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Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

Floramagoria

(or, Return to Floramagoria)

DSC05333

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I was thrilled to return to the gloriously colourful Floramagoria garden.  Last year, during the Garden Bloggers Fling, I was so taken with the garden that it got three whole blog posts which show the garden in much more organized detail than today:

the front garden

the back garden

and the farm area

During the Bloggers Fling, we were divided into groups of (I think) 50…or 80…and since everyone was blogging, there was a lot of everyone moving out of each other’s photos.  Today, the garden was more crowded with possibly 400 people touring at approximately the same time.  It was fun to see how well it absorbed the large number of people, as it is a garden made for entertaining.  This time, just walk with me here and there through the garden, and look at my favourite bits from many angles, and you can have a browse through the old posts if you want a careful explanation of how it all fits together.

entering the front garden

entering the front garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

signs made of styrofoam (Allan said)

signs made of styrofoam 

dog

as one walks around the side of the house

as one walks around the side of the house

clematis at the side of the house

clematis at the side of the house

entering the back garden

entering the back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

slug

slug

glass

little greenhouse/shed at corner of house

little greenhouse at corner of house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in the greenhouse: Allan's photo

in the greenhouse: Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the back garden

the back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pitcher plants...I want any and all of them.

pitcher plants…I want any and all of them.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I think this is crambe maritma.

I think this is crambe maritma (sea kale)

crambe2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

kniphofia

kniphofia

looking back at the corner greenhouse

looking back at the corner greenhouse

a stunning grass

a stunning grass

I figured that grass was a Stipa, and indeed, one of the garden owners told me it was a Stipa…something or other….I must do some Googling because I must have it.

must...

must…

have...

have…  (Is it Stipa pennata??)

nigella seed pods

nigella seed pods

water2

the Little and Lewis-y water feature

the Little and Lewis-y water feature

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

water3

That’s what I want for my garden.  My budget runs more toward plastic tubs.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

yellow

Allan's photo  (What is it?)

Allan’s photo (What is it?)

at the corner of the dining pavilion

at the corner of the dining pavilion

photo appreciation

photo appreciation

daylily (one that made me think, last year, that I need some frilly ones like this)

daylily (one that made me think, last year, that I need some frilly ones like this)

hakmak

one of two matched pillars near the dining pavilion

one of two matched pillars near the dining pavilion

I know little about the different varieties of pitcher plants, because we cannot get them anywhere around here....

I know little about the different varieties of pitcher plants, because we cannot get them anywhere around here….

(looking down from above): I want them ALL.

(looking down from above): I want them ALL.

pitcher3

I wonder if they are hardy?  I seem to recall that when I did have a few, they came back after winter.

I wonder if they are hardy? I seem to recall that when I did have a few, they came back after winter.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pitcher7

pitcher8

(Two weeks later, when we stopped by Garden Tour Nancy’s to see her recent plant acquistions from her visit to Dancing Oaks nursery, what did she have?  YES, a pot of pitcher plants!!  ARGH!

Okay, enough obsessing about this one area.

Okay, enough obsessing about this one area.

(Looks like maybe I can mail order them from here: Sarracenia Northwest, which tells me that they are indeed cold hardy.)

cannas

 

blue

 

into the shade, having walked through the dining pavilion

into the shade, having walked through the dining pavilion

the shade and bubble corner

the shade and bubble corner, so welcome because the day, while overcast, was hot

looking up into the sequoia

looking up into the sequoia  (bubbles were floating down)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

shady bench

shady bench

on the walls of the shade corner

on the walls of the shade corner

shade corner stucco walls painted green; this is the back of the blue water feature wall

shade corner stucco walls painted green; this is the back of the blue water feature wall

leaves

flower

Maybe I just need to settle for this kind of pitcher plant.

Maybe I just need to settle for this kind of pitcher plant.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back through the dining pavilion

looking back through the dining pavilion

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, Dan Hinkley and one of the garden owners

Allan’s photo, Dan Hinkley and one of the garden owners

dining pavilion chair

dining pavilion chair

from the pavilion

from the pavilion

the solidly floriferous side of the garden

the solidly floriferous side of the garden

daylilies3

daylilies

flowers3

my favourite shape of dahlias

my favourite shape of dahlias

flowers4

flowers5

another ruffly daylily

another ruffly daylily

After seeing this garden last year, I swore I was going to paint some bamboo poles and put them in the garden.

