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Posts Tagged ‘Fuchsia magellanica ‘Hawkshead’’

Wednesday, 29 August 2018

Depot Restaurant

weeding, deadheading, watering…

Fuchsia magellanica ‘Hawkshead’

Solidago ‘Fireworks’ and Persicaria ‘Firetail’

Last week, I was finally able to cut down all the twiggy stems on the escallonia.

It has more or less died out in the middle.

Long Beach

We did a quick weeding of horsetail in Fifth Street Park.  With the days getting shorter, we no longer have time to fit a project into the middle of a Long Beach-Shelburne-Ilwaco watering day.

Skookum Surf was returning from the beach….

to their new shop in First Place Mall.

The Red Barn

We did not have to water.  Amy said, “If those plants are telling you they are thirsty, they are lying.”  (The plants had told us that they were quite satisfied.)  So only some light deadheading and weeding was necessary.

our tiny Red Barn garden

crab pots and thistles by the Red Barn

Cosmo the barn cat (Allan’s photo)

I want to take Cosmo home. Maybe he wants to come home with us.

Allan’s photo

Diane’s garden

Diane herself doing some deadheading by the road.

By the way, Diane is a champion barrel racer. I found this photo (not by us) from four years ago.

Diane and Bunny

I told Diane today how impressed I am with her skills.

We had a good talk about the various plants in the raised box garden.

I had my new version of lunch: a deconstructed cheese, pickle, and onion sandwich, because I don’t especially like bready sandwiches.

deconstructed sandwich

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We did the usual hour long tidy. Deer had got into the garden again.

leaves stripped off the roses

birdbath view

Strobilanthus atropurpurea

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

looking in the east gate

Perovskia (Russian sage)

in the fenced garden

Helenium

Timmie (Timothea)

Mary and I are starting to talk about labeling a lot of plants by the end of the year for the new owners, and about which plants Mary will want to take starts of to their new home.

We were finishing work early today so that we could tour a friend’s garden near KBC.

Gail’s garden

Going down a road we had never been down before, and jogging over to another road, we found a woodland garden tucked away at the end of a long gravel driveway.  Gail has lived here for a couple of year.  Local gardeners Mark and Joe have helped her to create a garden in a woodland frequented by deer, raccoons, and bears.

The property abounds in old rhododendrons because the previous owners used to work at Clarke Nursery, the local specialists in rhododendrons, which was located where Steve and John’s Bayside garden is now.  Steve Clarke’s family nursery had a big influence here on the peninsula and you will find their plants in many gardens (including mine).

We were greeted by Gail and Bob the Dog.

Bob the Dog

lots of big old rhododendrons

Allan’s photo

a late lily and a rhodie with huge leaves

a “fairy garden” around an old stump

Bob the Dog on the back porch

The east edge of the property is marshland, with Spirea douglasii on an island in the middle.

The spirea is a haze of pink spires earlier in the year.

The raccoons and bears go in under the tree to the right, above, and cross over to the solid ground island.

farther along the edge of the marsh

I felt a little presence at my feet, and looked down to see Collar.  That was my clue that Mark and Joe had arrived to join our tour.

Joe and Collar. Let me see your ears!

Let me see your ears, Collar!

There we go!

a sit spot

Jack the Cat appeared.

a plush and friendly cat

Green Man on a tree

More sun along the entry drive allowed room for a flower garden on either side.

Gail took us back into the shade to see the last few blooms on the Crinodendron hookerianum (Chilean lantern tree).  Clarke Nursery used to sell this little tree; I do not see it often.

Gail sent me some photos later of the garden in springtime.

three rhodies by the woodshed (Gail’s photo)

a support built for the start of a new “Princess Rose”; it has covered the poles now. (Gail’s photo)

Crinodendron hookerianum (Gail’s photo) Best one I have ever seen.

Chilean Lantern Tree (Gail’s photo)

She also sent a photo of the bashful resident we did not get to meet:

“My assistants” (Gail’s photo) Freya the Beautiful and Jack the Cat

Gail says, “Bob the Dog, who is 14 ½, and Jack the Cat, 10?, both rescued me several years apart and were very happy with their original “guys at the pub” names so we kept them. Freya (formerly Rumbly!) was renamed by me to give her confidence and ranking.”

