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Posts Tagged ‘Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’’

Sunday, 24 April 2016

I was thrilled to wake to the sound of the predicted rain, meaning a day of reading book two of the Cazelet Chronicle.  I set aside Love All because I simply could not wait to read Marking Time, both by Elizabeth Jane Howard.

It was hard to put down Love All as one of the characters is a garden designer of about my age.  From Love All:

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[Gardeners] don’t come cheap, but if they’re good, they’ll make all the difference.”  !!

I had been so absorbed recently in the first of the Cazelet Chronicle that I simply had to start the second book.

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But wait….shortly after I settled in with Marking Time the sun came out.  NOOO.

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Brightness outside, interfering with reading bliss.

Although plagued with gardening guilt, I did stay in to read the entire book, after thinking about which I would rather have done, weeding or reading, if it were my last day on earth.

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The three cats agreed and also stayed in.  Calvin is on the back of the chair and Frosty is by the cat door.

Just one sight from the kitchen window drew me briefly outside:

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a welcome mat of fallen rhododendron flowers by Allan’s shed


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Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’


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mermaid birdbath


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Acanthus ‘Hollard’s Gold’ and hellebores almost over


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in Allan’s thoroughly weeded garden

Within less than five minutes, I had returned to my book.

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From Marking Time

Marking Time is set in the time of the London Blitz.  If I believed in reincarnation (my favourite afterlife possibility), I would be convinced that I had lived during the Blitz because everything about that time resonates with me when I read a novel or see a film set during that era.  I read up on it a bit more online whilst reading the novel and learned something new to me:  German planes drifted off course while intending to bomb a Royal Air Force site and accidentally bombed civilian London.  The next day, Churchill sent bombers to Berlin in retaliation.  Germany then focused its bombing runs on English cities.  In a perverse way, this actually helped the British war effort because it gave the Air Force time that it desperately needed to repair its severely damaged air fields and it took the brunt of Germany’s bombs away from what was left of English war planes.

“Beginning on September 7, 1940, and for a total of 57 consecutive nights, London was bombed. The decision to wage a massive bombing campaign against London and other English cities would prove to be one of the most fateful of the war. Up to that point, the Luftwaffe had targeted Royal Air Force airfields and support installations and had nearly destroyed the entire British air defense system. Switching to an all-out attack on British cities gave RAF Fighter Command a desperately needed break and the opportunity to rebuild damaged airfields, train new pilots and repair aircraft. “It was,” Churchill later wrote, “therefore with a sense of relief that Fighter Command felt the German attack turn on to London…””  (from The History Place)

For whatever reason, it particularly moves me to read about it.  I recommend the series The 1940s House to get a feeling of what it was like to live in England during those years.

While I had me nose in a book, Allan was absent from the house and I could hear the lawnmower chugging along.  Later, he showed me photos of the other big project he had accomplished:

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progress from last week (viewed from Nora’s back yard)


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today!


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before


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after

He made cheese toasties to keep my strength up (fortified with some bacon jam given us yesterday by Our Kathleen).

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We unpacked yesterday’s door prize of dog treats to give to Dave and Melissa, and gave our cats the two toys.

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Frosty looks less than thrilled.

I finished Marking Time and have made an interlibrary loan request for the third book, Confusion. Our day closed with two more episodes of Love in a Cold Climate, keeping with the historical English theme as it is set in the 1930s.

ginger

1995 (age 71):

April 24:  Planted the 4 bags of red and yellow onion sets 4 rows east of path and the rest in rows in asparagus patch.  In the fall till the asparagus bed and next year plant veggies in that area.  Started planting the new begonia tubers in “window” boxes and pots.  [The quotations are because they were window boxes not actually installed under windows.]

1997 (age 73):

April 24:  From about 12:30-5:00.  Planted strawberries.  I thought I was done but just before I quit I found another tray so I guess I’ll plant them tomorrow.   I also planted the pots of Gordon’s perennials from last fall into trays.  Most of the dianthus were ok but some of the others didn’t make it though the winter.  I am exhausted.

1998 (age 74):

April 24:  cool—rain—hail  I was going to put tomatoes but it was too cold so I started planting seeds in the kitchen.  I mostly planted low annuals for my color bowls.  I planted from noon to 8:30 with time out to eat.  Tomorrow I should take the new trays to the greenhouse—there’s not room in shop until I pot up the begonias.

 

 

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Tuesday, 24 November 2015

at home with the cats, catching up on this blog

at home with the cats, catching up on this blog and doing some billing for our November work

In the afternoon, we attended the Long Beach city council’s budget workshop about the distribution of the Business and Occupancy tax monies.

