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Posts Tagged ‘Full Circle Café’

Sunday, 1 February 2015

I was thrilled to begin A Fig at the Gate.

figatgate

There will probably be considerable blogging about Kate Llewellyn’s books after I have read them all.

Kate writes to her readers, and I agree:  “Do you know I talk to you while I garden? I ask myself if you would be interested in this small thing. ….I keep wondering if you would like to know of this or that.

Tuesday, 2 February 2015

Almost all days of the last week of staycation were reading days, due to a series of glorious bouts of rain.

I did venture out for a moment, just to get a photo of this or that that you might be interested in.

rainy iris reticulata by the front gate

rainy iris reticulata by the front gate

The stunning little Iris 'Katharine Hodgekin', my favourite of all the little ones I've seen.

The stunning little Iris ‘Katharine Hodgekin’, my favourite of all the little ones I’ve seen.

Azara microphylla variegata

Azara microphylla variegata

Allan made his daily excursion to get the mail and did a small bit of gardening work while he was out.

Allan's photo: debris in the Ilwaco planters

Allan’s photos: debris in the Ilwaco planters

narcissi at the boatyard

narcissi in a planter by  the boatyard

a window on First Avenue

a window on First Avenue

crab pots at the west end of the meander line

crab pots at the west end of the meander line

just down the street....an Ilwaco resident enjoys a brief break from rain

just down the street….an Ilwaco resident enjoys a brief break from rain

The rain stopped as I read Kate’s book, and I felt mildly guilty.  The knowledge that staycation was almost over kept me reading.

My view, with guilt: Smokey also contemplates whether or not to go outside.

My view, with guilt: Smokey also contemplates whether or not to go outside.

He agrees that a day of reading is preferable to an obligatory day of gardening.

He agrees that a day of reading is preferable to an obligatory day of gardening.

As night falls, I start a new book.

As night falls, I start a new book.

Tuesday, 3 February 2015

My Kate Llewellyn days continued.

Angels and Dark Madonnas

Angels and Dark Madonnas

The nagging guilt about not working in the garden plagued me slightly.  I kept the front door to open to be slightly in touch with the outside air.

IMG_4981

In my youth, I never did have a problem staying indoors to read on a nice day.  Fortunately I had accomplished a great deal in the garden during January so there were no pressing tasks to increase my guilt.  I could not tear myself away from Kate Llewellyn’s writing.  The travel book about India and Italy went quickly.  Next: travels in New Zealand and the Cook Islands.

liliesfeathers

Much more on Kate’s books later, I do hope.  I still have two more to read, which have not yet arrived from Australia.  Because of the deliciousness of staycation, I could read each night till three AM if I so desired (and I often did).

Wednesday, 4 February 2015

I got pried out of the house by a lunch date with Debbie.

Rudder from next door saw us off.

rudder

We went all the way to Ocean Park for a tasty meal at the Full Circle Café.  The drive seemed short as we had much to talk about.

my salad with cranberries and oranges

my salad with cranberries and oranges

and toasted cheese sandwich for Debbie

and toasted cheese sandwich for Debbie

in the Full Circle Café

in the Full Circle Café

Creme brulee for dessert.  I had heard tell of how good this dessert is, and it lived up to its reputation.

Creme brulee for dessert. I had heard tell of how good this dessert is, and it lived up to its reputation.

Because of my love for the Seaside Knitters mystery series (even though neither of us knit), we briefly browsed the Tapestry Rose yarn shop that adjoins the café.

soft to the touch

soft to the touch

and pleasing to the eye

and pleasing to the eye

Back at home, Debbie collected the various plant starts that I had been saving for her.  These will go into the Clatsop County Master Gardeners spring sale: some curly teucrium, lots of Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’, and Carex ‘Ice Dancer’.

a good haul

a good haul

We were still nattering away until the moment she drove off, and could have filled up another hour with conversation easily.

After lunch, it took a long afternoon and evening stint at the computer to do my blog posts about Susan Wittig Albert and other January reading.

