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Posts Tagged ‘Galanthus’

Thursday, 16 January 2014

Another staycation day began midmorning at Olde Towne Café, where I had a latte and a bagel and admired the bouquet of pussy willows that had been brought in by Cat, one of the regulars.

an early sign of spring

an early sign of spring

This willow from Long Beach is strangely early as the ones by my bogsy wood have barely begun to bud out.

During the afternoon at home, I tackled a bit more of the clean up in the back garden. Spring clean up comes early here because once we start work, I won’t have the time.

the back garden

the back garden

a very dead lavender by the patio

a very dead lavender by the patio

The weather has been particular hard on the garden this past winter, with a week of unusually cold night temperatures. This should provide me with plenty of space to add new plants…or to make more room for established ones that are already crowded.

Allan has been implementing an idea of mine: that in the space behind the garage, storage would be improved by shelves that actually fit and utilize the entire space.

an empty wall

an empty wall

lumber leans on the not very useful free shelves that used to sit there

lumber leans on the not very useful free shelves that used to sit there

Allan working on the project

Allan working on the project

resulting in a much more practical storage space

resulting in a much more practical storage space

Friday, 17 January 2014

A belated birthday to my dear old friend Roberta (since I am writing this a week later and setting back the publishing date).

Another late staycation morning begins at Olde Towne Café.

Olde Towne Café.

I went to Olde Towne for lunch rather than breakfast, as I had the desire to check out some gardens and perhaps see the sunset. After a Chai latte and a bleu cheese steak salad (my vegan friend Patt says a steak salad is an oxymoron!), I took a bit of a work stroll, resulting in a very tiny bit of work and a great deal of thinking about work.

I had brought a pair of garden clippers but no bucket; as I walked down toward the port, I clipped some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and pulled a large handful of weeds from under the street trees and offloaded the bundle in the long grass near the boatyard.

There were only a few boats in drydock because the Hoist is being repaired.

There were only a few boats in drydock because the Hoist is being repaired.

I had no intention of working on the boatyard garden during staycation. The long stretch to the north of the boatyard gate looked pretty good, as we had weeded it well before our winter break. The stretch to the south was another story.

boatyard looking south

boatyard looking south

All along the three block-or-so garden, plants that were left up for winter interest are looking tired and ready to be cut back. The southern stretch has far more weeds than I’d like to see…which was no surprise.

large area of creeping sorrel that I did not get to before staycation...

large area of creeping sorrel that I did not get to before staycation…

grass creeping in under the fence

grass creeping in under the fence

There are just a few crocus appearing!

There are just a few crocus appearing!

I am looking forward to cleaning this up in a couple of weeks.

I am looking forward to cleaning this up in a couple of weeks.

early evening light at the south end of the boatyard

early evening light at the south end of the boatyard

Turning the corner, I walked east along Howerton.

past Jessie's Ilwaco Fish Company

past Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company

gardenMy camera failed me by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle by going all blurry. I include a thumbnail of the photo here for my own reference; this garden at the west end of the street looks interesting and good and the weeding job, one of the last we did, has held up well. And there was a snowdrop!

snowdrop

Galanthus nivalis or ikarae; I confess I can’t tell the difference. Yet.

Further east, I felt a slight urge to cut back Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ behind the port office. I resisted, wanting to stay fixed in staycation mode.

port

However, I did have a mission. Last time I had taken a sunset walk, I’d been thoroughly bothered by the dead leaves on the Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ and a few other plants. I took pleasure in clipping them back and carrying an armful of clipped material over to the big wheelie bin by the dock.

before

before

after...I hope the difference shows

after…I hope the difference shows

I resisted going after the small weeds. In this garden, I saw this year’s first blooms of Iris reticulata and I hope I’m not the only one who notices this precious little set of blossoms.

Iris reticulata

Iris reticulata

I’d hoped to time the conclusion of my small work project to the sunset, but I was early by almost half an hour and did not want to wait around in the chilly air.

an almost sunset

an almost sunset

On the way home via Pearl Street, I could see fairly high water along the meander line (a ditch dividing the town property from the port).

At Pearl and the meander line, looking east toward out bogsy wood

At Pearl and the meander line, looking east toward out bogsy wood

The tree covered with ivy is at the back of my late neighbor Nora’s property. I think I’ll get back there and clip the ivy stems sometime soon.

This wide ditch will be filled with frog songs in early spring.

I had timed the sunset walk so very wrong that I still had daylight enough to gather up some firewood into a wheelbarrow and take it down to drop over the fence at New Judy’s. I hope it is not too mossy and lichen-y to make good firewood for her. Something about gathering firewood is so satisfying; I used to gather it all up to take to my mom’s house as she was happy for any small branches to dry and use as wood stove kindling.

bogsy wood storm droppings

bogsy wood storm droppings

Right after dark, Allan and I strolled down to the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum, three blocks away, for the opening reception of a show called Threads to New Worlds, A Collection of Fiber Art.

The food was, as always for museum events, delicious, and Allan and I sat for a spell while I sorely neglected to take very many photos.

photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

Clatsop Weavers and Spinners Guild gave demonstrations during the reception.

Clatsop Weavers and Spinners Guild gave demonstrations during the reception.

photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

Center:  Our dear client Cheri (photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum)

Center: Our dear client Cheri (photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum)

photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

photo courtesy Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

The very next day would be the first volunteer beach clean up of 2014, necessitating the rising at an hour much too early for night owl staycationers. That and jury duty had been looming over my lazy head. Fortunately, every trial I might have been called for had been cancelled except for one that may (but I hope will not) happen on January 30th.

 

 

 

 

 

at the end of the reception evening

at the end of the reception evening

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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While I was sick the first two weeks of January (and Allan fell sick with the same feverish ague one day after me), I was happy that by day three I was able to move from my bed to my chair.  The cats were happy, too, and awaiting my arrival  in the chair each day for the next several days.

catsOnly the first day of fluishness was a sunny one; the rest of the days were blissfully cold and rainy so I had no unhappiness about missing out on winter gardening time.

One of my happiest staycation memories is of the several days I spent simply reading, guilt free because of a sore knee, in January of 2012.  When I look back on these days of January ’14, I won’t remember the sore throat or fever but just the pleasure of reading all the day long.  I caught up on the latest books by Elizabeth George and Lee Smith and read one excellent gardening book:

book

The Layered Garden by David L. Cul

It addressed many questions about garden design...

It addressed many questions about garden design…

His analysis of beauty is up there with the very best garden writing:

beauty

The book had much enlightenment to offer me about snowdrops (Galanthus).   I have always known that there are lots of different cultivars.  The catalog from which I order offers only two, so I had not seen the differences (and had never gotten around to looking them up online).

Galanthus pages in The Layered Garden

Galanthus pages in The Layered Garden

Look at the ones in the upper right with that delectable touch of yellow!

Mary takes an interest.

Mary takes an interest.

from The Layered Garden:  I feel the urge to collect Galanthus coming on...

from The Layered Garden: I feel the urge to collect Galanthus coming on…

Mr Culp is possessed of a dry wit...

Mr Culp is possessed of a dry wit…

The end of the week of reading  culminated in an exciting wind storm with gusts of 93 mph at the beach nearby.  I then felt well enough to begin to putter in the garden in the week of nicer weather that followed.  (More on this later.)   In the evenings, I’ve been reading the archives of one of my favourite blogs, The Miserable Gardener.  I get through a month or two couple of evenings.  And what did I find there…but more fascinating discourse about snowdrops!

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