Allan's photo, city council in session

Allan’s photo, city council in session

We were especially impressed with Del Murry’s council skills (second from left, in black) and we are happy to report that the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market funding was approved.

Wednesday, 25 November 2015

Allan's photo: ice!

Allan’s photo: ice! in the Lake Street puddles

I slept ridiculously long and felt guilty when I saw the sun was out…till I realized that the morning had been cold and icy.  In the afternoon, the weather inspired me to put in four hours of intense gardening.

in bloom: Jasminum nudiflorum on the east fence

in bloom: Jasminum nudiflorum on the east fence

Jasminum nudliforum

Jasminum nudliforum

Mahonia in Allan's garden

Mahonia in Allan’s garden

Icy birdbath made me feel better about sleeping late.

Icy birdbath made me feel better about sleeping late.

bird bath ice

bird bath ice

Allan mowing; the lawn had gotten long during all the rain and then a week of workdays.

Allan mowed; the lawn had gotten long during all the rain and then a week of workdays.

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Allan's photo, before he mowed the lawn

Allan’s photo, before he mowed around the fire circle

perhaps the final mowing of the year

perhaps the final mowing of the year

a belated kniphofia

a belated kniphofia

penstemon

penstemon

penstemon, Geranium 'Rozanne' and Erysimum 'Winter Orchid'

penstemon, Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’

I decided to tackle the project of moving the floppy sanguisorbas from the front to the back (moister) garden.

front path view, before, looking west

front path view, before, looking west

before, looking east

before, looking east

a large frog awoken from a sanguisorba nap

a large frog awoken from a sanguisorba nap

Allan's photo: a large frog in my gloved hands, disturbed in the front garden

Allan’s photo: a large frog in my gloved hands, disturbed in the front garden. “NOW I’m awake.”

relocated to a wilder spot in the back garden

relocated to a wilder spot in the back garden

The sanguisorbas that got so floppy in dry soil got moved to the back.

The sanguisorbas that got so floppy in dry soil (like the ones above) got moved to the back garden.

Some with a more upright form were allowed to stay.

Some with a more upright form were allowed to stay.

I bagged some to give away to friend at dinner tonight.  This one, infested with carex, went into the garbage can.

I bagged some to give away to friend at dinner tonight. This one, infested with a too-vigorous carex, went into the garbage can.

back garden, mowed

back garden, mowed

future staycation project: arrange some of the river rock around the back of the boat

future staycation project: arrange some of the river rock around the back of the boat

We hauled a few more plants into the greenhouse.

We hauled a few more plants into the greenhouse.

Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web' in Allan's garden

Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’ in Allan’s garden

Allan put his mother's pot, now a water feature, away for the winter.

Allan put his mother’s pot, now a water feature, away for the winter.

It would be a shame if it froze and broke.

It would be a shame if it froze and broke.

I don't think I'm supposed to put my sarracenia in the greenhouse...

I don’t think I’m supposed to put my sarracenia planter into the greenhouse…

I did put it in a small sheltered spot.

I did put it in a small sheltered spot.

This had been my breakfast view.

This had been my breakfast view.

same view, end of the afternoon

same view, end of the afternoon

front path, end of day, looking west

front path, end of day, looking west

and looking east

and looking east

I was deeply pleased to have the sanguisorbas dug (and, later in the evening, Todd and Dave & Mel seemed happy to each get one in a big trash bag).  Last year at this time, I’d gone out to dig them and been discouraged by how hard it was and given up, so there they had sat for a whole ‘nother year..  Today, I asked for Allan’s help with only one of them.

At the end of the work session, I also asked Allan if he could “sometime” put one more line of wire along the sidewalk side of the garden.  With more plants cut down, I feared the deer would be inspired to try to jump over.  It seemed that in just moments, I turned around and he had it done.

deer proof

deer proof, with a second wire added above (not very visible)

Allan finishing the second wire

Allan finishing the second wire

Allan's photo: dusk

Allan’s photo: dusk

We had a dinner engagement with Dave, Melissa, and Todd. Shortly before dark, Todd texted to ask if I had anything in the garden that would look good in a bouquet that he needed to make on Friday.  Allan and I hightailed it to the port, where we knew of a red twig dogwood that could be clipped.

Allan's photo: Local kiteflier Dave was walking his kite through the port parking lot despite the cold evening temperature.

Allan’s photo: Local kite flier Dave was walking his kite through the port parking lot despite the cold evening temperature.