Thursday, 5 February 2015

The weather could not have been kinder as a five day rain and sometimes wind storm descended upon the coast.  I was able to finish out staycation almost entirely with my nose in a book.  A friend, expected from Seattle, delayed her visit because of the severity of the storm, and I think I will be better company when she visits after staycation is over.  I find reclusivity hard to break, and for the last six weeks I have broken it almost only to go to events at the Sou’wester.

view from north window: well weeded front garden - no guilt

view from north window: well weeded front garden – no guilt

view from south window: perfect reading weather

view from south window: perfect reading weather

I finished Lilies, Feathers and Frangipani and read one and a half other books, Stirring the Mud and the beginning of Entering the Stone by Barbara Hurd.  More on these in my next post.

Friday, 6 February 2015

Before finishing Entering the Stone, I took a garden walk to show you how much rain had accumulated by day two of the storm.

telephoto from south window

telephoto from south window

hellebores in Allan's garden

hellebores in Allan’s garden

We are both annoyed at how this particular hellebore fell open in bloom.

We are both annoyed at how this particular hellebore fell open in bloom.

primula

primula

walking back to the bogsy woods

walking back to the bogsy woods

watery lawn around the firepit

watery lawn around the firepit

water

water

an unusual amount of standing water

an unusual amount of standing water

southwest bogsy woods

southwest bogsy woods

looking north

looking north on the west-side path

east side of the garden

east side of the garden

the east side path

the east side path

our neighbours' lawn

our neighbours’ lawn

Drymis winteri along the east fence

Drymis winteri along the east fence; good red stems

and flower buds

and flower buds

buds on 'Pink Lemonade' blueberry

buds on ‘Pink Lemonade’ blueberry

The rain and winds returned and I finished Entering the Stone and started another book.

P1130785

Saturday 8 February 2015

After a Friday and Saturday of reading (finished The Magician’s Book, started The Year of Reading Dangerously), we made an excursion to the Sou’wester in the evening.

event description

event description

the book

the book

While the Sub Pop fanzine was being created in Olympia in the early 80s, I was enjoying the same sort of music scene in Seattle.

a full house for the talk (Allan's photo)

a full house for the talk (Allan’s photo)

Bruce Pavitt (Allan's photo)

Bruce Pavitt (Allan’s photo)

Calvin Johnson reminsicing

Calvin Johnson reminsicing (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo, looking in from the sunporch

Allan’s photo, looking in from the sunporch

From the talk:  They spoke of how Aberdeen seemed to them to be a “magical place” where a $1 bus ride from Olympia would take them to a selection of excellent thrift stores.  (By the time Nirvana emerged from Aberdeen became the number one band, I had already moved to the coast and I missed the whole grunge time in Seattle; that was fine with me because i didn’t find the sound of grunge appealing….although I would have fit right in with the clothing style of flannel shirts.)

After the talk, when the records began to spin (and the first song was one I had liked back in the day), we left.  Ironically, when I first moved here and lived at the Sou’wester in ’93, I would have loved for there to be a dance party in the living room.  While I was still pleased it was happening now, I felt too old and decrepit to participate.  As often happens, by the time we were driving home I had second thoughts…not strong enough ones to make me go back, though.  Sometimes I don’t want to reminisce.  Looking forward seems better.

Sunday and Monday passed with three more books read…and on Tuesday staycation officially ended.  After a bit (or too much) more about reading, we’ll return to the official work blog.

 

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Wednesday, 7 May 2014

While Allan went to work at Andersen’s RV Park, I swanned about the Peninsula with Garden Tour Nancy having sneak previews of some of the gardens for this year’s Music in the Gardens tour (July 19th!)

My Day

Nancy and I first stopped at a garden that we thought might be just wonderful for the tour.  The owner was so nice, and let us walk around, even though this was the first contact she had had with Nancy.  She remembered me from having lived near my mother’s house in Long Beach way back at the beginning of the century.  Her garden theme began with plants mentioned in the Bible, expanded to Mediterranean plants, and has expanded further to plants with heart shaped leaves and flowers.

