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Posts Tagged ‘finger blight’

By which I mean the last spring clean up job of 2017; I hope not the last of our career, as we plan to keep working at least part time for several more years.

Sunday, 19 March 2017

We were pleased to have a good weather day for weeding and clipping the boatyard garden.

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before, looking south

Allan cleaned up the small bed just around the corner:

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before (Allan’s photos)

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after

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weeds and self seeded poppies

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and lots of escholtzia (California poppy) seedlings

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Allan’s photo

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north end of garden, before (Allan’s photos)

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and after

Some of the very old woody lavenders needed to go away.  Allan did the digging:

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before

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after

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before

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after.  We also trimmed a lot of santolinas.

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The last big clumps of Miscanthus inside the fence.

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after

I have forgotten which one this is.  I have learned so many plant names in the last two years that I thought I would remember and don’t.  I need to make a list as I learn them, because my memory does not grab on like it used to.

The garden still had a few crocuses…

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But I had expected there to be daffodils, especially since I had planted about 100 of the same one as is blooming right now in the Long Beach welcome sign.  As I began working in the garden, I realized Every Single Damn One had been PICKED.  Not by deer (which would be unusual because narcissi are poisonous) but by humans.  Each stem was cut down low.  The foliage was not nipped at all like a deer would do.

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stolen, every single one!

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empty stems

A boat guy said that he had seen “a couple messing around in the garden” earlier that morning.  Or the thievery could have happened over the weekend or late last week.  It must have taken awhile to pick every single flower. So much for creating a great big beautiful show.

It was not a gardener thief, and I know that because I found a number of bulbs pulled out and just left lying on top.  A gardener thief would have considered the bulbs to be extra bounty.

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bulb pulled out and left behind

I persisted at the job.  It would have been enjoyable to work among flowers instead of in a garden with only a few crocuses.  About a third of the way along, I thought we would never get it finished today.  By the time we passed the gate and only had about one third left, I thought we would get done after all.  And we did.

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looking south from the gate

The new owners of Marilyn’s garden stopped their vehicle to say hello.  They are happy with Dave and Melissa’s spring clean up work at their new home.  I am so glad the garden is in the hands of people who appreciate it.

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Passersby did not have much to admire.  I enjoyed when a small family passed, and the dad was reading aloud as he walked.  I thought he said, “When she wanted to have her morning coffee there, she simply lifted him down into the garden.”  I wondered from which story that comes.  Google let me find it!  Pippi Longstocking:

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south end, weeded (Allan’s photo)

I took my after photos from the van because I was too sore to walk.

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It would look a lot more interesting with 100 narcissi.

We had not put up our polite “do not pick” signs yet.  Allan dropped me off at home and went to dump debris, and on the way back he put up the two signs that were still in good enough condition.  The words “horse” and “barn door” come to mind.  We have caught people picking flowers right smack dab under these signs before.  I do think signage might deter some.

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Wouldn’t it look nice if there actually were some flowers to leave?

At home, I was pleased to erase the last spring clean up job from the work board.

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Tomorrow, I had been hoping for good weather.  Now the forecast calls for rain.  We need to check up on the Anchorage Cottages garden, and I want to photograph all the narcissi in Long Beach, while they are still there.

 

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Tuesday, 28 February 2017

As usual lately, workable weather gave me the big idea that I could cross four things off of the work list.

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Iris reticulata at the Ilwaco post office (Allan’s photo)

After a brief post office weeding, we headed to Long Beach and began with the planters on the Sid Snyder beach approach.

Sid Snyder Drive

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looking west on Sid Snyder

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santolina and narcissi

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clipping santolina (Allan’s photo)

 

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I find it regrettable that this resort replaced drought tolerant lavenders and ornamental grasses with lawn.

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planter, before (Allan’s photos)

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and after

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more narcissi.  I should have paused to break off those echinops stubs.

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west end of Sid Snyder, south end of boardwalk, last planter

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a short scenic break, from the boardwalk, because life is short.

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interpretive signs on the boardwalk

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whale sculptures

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Discovery Trail (Allan’s photo)

Allan noticed two socks abandoned by a tourist excited to see the ocean.

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World Kite Museum

Also on Sid Snyder is the Kite Museum. While we began a little touch up clipping on the small entry garden, museum store manager Patty emerged and I was able to ask what the plans were for a newly cleared entry area.

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Kite Museum entry; our little garden is out of frame to the right.

The answer is that the museum will have a new bike rack and picnic table spot and some big flower pots.  Patty and I agreed that the row of tatty old hebes to the right should be pulled out, as the ones on the left side had been removed.  I like that idea even more if someone other than us does the digging.  Then our little garden will show better.

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before, with shabby hebes to the left that will be gone

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after

Allan did all the work while Patty and I discussed big ideas.  She knew we were coming soon because she watches the work board on this blog.

Bolstad beach approach

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west end of Bolstad

I had brought some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ starts from home to fill in these planters; last year we had a startling amount of theft of good plants along this approach.

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an interesting display showing local volcanos (Washington and Oregon)

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I myself have found pumice stone on this beach, probably from the 1980 eruption of Mt. St Helens.

In the second planter to the east, I found the first finger blight of the year.

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two recently stolen armeria (sea thrift) plants

Our thief is at it again.  I wish I could catch her.  I could tell her that sea thrift does not transplant well.  I put Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ in its place.  She may like that, too.

Allan had gone to the beach approach garden to clip ornamental grasses.  He brought the van back to me so that we could sit out a heavy rain squall.

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looking east

Fortunately, it was but a squall and we were able to get back to work without misery.

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lots of standing water in the dunes

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beach approach garden, looking east

Today we were only clipping.  The big weeding of the beach approach garden still awaits us.  I do not think it will be as tough a job as usual; the weeds are not a thick carpet this year.

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not too bad!

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some poppy seedlings; I scattered lots of seedpods last fall.

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looking west, rugosa roses

One of the things we will be doing along with the weeding is pulling out as many rugosa roses from right along the edge as we can.  So if any of you locals want some, let me know and I’ll tell you when that is about to happen.

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What have we here? Deer or thieving human? I think someone was trying to steal bulbs that are planted deep.

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Not very weedy.  I wish there were more poppy seedlings.  Maybe later.

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Looking east.  A volunteer wax myrtle is fighting it out with an escallonia.

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definitely deer eaten tulips

Parks Manager Mike drove by and agreed to get us a pile of Soil Energy mulch.  I am thrilled we do not have to drive up peninsula to get it ourselves.  We will bucket it from a pile in the works yard.

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rugosa rose stems sticking out too far into the sidewalk area

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a temporary fix by clipping

While I weeded and clipped in the planters, Allan had clipped tall grasses all along this garden.  It’s a tedious task.

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before and after

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before and after

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before and after

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before and after

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It’s especially unpleasant to pull old crocosmia leaves from inside prickly roses.

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This leads to thorns in the fingers.