From my own garden, I gathered some elephant garlic heads, some sanguisorba flowers, and some more  twiggy bits.  Two days later, we got to see the resulting bouquet at the Wiegardt Gallery during the studio tour.

studio tour sneak preview, Todd's autumnal arrangement

studio tour sneak preview, Todd’s autumnal arrangement

The Depot Restaurant

Burger Night (Wednesdays during off season)

Burger Night (Wednesdays during off season): Melissa, Allan, Dave, Todd

burger night at The Depot (Allan's photo)

burger night at The Depot (Allan’s photo)

We began our burger night meal at 7 and were the last to leave the restaurant.

 

 

 

 

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doubling up because I so want to get this blog closer to publishing in real time…

Tuesday, 20 October 2015

Port of Ilwaco

We started our work day with a tiny task at the port: planting some Watsonia bulbs at Time Enough Books.

In the curbside garden, the Ceanothus is blooming again.

In the curbside garden, the Ceanothus is blooming again.

I think that is rather unusual.

I think that is rather unusual.

cosmos still blooming in the garden boat

cosmos still blooming in the garden boat

blue calm water when we went to dump our debris

blue calm water when we went to dump our debris

I saved some red twig dogwood stems from the debris generated by pruning one at Shorebank. They make good winter decorations.

I saved some red twig dogwood stems from the debris generated by pruning one at Shorebank. They make good winter decorations.

The Planter Box

Our next stop was the acquisiton of some Gardner and Bloome Soil Conditioner (formerly known as Soil Building Compost) at The Planter Box.

Allan rassling a heavy bale.

Allan rassling a heavy bale.

lots of pumpkins for sale

lots of pumpkins for sale

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Teresa gave me the prettiest tea pot for an empty shelf on my porch that she had noticed the other day.  I will be sure to get a photo of it later.

Later: And here it is, through the window of our sun porch, right where Teresa suggested I put it.

Later: And here it is, on a top shelf seen through the window of our sun porch, right where Teresa suggested I put it.

Allan's photo: I got a couple of flowering kale at the request of a client.

Allan’s photo: I got a couple of flowering kale at the request of a client.

late blooming roses

late blooming roses

Allan liked the way these pots were stacked and sorted.

Allan liked the way these pots were stacked and sorted.

Golden Sands Assisted Living

Now we began a Project Day.  I wanted to get the fall projects done and off the list before Bulb Hell, I mean…Bulb Time.  At Golden Sands, the project, which Allan tackled, was to dig out some old and non blooming Siberian iris.

I noticed the shovel had some heavy clay on it; that was from the Ilwaco Community Building garden where he had worked yesterday evening.

sticky heavy clay

sticky heavy clay

Allan's project, before and after=hard work!

Allan’s project, before and after=hard work!

I planted some hellebores and cyclamen donated by Our Kathleen and then pruned a Ceanothus that was so big it blocked the views of the garden from two rooms.

SW quadrant

This photo from last June shows its size.

today's "after" photo

today’s “after” photo

Like many of the shrubs in the courtyard next to the windows, it is just too big (not planted by us!).  Large rhododendrons and euonymous were planted in front of most of the windows and have to be frequently pruned.  That ceanothus should break out some new lower growth that will enable me to give it a better shape.

Allan had some clean up to do in the hallway after hauling out the branches.

Allan had some clean up to do in the hallway after hauling out the branches.

some nice schizostylis in one of the beds

some nice schizostylis in one of the beds

Marilyn’s Garden

Again, Allan embarked on the project while I did a bunch of cutting back.

Some serious trimming happened here.

Some serious trimming happened here.

We leave a lot of the old plants standing in the winter for the happiness of wildlife.  We recently learned that tiny bees will overwinter in hollow stemmed plants, so it is even more beneficial than we knew to leave plants standing.  I do like to make it clear along the path, though.

Allan’s project was another hard slog: removing a patch of pesky orange monbretia that had volunteered by the back steps.

before and after

before and after

Allan's photo: Removing some carex also. Hard work.

Allan’s photo: Removing some carex also. Hard work.

Allan's photo: Scooter observed.

Allan’s photo: Scooter observed our work.

Each project was topped off with one of those bags of Gardner and Bloome.

ready for bulbs and some good flowers for a dining room table view

ready for bulbs and some good flowers for a dining room table view

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At home, we offloaded some of the tall clipped plants I was saving for our Halloween Corridor of Spooky Plants.

I was ever so pleased to have only one big fall project left.