This water feature is perfect for the tour.

This water feature is perfect for the tour.

the upper pond where the pump recirculates

the upper pond where the pump recirculates

I do wish Allan and I had it in us to build a pond like this.  The gentle slope in this garden makes it look natural.

I do wish Allan and I had it in us to build a pond like this. The gentle slope in this garden makes it look natural.  It would be more difficult in our flat garden.

large garden beds

large garden beds

wisteria

wisteria

enticing sit spots

enticing sit spots

a hosta grove

a hosta grove

The property was briefly the home of Lamb Nursery and some of these hostas were left behind in pots when the nursery closed.

A piece of driftwood collected by Dennis Oman came with a native currant seedling that adds a perfect accent.

A piece of driftwood collected by Dennis Oman came with a native currant seedling that adds a perfect accent.

a tour worthy garden indeed

a tour worthy garden indeed

After that fascinating interlude, we checked out a garden in Ocean Park that is planned to be on next year’s tour.  On the way, we slowed to look at “Prince Lodge”, a beach house on green and peaceful Park Avenue that was part of Nancy’s husband’s childhood.

Prince Lodge, where many porch sitting memories were made

Prince Lodge, where many porch sitting memories were made

Our next destination was Oysterville.  The folks whose garden will be on the tour were not home, so we did not walk around.  Always scouting for new gardens, I took Nancy to see Linda and Peter’s wonderful Oysterville garden.  She agreed that with one thorough weeding, it would be tour ready any year that they decide they want to be on the tour.

Peter and Linda's view of Willapa Bay

Peter and Linda’s view of Willapa Bay

the good looking front garden bed

part of the good looking front garden bed

the charming house

the charming house

Way back when, we did a couple of weeding day on this garden.  It has the heartbreak of horsetail, the same maddening little thready kind that I have, and it is hard to keep up with weeding that pernicious little plant.  I love the garden, with its views of the bay, and perhaps someday it will be on the tour.

We returned south via Surfside, where I showed Nancy two gardens that have caught my eye, and she left her card at each as the owners were not home.  Then she treated me to lunch at the Full Circle Café in Ocean Park.

Full Circle Café on Bay Avenue

Full Circle Café on Bay Avenue

crab quiche and cheesy bread and salad

crab quiche and cheesy bread and salad

Back to Sandridge Road, we pulled into a driveway to look from the side at one of the tour gardens.

Another pond, this one with an island!

Another pond, this one with an island!

Again, we did not get out and walk around because this is just the very first pre-tour and we prefer to view the gardens when the owners are at home.  The last two gardens of our day were back in Long Beach.  As we drove south, just after returning to Sandridge Road, the red warning light came on in Nancy’s very nice rather new BMW and, losing power, we slowed to the side of the road.  After letting the engine cool, we tried again, and again began to lose power.  This time we were next to the Basket Case Greenhouse which seemed an excellent place to stop and call for help.  While we waited for Phil to come to the rescue, Nancy and I picked out some good perennials to add to her garden.  (Dianthus ‘Essex Witch’ and ‘Raspberry Swirl’, Geum ‘Mango Lassi’, Agastache ‘Summer Glow’ and ‘Sangria’, Jackman’s Blue Rue, and more.)  The last two gardens would have to be postponed for another day.

Meanwhile:  Allan’s Day

Allan worked at Andersen’s on the difficult task of digging a large quantity of vastly multiplied narcissi bulbs from four whiskey barrels.  The bulbs have gotten so thick that they no longer bloom well and they would certainly interfere with the planting of annuals.

one of six whiskey barrels

one of six whiskey barrels

bulbs from just one barrel

bulbs from just one barrel

each bulb had clumped into many

each bulb had clumped into many

he found a few viola seedlings to replace (nice yellow ones, not the rampant wild one)

he found and replanted a few viola seedlings  (nice yellow ones, not the rampant wild one)

The hardest part would be finding room all over the garden to plant this many bulbs!