After seeing this garden last year, I swore I was going to paint some bamboo poles and put them in the garden.

Did I?  No.  Will I this year? I surely do hope so.

Did I? No. Will I this year? I surely do hope so.

poles5

poles6

cobalt

stripes

an astrantia for Mr. Tootlepedal

an astrantia for Mr. Tootlepedal

combo2

astrantia, closer

astrantia, closer

looking over the garden to the dining pavilion

looking over the garden to the dining pavilion

at the end of a dead end path in the floriferous garden

at the end of a dead end path in the floriferous garden

in the shade at the back of the flower garden

in the shade at the back of the flower garden

the covered deck behind the house

the covered deck behind the house

from up on the deck

from up on the deck

from the deck: the patio right behind the house

from the deck: the patio right behind the house

one of the hosts (Allan's photo)

one of the hosts (Allan’s photo)

near the back door

near the back door

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

corner2

on the corner of the deck (from where I had sat down)

on the corner of the deck (from where I had sat down)

another sitting down view

another sitting down view

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I spy Dan Hinkley!

I spy Dan Hinkley!

from my comfy couch seat

from my comfy couch seat

tour guests and host

tour guests and host

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo (he entered the garden via the farm area and this side entry to the deck)

more garden gazing

more garden gazing

crowds

Allan rejoined me and we exited via the “farm” side of the house.

the farm greenhouse, at the back corner of the covered deck

the farm greenhouse, past the back corner of the covered deck

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bouquets in the greenhouse

bouquets in the greenhouse

duck

the farm

the farm

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bee hive

bee hive

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back on the farm

looking back on the farm

farm3

around the corner into the front garden

around the corner into the front garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

front garden ferns

front garden ferns

front5

tiered fern planter near front door

tiered fern planter near front door

screen for front door privacy

screen for front door privacy

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

While I can’t afford a stucco wall and dripping column water feature (and lack the skills to make one), I leave this garden (again) with the ideas that I could paint some bamboo poles and perhaps buy some metal livestock troughs to grow veg in…and get me some sarracenias.

Tomorrow: our very last garden of the 2015 study weekend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I learned just in time to call it by the right name for this entry that this garden is known as Pink Poppy Farm!

from the program:   The Dickerson garden:  Allow yourself time to explore this expansive, one acre country garden where edibles and flowers grow in harmony, surrounded by mature conifers which provide privacy and some wind protection. As you enter the front gate, see swirls of lavender and rosemary filling deep perennial beds.  After circling a ring of dahlias,  head for the cutest chicken house ever, “The Imperial Chicken Palace,” which is filled with 13 gorgeous hens.  Meandering through the property you will see  2 poly tunnels which shelter tomatoes, cucumbers, basil, peppers and more.  Masters of edible landscapes, the owners have lived and worked on the grounds for 19 years.  The garden is full of clever ideas for watering, fencing, and decor.

Expansive indeed, this garden is going to make for a long entry!

Our friend Kathleen got this good shot of the entry gate:

photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

Inside the gate, we saw to our right a lavender garden and ahead, a circle of dahlias and other flowers.

entry garden

entry garden

To our left is the front porch and behind us the bright red door of the garage.

photo by Kathleen Shaw, looking east

photo by Kathleen Shaw, looking east

north side of house

north side of house

After an amazing tour of this garden we will exit through that narrow passageway.

front porch

front porch

NW corner of house

NW corner of house

a detailed garden

So far, it seems like a normal, nice, restrained garden.  Then, coming around the west side of the house….

west lawn and garden bed...

west lawn and garden bed…

…we get the first indication of the special delights of this garden.  Below, Sheila sees the Imperial Chicken Palace!

just wow!

just wow!

