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Posts Tagged ‘frog pond’

Friday, 8 February 2019

Note: While on staycation, I mostly take photos with my phone, leading to photos that are a bit softer, unfortunately.)

We still have snow.

Front window view:

The temperature was still so cold that in the back garden, not even in the shade, wheelbarrow ice had not melted.

First, I gave biscuits to my friends next door.

I’d had a brainstorm before rising this morning: plastic window boxes would work well for plants on the pond shelves.

I fretted for awhile on whether green or brown would be hidden better under the water. (I can’t plant these up with marginal plants yet because my plants are still frozen into their pots.)

Our friend Mark, a pond owner, reminded me later that algae will hide either color!

The cold water felt painful on our hands. Nevertheless, Allan redid the driftwood edge on the back of the little pond that has gotten dislodged while making the big pond; he inserted blue broken pottery to hide the liner.

I worked on placing rocks and broken pottery “waves”. Just using the rocks we have makes for a rather jumbled effect which I hope to improve on later.

This time, I added some green broken pottery. A friend’s photos of waves at nearby Cape Disappointment State Park have enlightened me that ocean waves contain a lot of green.

Photo by Donna McKinley

Icy cold rain sent me indoors. Allan decided to go, despite the rain, to a secret driftwood collecting spot; we needed some to hide the liner that is tucked up against the boat at the back of the big pond.

On his quest:

Before he returned, the rain stopped and I went back out for more pond edging.

Allan unloaded his excellent collection of driftwood and went into the pond like Monty Don.

He had found the perfect very thin piece of wood to screw into the boat in order to hide and secure the top of the liner.

The long pieces of driftwood will further hide the liner and make good shade for frogs…but not today because daylight ended.

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Thursday, 7 February 2019

Predicted snow did not arrive and so we were able to continue on with the bigger pond. A small land bridge divides the two ponds for several reasons. It will allow me to get to the boat for boat gardening. It lets us avoid a weird L shaped liner fold. And it isolates problems so a leak would be easier to find and fix.

The back garden still had considerable snow.

I raked all around our new work area to remove packed ice.

Those hoses from yesterday were lightly frozen into the smaller pond. When I tossed little smooth rocks on top (to go to the bottom and hide the liner), they just sat.

Allan’s photo:

The second pond had more little rocks to remove (the results of having been a scree garden). Allan deepened the bottom a bit and we sculpted the edges.

Allan’s photos:

Allan is able to hop in and out of the pond more easily than I could.

We siphoned water out of our faucetless rain barrels, bucketed out of others, used every bucket of water we’d had sitting around and every green jug Allan had filled up last week…

…and we still had to use metered water to fill up the last few inches. I could not wait for more rain to see how it looked full.

While the pond filled, I found some marginal pond plants reseeded into the patio (from the water boxes) and potted them up in plain bagged soil, not potting soil, put little rocks on top, and placed the plants at the back of the small pond.  I had hidden the liner there  with some driftwood

There was a sudden crisis when I realized that we had not used the board and level method of making sure the sides were even. The west edge was deliberately higher, but the land bridge was too low for the pond to fill high enough to cover up my pond planters. Fortunately, I had saved a wheelbarrow of the brown sand for just such an emergency. Much rushing about, squabbling, and swearing (mine) ensued but we averted catastrophe and got the land bridge built up and tamped down so that the pond could fill by dark.

I even had time to add just a few rocks.

Snow is again predicted for tomorrow. I hope to have time to work on hiding the liner. We ended up with enough leftover liner and underlayment to make me question our measuring skills. If the extra liner does not have enough of a wide part to make another mini pond or stream, I can use it to make a bog garden. Allan measured it and put it tidily into boxes.

Frosty (age 14) had wanted nothing to do with this icy and challenging project.

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6 Feb: ponding

Wednesday, 6 February 2019

The pond materials arrived from The Pond Guy a day early.

Allan’s photo

We were determined to get the small pond done.

Snow had melted in Allan’s garden on the east side of the house.

Some plants have been laid flat.

Between the house and shed, snow still lingered, blanketing some of my plant sale plants. Even the plants without the protective white blanket appear to have survived the cold, down to 26 F at night.

I’d feel more secure if I had been able to fit all of them into the greenhouse.

I recently learned from Gardeners’ World that I could have put winter dormant plants under the greenhouse shelving. Too late for this year. Next year, that will make more room.

Snow still lay firmly over the back garden, despite sunshine.