The hardest part would be finding room all over the garden to plant this many bulbs!

From one end to the other of the gardens, he found room to plant small clumps of the narcissi bulbs.

From one end to the other of the gardens, he found room to plant small clumps of the narcissi bulbs.

Ideally, they would all have been separated into one bulb per hole, but that would have taken more time than the bulbs were worth.

Our Day

Phil came to rescue Nancy in his clamming jeep and gave me a ride over to Andersen’s.  They had a lot to deal with in getting the car towed to the dealership (which is, of course, off the Peninsula) so I got a ride to Andersen’s to join Allan and help him finish the work day.

Phil's clamming jeep

Phil’s clamming jeep at Andersen’s

There was still one wheelbarrowfull of bulbs to plant.  I sympathized with how hard Allan had been working when I realized how many more holes had to be dug throughout the gardens.

the last of the bulbs

the last of the bulbs

After we were finally done, I got some photos of the high points of the Andersen’s garden today.

Oriental poppies

Oriental poppies

vibrantly orange

vibrantly orange

Allium beginning to open

Allium beginning to open

red ranunculus in the Payson Hall planters

red ranunculus in the Payson Hall planters

Sparaxis tricolor, a bit out of focus; one of my favourite late spring bulbs

Sparaxis tricolor, a bit out of focus; one of my favourite late spring bulbs

We were planning to end the day by helping Nancy place her newly acquired plants, but by the time we were in Long Beach, she and Phil had had to go back north to meet the tow truck.  After the storms pass, we will reschedule.  As eager as I am to get annuals planting he….I mean TIME…begun and then DONE with, I am looking forward to perhaps having a day or two of reading while rain falls and a 25-30 mph wind blows.

from 642weather.com

from 642weather.com

I have a book by Nick Hornby from the library and would love to sit and read it cover to cover, and will end up with another list of the good books that he recommends in his books about books.  (It may not be as exciting as I think it will be, because I just found out it is compilation of all his previous smaller volumes of Books About Books).

Phooey, I thought it would be all new!

Phooey, I thought it would be all new!

If that book fails me, I have the usual pile of almost overdue library books so any guilt free rainy days off would definitely be a boon.

 

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We left home late because of an unexpected visitor: a gentleman from North Carolina who was friends with Jeff and Mary (two doors down) and was here to go fishing with Jeff.  He had heard from Mary about our garden (and from her back porch, there is a view down Nora’s back garden showing an enticing glimpse of ours).  I walked through with him as he took lots of photos to show his wife.  She is, he told me, a painter who likes to paint gardens, and he told me her name so I could Google her website later on.

I was impressed with how well he saw the garden and what he chose to photograph; he noticed the tunnel cut through the salmonberry with a painted door at the end.  Not everyone notices that.

It took me two weeks to get around to looking up her page, Connie Winters Art.  I strongly encourage you to peruse it; she is a wonderful artist!

We began the work day with a quick fix: taking some buckets of water from home to the two most westerly planters on the Bolstadt beach approach in Long Beach.  There had been a misunderstanding:  Allan thought I meant to have him skip watering them because we are so bored with the planting of plain old vinca out there (done by someone else ages ago).  I had noticed them wilting the day before and wanted them refreshed before kite festival.  Had we known what the day’s weather would bring, we wouldn’t have bothered.

On the way we saw these folks photographing their vintage autos by the iconic arch.

the Bolstadt arch

the Bolstadt arch

Next, I had a small mission.  Teresa of The Planter Box had messaged me the day before asking if I wanted a “Pistachio”.  Before she even finished, I asked “Pistachio Hydrangea??!”  Yes!  It had been on my list of plants to acquire for ages, so I got two, one fore me and one for another garden….probably Larry And Robert’s where we can keep a good eye on it, although it would also look good against the greeny colour of the Wiegardt Gallery.

Hydrangea 'Pistachio' from The Planter Box.