ICP

Imperial Chicken Palace

Imperial Chicken Palace

ICP

side view

side view

chicken palace window box

chicken palace window box

There, I am back in love with Petunia ‘Phantom’!

the girls; top photo by Kathleen Shaw:  dust bath time

the girls; top photo by Kathleen Shaw: dust bath time

nesting boxes accessed by an exterior hatch

nesting boxes accessed by an exterior hatch

Although it was hard to leave “the girls”, we walk east along the south side of the house.

looking east

looking east

chairs and a photo album I wish I had taken time to look at

chairs and a photo album I wish I had taken time to look at

up a slope of lawn, looking back

up a slope of lawn, looking back

Below, Allan and Debbie from Rainyside Gardeners, who sets up for a photo while garden owner Mike Dickerson walks forward to greet them.

SE corner of house

SE corner of house

from further east

from further east

This garden had been on tour before, but on the same year that my old garden was on the tour, so we did not get to see it,  This time, Mike joked “You’ve finally paid to come see my garden!”

Mike demonstrates a simple clever fence to keep chickens out of the garden beds.

Garden owner Lynn demonstrates a simple clever fence to keep chickens out of the garden beds.

along the south side of the garden...In the background, you can see the compost bins

along the south side of the garden…In the background, you can see the compost bins

further east, hoop houses, "two and a fourth" (small one), Lynn said.

further east, hoop houses, “two and a fourth” (small one), Lynn said.

veg boxes (compost bins in background)

veg boxes (compost bins in background)

Sheila and I always enjoy the true working areas of the garden, like the compost bins.  Here, they are enviably large, running along the middle south side of the property and made of old pallets.

much compost

much compost

Speaking of working areas, we admire the watering system in this garden:

hose manifolds

hose manifolds

Hoses lead to oscillating sprinklers which are mounted on posts.  Each hose connects with a quick connect to the sprinkler which is permanently set for optimum watering pattern.

sprinkler

sprinkler

and another view of the chicken fence

and another view of the chicken fence

We intend to adopt this watering system for our garden as soon as we have time.  It will save lots of fiddling with the sprinklers.

a tour guest walking east

a tour guest walking east

poppies

pre-tour photo showing two hoop houses (looking east)

pre-tour photo showing two hoop houses (looking east)

on tour day

on tour day

The first and smaller hoophouse:

house

one of the the hoop houses

 north door

inside

inside

south door

south door

looking east

looking east

The big hoop house and raised beds:

approaching a big hoop house

approaching  big hoop house

I loved the raised box of nasturtiums (photo taken while pre-touring in June)

I loved the raised box of nasturtiums (photo taken while pre-touring in June)

hoop

inside the hoop house

inside the hoop house

a prolific crop

a prolific crop

tomatoes

tomatoes

Allan was interested in the details of how it was constructed, and you might be, too:

how to

how to

how to

how the windows open

how the windows open

Way up at the top of garden by a house (which is also part of the property but lacks amenities) is another, smaller hoophouse where Madeline and Jacob grow their produce for the Saturday Market.  The garden also provides food for a few CSA boxes.

the littlest hoophouse

the littlest hoophouse

garden tour guests

garden tour guests
friends

guests

boy

Donna and M.R.

Donna and M.R.

Because this was the most central garden of the tour, we ran into some of our touring friends there.  We found our friends Donna and M.R. photographing flowers on the route from the hoophouses to the north side of the garden.

bachelor buttons

bachelor buttons

Set in a fenced garden of its own, the garden shed charmed everyone with its old windows and shingled sides, and windowboxes.

taken on pre-tour day, late June

taken on pre-tour day, late June

shed windowboxes

shed windowboxes

neatly cut edges in the  shed garden

neatly cut edges in the shed garden

an old swingset used as trellising near the garden shed

an old swingset used as trellising near the garden shed, in late June

on tour day

My, how the flowers had grown since June 24th when I first visited the garden!

right...the smaller hoophouse...left...the garden shed

right…the smaller hoophouse…left…the garden shed

cornflowers and just a glimpse of the "stage" area

cornflowers and just a glimpse of the “stage” area

Coming around a grass path from the garden shed, we followed the beautiful music to the green stage setting for the Mozart Chicks.

The Mozart Chicks

The Mozart Chicks

classical quintet

classical quintet

music appreciator

music appreciator

I took an iPhone video walking from the musicians’ area around the garden which you may be able to view here.