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planter work

Parking Lot “Berms”

We tidied up several Stipa gigantea and a few perennials on the north and south parking lot gardens, east of downtown.

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Allan’s photos: Stipa gigantea before

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and after

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the north berm

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last Stipa, south berm, before trimming

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end of south berm

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While pulling crocosmia, I found an old bird next.

I had had a dream today of getting the rambling roses pruned in Fifth Street Park. Since the temperature was dropping, a wind kicking up, and not enough time left, we did one more small project that had never even made it to the work board.

Minnie Culbertson Park

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before

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after, with a vigorous trimming of the lithodora

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The first clean up column is almost done!

While we might be able to polish off the Port of Ilwaco spring clean up in one day or two, the weather forecast is dire so I cannot count on it happening tomorrow.

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Thursday, 6 October 2016

Ilwaco Post Office with Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' still in bloom.

Ilwaco Post Office with Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ still in bloom.

The Ilwaco post office garden got a tidy because this weekend the Cranberrian Fair will be in session at Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum across the street.

Long Beach

The first thing I saw when we got to the city hall garden was a hole in the ground where there used to be a beautiful amber-leaved Heuchera.

This theft made me mad.

This theft made me mad.

Later, I was checking on planters on the two southernmost blocks of downtown.  I was cheered by this sign that the Herb ‘N Legend Smoke Shop owner had made, so much so that I went in and gave her a hug.

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Herb 'N Legend. Do you get the pun?

Herb ‘N Legend. Do you get the pun?

a great show of schizostylis in Fifth Street Park

a great show of schizostylis in Fifth Street Park

Allan’s project was to dig a not-showy-enough baptisia out of Fifth Street Park.

By the time I had checked on two blocks worth of planters and Allan had dug the baptisia, a drizzle had begun.  I still had a couple of small projects I wanted to accomplish:  pulling the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from in front of Wind World Kites and digging out the ugly-on-one-side big old lavender in front of the Cottage Bakery.

Allan tackled the lavender.

Allan tackled the lavender.  I pulled the Crocosmia.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photos, before

after

after

Crocosmia and Lavender both gone now.

Crocosmia and Lavender both gone now.

Don’t be surprised if you see Wadworth Electric company digging in the planters next week.   Something wrong must be fixed with the electrical line that runs the lamp posts between the stoplight and the police station, but first they have to find it by digging.

We remembered to drag the far back containers in Fish Alley out to where they will get rain.

We remembered to drag the far back containers in Fish Alley out from under the eaves to where they will get rain.

Allan sweeping up. The hanging baskets have been taken down by the city crew.

Allan sweeping up. The hanging baskets have been taken down by the city crew.

By now, the rain had become fierce and we were soaked through and envied folks who were indoors.  I had been in denial and had not put on my raincoat.

It would be cozy to be indoors having a drink!

It would be cozy to be indoors having a drink!

At City Works, the street sweeper was dumping at the same time that we were.

cute l'il sweeper

cute l’il sweeper

on the ground along the edge: all of the hanging baskets from the Basket Case Greenhouse

on the ground along the edge: all of the hanging baskets from the Basket Case Greenhouse

I suggested that Allan retrieve a white tree trunk that has been catching my eye every time we dump debris for the past two weeks.

Good sport Allan goes to climb the pile for the trunk.

Good sport Allan goes to climb the pile for the trunk.  I think it would make a showy railing for some future project.

On the way home, I looked at the weather and was surprised to see a storm with 50 mph winds was predicted for the evening and overnight.

A quick stop at the library netted me some books I had been eagerly awaiting.

crocus at the library (Allan's photo)

crocus at the library (Allan’s photo)

in the library

in the library

Two books came in that I was ever so eager to read.

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Nella Last won, and I so wished I had nothing to do but read for the next four days.

Nella Last won, and I so wished I had nothing to do but read for the next four days.

We later drove back out into the wind to meet Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) for our weekly dinner at…

The Cove Restaurant

We got the coziest table by the fire.

We got the coziest table by the fire.

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Chef Jason Lancaster sent us a scrumptious appetizer plate.

Chef Jason Lancaster sent us a scrumptious appetizer plate.

an autumnal salad with cranberries

an autumnal salad with cranberries

house salad (Allan's photo)

house salad (Allan’s photo)

noodle bowl (Allan's photo)

noodle bowl (Allan’s photo)

Thai Street Prawns (Allan's photo)

Thai Street Prawns (Allan’s photo)

When I reminisced about last autumn’s menu dish of Cajun Chicken Alfredo, darling Chef Jason made me a dish of Cajun Prawns Alfredo.

dinner AND the next day's lunch

dinner AND the next day’s lunch

Over dinner, we talked about our work weeks.  Melissa and Dave had cut back the hydrangea allée in THE Oysterville Garden the day before.

photo by Melissa Van Domelen, the hydrangea allée cut to one foot tall

photo by Melissa Van Domelen, the hydrangea allée cut to one foot tall

the allée

the allée a couple of weeks ago

Friday, 7 October 2016

Storm damage: One plate had blown down. (Allan's photo)

Storm damage: One plate had blown down. (Allan’s photo)

unbroken (Allan's photo)

unbroken (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

more storm damage across the street in the J's garden: a blown over ghost in their Halloween display (Allan's photo when he went to fix it)

more storm damage across the street in the J’s garden: a blown over ghost in their Halloween display (Allan’s photo when he went to fix it)

Allan worked outdoors on the fence panel project.

Allan's photo of the wires and netting that will have to come down.

Allan’s photo of the wires and netting that will have to come down.

I had had every intention of Friday being a day off.  After the wind storm had blown through, though, and Friday had turned out to be a pleasant weather day, I became anxious about the Long Beach planters.  I had only checked half of them yesterday before getting rained out.  I had two home visits scheduled for the day: The “knee brace” woman was coming by to do a quick fitting, and Bill and Carol were coming over so that Bill could show us the beautiful plans he had drawn for our bathtub replacement project.  After that enjoyable visit, Allan and I headed out to do just a couple of hours of Long Beach tidying.

Allan had already tidied the Ilwaco post office planter when he went to pick up the mail.

after tidying (Allan's photo)

after tidying (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a bucket of debris removed from the post office planter

Long Beach

sign in the shop window (Allan's photo)

sign in the shop window (Allan’s photo)

The city crew was taking the flags down from the lamp posts.

The city crew was taking the flags down from the lamp posts.

a late bee on Geranium 'Rozanne'

a late bee on Geranium ‘Rozanne’

After tidying two blocks of planters and one bed of Fifth Street Park, we decided to check on…

Jo’s Garden

…for sideways cosmos and such.  At last there was a “sale pending” added to the For Sale sign so we knew that the wheels of bureaucracy were successfully turning.  I was glad we visited because a big rose branch had come down at the inside of the entry arbor.

the wee guest house

the wee guest house

I did pull some tall leaning cosmos from the back of this entry bed...