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I love erasing projects from the work board…

but immediately filled the space with the list for BULB TIME (when the bulbs get here...)

but immediately filled the space with the list for BULB TIME (when the bulbs get here…)

Wednesday, 21 October 2015

I skived off work today to swan off with Garden Tour Nancy in order to hear Lucy Hardiman speak at the Cannon Beach Garden Club.  And took the opportunity to go boating, which will be tomorrow’s post.

Before we left town, Nancy and I got delicious chicken salad sandwiches to go from Roots Juice, Salad and Java Bar in Ilwaco.

photo from summertime because my camera did not click after all

photo from summertime because my camera did not click after all

Then we were off on the trip to Cannon Beach.

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The garden club meets here.

The garden club meets here.

The Cannon Beach Garden Club clubhouse

The Cannon Beach Garden Club clubhouse

the front yard: The club is slowly redoing the garden.

the front yard: The club is slowly redoing the garden.

Garden Tour Nancy about to go in, with her Dick and Jane lunch bag from NIVA green. ;-)

Garden Tour Nancy about to go in, with her Dick and Jane lunch bag from NIVA green. 😉

inside: bouquets with pin oak foliage

inside: bouquets with pin oak foliage

center: Lucy herself, one of my favourite speakers ever

center: Lucy herself, one of my favourite speakers ever

We all dined on the lunches we had brought; the club provided luscious chocolate cake for dessert.

The Cannon Beach Garden Club

The Cannon Beach Garden Club

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I simply had to get a luncheon photo of Lucy sitting with June Kroft, who has one of my favourite gardens ever.  I visited it years ago when I took a workshop in Cannon Beach from Lucy and another garden idol of mine, Anne Lovejoy.  And it was on the cottage tour in 2014.  I learned today that Lucy went to school with June’s children and so they have known each other for many years.

Lucy and June

Lucy and June

June said to Nancy that she could come see her garden and I later said to Nancy that she must make that happen and invite me!

during the lecture

during the lecture

My lecture notes on Lucy Hardiman’s Beyond Plants: Furnishing the Garden

Lucy said “I would do anything June Kroft asked.” thus she had come to give this lecture.   Because she so admired “the woman and artist that June is.” 

Furnishing and art in the garden

Gateway tells gardener’s personality and the way they see the world. 

Dismal entries are never an invitation 

Looking through a portal into the rest of the garden

Lucy’s thing: Art in the public domain on private property

Pulling the eye in 

From the street a sense of what we’ll see 

Invite people into different spaces the same way you would invite them in from the street

Multiplication by division.  Small garden made bigger by dividing. 

Poetry box by the door

Yellow stopping the eye 

Less lawn equals less watering. Seven percent cultivated space is lawn in USA

Water. Not too big. Little ruffle sound of small water feature. 

Gardens should be about surprises. 

It was a glorious hour or two.  My gardening energy, which had been waning, was revived by inspiration.

On the way home, we stopped at Seven Dees just south of Seaside.

Dennis Seven Dees

Dennis Seven Dees: “Vampire Free Zone—We Have Garlic”

in the display house

in the display house

For Mr. Tootlepedal

For Mr. Tootlepedal

I almost bought this fountain.  I loved it and yet I wondered if the clack clack clack of the beak would work my nerves eventually.  (My first attempt at inserting a video.  I hope it works!)  I’m still thinking about it.

home again

After Lucy’s lecture, I feel pretty good about the entryway to my garden.  However, I have now decided that YES, I should paint the top board of the wooden fence green.  The weather is too autumnal now, so…next year.

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spider web on front gate

spider web on front gate

The east front gate also makes me happy. Idea by Pam Fleming, executed by Allan. Can you see Mary?

The east front gate also makes me happy. Idea by Pam Fleming, executed by Allan. Can you see Mary?

Here she is.

Here she is.

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Spider webs are all over the garden and the arbours.

Spider webs are all over the garden and the arbours.

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Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web' was available down at Seven Dees; here it is in Allan's garden.

Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’ was available down at Seven Dees; here it is in Allan’s garden.

Melianthus major 'Antenow's Blue'

Melianthus major ‘Antenow’s Blue’

fuzzy wuzzy verbascum

fuzzy wuzzy verbascum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 20 September 2015

My gardening energy is most definitely revived with autumnal weather.  I will admit I had been looking forward to a rainy day to stay indoors and read.  Surprising sunshine got me out working on a garden project instead.

This much had fallen overnight.

This much rain had fallen overnight.


The newly painted copper heart looks like a pillow.

The newly painted copper heart looks like a pillow.

I wanted to weed back in the bogsy wood but a brisk wind stopped me.

Instead, I worked on the center bed.

Instead, I worked on the center bed.

