old brick found on site.  A kitchen-handy herb garden thrives near the beautiful grape-covered gazebo.  A Sargentina crabapple tree, chives, pincushion flowers and cosmos take center stage, surrounded by lush chamomile.

from the street

from the street

over the fence

over the fence

from the inside looking out

from the inside looking out

front windows

front windows

front door

front door

Fleur Haven House

Fleur Haven House

I absolutely love quotations in the garden and this particular garden had mine beat in sheer number of well displayed signs.  I think I found and photographed every one of them except one turned out blurry so I will never remember what it said.

by the front walkway

by the front walkway

sign

weed

sign

sign

just inside the side gate to the front garden

just inside the side gate to the front garden

Inside the side gate to the front yard, we were pleased to find a fairy garden.

fairy door

fairy door

door

Here is where we lingered for a little while as we both took photos.

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village

village

We then made our way into the back garden, which as I recall meant stepping back out onto the sidewalk and in another gate.

inside the back gate

inside the back gate

I had not carefully read the description (I usually don’t read them thoroughly till later in my eagerness to see the gardens), so I was surprised and pleased by the chamomile lawn.

a fragrant chamomile lawn

a fragrant chamomile lawn

Allan found out that they maintain it with a strimmer rather than a mower.  (Note: from now one I am going to use the much nicer UK word for string trimmer AKA weedeater.)

on the lawn

on the lawn

a curving path

a curving path

some wilde thyme

some wild thyme

a little friendly bird

a little friendly bird

floriferous corner

floriferous corner

sign

rose

an even more floriferous corner

an even more floriferous corner

sign

sign

sign

back porch

back porch

I went up the back porch steps to get an overview.  They were interestingly made out of concrete blocks and were very stable.

view from porch

view from porch

gazebo

gazebo

digression:  I like the colour of green on the neighbours' house.

digression: I like the colour of green on the neighbours’ house.

The little bird was sitting on the bench just beyond that arbour, above, and in the corner hangs the basket of nasturtiums.

looking down to the patio

looking down to the patio

thyme-softened patio

thyme-softened patio

wall fountain

wall fountain

patio bench

patio bench

bench

by the gazebo

by the gazebo

inside the gazebo

inside the gazebo

and a view from the gazebo

and a view from the gazebo

another view of the chamomile lawn

another view of the chamomile lawn

on the house wall

on the house wall

sign

I like gardens that reflect the owners’ particular interests and this garden certainly did that.

Next: a garden with a phemonemal view, and meanwhile, another reminder that the excellent Peninsula garden tour is coming up this Saturday, July 20th!  I hope some of the Astoria people will come to our tour.

a reminder

a reminder

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While I swanned off to the Sylvia Beach Hotel with my friend Carol, Allan worked hard on a huge garden project at Andersen’s RV Park: weeding a nasty stretch of rugosa rose ‘Blanc Double de Coubert’ outside the park fence. We have a of garden space to care for INSIDE the park and usually weed this once a year. Last year, we did not even get the roses pruned and did not do any weeding of this stretch except for right where people drive in the entry road. Oh, dear.

before

before

What a mess! The roses had gotten way too messy so one of the park caretakers had cut them down for us in the fall.

tools of the trade

tools of the trade

partway done

partway done

That red leafed rose in the foreground is the old root stock coming up.  A boring rose.  Most of these rugosas are on their own roots, but one, just one, seems to have been grafted.  Or perhaps the boring rose was there from before.

Rugosa roses got their name because their leaves are “rugose”:  wrinkled, corrugated.   They can take the salt air (thus their nickname, the salt spray rose) and are fragrant and resistant to black spot.

very nice!

very nice!

all weeded

all weeded

The neighbour across the street had just moved in full time and was most appreciative of an improved view!

The weed pile got put in the woods off to the side of the park with rose roots and clippings removed because the caretakers want to use this pile to fill rough areas around the edges.the weed pile!

the weed pile!

Thanks, Allan!!

For a much more creative project, he installed a fairy door at Crank’s Roost. He bought the door at Home and Garden Art in Seattle (same place we got the fairy doors in our bogsy woods), but he built the steps and added the paint to match the Roost’s trim.

crank's

Crank's Roost

new fairy door at Crank's Roost

new fairy door at Crank’s Roost

Sorry for the short post; I have been preoccupied tonight with setting up blog entries for my Ilwaco blog. I procrastinated till this last week in getting last year’s Saturday Market photos posted….and the market starts up again this Saturday. Fortunately, WordPress allows me to schedule publishing in the future, so I set up four posts to publish throughout this week….except for the yearly Parade Of Dogs which I do hope to get organized by Saturday. Not an actual parade of dogs: a photo retrospective of dogs that I photographed at the market last year.

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