I did pull some tall leaning cosmos from the back of this entry bed…

...and from this area just before the center courtyard.

…and from this area just before the center courtyard.

I must admit I got myself a side piece of this well behaved tall aster.

I must admit I got myself a side piece of this well behaved tall aster.

center courtyard with cosmos and Salvia 'Hot Lips' still blooming

center courtyard with cosmos and Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ still blooming

center courtyard sit spot

center courtyard sit spot

northwest garden

northwest garden

Ilwaco

Because of the weather and impending dusk, we decided not to bother with the Ilwaco planters.  We will save the city some money by just letting them go into a mild decline for another week or so.   I did want to have a look at the port gardens and fix anything blown over or trash blown in by the storm, so we did a drive by.  We found nothing amiss enough to warrant more work.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

pink sweet peas with a boat that came in recently

pink sweet peas with a boat that came in recently

Sweet peas survived the storm.

Sweet peas survived the storm.

cosmos still blooming

cosmos still blooming

The Dream, a boat name that I particularly like.

The Dream, a boat name that I particularly like.

Around the corner on Howerton Avenue, a new shop has opened with a green theme.  It was an ice cream shop, thus the pink theme.  I’d repaint the trim with green if I were the Ilwaco Freedom Market.

changing times in Washington State

changing times in Washington State

Now we would have three days off, two of which I hoped to spend just reading, IF I can concentrate instead of obsessively reading the news about the increasingly infuriating Republican candidate.


ginger

1997 (age 73):

Oct 6:  SUNNY—WARM  I spent a couple hours pulling the blighted tomato plants, throwing them into the garbage can.  It was in the 40s last night so I must get started planting the plants from the shop and the Bluestone perennials.

Oct 7: Received Dutch Gardens bulbs and spent time in the evening checking them against my list.   All ok.

1998 (age 74):

Oct 6:  I picked all the tomatoes that were ripening—got 4 Sealameal pkgs from the ripe ones.  I also picked up apples and some from tree and got 4 Sealameal pkgs.

Oct 7:  It stopped raining in the afternoon so I went out and labeled the upright begonias and did some watering (by hand).  I set up the hose to water in PRFB in the morning if I get up early enough.  Note: It rained all night and during day so I didn’t water in morning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 30 June 2016

Our mission continued to get Long Beach and Ilwaco gardens close to perfection before the Fourth of July weekend.  I hoped to finish today in order to avoid the crowds streaming into town on Friday for the most chaotic weekend of the year.

Ilwaco Post Office

I decided the “weeping love grass” by the little triangle of gravel that people cut across sometimes had to go.  It was too much of a foot grabber.

closest thing to a before pic is the grass in the trailer

closest thing to a before pic is the grass in the trailer, along with some debris from yesterday

I added some new eryngiums from Dancing Oaks Nursery.

I added some new eryngiums from Dancing Oaks Nursery.

much too empty now!

much too empty now!

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I want time to dig up the dratted columbines along the front; they had reseeded too freely.

Long Beach

Allan's photo. The law allows fireworks to be shot off for about seven days in a row. It is tiresome.

Allan’s photo. The law allows fireworks to be shot off for about seven days in a row. It is tiresome.

Someone had pushed over the anchor at Veterans Field, and the garden was smashed up in the middle, too.

Someone had pushed over the anchor at Veterans Field, and the garden was smashed up in the middle, too.

I wonder what happened.

I wonder what happened.

Although I love agastaches, I’m not impressed with the red one that I put in the planter by the tattoo shop.

The red agastache is small and weak.

The red agastache is small and weak.

I wanted a showy red one because the planter is near Red Dog Tattoo.

I wanted a showy red one because the planter is near Red Dog Tattoo.

Geranium 'Rozanne' excels in these planters.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ excels in these planters.

I weeded by Scrappucino.

I weeded by Scrappucino.

carousel (Allan's photo)

carousel (Allan’s photo)

petunia array by the Long Beach Tavern (Allan's photo)

petunia array by the Long Beach Tavern (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo (while watering street trees)

Allan’s photo (while watering street trees)

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Geranium 'Rozanne' and California poppy

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and California poppy

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Note to self: Put Geranium 'Rozanne' at each end of this planter by Funland that gets frequently sat upon.

Note to self: Put Geranium ‘Rozanne’ at each end of this planter by Funland that gets frequently sat upon.

Someone broke a big old lavender apart.

Someone broke a big old lavender apart.

It looks even uglier now on the inside.

It looks even uglier now on the inside.

still good on the outside

still good on the outside

I took the lavender from the broken part to Heather at NIVA green, my favourite shop.

NIVA green (Allan's photo)

NIVA green (Allan’s photo)

sand sculpture in Fish Alley

sand sculpture in Fish Alley

The sculptor will have to knock down last week’s sculpture to make room for the new one. He says he puts that off as long as possible.

by Wind World Kites: Crocosmia 'Lucifer' will still be blooming for the Fourth of July.

by Wind World Kites: Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ will still be blooming for the Fourth of July.

A thought in Third Street Park:  Which shrub is better for a summer tourist town, rhododendrons or hydrangeas?

old rhododendrons

old rhododendrons

the new hydrangeas I planted a few years back to replace some tatty old rhodos. I rest my case.

the new hydrangeas I planted a few years back to replace some tatty old rhodos. I rest my case.  (Steve and John, they were not special rhodos!)

Lately, I have been distressed about the string trimmer whacking my along the edges of city parks.  I finally called and left a message about this one.  (No swearing or yelling, I promise.)

Weed-eater damaged Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Weed-eater damaged Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Nasturtiums swallowing the other plants on Seventh Street.

Nasturtiums swallowing the other plants on Seventh Street.

We checked the planters out on the beach approaches.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Some wedding flowers had been left last week in the Lisa Bonney planter. Our friends Bill and Susie (Boreas Inn) had been close friends of Lisa and had officiated at her daughter’s wedding.

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The wedding flowers were dried up by now, so I placed them in the spot where she died, close to this planter.  Felt choked up about it, as I often do in this place.

There was a snake out in the road by the next planter.  Allan herded it into the safety of dune grass.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; I wish we had taken it home to eat slugs and snails.

We would have nabbed that snake for home, but a tourist passing by was terrified so we had to get it off the sidewalk quickly.

I decided that one section of roses needed to be pruned back, even though I knew this meant we would be pressed to find time to water Ilwaco tonight.

Allan's photos: before

Allan’s photos: before

and after

and after

On the Sid Snyder approach, the planter closest to Ocean Beach Boulevard had had both of its lovely lavenders stolen by next to the lamp post.

Damn the hide of whoever is doing this...and I think it is one person, and local.

Damn the hide of whoever is doing this…and I think it is one person, and local.

It should have lavenders like this one, further along.

It should have lavenders like this one, further along.  The plaque goes back to volunteer days of yore.