We departed after a good hour in this hidden woodsy paradise.  I love discovering a special garden like this down a secret road.

On the longish drive home, we decided to have a dinner work reward at the

 42nd Street Café.

We had a gift certificate from Allan’s January birthday from our friends Susie and Bill of the Boreas Inn.

42nd Street Café

Dinner there always begins with their good bread with corn relish or marionberry preserves.

brussels sprouts appetizers

delicious carne asada style steak

Butternut squash ravioli

My favourite dessert on the peninsula is their tiny chocolate mint sorbet served with a tiny spoon.

Allan had the tiramisu, which came as a cake, not layered in a glass.

better this way, I decided.

a new mural painted by Susan Spence

Why, I thought, don’t we eat here more often?  I tend to frequent restaurants associated with gardening jobs. The ambience here is friendly and cozy and the food is so tasty that I felt especially happy throughout the meal.

sunset over the trees in Seaview on our way home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 16 September 2014

My work behavior, or lack of it, is shocking these days. Just took three days off, and we are going to cram the work into just two days now so that I can go to the Sylvia Beach Hotel with old friend Carol from Thursday through Sunday. I am hoping we get enough done so that all Allan will have to do for work during that time is water Ilwaco (and maybe Larry’s garden if we have dry weather).

Long Beach

After the hot, dry weather, we definitely had to water the Long Beach trees and planters. Some showers are predicted for Wednesday and Thursday. Getting the soil moist now will help the rain water to soak in; otherwise, just showers would not penetrate the soil.

Allan wished to promote this decal that he saw on a car; the owners were happy to see him photographing it.

Allan wished to promote this decal that he saw on a car; the owners were happy to see him photographing it.

Wouldn’t it be ironic if this inspired me to really pursue adopting a greyhound? (Because Allan does not want a dog.) I have heard that some greyhounds chase cats, and that would not do in our house.

All the retired greyhound friends that I’ve had have been wonderful dogs indeed.

Allan's photo:  This planter was complimented as a unique one and a visitor wanted to know what was the plant mix and where to get them.

Allan’s photo: This planter was complimented as a unique one and a visitor wanted to know what was the plant mix and where to get them.

This is the same planter I was fretting over last week as being full of creeping red clover.

Allan's photo:  Trying to reduce the fall die back under a dry tree.

Allan’s photo: Trying to reduce the fall die back under a dry tree.

The tree south of the stoplight on the west side has no working water system so unless Allan hauls a bucket to it from the next planter down, it stays dry.

Allan's photo:  The next thing for your car, the tail wags with the wiper!

Allan’s photo: The next thing for your car, the tail wags with the wiper!

Allan's photo:  Long Beach was blessed as a field trip destination.

Allan’s photo: Long Beach was blessed as a field trip destination.

Allan's photo:  a very dry hanging basket before it got watered by city crew with 75 foot hose.

Allan’s photo: a very dry hanging basket before it got watered by city crew with 75 foot hose.

Some of the baskets looked so stressed I thought they might have been missed on the weekend watering, or maybe it was just from the 85 degree weather. This and the other one by the Fifth Street Park restroom are just about at the end, while the four at the gazebo and police station still look excellent.

Allan's photo: city crew member watering a hanging basket

Allan’s photo: city crew member watering a hanging basket

Allan's watering life would be easier if his water trailer was set up like this.  Unfortunately, to water Ilwaco he needs 100 feet of hose (two 50 footers joined together).

Allan’s watering life would be easier if his water trailer was set up like this. Unfortunately, to water Ilwaco he needs 100 feet of hose (two 50 footers joined together).

Fifth Street Park...loving the striped cannas although only two out of three bloomed.