One garden bed after another abounded with food and flowers mixed together.

produce

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

sunflowers against the "extra house"

sunflowers against the “extra house”

mix

dahlias

dahlias

The Pink Poppy Bakery booth at the Ilwaco Saturday Market offers bouquets of flowers from this garden.

After going round and round the garden, we came to the patio on the east side of the house where delicious treats awaited.

handsome steps down to the patio area

handsome steps down to the patio area

treats

treats

You can see in the background, above, how popular the Pink Poppy Bakery treats were!

treats

 

This garden will also be on the Peninsula Edible Garden Tour...

This garden will also be on the Peninsula Edible Garden Tour…

patio detail

patio detail

The patio wraps around the corner of the house.

The patio wraps around the corner of the house.

view from just inside the house

Around the patio, many tour guests converged and lingered and chatted, even though we all had more gardens to see.

M.R. photographing flowers

M.R. photographing a birdhouse

house

We photographed it, too.

(right) garden owner Mike Dickerson

(right) garden owner Mike Dickerson

Mike and Sheila

Mike and Sheila

Mike and M.R.

Mike and M.R.

Finally, we did have to tear ourselves away because we had three more gardens to see…

walkway between garage and house

walkway between garage and house

back to the entry garden

back to the entry garden

back

And with wistful looks back, we departed for the rest of our tour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 19th and 20th, 2013

from the program:  Cottage gardens wrap around this 1896 home in a succession of outdoor rooms, each filled with breath-taking color and whimsical garden art.  Flowers and feeders provide a sanctuary for birds, which you will surely hear as you meander on the brick path.  The welcoming deck is a haven for friends and family.  This exquisite garden will be a great inspiration to those who garden in small spaces.

The garden tour was on the 20th, but I have included some photos from the 19th when we did our last check up on this garden, one we have been working on, with owners Jo and Bob, for 19 years.  I knew it would be crowded with people on tour day so wanted to get some clear photos of the garden from one end to the other the day before.

This photo, taken by a friend on tour day, shows the driveway approach to the home.   You might not guess what a lavish garden lies beyond the gate.

photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

Looking west at the entry arch, photo by Kathleen Shaw on tour day

Looking west at the entry arch, photo by Kathleen Shaw on tour day

On Friday, Jo agrees the garden is ready.

On Friday, Jo agrees the garden is ready.
through the arch on tour day

through the arch on tour day

Just inside, along the wall of the garage (which has been turned into a garden shed on one side and a darling guest cottage on the other) are containers and windowboxes featuring plants from The Basket Case Greenhouse.

along the guest cottage wall (a north facing wall)

along the guest cottage wall (a north facing wall)

The annual geraniums, alternating pink and red, thrive even though one side is at the base of a north wall.

geranium (pelargonium) walk

geranium (pelargonium) walk

For the windowboxes, Jo buys flats of assorted annuals from the Basket Case and then I figure out an arrangement with what she brings home.  Every year we do her ground level arrangement of pink and red geraniums with alyssum so the window boxes echo that pattern.

guest cottage windowbox, north wall

guest cottage windowbox, north wall

At the northwest corner of the guest cottage (formerly a garage), you get the first good look at the 1896 house.

beach house

beach house

Meanwhile, on the other (north) side of the geranium walk, raised up with a railway sleeper wall (railroad ties to non-anglophiles) is a bed of mixed colourful perennials and annuals.  Inspired by visiting my garden last summer, Jo had us tear out some shrubs and some dull perennials (big yellow daylily, for example) and plant thickly with our favourite plants, especially the ones she had pointed at as we walked through my garden.

sunny bed on north side of entry walk

sunny bed on north side of entry walk

Above: I see Salvia viridis (painted sage), Nicotiana langsdorfii (chartreuse flowering tobacco), snapdragons, salpiglossis, Eryngiums, Cosmos, Agastache, backed with Lavatera ‘Barnsley’.  The rugosa rose at the right is so fragrant that it was allowed to stay during the re-do.

another view of new mixed bed

another view of new mixed bed

Back to the northwest corner of the guest house:  If you look south, you will see a shade bed planted against the house deck.

(left) more windowboxed (right) shade bed

(left) more windowboxes
(right) shade bed

a view looking north from beside the shade bed, photo by Kathleen Shaw

a view looking north from beside the shade bed, photo by Kathleen Shaw

Above, shade bed would be to your left and the guest cottage window to your right.