As the plants repeatedly get stolen from the planters on both beach approaches, I have stopped replacing them.  The bareness of the planters probably makes people think that we (or the volunteers that they may think still do the planters) are not doing our job.  I have given up, quite frankly.

Someone left a present, and that was a bit cheering.

Someone left a present, and that was a bit cheering.

The Long Beach welcome sign, both sides

The Long Beach welcome sign, both sides

front

front

and back

and back

There was no way that we could get all of the Ilwaco gardens done as well today.  At least we had time to water the planters before our weekly garden club dinner, and we would not have to return to Long Beach on Friday.

Ilwaco

This time I walked around and checked on all the planters.

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right: Diascia 'Blackthorn Apricot', my favourite

right: Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’, my favourite

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I crossed paths with Allan and his water trailer.

I crossed paths with Allan and his water trailer.

I spent the rest of my time weeding at the boatyard.

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NOOOOOO. I pulled out a healthy sweet pea.

NOOOOOO. I pulled out a healthy sweet pea.

I blame the low angle of sun being in my eyes....

I blame the low angle of sun being in my eyes….

and the damnable horse tail that grows along the fence.

and the damnable horse tail that grows along the fence.

I was awfully glad when Allan arrived to pick me up.

I was awfully glad when Allan arrived to pick me up.

We even had time to drop the trailer off at home before meeting Dave and Melissa for dinner at…

The Cove Restaurant

…where we were joined by Bill and Susie of the Boreas Inn.  The Boreas garden is one I have let go, last year, and passed into the capable hands of Dave and Mel (Sea Star Gardening).

Sondra's gladiolas in the entry garden (Allan's photo)

Sondra’s gladiolas in the entry garden (Allan’s photo)

and lilies (Allan's photo)

and lilies (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Melissa, Susie, me, and delicious warm bread

Melissa, Susie, me, and delicious warm bread

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caesar salad

caesar salad

strawberry feta salad (Allan's photo)

strawberry feta salad (Allan’s photo)

ahi tuna

ahi tuna

spicy Thai prawns (Allan's photo)

spicy Thai prawns (Allan’s photo)

Moroccan chicken (Allan's photo)

Moroccan chicken (Allan’s photo)

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 7 June 2016

The Depot Restaurant

We began by watering and planting one plant (a Chelone ‘Hot Lips’, excellent fall bloomer) at the Depot.

Allan watering

Allan watering


plantings by Nancy of Basket Case Greenhouse

plantings by Nancy of Basket Case Greenhouse

This cat entertained me:

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

This well fed cat liked to be petted, so am fairly sure it is a neighbourhood resident and not a stray.

Long Beach

When we arrived in Fifth Street Park, we found Debbie Teashon there adding to her collection of Peninsula garden photos.

Rainyside Debbie

Our Debbie of Rainyside.com


Debbie and I deadheading a lavender prior to a photo

Debbie and I deadheading a lavender prior to a photo

After a brief visit and a farewell as she left to take more photos at city hall and then drive a few hours north to her home, Allan and I buckled down to watering and grooming the Long Beach planters.

Watering was preceded by some grooming in Fifth Street Park. Here, the northeast side with Brodiaea 'Queen Fabiola'.

Watering was preceded by some grooming in Fifth Street Park. Here, the northeast side with Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’.


Allan watering and deadheading

Allan watering and deadheading


by Herb 'N' Legend Smoke Shop

by Herb ‘N’ Legend Smoke Shop

The planters are all of a sudden well filled in and looking fine.

Allan's photo: pink California poppy and Geranium 'Rozanne'

Allan’s photo: pink California poppy and Geranium ‘Rozanne’


California poppies, Allan's photo

California poppies, Allan’s photo


a small hardy gladiolus (Allan's photo)

a small hardy gladiolus (Allan’s photo)


planting a few new plants

planting a few new plants

To water, we use a bayonet fitting to hook up the hose.  We often find snails, baby slugs, or loads of earwigs under the plastic cap.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I kill the slugs, relocate the snails, but tend to give the earwigs a pass just because there are so MANY and I don’t want to use poisons.

Allan bucket watered the Fish Alley barrels, where I am replacing stolen edging plants with free Sedum 'Autumn Joy' divisions.

Allan bucket watered the Fish Alley barrels, where I am replacing stolen edging plants with free Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ divisions.


!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!&*#$@###!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The Crabby Gardener

an occasion feature when public gardening goes bad

The Crabby Gardener by Don Nisbett

The Crabby Gardener by Don Nisbett

Allan noticed a big hole when watering the northernmost planter by Dennis Company.  I went to have a look.

furious photography

furious photography

Someone had pulled out a full sized Agastache ‘Fragrant Delight’, left the hole, and had broken off at the base a Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ (probably while trying to steal it, too).  The knautia was left behind, dead.  Neither of these plants are available on the Peninsula at this time and so I cannot fix this properly.

broken dead knautia and missing agastache

broken dead knautia and missing agastache


Here is the side that did not get vandalized and stolen.

Here is the side that did not get vandalized and stolen.


Here is the side that is empty now, by one of the busiest parking lots in town.

Here is the side that is empty now, by one of the busiest parking lots in town.

It is so important to me to have symmetry in the planters that I almost wish people would just damn well steal BOTH sides so I could start over with new matching plants.  Why does symmetry matter to me when our business name is “Tangly”?  Because a little symmetry tames the wildness, just like the boxwoods in the Oysterville garden add a frame to an exuberant garden.  I spent the time while watering six more planters and weeding a park fretting over how I was going to fix that space when there are no Agastaches of that colour, and certainly not an exact match, available here.  I texted Melissa in my despair and she replied that she had a pink Agastache, so I planned to acquire it from her.  I have to keep trying even though the Finger Blighter strikes so frequently.  Debbie had even wondered earlier if it could be someone who reads this blog, and knows where the good plants are.  I assured her that because I like to have the blog running at least five days behind (takes the pressure off writing it), and the thefts often happen the day after a new plant goes in (although not in the case of this incident), I am pretty sure there is no connection.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!$#@*&^%#!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Cheeringly, when Allan and I reunited after watering, he gave me a present from the Kite Guy at Wind World Kites.

Wind World Kites

Wind World Kites


This purple whirly flower!

This purple whirly flower!  Thanks, Wind World Kite Guy!

We moved on after our watering to weed the Veterans Field garden beds because the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market is due to open on Friday afternoons there starting this week.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


corner bed, Veterans Field

corner bed, Veterans Field

DSC09865

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I asked Allan to take some photos of the narrow, arced garden that goes halfway around the flag pavilion, my version of a red white and blue theme:

DSC05044

DSC05045

Salvias ‘May Night’ and ‘Hot Lips’ and Phygelius ‘Cherry Ripe’


DSC05040

Salvia ‘May Night’ and ‘Crimson Pygmy’ barberry with Eryngiums


Salvia patens (sometimes tender) has come back strong (center, next to red flowers)

Salvia patens (sometimes tender) has come back strong (center, below red Phygelius flowers)


Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Nearby, a silver, white, and pink streetside garden is one I often admire and is now at its peak.

rose campion, sea thrift, pink roses

rose campion, sea thrift, pink roses


DSC09863

streetside garden, Long Beach

On the way south, we watered the edge plants at the Long Beach welcome sign.  The soaker hoses don’t help them enough till their roots are well established.  Allan feels the sign is getting battered by people standing in it, especially the back side.

welcome sign front

welcome sign front


back

back


Allan pulling the persistent horsetail.