I was pleased to find that my special Dan Hinkley plant that I bought at last summer’s Hardy Plant Weekend, now in a pot too heavy to move, seems ok with the cold. I had asked him what plant I should buy that would make other gardeners envy me and he said this one. (I should look up the name. The pond is distracting me.)

Also on the patio

I eagerly went to the little pond, only to find that the ground was frozen solid so that the edge could not be sculpted. Happily, after an hour indoors, the temperature warmed enough so that we were able to carve out the plant shelf edge in a different spot (the thawed side!) than I had planned. The frozen side will be the gentle slope that frogs (and I hope not raccoons) are said to like.

I almost forgot to be like Monty Don and use a board and level.

It was perfect.

I raked the snow from around the pond to avoid working on a mat of ice.

Allan was glad to have the Nora House driveway for laying out the underlayment and liner. Later, I saw a hint on Gardeners’ World: Monty said to lay out the liner in the sun for an hour to warm up. I don’t think that would have helped today. He uses a butyl liner. Our is heavy but not that heavy. (I think we could have bought butyl liner from Firestone…but Pond Guy has a good reputation so we went with his, which is, by the way, heavier and cheaper than Home Depot’s liners).

I was glad the underlayment is dark, not white.

Skooter helped (Allan’s photo)

We were able to run hoses from two faceted water barrels to fill it up.

After helping

I wanted to put rocks all around…but the temperature had dropped so much and dusk was fast approaching.

That’s as far as we got today.

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Saturday, 18 July 2015

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for the Water Music Festival and music programs in local schools.

ticket tour map

ticket tour map

Garden 6: Rita and Ken’s Garden

The landscaping on Rita and Ken’s property, located on a ridge between Nahcotta and Oysterville, surrounds a lodge-like home.  The front gardens and meditation alcove and upper pond are connected by a cascading stream to a lower pond, home to fish and frogs. The courtyard, deck and gazebo overlooking  Willapa Bay will invite you to sit, relax and enjoy the beauty and peacefulness of the view.  

We parked in a field by the road and walked up the long driveway.

We parked in a field by the road and walked up the long driveway.  (Allan’s photo)

driveway circle garden

driveway circle garden

welcome

driveway circle garden

driveway circle garden (Allan’s photo)

island

bark

Allan’s photo

circle

storage shed and potting shed

storage shed and potting shed

the back of the driveway bed, looking west (photo by Kathleen Shaw)

the back of the driveway bed, looking west (photo by Kathleen Shaw)

Shed, photo by Kathleen Shaw, with one of the original signs for Clarke Nursery.

Shed, photo by Kathleen Shaw, with one of the original signs for Clarke Nursery.

Clarke Nursery may sound familiar to regular readers; it was on the properties now owned by Ron Barclay and Steve and John.  All longtime gardeners on the Peninsula have fond memories of it.

potting shed, photo by Kathleen Shaw

potting shed, photo by Kathleen Shaw

turning south, walking toward the front (west side) of the house.

turning south, walking toward the front (west side) of the house.

I digress to take a path going west into the woods.

I digress to take a path going west into the woods.

The woodland paths have been extended and refined by local gardener Sara Zaga.

The woodland paths have been extended and refined by local gardener Sara Zaga.

path3

I turned back here, lacking time and a walking stick for balance.  The destination of the enticing paths must remain a mystery.

I turned back here, lacking time and a walking stick for balance. The destination of the enticing paths must remain a mystery.

looking east toward the potting shed from the woods

looking east toward the potting shed from the woods

tour guests in the front garden; to their right is the newly created meditation alcove.

tour guests in the front garden; to their right is the newly created meditation alcove.

meditation alcove

meditation alcove

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

front garden with Acanthus mollis

front garden with Acanthus mollis

front garden and house

front garden and house (Allan’s photo)

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

Rita and Ken built this wall.  The white signs said which year each area had been created.

Rita and Ken built this wall. The white signs said which year each area had been created.

west side of house. from below the rock wall in previous photo

west side of house. from below the rock wall in previous photo

Rita plants up all her own containers and baskets with plants from the Basket Case Greenhouse.

Rita plants up all her own containers and baskets with plants from the Basket Case Greenhouse.

upper pond at south end of the lawn

upper pond at south end of the lawn, the start of one of my favourite water features ever

upper pond

upper pond (Allan’s photo)

bench and garden mirror that reflects leaves and sky

by the upper pond: bench and garden mirror that reflects leaves and sky

fire pit seating on south side of house

fire pit seating on south side of house

stream emerging from upper pond

stream emerging from upper pond: Rita and Ken built this water feature.