Hydrangea ‘Pistachio’ from The Planter Box.

I admired a beautiful Clematis for sale.

I admired a beautiful Clematis for sale.

And then, way up north to Marilyn’s garden….

begonias on front porch at Marilyn's

begonias on front porch at Marilyn’s

Phygelius

Phygelius

I think this is some kind of phlox, but I wish I knew for sure.  It spreads, but not aggressively (so far) and the deer do not eat it:

phlox? wish photo had turned out better

phlox? wish photo had turned out better

?

?

I have inquired on the Plants to Identify Facebook group, as I should do more often.

Helianthis ‘Lemon Queen’ is starting to bloom and will put on a good tall show for a few weeks.

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen', a favourite perennial

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’, a favourite perennial

I am amazed the deer are not eating Marilyn’s lilies.  Do I dare plant more throughout the garden?  I might try!

oriental lilies

oriental lilies

looking northish from the back steps

looking northish from the back steps

bronze fennel, lovely and thuggish

bronze fennel, lovely and thuggish (too many tiny seedlings)

Next, the usual routine:  Back down to Wiegardt Gallery on the cusp of Ocean Park and Nahcotta.

The bed on the west side of the building is so unsatisfactory to me.  It does not get enough water (not for lack of trying, but soaker hoses just do not work well) and just looks scraggly.  But I have a solution!   Pam Fleming of Back Alley Gardens will be pleased to hear that I want to plant evergreens here.  Because of rampant deer and because Eric did not like it when I used to have two escallonias (too big!) , I am thinking three groups of Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’.  That may be trite, but I know they will work.  And surprisingly few people on the Peninsula use them.  (So they are not trite here…yet.)

terrible, terrible, terrible

terrible, terrible, terrible

If it got more water, the Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ would be beautifully tall.  I must get rid of the horrible Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’…have tried…it is a curse.  The nice pine scented Geranium macrorrhizum can stay.  If it were my garden, I would plant some lemony small very columnar gold conifers….

The north bed looks better with three variegated Miscanthus:

grasses

height and repetition

I still love the view to the street (Bay Avenue);

lots of grasses with cotoneasters and a few rhodos

lots of grasses with cotoneasters and a few rhodos

Some drizzling began while we were weeding at Wiegardt’s.  By the time we got to Oman Builders Supply Ocean Park store, we had a serious situation.

rain and lots of it

rain and lots of it

So we went to the Full Circle Café…

driftwood fence, Full Circle on Bay Avenue

driftwood fence, Full Circle on Bay Avenue

drift

inside...nice and dry...

inside…nice and dry…

with pie

with pie

The sad thing is we had just eaten our lunchbox sandwiches or we could have had one of their tasty lunches.

We waited for awhile and saw the sky looking brighter to the southwest…so set off again optimistically.

The café is almost this close to the ocean.

The café is almost this close to the ocean.

The Klipsan Beach Cottages garden awaited us.  Even the birds looked rather hunched and miserable, as we had called the weather wrong and the rain soon returned.

hunkered down

hunkered down

After awhile, I took shelter from the torrent in the garage.  Allan was off working under some trees.  Neither of us were prepared with proper coats for this weather.

unfinished job

unfinished job

Mary, garden owner, had come out to chat and commiserate.  At first I told her we would bail out for the day and come back.  Then I realized that the weather already had us running behind and it is a long drive back to KBC, so we perservered and worked through the weather.

in the fenced garden

in the fenced garden

sweet peas

sweet peas

Veronicastrum virginicum

Veronicastrum virginicum…

with lilies

with lilies

After getting thoroughly soaked, we bailed on the rest of the day and went home.  I managed two photos on the way to check the greenhouse tomatoes:

Sarah Sloane's bird

Sarah Sloane’s bird

And a quotation; a reader has asked me for more photos of quotations in the garden.  Eventually, I hope to do a post with all of them together.

This seems to be a favourite!

from “The Pleasures of Merely Circulating”

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