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Posts Tagged ‘Fort Canby’

Tuesday, 5 April 2016

Allan’s day

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tulips at the Ilwaco Library

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foreground, Tulip ‘Flaming Spring Green’

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a tulip at Time Enough Books

Salt Hotel

When I first visited to the Peninsula, the state park by Ilwaco was known as Fort Canby.  It is now called Cape Disappointment State Park; locals just call it Cape D.  Sand Island is the big island offshore.  Even when Allan moved here in 2005, I still slipped up sometimes and called it Fort Canby, as do many “oldtimers”.

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I have seen on a historic map that Ruby Island may be the site of the first garden (of potatoes) in the Pacific Northwest.

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map by Maureen Mulvey

Salty Talk

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A good crowd.  I see Rose who brought me some books a few days ago!

Allan took some photos and some notes.

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Center Battery cannon didn’t aim left to right.

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Look at the darling cottages in the photo below; they were World War II housing for the military.

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Ilwaco is over the hill from here.

 

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on Sand Island: False railroad concealed cannon spotting (not water) tower & barracks

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Stairs (to nowhere) still exist up to radar mounts

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Building on hill up to lighthouse. (old photo shows only half) housed a powerful spotlight

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Coast lights, navigation lights were shut off suddenly after Pearl Harbor. A ship was allowed to ground ashore at night rather than signal it and reveal our capabilities to track vessels.

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Small house-upper right was a Canby house that was moved to Seaview, then later torn down. A similar one is behind Hill’s Towing in Ocean Park.

I was completely fascinated when Allan came home with the news that some of the little WWII houses were salvaged and moved around the Peninsula including….forming the complex now known as The Anchorage Cottages, one of our gardening jobs!  I asked Our Kathleen, who used to stay at the Anchorage before she bought her own beach cottage, if she knew about that.  Of course she did, as she does seem to know everything about the Peninsula, and she directed me to the Anchorage website where the story is told.  The “Max” Wilson, according to Allan, is, or is related to Skip Wilson who owns the Bay Trader and who built the bookshelves in our house.  An excerpt from The Anchorage Cottage’s site:

The nearby military outpost of Fort Canby (now Cape Disappointment) had been recently decommissioned with the end of World War II, and Max’s vision found fodder with the sale of the outpost’s officers’ barracks offered at $15 per building. As the current proprietor of a moving and hauling business, Max had the necessary equipment to individually load the barracks onto trucks and cart them up the beach to their present location, where he ingeniously coaxed these rustic 1930’s accommodations into “modern” 1950’s gems.

One by one, each of ten units came together to create the Anchorage Motor Court, which was fully completed by the early 1950’s, proudly boasting “Frigidaire equipment, Simmons beds, and a view of Long Beach’s most recent shipwreck.”

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Our garden areas are the courtyards within the array of cottages.

Viburnum at Anchorage Cottages

I am ever so pleased to know the history of these darling cottages at The Anchorage.

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Museum director Betsy Millar concludes the lecture.

at home

For dinner, after another day of jello and broth while recovering, I was thrilled to have a delicious and perfectly cooked piece of spring salmon caught by our kind neighbour Jeff Norwood (I assume from his red boat called the Salmonator).

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The fish went down a treat.

Tomorrow: back to work, ready or not!

 

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