Up we go to the next level.

Up we go to the next level.
to the right, an old bench with containers

to the right, an old bench with containers

Fat little birds like to sit on the rail above that bench.  A friend told me the birds were there even on tour day.

friendly bird

friendly bird

A wooden arch and metal gate lead into a narrow path in the new mixed border.

the day before tour day

the day before tour day

Honeysuckle grows over the arch.

Honeysuckle grows over the arch.

Inside the arch, people could walk one by one on a narrow brick path through the newly planted colour beds.  Jo calls it a “one butt path”.

path

narrow path, east to the white entry arch through which we entered the geranium walk.

looking west back to the honeysuckle arch

looking west back to the honeysuckle arch

looking west back to the honeysuckle arch

looking west back to the honeysuckle arch

just inside the honeysuckle arch where the garden comes to a narrow corner

just inside the honeysuckle arch where the garden comes to a triangular corner

North of the honeysuckle arch on a small patio at the north side of the deck is a water feature with a tipping bucket.

This is a favourite spot for the birds.

This is a favourite spot for the birds.

on the deck the day before tour day

on the deck the day before tour day

on tour day, photo by Kathleen Sayce

on tour day, photo by Kathleen Sayce

tour day refreshments including Bob Fitzsimmons' home made cookies.

tour day refreshments including Bob Fitzsimmons’ home made cookies.
Jo serving lemonade

Jo serving lemonade

Jo and Bob have a wonderfully arranged deck, sheltered from south and west winds and with a roofed nook by the back door.

Tom Trudell was the musician at this garden and played in a cozy corner of the deck.

Tom Trudell was the musician at this garden and played in a cozy corner of the deck.

northeast corner of deck

northeast corner of deck, looking over the garden; hanging basket at right is on guest cottage

Just west of the tipping bucket water feature, we walk through another wooden arch into the center patio.

just past that arch....the day before tour day

just past that arch….the day before tour day

Above, the guest house is marked by the hanging basket, and the tipping bucket water feature would be to your right if you walked back through the wooden gate.  You can see the metal gate to the left, and the plant bench below the rail where the chubby birds like to sit.

just west of that gate, photo by Kathleen Sayce

just west of that gate on tour day, photo by Kathleen Sayce

Here is the center courtyard, on the north side of the house, looking west.  Next year, Jo wants to remove the old rhododendrons and make a new, no doubt colourful, shade garden on the north wall.

center courtyard

center courtyard

When we first started working in this garden in about 1995, all that was here was a line of rhododendrons running along the fence and a straight gravel path down the middle.

center courtyard with bird feeders

center courtyard with bird feeders

looking west; to the left, stairs to the house.

looking west; to the left, stairs to the house.

looking west over the fence

looking west over the fence

Jo demands that every plant provide lots of colour; if it is not colourful enough, she says a plant “doesn’t have enough bang for the buck”.

colour

colour

This garden view was one of my main inspirations to move from my old shady garden to a sunny one in 2010!

through the gate

through the gate

just past the windmill

just past the windmill

birdbath where the path curves to the west

birdbath where the path curves to the west

turning south at the west side of the house

turning south at the west side of the house

Crocosmia 'Lucifer' that Allan fenced in with rebar and bamboo

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ that Allan fenced in with rebar and bamboo

looking south

looking south; the path to the right leads to a west gate, below

west gate

The west gate opens onto a big lawn that is also part of the property.  When Jo said she wanted part of her garden to look just like mine with all her favourite plants that she saw when mine was on tour last year, I never thought to say we could make a garden exactly like mine by doing great big beds out in this lawn!   We are contemplating the idea, I’m not sure how seriously on Jo’s part!

daisies and monkshood in southwest garden

daisies and monkshood in southwest garden

looking south: the garden ends here

looking south: the garden ends here

Let’s turn around and walk back to the center courtyard, admiring the plantings from a different angle.

looking north from the end of the brick path

looking north from the end of the brick path

the northwest corner of the old porch steps

the northwest corner of the old porch steps

The house had a west and north facing wrap around porch that has been enclosed into a wonderful L shaped sitting room.