Meanwhile, I pondered where I could make a new strawberry bed as I would like to expand my scree garden to all around the boat.

I still have not figured out another place for growing strawberries.

I still have not figured out another place for growing strawberries.


I want more scree.

I want more scree.


scree garden edge expanded

scree garden edge expanded

Just as I finished edging the scree garden, enough rain arrived so that I could spend the rest of the day indoors catching up on this blog.  (As soon as staycation begins, sometime in November, the blog will take second place to reading days.)

Monday, 21 September 2015

I continued to sleep poorly.  My mind is haunted with sadness for a former friend whose loved one has died.  The door of friendship was closed firmly and decisively (from the other side) making it difficult to reach out with comfort and yet my thoughts are with her because I have rarely known a couple so together-y for 49 years of marriage, especially after retirement.  They even went to have their hair cut together.  The best I could come up was to post the wonderful song All of the Good Things on “Our Ilwaco” Facebook page as a sign of sympathy.  While an atheist probably cannot picture the kind of afterlife with wings as described in the first verse, the rest of the song speaks so eloquently of memory, as do the family photos in the video (which are the family photos of the songwriter, Amanda Birdsall):

“I heard your voice today
in this old machine
it made me remember
all of the good things.”

I once made a memory garden for the widow of a couple who were as closely bonded.  One memorial that I incorporated was the Jewish custom of each visitor leaving a small rock on top of a larger one in memory of their lost friend, as in a cemetery pebbles are placed on the gravestone in memory by all who visit.

From the blog I wrote about that garden:

memory

I leave this pebble here in memory.

I leave this pebble here in memory.

Also from that blog entry:

books

Because I just don’t have the ability to envision a guaranteed afterlife, I find the Angelo Patri quotation to be particularly comforting.

Hard work in the garden focused my mind on pruning and weeding.  I worked back in the bogsy wood despite a somewhat disconcerting wind because, after a whole summer of wind, I am tired of putting that area off.

main path to the bogsy woods with the side bed weeded and blackberry tangle removed

main path to the bogsy woods with the side bed weeded and blackberry tangle removed


by the bogsy woods swale, before

by the bogsy woods swale, before


after

after


I got grass, creeping buttercups, and blackberries pulled out of the swale "streambed".

I got grass, creeping buttercups, and blackberries pulled out of the swale “streambed”.


Now standing rainwater will look more attractive this winter.

Now standing rainwater will look more attractive this winter.


long shadows in the bogsy wood

long shadows in the bogsy wood


outside the gate: why I worry about working out here in the wind.

outside the gate: why I worry about working out here in the wind.


I refined the salmonberry tunnel.

I refined the salmonberry tunnel.


view north from the bogsy wood

view north from the bogsy wood

I even had time to work on a bed that has escaped my attention all summer:

east side garden, a big mess, before

east side garden, a big mess, before


after

after


Smokey examined a sad hydrangea aspera. I moved it here this summer from a spot that was too dry, and I still have hope.

Smokey examined a sad hydrangea aspera. I moved it here this summer from a spot that was too dry, and I still have hope.

Meanwhile, Allan had been working on a project of his own: making strips of wood to top the new arbour in the front garden:

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making strips

making strips

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painting them

painting them


a time-consuming task

a time-consuming task

Outside his shop, he photographed this big fat flower bud:

on Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web'

on Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’

Before dusk I took a walkabout around the garden.

fire circle with cleaned up bogsy woods behind

fire circle with cleaned up bogsy wood behind


I noticed how big this Chilean tree has grown.

I noticed how big this Chilean tree has grown.


The leaves do smell wonderful.

The leaves do smell wonderful.


Clematis 'Rooguchi'

Clematis ‘Rooguchi’


Kniphofia 'Earliest of All' (from Todd)

Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’ (from Todd)


I remembered to take some macros!

I remembered to take some macros!

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Dicentra scandens (bleeding heart vine)

Dicentra scandens (bleeding heart vine)


Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

I went to pick a Cripp’s Pink apple and look who I found.

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Cripp’s Pink (Pink Lady) with Pacific Tree Frog


I did not pick that one.

I did not pick that one.

I am glad I don’t have the competition for apples that my former client Ann has.  A couple of days ago, she posted these photos of her apple trees in her garden a few blocks uphill from me:

photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


photo by Ann Saari

photo by Ann Saari


bear3

photo by Ann Saari


the three bears, photo by Ann Saari

the three bears (mom and two cubs), photo by Ann Saari

I also realized that Mr. Tootlepedal might enjoy seeing this card that I have pinned to a bulletin board.  It looks very much like Mr. Grumpy.