SW quadrant of Fifth Street Park…loving the striped cannas although only two out of three bloomed. Next year: fertilizer so they get bigger. This is a damp corner, which they should like.

across the street kitty corner in the NE quadrant of Fifth Street Park:  Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' steals the show.

across the street kitty corner in the NE quadrant of Fifth Street Park: Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ steals the show.

moldy old Dorothy Perkins rose

moldy old Dorothy Perkins rose

I would love to dig out that Dorothy Perkins rose, always whiteish with powdery mildew, from the NW quadrant to the park. That would undo the match with the healthy and beautiful Super Dorothy on the other side the of the street. Even so, I think plain old Dorothy has to go. It is irksome to have to constantly clip her back from the driveway, which she would love to engulf.

The city has replaced the bench that disappeared during Rod Run last weekend.

The city has replaced the bench that disappeared during Rod Run last weekend.

This was our original planter, one of four, back in volunteer days. In fact, my four planters caught the eye of the city administrator back then (Nabiel Shawa) and that led to my getting the city flower-care job eventually.

the planter by the credit union...still excellent with dahlias and California poppies

the planter by the credit union…still excellent with dahlias and California poppies and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

Andersen’s RV Park

The park was still almost full of RVers.

The park was still almost full of RVers.

Clamming season will soon begin and bring even more park guests.

Clamming season will soon begin and bring even more park guests.

The Bad Aster is putting on a good show.  As soon as it is done, I will pull as much as possible so it does not take over the whole park.

The Bad Aster is putting on a good show. As soon as it is done, I will pull as much as possible so it does not take over the whole park.

the picket fence garden looking autumnal

the picket fence garden looking autumnal

I'm currently reading a delightful and amusing book about 'trailerites'; I highly recommend it.

I’m currently reading a delightful and amusing book about ‘trailerites’; I highly recommend it.

Anchorage Cottages

I was delighted to see a good review of The Anchorage on Trip Advisor with raves about the garden. I snagged the photos from the Trip Advisor app on my phone. As you can see, I have been setting my blog to publish in the early morning, but it gets written in the late evening. At least, I think these are taken by a guest, because photos from the management say “Anchorage Management” on them. Anyway, whoever took them, I like seeing the gardens (even undeadheaded cosmos) through someone else’s eyes.

photo 1

photo 3

photo 2

photo 4

photo 5

Today at the Anchorage:

Fuchsia 'Golden Gate' (I think)

Fuchsia ‘Golden Gate’ (I think)

Fuchsia magellanica 'Hawkshead'

Fuchsia magellanica ‘Hawkshead’

Persicaria 'Dimity' still looking good in its decline.

Persicaria ‘Dimity’ still looking good in its decline.

center courtyard

center courtyard with painted sage

arbutus in bloom

arbutus in bloom

cosmos and Fuchsia magellanica; windowboxes are mismatched now as one Calibrachoa died.

cosmos and Fuchsia magellanica; windowboxes are mismatched now as Calibrachoa died on the lefthand one.

Anchorage office

Anchorage office

home

At home in the evening, I did some hose watering and especially admired two plants.

Mahonia gracilipes, for which I once paid $45 from the Heronswood catalog even though I was rather poor.  Note the white back to the leaves.

Mahonia gracilipes, for which I once paid $45 from the Dan Hinkley Heronswood catalog even though I was rather poor. Note the white back to the leaves.

I had seen a photo of the gleaming white leaf undersides in a photo during a Dan Hinkley lecture and could not resist. As a young plant, the under-leaves were not white; that developed later.

I've had it for years and it is blooming for the first time.  (It was set back from being transplanted from our old house.)

I’ve had it for years and it is blooming and berrying for the first time. (It was set back from being transplanted from our old house.)

And I noticed some pink berries on a special snowberry that I bought...somewhere.  Maybe Back Alley Gardens when Pam Fleming was there.

And I noticed some pink berries on a special snowberry that I bought…somewhere. Maybe Back Alley Gardens when Pam Fleming was there.

Allan made the second tasty dinner with Nancy’s and Phil’s gift of salmon.

with our seemingly endless supply of cherry tomatoes

with our seemingly endless supply of cherry tomatoes

This post is set to publish on 9-27 (as I fell way behind again with cottage tour posts) so:

Happy Birthday, Kathleen!