looking east, swinging back around the corner

looking east, swinging back around the corner

Years ago, my former partner Robert Sullivan laid this path for Jo and Bob.  Originally, the beds were straight and edged with railroad ties and the whole impression was not soft and flowing like this.

around the corner, looking east to the center courtyard

around the corner, looking east to the center courtyard

daisies and Lavatera 'Barnsley'

daisies and Lavatera ‘Barnsley’

from the garden, looking over Knautia macedonica to center courtyard

from the garden, looking over Knautia macedonica to center courtyard

the day before the tour:  Coco went to "doggy spa" on tour day.

the day before the tour: Coco went to “doggy spa” on tour day.

looking east in the center courtyard the day before the tour

looking east in the center courtyard the day before the tour

guests in tour attire

guests in tour attire

pointing at a hummingbird

pointing at a hummingbird

It was an enormous pleasure to help Jo and Bob get this garden ready for the tour.  For more history of their garden, just put “Jo’s garden” into the search box on this blog!

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By 1996, through word of mouth, we had almost more work than we could keep up with.

In Long Beach, we made a wildflower garden by a manufactured home called, at the time, the Sand Dollar.  Some of you know Janine, the tiny French woman who had a lovely garden on N. Washington street.  She had previously owned this little garden and remnants of it still remained to be revived.

reviving Janine's former garden

reviving Janine’s former garden, 1996

Sand dollar, 1997

a new border along the street, Sand Dollar, 1997

The house got sold and nowadays this garden has gone all back to lawn.

My Delft-collecting grandmother would have loved that several of our jobs had windmills.

In spring of ’96, we created from nothing this garden in front of the the Loose Kaboose Cafe for then – owner Jill. When we first planted tiny perennials in March and then gave her a bill, she gave us a check with skeptical eye and then acted rather cold when she saw us for the next two months. To her amazement, it looked great by midsummer, and she admitted she had had no faith in the growing power of those little plants.

Robert working on the Loose Kaboose garden

Robert working on the Loose Kaboose garden

our Loose Kaboose garden

our Loose Kaboose garden in 1996

By 1997, Jill had faith and had us adding more flower beds and some window boxes.

more flowers at the Kaboose, 1997

more flowers at the Kaboose, 1997

Loose Kaboose 1997

Loose Kaboose 1997

Loose Kaboose 1997

Loose Kaboose 1997

Loose Kaboose 1997

Loose Kaboose 1997

Robert watering Loose Kaboose windowbox

Robert watering Loose Kaboose windowbox

That was a fun little job; I was sorry (for us) when Jill sold the place.

I continued to spend a day a week at Peggy’s garden in Nahcotta, and kept the job until 1998 when she wanted the beds carpeted with red bark.  I was developing a strong personal taste in gardening and even nine years before a certain  great revelation, I couldn’t do it, nor could I severely prune a wooded path area that I loved just the way it was.

the view from Peggy's deck

the view from Peggy’s deck

springtime at Peggy's

springtime at Peggy’s

We still took care of Glennie’s garden in Seaview, where her flower garden (formerly boring rhododendrons) thrived:

Glennie's flowers

Glennie’s flowers 1997

Glennie's 1998

Glennie’s 1998

Glennie's 1998

Glennie’s 1998

And bless her heart, she paid us to care for her house in the winter (with a weekly check up) and did we ever need money to get through the winter.  Eventually, she moved fulltime to Arizona, and the garden is pretty much gone now.

In Nahcotta, I had achieved the softer palette that I wanted to go with Carol’s grey house:

Carol's Nahcotta garden

Carol’s Nahcotta garden

At our one job up on Sahalee hill in Ilwaco (at that time our only Ilwaco job), we planted up a new rock wall below the house with plants including Oenothera (pink evening primrose).  When I first heard Ann Lovejoy speak about perennials in 1988, I had had to spell such names out phonetically. “Just say you want the PINK evening primrose”, she had advised.

Oenothera, Sedums, Dianthus

Oenothera, Sedums, Dianthus

close up of the large flower border at the edge of the hill in the Sahalee garden

close up of the large flower border at the edge of the hill in the Sahalee garden

Weeding the big flower border that ran along the edge of the hill in that garden made me feel, as I bent among the plants, like I was swimming underwater in the colourful coral reef.