Great Blue Heron in the Rain by Dli Leger

Great Blue Heron in the Rain by Dli Leger

Next: If all goes well, we will accomplish some more fall projects at work this week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 13 July 2014

Garden Bloggers Fling, Portland

The itinerary for our bus was different than on the schedule.

The itinerary for our bus was different than on the schedule.

Floramagoria, part 1: the front garden

There were three gardens I was especially excited to see on the tour, two because I read blogs about them (Rhone Street and Danger Garden), and Floramagoria because I had heard it is wonderful and rarely has a garden open.

Because I like to put every single last detail of gardens I tour into our blog, so that I can relive the experience later, I have divided this garden into two (or maybe even three) sections, thus avoiding an entry with over 100 photos! You will understand when you see the back garden.

The front garden is “NW/Asian” in style and is five years old.

arriving at Floramagoria; Allan's photo

arriving at Floramagoria; Allan’s photo

front

along the driveway

front

dog sculpture

dog sculpture

woodsy front garden

woodsy front garden

bird draped with Japanese forest grass

bird draped with Japanese forest grass

raised fern display

raised fern display

I suggested to Allan that he do something like this to squeeze more ferns into his garden.

I suggested to Allan that he do something like this to squeeze more ferns into his garden.

daylily...a hint of brightness to come

daylily…a hint of brightness to come

¯front1

I found the front garden pleasant, but I knew the garden was about flowers. Allan did not know that as he had not read hints about it online, as I had. So he was quite content in the front garden, especially because of his love of ferns.

Allan’s photos:

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P1100493

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Fatsia 'Spider's Web" (he has one in his garden)

Fatsia ‘Spider’s Web” (he has one in his garden)

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P1100501

P1100502

P1100503

 

 

a gentle adjustable limb brace

a gentle adjustable limb brace

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P1100506

P1100507

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Allan was in fern heaven and I believe he thought that’s what the garden was all about…until he looked up and realized everyone else had disappeared and he wondered where we had all gone.

That’s when he came around the side and joined the rest of us in the back garden.

side

Prepare to have your sock knocked off!

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Thursday, 7 November, 2013

I had been so sure we would have the day off that I was shocked when sunshine awoke me.  The sky to the south, more white than grey, perhaps boded that some work time could be found before the predicted storm.  We decided to try.  I have a few plants left to put in the ground for clients, and it is better to do so before the soil gets colder.

I went to the patio to grab a chunk of a Libertia that we divided from the Golden Sands garden.

The cosmos in the garden boat, while sideways, still have a few blossoms.

The cosmos in the garden boat, while sideways, still have a few blossoms.

One pink dahlia is going strong.

One pink dahlia is going strong.

the blue river of Geranium 'Rozanne' would look better if I had tidied it up...

the blue river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (still blooming!) would look better if I had tidied it up…

I should do something about the squash (one real, one fake).

I should do something about the squash (one real, one fake).

I WILL pick those squash tomorrow.  One has sunk into itself like a popped balloon but I think two are left.

one tall sweet pea vine to the very top of the deer fence

one tall sweet pea vine to the very top of the deer fence

We then made the forty five minute drive to the Wiegardt Gallery to plant three Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ and a clump of Libertia and, we hoped, do some fall clean up.  We also hoped to plant a Hellebore and a Libertia at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

Wiegardt Gallery west side now with five Ilex 'Sky Pencil'

Wiegardt Gallery west side, now with five Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’

and one little Sky Pencil to add some verticality (eventually) on the south side.

and one little Sky Pencil to add some verticality (eventually) on the south side.

It is just past the end of the hose!

We chopped down some Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ (unusually short, in a northern bed that does not get much water).  While I might have continued to enjoy the blackened foliage against the pale variegated Miscanthus, I think it is one of those tableaus that passersby would see as something undone that should have been done.

before and after

before and after, with Miscanthus variegatatus and Siberian iris and Libertia

The weather having turned  dire, we popped into the gallery for a moment to get out of the wind, hoping it would die down so we could go on to the KBC garden.  Earlier in the month, Eric had picked from my wheelbarrow some tattered cosmos blossoms to paint.  Today I picked him a bouquet of the last of windblown flowers.

the last of the cosmos, from some plants we had pulled up

the last of the cosmos, from some plants we had pulled up

warm inside

warm inside

I love the painting at the center, left, with red flowers:  Knautia macedonica

I love the painting at the center, left, with red flowers: Knautia macedonica

Gallery manager Christl says she asked me for the proper spelling of Knautia!

wiegardt

rose painting by Eric Wiegardt

rose painting by Eric Wiegardt

Afte chatting (and consuming some Finnish mint chocolate candy offered by Christl) we went back out into the now pelting rain.  Allan came up with the bright idea that we should try again to go to the Oysterville Store to ask the owner if he wants to be “cash mobbed” in March.  Last time we went, we happened upon his lunch break and missed seeing the inside of the store.

rain....daunting us from working

rain….daunting us from working

wind in the Wiegardt garden

wind in the Wiegardt garden

Oysterville Store it would be.  The wind chased us over to Nahcotta, just east on the bay….