Allan pulling the four horsetail of the apocalypse.

I had read somewhere that Geranium ‘Orion’ is even better than Geranium ‘Rozanne’, that its flower size is bigger and a deeper blue.  Based on growing both of them in the welcome sign bed, ‘Rozanne’ remains the strong winner.

Geranium 'Rozanne'

Geranium ‘Rozanne’


Geranium 'Orion'

Geranium ‘Orion’


Rozanne (right) is still the champ.

Rozanne (right) is still the champ.

Ilwaco

We planted a few new curbside plants in this bed that is now back in the fold of watering.  If you water it, the gardeners will come.  This garden might even get more watering than it needs, since we are not the ones watering, and we are the ones who know which plants are utterly drought tolerant and which are not.  (Most drought tolerant plants do need good watering until they get established.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Then Allan went off to water the Ilwaco planters and street trees.

Ilwaco planter (Allan's photo)

Ilwaco planter (Allan’s photo)


traffic jam in town (Allan's photo)

traffic jam in town (Allan’s photo)

Meanwhile, I planted a few more plants and then started watering near the west end.  As I began, a couple of staff members at Salt said how much they appreciate the flowers and to use their hose anytime.  It was the first time this year that I had gotten out the Salt Hotel hose for their curbside garden.  It’s a long thin hose with a big leak patched with electric tape that spews water from the middle.

DSC09872

I struggled to get it undone enough to get to the further west garden bed and I was eventually  in despair, thinking it would be embarrassing to go home and watch Deadliest Catch tonight after giving up in a hose.  I kept trying.  But I was stumped.  I have no sense of how to untangle knots, chains, and hoses.

I needed to get all the way down to that tree, by a building that is for sale and has no water, whose garden was parched and miserably dry.

I needed to get all the way down to that tree and black light post, by a building that is for sale and has no water, whose garden was parched and miserably dry.

A kind middle aged man, a guest at Salt Hotel, quickly assessed the situation and in a trice had the hose untangled.  Otherwise, I might still be there.

The whole time I was struggling with hoses, I was aware on a level beyond exhaustion and frustration of how much I love these gardens.  Curbside gardens, parking strips, also known as “hellstrips“, are one of my favourite challenges and I think that these at the port are the only ones on the entire Peninsula, which is not known for parking strips along the streets.  My life is given meaning by these beds along the port and that is why I will work so hard at getting them watered.

After watering as far west as I could with the Salt hose, I switched to the one at the new Ilwaco Freedom Market.  The Port had permission to use it from the owner of the building.  The business whose manager would not permit us to water last year has gone!  The hose, though high quality, was still a struggle for me.

blargh!

blargh!

Between the two hoses, Salt’s and Freedom Market, there is still a section in the middle of that stretch of gardens that cannot be reached, whose plants remained dry and will be that way until the adjacent building that has sat vacant for two years (former home of Queen La De Da’s gallery) is in use again.  My plan is to just pull the most stressed plants out on Thursday.

Of course, I had to coil both hoses up again all nicey nice, not my favourite task.  The Salt one got stuck under a planter and I almost fell over tugging it out.  Some ladies of a clique of which I was formerly a member had gone up to the pub (without a word, of course…it’s a dangerous social choice to leave a clique).  I thought great, I’ll be all fallen over tangled in this hose and stuck when they come out.  Fortunately, I made my escape unscathed.

I then walked up to the port office gardens and hooked up our long hose, also an untangling nightmare.

It is to weep.

It is to weep.


I did it!

I did it!

I doubled up the hose and dragged it past four or five buildings to get to the next water hook up at the Ilwaco pavilion.

hose drag number one

hose drag number one, Ilwaco Pavilion has the blue roof


From there, I can even reach the tiny "drive over" garden between two big driveways.

From there, I can even reach the tiny “drive over” garden between two big driveways.


looking east

looking east


my favourite bed by the Pavilion

my favourite bed by the Pavilion


The wax myrtle we cut to the ground is coming back, as planned.

The wax myrtle we cut to the ground is coming back, as planned.


The Tall Ships were still in port.

The Tall Ships were still in port.


reaching as far west as I could in the Craft 3 bank garden bed (red and brown building)

reaching as far east as possible in the Craft 3 bank garden bed (red and brown building)

I watered as far east as I could reach in the Craft 3 bank beds.  They don’t thrill me because they are mostly kinnickinnick ground cover, pretty boring to me.  If there is no rain soon, I’ll try harder to get some water onto them.

old plantings in Craft 3 beds, from way back when it was Shorebank

old plantings in Craft 3 beds, from way back when it was Shorebank

I could see Allan way way down at the easternmost garden, watering with three hoses stretched from the docks.

Allan's photo at the east end. Butch of CoHo Charters says we could use his faucet, but I guess Allan thinks this is easier or quicker.

Allan’s photo at the east end. Butch of CoHo Charters (red building to the left) says we could use his faucet, but I guess Allan thinks this is easier or quicker.


Allan's photo: laying down a lot of water; this bed has not been hose watered for a couple of weeks or more.

Allan’s photo: laying down a lot of water; this bed has not been hose watered for a couple of weeks or more.


Allan's photo: a successfully pretty much drought tolerant bed still needs water to look tip top

Allan’s photo: This successfully pretty much drought tolerant bed still needs water to look tip top.

Meanwhile, I doubled up the hose again and did another drag with high hopes that the water at the old Wade Gallery, now owned by Fort George Brewery, would be turned on by now.  (Fort George has given us permission to water.)

hose drag number 2

hose drag number 2


nice view while testing the faucet at the Fort George building

nice view while testing the faucet at the Fort George building

I was tired and the water was not on at Fort George building and the garden was dry and Allan did not hear my four phone calls asking him to bring buckets and he didn’t have the work trailer anyway, as it turned out, and I sat on a utility box and felt exhausted and decided that TOMORROW we would bucket water that little garden.  By now it was 8:30 PM, we had been working for 9.5 hours, and I couldn’t face waiting for the trailer, driving to the boatyard, filling buckets, and coming back to dump them.

"Help! We are so thirsty!" "I just can't!!!"

“Help! We are so thirsty!”
“I just can’t!!!”

At home, I watered my own containers.

DSC09889

back garden, 8:40 PM


Smokey glad I am home

Smokey glad I am home

Later, watching the hard and dangerous work on Deadliest Catch, I was glad I hadn’t given up on the tangled hoses.