I quit that job when the owner said two homophobic things.  One is bad enough, but two?  Intolerable intolerance.   (After we resigned, politely…I just told her that we were too busy with public gardens….she told someone that she could not tell which of us, me or Robert, was the man and which was the woman.  So make that three things.)  Does it seem that I quit a lot of jobs?  I wrote about that once, but keep in mind that I have many jobs that I had done for over twelve years!

Carol of the Nahcotta garden recommended us to Klipsan Beach Cottages and thus I acquired what is still my favourite job and two dear friends, owners Mary and Denny.  in 1998, I planted up the window boxes and a deck planter there.

office windowbox at KBC, '98

office windowbox at KBC, ’98

cottage windowbox at KBC

cottage windowbox at KBC

KBC garden 1998

KBC garden 1998

In 1998, the garden that we helped weed there looked this, and nowadays it looks like this!

In 1998, we acquired another resort garden, Andersen’s RV Park, which Allan and I still do today.

Andersen's

Andersen’s

at Andersen's RV Park, 1998

at Andersen’s RV Park, 1998

Andersen's 1998

Andersen’s 1998

These days I plant an extravaganza of sweet peas along that picket fence.

I wrote already about the creation and demise of Sharon’s garden on the bay.  And the saga of helping out in Donna’s garden is awaiting a full entry about her garden of perfection in Seaview.

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Before I get into our trip to the market, let me warn my faithful few readers that I am having a terrible time publishing to iweb.  Much woe is me, as I love the interface which enables me to so easily add photos and links despite my state of html ignorance. There is a work-around, to “publish all”, that is, the entire blog from the very first post, every time I add a new one, but it does take hours.  I hope Apple gets this problem sorted soon; forum posts show that I am not the only one.  Meanwhile, if my blog goes for weeks without updating here, that is why.  I have set up an alternate blog spot on blogspot, where you may someday be able to find me at [2012 note: blogspot did not appeal to me and so my blog was idle in 2008 and 2009 till I discovered WordPress and later moved 2007 to here.]

Today we went to the Astoria Sunday Market for some holiday shopping.  Our busy work schedule…yes, and assorted garden tours…have kept us away from there for all of this year (as far as I can remember), and we have less than a month left to enjoy it before it ends for the year.

We can always count on finding some good plants at the plant booths, but today our quest was more for presents…some of which were for a faithful reader or two of this blog, so the results are very hush hush.  My eyes were filled by flower vendors’ gorgeous bouquests and as always by the interesting plantings outside the Alley Cat coffee shop.  We used to go in there almost weekly so I could visit their sweet dog, George, but the last three times George has snubbed me by refusing to come down the stairs for petting.  I didn’t feel like getting my feelings hurt today.

the flower booth and the Alley Cat plantings

gleaming array of vegetables and a damp view of the Liberty Theatre

There had been talk of meeting our friend J9 and her out-of-town guest for coffee but that mission was cancelled because of rain. The crowds were but plucky, though, and kept on shopping despite the occasional and unpredictable sudden waterfalls off of overloaded booth tops.

rainy market day

Too damp to even go out to coffee at Astoria Coffee Shop (it was busy and the only spot with seating was a little too outdoorsy for my chilled and drippy condition), we went on to Fred Meyer where I bought more bulbs.  Oh dear, I may now have exceeded my projected budget (slightly over $2000) for clients, as I simply had to have all of the Sparaxis that the bins had to offer.

This is what a garden of two hundred and fifty hydrangeas looks like:

bayside house with hydrangeas

No postscript with cries of woe here means these last two entries uploaded smoothly.

POSTSCRIPT!!  And cry of woe: AGAIN with the crashing while publishing.  Now must “publish all”.  Must I really move this whole venture to blogspot?

[2012 note: I decided to leave in most of the struggles I was having with uploading to iWeb because I know I was not alone.  And because it is why I got discouraged with blogging, after being on such a roll in 2007. My good friend Mary who now writes Yummy Montana had similar trouble with her Yummy Northwest blog on iWeb (mobile me) as did the writers of many sad help forum posts.  Apple did not really fix it, apparently, and in June they are shutting down the old iWeb blogs.]

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