Nahcotta oyster shell mountain

Nahcotta oyster shell mountain

…and on up to Oysterville, where we parked right in the middle of quiet Territory Road for some stormy day photos.

Territory Road, looking north

Territory Road, looking north

Territory

reflection

trees

the iconic Oysterville picket fence

the iconic Oysterville picket fence

bay view bench

bay view bench

I snooped with my eyes over the fence of the Huson garden, a garden created by the owners of another favourite garden of mine, a garden in Ruston that I still think of often.

Oysterville garden

Oysterville garden

along the road

along the road

It is magnificent.

It is magnificent.

Across the street, a couple of hardy fuchsias still bloomed, one overhanging one of the pumpkins that Huson has placed throughout the village.

fuchsia

fuchsia2

Because the dashboard clock told us the store would not be open for another few minutes,  we took a detour past Oysterville Sea Farm.

oyster beds

oyster beds and gulls

pilings

Oysterville Sea Farms

Oysterville Sea Farms

oyster shell road

oyster shell road

across from the Oysterville Store

across from the Oysterville Store

a photo of the store/post office taken last February

a photo of the store/post office taken last February

We usually see Oysterville only on a rainy day off!

You can read some history of the Oysterville store in Sydney Stevens Oysterville Daybook.

In the window of the front door, a big dog greeted us.

I wanted to stand around and pet him, but he wanted to go outside and find someone to play ball.

I wanted to stand around and pet him, but he wanted to go outside and find someone to play ball.

in the store:  books

in the store: books

a parlor off to the side

a parlor off to the side

cozy wood heat in the main room

cozy wood heat in the main room

Allan buys some Jean Nitzel greeting cards at the counter

Allan buys some Jean Nitzel greeting cards at the counter

Owner Greg Rogers told us that the candy case was original to the old store.

Old timers remember this.

Old timers remember this.

a historic scale

a historic scale

Greg also told us that the table on which the scale and candy case sit had belonged to his grandfather, Ernest Rogers.  Ernest, while working at Davies Coffee and Spice on the Seattle Waterfront in 1915 had bagged (or otherwise sorted into containers) coffee on this very table and then delivered it to Chinese restaurants.

Greg has a fondness for old signs.  The “Information” sign below is part of a park (?) sign from Hawaii, part of which was burned in a volcano eruption or lava flow.

signs

signs

seattle

The cities, above, are part of the trajectory of Greg’s life, as described in this article.

behind the counter

behind the counter

in the store

in the store

A connection from Ilwaco to Oysterville:  Kelly of Blue Crab Graphics screen prints the t shirts.

We spoke for awhile of cash mob ideas and then Allan and I re-examined the weather through the front door.

still rather dire

still rather dire

I continued to hope, as we departed, that we could get just two plants planted at Klipsan Beach Cottages.  Allan pointed out that we had done a lot of time in the van to very little time working.

I wish I had stopped to take a photo looking west as we came over the hill from Oysterville to Surfside.  The ocean waves crashed dramatically high and pampas grass in residents’ gardens bent sideways in the wind.

We tried for another photo from Bay Avenue in Ocean Park but there were too many storm watching cars parked right in the scene.  Tp pass the time in hope of a weather break, we shopped at Sweet Williams on Bay for Christmas cards; owner Katie Williams always has some with a coastal theme.

Sweet Williams on Bay

Sweet Williams on Bay

Polish Pottery

Polish Pottery

The sky had just a bit of blue as we entered and left Katie’s shop.  I knew better than to fall for it. The wind had picked up to 30 mph.  We gave up on work and headed back to Long Beach in lashings of sideways rain.

at the Bolstadt street light

at the Bolstadt street light

lb

Back in Ilwaco, we saw from our driveway a garbage can heading north to south along Lake Street and Pearl.  Although our wheelie bins are of a substantial size and weight, it looks like this one might end up at the Port.

wheelie bin on a journey

wheelie bin on a journey

Getting home from work early was a good thing today.  We had a project to do in the garage, making space for bulb sorting.  Tomorrow a large bulb delivery is due to arrive.