Deadliest Catch: keeping ropes untangled is critical

Deadliest Catch: keeping ropes untangled is critical

Tomorrow: the north end rounds of gardeners where the garden owners do the watering…thank heavens.


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s gardening diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 73):

June 7:  Two years have gone by since Bruce died.

I picked the weeds I pulled using the garden cart from Don.  Then I weeded in front of compost box, next to raspberry row (both sides) and picked strawberries.  The Ft Laramie plants have huge berries like the ones from California but they are hollow in the inside.  I went to bed at 10:00.

1998 (age 74):

June 7: Al’s birthday [her older brother who lived in Seattle] and 3 years since Bruce died.  I still miss him so much.

The Jazz were getting blown out when Mary Anne came over.  She put on Tabby’s halter and we went out on the porch by the shop.  However, Erik and a friend came over and Tabby bolted.  I figured she was under the shop.  Mary Anne and I kept calling and she came out from under the shed.  I think she was glad to see us.  Mary Anne said I should get another halter with a wider strap.  I called Al to wish him happy birthday.


On the 21st anniversary of my dad’s death, mom and dad camping in the early 1950s:

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dsc06208

and at home in the 1950s:

bruceginger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 31 May 2016

An exciting start: We have pretty large wheelie bins for our garbage, and our neighbour across the street told us she had seen a “bear as big as the garbage can” in our next door neighbour’s bin!

Port of Ilwaco

I had a few salvias to plant at Time Enough Books and some chives from my garden to transplant at the east end of the port (inspired by seeing chives as an ornamental in the book Gardening in the Post Wild World).

Howerton Ave, looking west

Howerton Ave, looking west

Howerton, east end garden

Howerton, east end garden

at last, some Eremurus (Foxtail lilies)

at last, some Eremurus (Foxtail lilies)

Asking around online, I’ve had it anecdotally confirmed that eremerus take years to size up and that sometimes they don’t even bloom, so just plant lots and lots.  (They are pricey but worth it.)

We replaced the last tatty old Erysimum in a planter with a fresh new one.

the new and the old (Allan's photo); Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' gets woody after a couple of years.

the new and the old (Allan’s photo); Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ gets woody after a couple of years.

Long Beach

I’d had the idea of adding more beach-tough plants to the planters on Bolstad, only to find out that even more plants had been stolen.  Since some folks may be getting tired of my ranting about finger blight, I am toying with starting a new compartmentalized section in the daily blog so that those that just want happy gardening can skip ahead.  I do know of at least one reader who enjoys a good rant.


The Crabby Gardener

The Crabby Gardener by Don Nisbett

The Crabby Gardener by Don Nisbett

Today on the beach approach my plans to enhance and improve the planters were thwarted by further plant theft.  The following photos show the blatant holes left by the thief followed by the matching plant left on the other side of the planter.  The plants I had brought for enhancement and a richer, fuller picture ended up being used to fill in the holes instead.

Planter one:

What's missing?

What’s missing?

this sea thrift's brother!

this sea thrift’s brother!

Planter two:

What's gone?

What’s gone?

This santolina's mate!

This santolina’s mate!

I had to pop a golden ‘Lemon Fizz’ santolina into the hole, as I had no more green ones.  The golden ones revert to green and I have never before been glad of that.  I like things to match in the planters.

Planter three:

What's gone here?

What’s gone here?

the buddies of these sea thrifts!

the buddies of these sea thrifts!

What was once here?

And what was once here?

The newly planted mate to a stolen silver santonlina has been stolen again. All I had for replacement was a gold one, a combo that makes me kind of queasy.

The newly planted mate to a stolen silver santolina has been stolen again. All I had for replacement was a gold one, a combo that makes me kind of queasy.

Now I am ALL OUT OF REPLACEMENT SANTOLINAS.

What is more, three of the plants stolen were from the Lisa Bonney memorial planter, with a plaque in memory of a beloved local woman who was killed by her estranged boyfriend just a few feet away from this very spot.  Has this thief no shame and no respect at all?

for deep shame, stealing from this planter.

for deep shame, stealing from this planter.

Further on down, a Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ had also been swiped.  That at least has already reverted from variegated to green foliage so I can add a balancing plant from seedlings in my own garden.

illustration from another planter: Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning' foliage reverting to green

illustration from another planter: Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ foliage reverting to green

I suspect the thief is one person furnishing a garden of his or her own, since the same sort of plants are targeting every dangblang time.

I talked to the office staff at city hall while Allan planted some sea hollies there.  What the heck to do, keep planting and planting for this person to steal the plants every single week?  The city hall staff said if we had a camera out there, the camera itself would be stolen.  Allan reminded me that I could just keep sticking in more and more Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ divisions.  Too bad the thief so much likes the same plants that are my favourite seaside plants.

And then in town, I noticed:

Lollipop lilies on one side...

Lollipop lilies on one side…

only one on the other side where they all got broken off last week

only one Lollipop lily on the other side where they all got broken off last week

And one more bit of kvetching today:  A planter stuck with five or six flippy flappy rather large miniature American flags on sticks with the flags flapping away in the 20 mph wind breaking off the cosmos.  People just do not realize how much damage can be done by something like that.  Goodbye little cosmos.  I took the flags into the adjacent business (who may not have even been responsible) and left them on the counter.

flapping flags make for broken plants

flapping flags make for broken plants

“There’s that crabby gardener again!” just might be going through people’s minds.


But back to the sunny side of public gardening.  Allan and I each watered half of the planters on the main street. Other than me feeling impatient for the plants to size up and the planters to look lush, the rest of the day was a good one with no backsplash from the hose while watering and hot enough weather that the 20 mph wind actually felt sort of good.  Sometimes.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan also noticed the 'Lollipop' Asiatic lilies.

Allan also noticed the ‘Lollipop’ Asiatic lilies.

This time Allan deadheaded the rhodies behind the frying pan (a prime background for tourist pictures). Before...

This time Allan deadheaded the rhodies behind the frying pan (a prime background for tourist pictures). Before…

and after

and after

the classic tourist fry pan photo

the classic tourist frying pan photo

My experiment with cosmos in the planter by the Bolstad stoplight is not successful.  A strong wind tunnel there has the cosmos going sideways with some broken off.  Pretty sure they are broken by wind, not flags.  Just a few of the planters have a severe wind affect and as such must just have tougher plants than the more sheltered ones.

a planter where only low plants thrive..

a planter where only low plants thrive…. Half the cosmos were broken off.

cute boat in the Castaways window

cute metal boat in the Castaways window

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park, NW corner

Baptisia australis (false indigo)

Baptisia australis (false indigo)

Fifth Street Park, SE side, Darmera peltata and Gunnera (Allan's photo)

Fifth Street Park, SE side, Darmera peltata and Gunnera (Allan’s photo)

Allan wondered what chews on a gunnera leaf.

Allan wondered what chews on a gunnera leaf.