This recirculating stream is my favourite thing here; I would love to have this in my garden (but my present garden is too flat for it to seem real).

This recirculating stream is my favourite thing here; I would love to have this in my garden (but my present garden is too flat for it to seem real).

coming around the corner of the house

coming around the SE corner of the house

looking down at the lower pond, into which the stream falls.

looking down at the lower pond, into which the stream falls.

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

the deck

the deck

Acustica World Music, from Astoria, was playing from the gazebo.

Acústica World Music, from Astoria, was playing from the gazebo.

nook

photo by Kathleen Shaw

Acústica World Music

Acústica World Music; They probably liked it up there in their own world.

Acústica 2

Rainyside’s Debbie Teashon made this video featuring a song by Acustica while she was at Rita’s garden (at a different time of tour day from us).

I had the problem of not being able to get down to the deck because of stairs with no railings.  However, because Allan and I had weeded here one summer years ago (before we started cutting back on private garden jobs), I knew another way down.

alternate route: across the lawn and around the north end of the deck.

alternate route: across the lawn and around the north end of the deck.

and next to this little patio...

and next to this little patio…

bench3

...there is a path around to the deck level.

…there is a path around to the deck level.

north side of house, below the potting shed

north side of house, below the potting shed

north side of house, photo by Kathleen Shaw

north side of house, photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Bob Duke well shows my path around to the deck level.

photo by Bob Duke well shows my path around to the deck level.

the deck, pretour photo by Bob Duke

the deck, pretour photo by Bob Duke

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Bob Duke

our friend Shelly of Flowering Hedge Designs helped with the flower planting by the deck and patio.  Photo by Shelly Hedges.

our friend Shelly of Flowering Hedge Design helped with the flower planting by the deck and patio. Photo by Shelly Hedges.

dahlias, photo by Shelly Hedges

dahlias, photo by Shelly Hedges

the deck

the deck

view from the deck

view from the deck

I saw Our Kathleen sitting by the pond and joined her.

I saw Our Kathleen sitting by the pond and joined her.

pond

I especially like the way the deck is right over one side of the pond.

pond2

one of the nicest little garden ponds around; imagine the splashing of the waterfall.

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw; we were told that Rita had made the mosaic sign.

the frog in question (spotted by Kathleen)

the frog in question (spotted by Kathleen)

lower pond wall, photo by Kathleen Shaw

lower pond wall, photo by Kathleen Shaw

hydrangeas, photo by Kathleen Shaw

hydrangeas, photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Shelly Hedges

photo by Shelly Hedges

mosaic bench by Renee O'Connor, photo by Kathleen Shaw

mosaic bench by Renee O’Connor, photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

the stairs from lawn path to deck patio

the stairs from lawn path to deck patio

Railing-less stairs flummox me with dizziness and uncoordination.  I think there were refreshments up on the upper deck, but for me, they might as well have been up a rickety ladder.    (Our Kathleen said that as soon as she saw the stairs, she knew I would have a problem.)

pretty but impassible to me without a railing

pretty but impassible to me without a railing

I was reminded of that garden in Portland where I sent Allan up the railingless steps to take photos of cool collectible plants on the deck.  This time, I could not find him to see if I could get him to bring me some water or food. We had no phone signal, but fortunately I found him eventually when he came down to the deck level.  By then, we had to move on to see the last two gardens (and one non-garden).  Because I was feeling flustered and frustrated, I am sorry to say that I did not take as many photos of the flowers as I otherwise would have.  This garden was a favourite of many people, so I feel I “let down the side”.  Being unable to preview the garden for “sneak peek” photos also means I have fewer photos to work with here.

steps to house deck, lined with flowers on both sides

steps

I’ve fallen down almost every set of steps everywhere I’ve lived, so accessibility in a garden is something that I think about.

Allan's photo when he finally found us.

Allan’s photo when he finally found us.

Kathleen was heading out in reverse order from us, so we would not see her again until our post-tour dinner at The Depot.  Her camera battery had died; I lent her the camera known as Spot so that she could keep taking photos.  Garden Tour Nancy had just arrived, but I was on a quest for a drink of water and toddled back down to the parking field as fast as I could.

Next two posts: one of my favourite gardening situations, two gardening neighbours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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