Garden theme birthday cake with white picket fence and ladyug and bee

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Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Almost always my workday in other people’s gardens begins with some thoughts about our own.  Today, the view from the kitchen sink window…

sink view

sink view

…inspired me to get a photo of a beautifully silvery corner of Allan’s ferny shade garden.

fern collection edged with ajuga

fern collection edged with ajuga

During a brief stop at Olde Towne to switch compost buckets, I added some Alliums to a dried bouquet I had started there earlier in the week.  It seemed to me that the Alliums that blow down in the boatyard garden will get a bigger audience in a vase on the Olde Towne counter.

at Olde Towne Café

at Olde Towne Café

We did not linger because we needed to start at our furthest north garden, Marilyn’s.

Marilyn's garden, the usual view

Marilyn’s garden, the usual view

Eventually I hope to do a reprise post of how this view changed over the year.

Next, the Wiegardt Gallery:

Wiegardt Gallery garden

Wiegardt Gallery garden

Japanese anemone, north side Wiegardt garden

Japanese anemone, north side Wiegardt garden

I would not let loose the Japanese anemone in a flower border but it seems to behave all right back here in the shade among the ferns.

Then came the weekly deadheading at the increasingly drought tolerant Oman Builders Supply garden in Ocean Park.  Today was not a day with extra time to stop for a snack at Jack’s Country Store.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' and some late poppies at OBS

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ and some late poppies at OBS

At Klipsan Beach Cottages we try to spend at least an hour a week grooming the garden.

KBC, looking into the fenced garden

KBC, looking into the fenced garden

some annual colour that Mary added by the pond

some annual colour that Mary added by the pond

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

Look how tall that Eucryphia is!

Look how tall that Eucryphia is!

I needed to talk with Mary about something so went up to the cottage she was cleaning.  The place was unusually empty at mid week and the ocean view decks looked so peaceful.

west facing cottage decks at KBC

west facing cottage decks at KBC

At our next stop, Andersen’s, we weeded the box by the road because car-watchers would for sure be sitting out there during Rod Run, a classic car event that would take over the Peninsula on the upcoming weekend.  The cars cruise all around the Peninsula and car lovers sit and watch.

Pacific Highway and 138th

Pacific Highway and 138th, with staffer Al in the background mowing by the road

My energy was low and I helped myself along with a handful of wake up beans (coffee beans covered in dark chocolate).

The Andersen's poppy field is pretty much poppyless now.

The Andersen’s poppy field is pretty much poppyless now.

At Andersen’s, two great big car-hauling trailers were already parked in which guests had transported  their rods.  (“Trailer Queens”, these cars are called, the ones that are not driven in.)  And a couple of rods rumbled into the park.  (These are classic American cars made prior to a certain year, sometimes souped up for more speed.   I personally prefer a nice British or Italian car but never mind.)

We got back down to Ilwaco and to our weeding at the boatyard.   It’s a long strip and to finish it in time for Slow Drag at the Port, we had to fit it in around other jobs.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

The least attractive part of the garden is a section that the port crew did not entirely clear so I reclaimed it by adding some soil and doing some weeding…oh, a couple of years ago.  It never got a fresh new set of cool plants so once the poppies are done has very little structure.

before and after

before and after…adding good plants will be another improvement project for fall

We worked till dusk again…but remember, we don’t start early in the morning.

sky over the boatyard

sky over the boatyard (with Stipa gigantea)

looking north past the oil tanks

looking north past the oil tanks

and south over Jessie's

and south over Jessie’s

Thursday, September 6, 2013

Morning home garden thought:  I love the big puddle that forms in the Lake Street depression outside our driveway when it rains.  Allan always hopes the city will fill it in.  (I’ve told him to just ask them to, and I think they will.)  But I like the way it gives me a raindrop weather report and its reflective quality for photos of the house!

raindrops in our puddle

raindrops in our puddle from our front window

Thursday:  the big push to make the Port of Ilwaco gardens perfect for the Slow Drag.  By Friday morning we figured (correctly) that flagged ropes would be run down the side of Howerton Street making garden access difficult for weeding.

The Phormiums and the pampas grass that I so wanted to get the port crew to remove from the street garden by Marie Powell’s Gallery looked…okay today.  I might lose my incentive to get this done and be stuck with them for another year!