While I weeded nearby, Allan sheared the white rugosa roses at the police station so the sidewalk is fully clear for the Columbia Pacific Farmer’s Market, due to begin June 11 in Veterans Field.

before

before

after

after

a pretty garden on the way to dump our debris (Allan's photo)

a pretty garden on the way to dump our debris (Allan’s photo)

more of the pretty streetside garden (Allan's photo)

more of the pretty streetside garden (Allan’s photo)

We added some mulch to that little popout that we had weeded last week.

better, and will soften up the weed roots

better, and will soften up the weed roots

While working, I spent much reflection on what I had learned today when a dear client came to the beach approach to talk to me.  One of my favourite private gardens, and my most longtime job, has been sold to a younger family member.  It is sad to see someone have to choose, because of age and health, to give up her garden even though it is passing to someone who loves it. This awaits all of us sooner or later.

Last task of the day was a quick bucket watering of the edges of the welcome sign.  But what have we here?

Note the removed piece of paver.

Note the removed piece of stone.

A geocache is located in this planter and we sometimes find it dug in and messed around with by geocache seekers.  Hint: It is not inside the planter and the city crew does not really want their wall removed to find it.  We know right where it is…and you don’t have to remove plants or stones to get at it.  Nor do you have to open the water hatch and disassemble the hose timer to get at it.  (Uh oh, getting crabby again.)

Hose timer is broken now.

Hose timer is broken now, probably in a geocache quest.

welcome sign today

welcome sign today

from the end with late evening shadow

from the end with late evening shadow

The Depot Restaurant

At seven, we met our good friend J9 to treat her to a belated birthday dinner.

Uh oh, the escallonia (wanting to be eight feet tall or more) is up over the sign again.

Uh oh, the escallonia (wanting to be eight feet tall or more) is up over the railway history sign again.

new and delicious salad

new and delicious salad

Baja Salad

Baja Salad

clam chowder

clam chowder and all (Allan’s photo)

Thai calamari

Thai calamari

J9's double order of mango sea scallops

J9’s double order of mango sea scallops

Steak Killian

Steak Killian

a candle on J9's cranberry pear sorbet and a round of Happy Birthday To You.

a candle on J9’s cranberry pear sorbet and a round of Happy Birthday To You.

and cheesecake

and cheesecake

With May at an end, tomorrow’s entry will be my mother’s garden diaries for May and June 1995, two months that could not be separated or presented in a light way in this gardening blog.  The next day will feature her diaries, illustrated and with some non gardening entries, for May of ’97 and ’98.

 

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Monday, 23 May 2016

Ilwaco

During gardening season, picking up our mail always involves a bit of weeding and deadheading at our volunteer garden at the post office.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

post office garden

post office garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum

pink California poppies

pink California poppies

We drove to the fire station to check on the water needs of the planter there, which is under the eaves and gets no rain.  I looked again at the garden areas that I keep thinking of taking over as a volunteer…especially now that we have been fired (or I suppose I could say REPLACED) at Golden Sands and therefore have an extra two hours a week.  I walked all round looking for a hose faucet and found none anywhere near the gardens, except for one down in a hole in the sidewalk that is turned off.  The lack of water, and the thought that I might be crazy to take on a new project while needing a new knee, put the kibosh on the idea for now…along with the fact that it is getting late to transplant free plants.

one of the areas that calls out to me...north wall, under wide eaves...

one of the areas that calls out to me…north wall, under wide eaves…

and the other...southwest corner, sunny

and the other…southwest corner, sunny

The station deserves a volunteer garden because the firefighters themselves are volunteers.

We did a bit of weeding at Time Enough Books (Allan's photo)

We did a bit of weeding at Time Enough Books (Allan’s photo)

and some weeding and planting at the Community Building, which got some Sedum 'Autumn Joy' starts and a couple of sanguisorbas that had come out of my garden to make room for my mom's copper rose.

and some weeding and planting at the Community Building, which got some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ starts and a couple of sanguisorbas that had come out of my garden to make room for my mom’s copper rose. (Allan’s photo)

free plants going in

free plants going in

Long Beach

Today was the first day for liquid fertilizing of the Long Beach planters.

As we secured an excellent parking spot by Fifth Street Park, my eyes zoomed in on something that really bugged me.

Do you notice what is wrong?

Do you notice what is wrong?

The old lavender in the planter kitty corner, that I had cut back to improve traffic sight lines earlier this spring, is so dead inside.  So ugly.  I planted another small lavender in front of it in hopes of hiding the horror.  I can’t wait, so I asked Allan if he could dig the big old one out after he did his portion of the watering rounds.

lavender on left is glaringly hideous

lavender on left is glaringly hideous

In the first planter that I watered, I found half of the Lollipop lilies broken off.

What happened here?

What happened here?

I just philosophically picked them up and threw them out.  Now the planter is all out of symmetry.

Lilies remain on the other side.

Lilies remain on the other side.

This is one of the planters with a planting scheme left over from volunteer days, with an aggressively running rose that is too vigorous for the planter (beautiful right now when in its once-blooming stage).  I don’t plant lilies in the planters because their foliage, while dying back, is unattractive.  To have them broken off just in full bud is a darn shame.  Oh well!

Right about that time, Todd drove by and called out “You guys rock!”.  That was nice.

Also nice: I had unearthed a pair of my favourite clippers, the ones Fred Meyer stopped carrying.

Also nice: I had unearthed a pair of my favourite clippers, the ones Fred Meyer stopped carrying.  I wish I could find these to buy somewhere.

a Long Beach planter (Allan's photo)

a Long Beach planter (Allan’s photo)

In Fish Alley, I came upon the city crew hard at work making a big sandbox.  There will be sand castles built here by expert builders every weekend this summer.

DSC09175

Parks Manager Mike driving the back hoe.

Parks Manager Mike driving the back hoe.

While bucket watering the four barrels in Fish Alley, I discovered that the two barrels at the west end of the alley had once again had every edging plant stolen. I told Mike it’s not from lack of trying that those barrels look blah.  One of the crew pointed out that all the lower light bulbs on the poles at the alley entrance had been stolen.  You can see the results in the first photo of the crew, above, and below.

light bulbs almost all gone!

light bulbs almost all gone!

This is not a crazy crime ridden town.  Yet things like this are so frustrating.  I told the crew that I had just had a brainstorm:  I am going to stuff the back two barrels with Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ which is easily replaced with divisions if the plants get stolen.  It is the perfect plant for that: drought tolerant, so divisible, and yet not invasive or impolite toward other plants.  No more special plants for whomever is repeatedly stealing there.

Outside Wind World Kites, I joined in on petting the Mighty Quinn, whose tail never stopped wagging.  Quinn is so big and only two years old.

Quinn and the Kite Guy

Quinn and the Kite Guy

Quinn’s predecessor was a good friend of Tank, the kite shop mascot dog, and after Tank died of old age, his buddy used to check out Tank’s “office” in the back of the shop to see if maybe Tank was there.