I got plant tags from the summer stuffed into a 5 gallon bucket.  Sorting them will make a useful winter’s day project and perhaps I will even make a database of what plants have been added to my garden.

sorting project

sorting project

I rooted for the Danger Tree to harmlessly fall….

Danger Tree!

Danger Tree!

admired the Melianthus major in the front garden…

A heavy frost could take this down.

A heavy frost could take this down.

and a hebe in geometric bloom:

very tidy

very tidy

The Fatsia is blooming in Allan’s garden.

Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web'

Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’

and some annuals are still blooming by the garage.

even a double impatiens!

even a double impatiens!

The leaves of Nora’s maple are turning by the window where she used to sit and wave to us when we came home.

We miss her.

We miss her.

After considerable reorganizing and placing of seasonal tables (including taking Allan’s sorting table from the middle of his room!), we are now ready as can be for bulb hell time.  I have fingerless gloves:

It gets chilly in the garage.

It gets chilly in the garage.

My Colorblends mug for hot cups of tea:

It's rather a strange design.

It’s rather a strange design.

I like the way the Colorblends order always comes with some Dutch newspaper inside.

paper

Usually there is a little giftie enclosed, like the mug, or some tulip coasters, but not this year.

I have paper, a clipboard, a chair, a calculator, crates to sort in, bags, a sharpie (better have more than one) and a U shaped table arrangement…and still room for the van to park.  One table is for tulips, one for narcissi, one for small bulbs and one for Alliums.

Couldn't be more ready...

Couldn’t be more ready…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have a finger blight story to tell you….the worst one yet of the year!  And some photos of Ilwaco Saturday Market and Fireworks at the Port…which should probably go on my other blog.  Lots of photos to share of the garden this weekend…and then today’s work (including the finger blight).

But I am terribly behind on paperwork and had not even transcribed the work notes for the past week into the spreadsheet!

Paperwork

Paperwork

I know, I can quickly share garden photos that I took before and after work last week and that will count as a proper blog post.

Tuesday before work, I frittered away some before work time in the garden while Allan watered Larry and Robert’s garden.

front garden

front garden

pink lily

pink lily

pale yellow lilies

pale yellow lilies

This double orange daylily wins me over every year.

This double orange daylily wins me over every year.
orange on orange

orange on orange

Those cool new Alliums and the Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’.

no time to lighten this up

no time to lighten this up

front garden hebe

front garden hebe

Around the side of the house to Allan’s garden…

Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web'

Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’

moss roses in Allan's gutter

moss roses in Allan’s gutter

Allan took a wonderful photo of sedums in the gutter and sent it to me but I cannot find it.  Perhaps he will send it again.

Dicentra spectabilis and Basket Case basket

Dicentra spectabilis and Basket Case basket

The darn slugs ate the Tradescantia 'Blue and Gold' in the back of this planter.  As always.

The darn slugs ate the Tradescantia ‘Blue and Gold’ in the back of this planter. As always.

why edible gardening discourages me

why edible gardening discourages me

Around to the back garden…

greenhouse from patio

greenhouse from patio

Salvia africana lutea

Salvia africana lutea

the pink Oenothera that always reminds me of Ann Lovejoy

the pink Oenothera that always reminds me of Ann Lovejoy

frog on nasturtium leaf

frog on nasturtium leaf

Cosmos 'Happy Ring' in garden boat

Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ in garden boat

Cosmos 'Happy Ring'

Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’

I did not think, from the catalog photo, that I would like this cosmos but I adore it.

plant table

plant table

Every day I find the fluffy grey cat from the big white house across the street hanging out in my garden.  He is furtive because I have yelled at him a lot; he used to chase and pester my cats, but they seem to have reached a comfortable detente so now I don’t mind him.

We call him Stubby...

We call him Stubby…

his tail disappearing into the garden

his tail disappearing into the garden

in a safe place

in a safe place

The rest of the week was so busy I only got two more garden photos on workdays.

At the beginning of our very long Friday, I saw that another lily had come out.

by the front fence

by the front fence

and at almost dusk on that same day, when we arrived home, Allan commented that a new flower was out:  This hardy gladiola.

gladiolus nanus

gladiolus nanus

Ok, blog written…back to paperwork.

Someone asked me recently how I manage to work, do assorted volunteer Facebook pages, clean the beach, take photos of local events, and blog.  The answer right now is “With difficulty”, till the workdays get shorter when the daylight goes away sooner.

P.S.  Ah, Allan re-sent the sedum photo:

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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