Looking east from Powell Gallery

Looking east from Powell Gallery

The spot by the Ilwaco pavilion (restrooms) that we decided to take on before Blues and Seafood showed the effect of having had dandelions gone to seed there for years…  I forgot the after photo so took one on Slow Drag evening (the next day)

before and a belated after

before and a belated after

As soon as the weather is reliably moist, I’ll put some starts of small grasses and santolina in here.  Oh, maybe that gorgeous reddish unidentified grass (might by pink muhly grass) from my garden! What’s in there now is Pacific Reed Grass which I find a bit dull (though native and all).

At the west end of the port we just had to do a small amount of weeding at the garden by Queen La De Da’s.

down by Queen La De Da's

down by Queen La De Da’s

There was a restaurant sign that kept falling down at this end so there is nothing planted there.  It’s fixed now (bolted to a post) so I could fill this area in.

an Agastache 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink' still blooming

an Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ still blooming

Even though the poppies are gone, there is still enough going on here to make it interesting.  (And the big test?  During Slow Drag, this garden did not get walked on (much) even though it was by the starting line of the race…so it looked enough like a garden to keep people off… More on this during the Slow Drag blog entry!)

At the Time Enough Books garden, I cut back the Ceanothus that was overhanging the street in order to make plenty of room for pedestrians.

It was out as far as where the sidewalk is damp.

It was out as far as where the sidewalk is damp.

This did NOT look enough like a garden, apparently, because during Slow Drag some people put their chairs right in it!  (Yes, there will be a photo of that!)

With the Port gardens put to rights we headed north, first deadheading the cosmos at the Depot Restaurant.

The Depot, same old view!

The Depot, same old view!

and more admiration for Solidago 'Fireworks'

and more admiration for Solidago ‘Fireworks’

When we drove through downtown Long Beach, we could tell Rod Run was imminent.

long beach

North of town we weeded and deadheaded at the Anchorage and I did a limbing up of Viburnum by cottage 6.  Here is the “before” from last week:

What was I thinking?

two weeks ago

And the after.  I think the two long curvy branches on the sides of the one to the right should go, but Allan disagreed.

after

after

I also have a problem with the squatty short trunk on the left side.  It has to be low to let the number of the cottage show….But if I cut it to the ground, the left hand shrub will look lopsided.  What do you think?

nearby, a favourite of mine:  Fuchsia 'Hawkhead'

nearby, a favourite of mine: Fuchsia ‘Hawkhead’

The pots were windblown.  I hope they have a certain weather-sculpted charm.

Picotee petunia with a chunk missing

Picotee petunia with a chunk missing

While I was deadheading sweet peas in the office patio I heard a deep rumbling.  Sure enough, a guest with a hot rod had arrived.

at The Anchorage

at The Anchorage

As I put my tools in our van, Allan chatted with the owner about…cars.

car talk

car talk

Thanks to a good rain, the Long Beach planters did not need watering but we did check most of them for deadheading.  The Rod Run audience was already setting up chairs in the street to see the cars come in.   The most avid fans start their vigil on Thursday and watch cars till they drive away on Sunday or Monday.

car watchers

car watchers

I appreciate the ones who bring chairs.  I can guarantee there will be much planter sitting over the weekend.

At least the hanging baskets will be unscathed...I hope.

At least the hanging baskets will be unscathed…I hope.

Oh dear, how will the city crew get through the throngs of people to water the baskets?  Probably at 7 AM!

We went back just north of downtown to the Boreas.  I do like to do jobs in order from north to south or vice versa but earlier our friend Ed Strange had been parked in “our” spot while mowing the lawn!

after deadheading at the Boreas

after deadheading at the Boreas

As we drove south through Long Beach again, I saw that the planter sitting had begun.  There were two men parked on this one, but one of them is behind the two women.

planter sitters

planter sitters

A nice Veronica is under that one man’s butt  (That’s a flowering plant, not a person!).  This does not bother me as much as you might think.  Over the years, I have gotten inured to what Rod Run audiences do to the planters.  I just observe in amazement, really.