Tank in his office

my very good friend Tank in his office, years ago

Allan finished watering and accomplished his lavender removal project.  His photos:

before

before

DSC04342

He moved the new small lavender into the space.

He moved the new small lavender into the space.

after

after

I’d like to redo that whole planter and get the curly teucrium and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ out of it—both too invasive—but not this spring.

Allan's photo by Hungry Harbor Grille

Allan’s photo by Hungry Harbor Grille

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Walking by the park on Third Street reminded me that Mike had asked me to prune the hydrangeas by the bench.  After watering, Allan and I parked by there and did so.

after pruning. The hydrangeas had been blossoming through the back and seat of the bench.

after pruning. The hydrangeas had been blossoming through the back and seat of the bench.

A fellow smoking by the fence told me he had picked some flowers (rhododendrons, I believe) from the park and then felt he had done something wrong.  I was touched by his confession and gave him the hydrangea flowers I had needed to cut.  He was ever so pleased.

At the back of the park: aegepodium. DO NOT ever plant it! and tall fireweed. I left the fireweed, remembering that in the UK it goes by the lovely name rosebay willowherb.

At the back of the park: aegepodium. DO NOT ever plant it! and tall fireweed. I left the fireweed, remembering that in the UK it goes by the lovely name rosebay willowherb and is much admired.

Allan bucket watering the stage planters at Veterans Field

Allan bucket watering the stage planters at Veterans Field

We have a lot of little things to remember to do in Long Beach in order to keep plants alive and happy.

Eschscholzia californica 'White Linen' and Salvia 'May Night' in vet field corner garden

Eschscholzia californica ‘White Linen’ and Salvia ‘May Night’ in vet field corner garden

We had saved the northern two blocks of planter fertilizing till late afternoon.  I took a break  to go into NIVA green and get some more photos for the shop’s Facebook page.

front window, NIVA green

front window, NIVA green

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Heather Ramsay’s lamps

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a seat for a miniature garden

a seat for a miniature garden

doggies

doggies

Heather has the most artistic selection of greeting cards around.  I had a birthday gift certificate from Todd burning a hole in my wallet and I decided a wide selection of cards would be the perfect things to spend it on.

owl card

owl card

many choices throughout the shop

many choices throughout the shop

Allan's photo by Dennis Company

Allan’s photo by Dennis Company

Back to Fifth Street Park Allan and I went to get some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.  I planted all the rest of my sweet pea seeds, tired of packets floating around the house with just a few seeds in each.  It is crazy late to plant, I know.

looking toward the NE quadrant of Fifth Street Park

looking toward the NE quadrant of Fifth Street Park

When I took the above photo, I did not even remember that it was the planter whose lilies had been broken off on the north side.  That’s because I was being all philosophical about plant damage today.

Fifth Street Park, NW corner

Fifth Street Park, NW corner

Phlomis fruticosa (Jerusalem sage) (Allan's photo)

Phlomis fruticosa (Jerusalem sage) and the first lily (Allan’s photo)

We dumped our debris and got some soil from the city yard and went to Fish Alley to replant the stripped out two barrels.

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' on the move (Allan's photo)

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ on the move (Allan’s photo)

Fish Alley replanting (Allan's photo)

Fish Alley replanting (Allan’s photo)

Because we still had time in our day, we went to the Bolstad approach to remove some of the clover that had turned out to have boring, lax white flowers.

the silver Pacific Ocean, end of the Bolstad approach (Allan's photo)

the silver Pacific Ocean, end of the Bolstad approach (Allan’s photo)

clover attack

clover attack

before (Allan's photo)

before (Allan’s photos)

and after

and after

I worked on pulling grasses from among the roses.  As I approached the nearby planter, I let out a bellow and all thoughts of being philosophical flew away.

NOOOOOOOO!!!!!

NOOOOOOOO!!!!!

That hole marks where a brand new perfectly shaped santolina had been planted within the past month, to match its brother on the other side of the planter.

Now its brother is all alone.

Now its brother is all alone.

utterly maddening

utterly maddening

The fairy door at the base of the planter had not protected it nor had the little green soldier that Allan found in the planter itself.

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I looked around to make sure no tourists or children were nearby and then let out a string of swearing and imprecations against plant thieves.  To anyone looking from the distant hotel windows, I must have looked like a cartoon character hopping about and waving my arms in rage.

hopping mad!!

hopping mad!!

This is why the beach approach planters look so sparse.  I plant repeatedly, and choice new additions are repeatedly stolen.  I suspect it might be just one person, maybe the same one also stealing in Fish Alley, who is furnishing quite a nice little garden somewhere.  I have no idea who.  Someone who knows good plants and only takes the choicest ones. Perhaps they think I will just replace the plant.  Well, no, because now every nursery on the Peninsula is sold out of it.  I found a small specimen of a different santolina cultivar at ground level, where I had stuck in some cuttings earlier this year.

It would have been swamped by resprouting roses anyway.

It would have been swamped by resprouting roses anyway.

into the planter it goes...maybe won't be stolen as is not impressive.

into the planter it goes…maybe won’t be stolen as is not impressive.

On the other side of the sidewalk, I noticed that someone had stolen one of the fairy doors, breaking it off in the process of prying it from the driftwood.

gone!

gone!

Wendy Murry had sent me this photo of it on May 15th.

Wendy Murry had sent me this photo of it on May 15th.

All thoughts of being philosophical had disappeared and I was back to being a crabby gardener.

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The Crabby Gardener by Don Nisbett, an art idea suggested, oddly enough, by someone who knows me.

In better news:  The beach approach was so easy to weed now that we got two sections done in less than an hour and stopped work at the eight hour day mark.

It should be easy to do a weeding of the rest of the approach, maybe just a one day job.

It should be easy to do a weeding of the rest of the approach, maybe just a one day job.

at home

the garden at 8 PM

the garden at 8 PM

I moved my kitty statue from near the greenhouse over to Mary’s grave after suddenly realizing how much it looks like Mary.

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Mary herself

Mary herself

Rose 'Mary Rose' planted on her grave

Rose ‘Mary Rose’ planted on her grave

Mary Rose, picked for a closer look

Mary Rose, picked for a closer look

and to float in my mom's birdbath

and to float in my mom’s birdbath


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

On this day in 1995, my father went into the hospital with a heart problem.  The diary entries from May 23 through June of that year will appear in one post at the end of this month.

1997 (age 73):

May 23:  Don [her neighbor helping get ready for a garage sale] 12:00-3:00.  We sorted the rest of the boxes from garage shelves.  I found some pink dishes that might match Skyler’s dishes and several pieces of colored glass to put on kitchen shelf over sink.  Sorted through flower seeds for ones to direct seed.

1998 (age 74):

May 23: Cool wet dreary—too lousy weather to go outside so I planted seeds—for several hours.  I keep switching trays between heating mats on the card table and Floralight.  The Jazz swept the Lakers.

 

 

 

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