They may not know that, at least at one time, there was a fine for sitting on the planters (except for the benches, of course, which are on the sidewalk side).  Or so I was told by then city administrator Nabiel Shawa, who may have been just humouring me.  And if it existed, it was never enforced.  (Long Beach town could get rich on that fine during Rod Run weekend.)

We finished the day doing more weeding at the boatyard garden.  Lots of people would be driving and walking by there the next evening for the Slow Drag at the Port.

a beautiful reseeded four o clock at the boatyard

a beautiful reseeded four o clock at the boatyard

Gallardia continues to dazzle.

Gallardia continues to dazzle.

I adore Oregano 'Hopley's Purple'

I adore Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’

Cosmos, Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies', Artemisia 'Powis Castle'

Cosmos, Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’, Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’

For some reason I have thought the white Gaura looks great in a garden but the pink Gaura only looks good in containers.  This pink one might make me change my mind.

I think it's 'Passionate Rainbow'.

I think it’s ‘Passionate Rainbow’.

Rain threatened after forecasts of thunder and lightning.   The Kaisha Lanae had her lights on out in the water.

a dark evening

a dark evening

The rain held off long enough so that we had time to weed the garden at the very east end of Howerton…one that has not had any supplemental water for a couple of months.

Howerton and Elizabeth, looking west

Howerton and Elizabeth, looking west

Stipa tenuissima in the wind

Stipa tenuissima in the wind

What a good sense of accomplishment.   We had gotten all the port gardens done and finally freed up a day to for weeding Ann’s garden.  With Rod Run traffic, a Friday job just  a few blocks from home would be perfect.

Friday, September 6, 2013:  before Slow Drag

At home garden thought:  Can anyone tell me what this cool plant is in my front garden?  It’s right by when I get into our vehicle in the morning.

probably from a Hardy Pant Study Weekend plant sale!

probably from a Hardy Pant Study Weekend plant sale!

I had been quite pleased with the accomplishment of getting all the Port gardens done, till I realized I had forgotten the one on the south side of the Port Office.

Allan weeding at the port office

Allan weeding at the port office

The morning was one of those still ones with the water like a mirror.

rumrunner

After that, we got back to Ann’s at last,  We had left last time to go to the Pacific County Fair, thinking we would be back the following week, and then got rained out.   In bad weather it is all we can do to get our city and resort gardens done.

The neighbour cat came over and said hello while I was weeding.

a pretty and friendly cat with a big fluffy tail

a pretty and friendly cat with a big fluffy tail

S/he may or may not have been welcome in Ann’s garden but got quite comfy on the back porch.

right at home

right at home

Allan was working on the side of the house so the wheelbarrow was far from me.  I carried my bucket down to the dump area at the bottom of the sloping lot.

admiring some 'Bright Lights' chard on the way

admiring some ‘Bright Lights’ chard on the way

And got a different view from the house.  It reminds me of a farm in the city.

at the bottom of the hill below the fenced veg and berry gardens

at the bottom of the hill below the fenced veg and berry gardens

I divided up some golden marjoram and spread it around the flower garden.  This might add some cohesiveness.

imagine a nice repeating gold along the edge

imagine a nice repeating gold along the edge

I put in a start of shasta daisy, some toadflax, some Phygelius.  (The deer might nibble the latter but they let it bloom at Marilyn’s garden.)   Now I know it also needs some Solidago ‘Fireworks’.

some new garden art by a friend of Ann's

some new garden art by a friend of Ann’s

I’m pleased to report that we got around the entire garden and were able to leave by a quarter to four to go to Slow Drag.  Last year we had also chosen Ann’s as the best place to work on Rod Run Friday and had gotten so absorbed in weeding (it was a new job then and we had a lot to do there) that we missed the first hour of the drag and some of the best photo opportunities of cars going round and round and round and round.

Walking down to the Port I paused to contemplate the pruning going on, quite visible from the street, in the “lost garden” that I think I will soon have to call the formerly lost garden.

oh dear...

oh dear…

The Hawaiian shaved ice booth was just arriving….

cone

Next, some Slow Drag photos.  It sort of relates to gardening because, well, our gardens are there.

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