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Posts Tagged ‘garden boats’

Sunday, 7 February 2016

I had one more day off before getting back to work for a bit, so I made a list of everything I wanted to accomplish in the garden: finish the end of the scree bed, weed two patches of creeping buttercup, prune the hydrangeas.  Allan was off boating, which will, I hope, be tomorrow’s post.

I felt terrible that on such a beautiful warm day, Smokey could not go outside.  He still has a wound on his foot that must be treated daily and “kept open” (ew) so it does not abscess again, and I can’t have him out getting soil in the wound.  A child I could perhaps tell, “You can go outside, but only play on the grass, not in the dirt.”  That would not work on even the smartest cat.

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Smokey wanting out, with jugs of water reinforcing the cat door flap.  Because he will pry and pry at it.

Because I wished him to at least have a window view, I kept all the cats indoors for the day instead of shutting Smokey and Mary into the second bathroom.  Even with the run of the house, he sat by the front door and expressed his desire quite strongly.

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“Open, please!”  With much meowing.

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…Maybe THIS side will open?

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tragic looks

It reminded me of this Fat Freddy’s Cat cartoon…except I felt bad for him so it was not funny.

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a classic

I had too many projects in mind to stay indoors with Smokey. My first was to remove all the blue ceramic “waves” at the stern of the garden boat, lay down landscape fabric and river rock, and then replace the waves.

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dismantled

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found dozens of hibernating snails

I put the snails inside two stacked plastic pots and rehoused them in a wild area at the end of the day.

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the waves replaced

I will remember to put slug bait down inside this area, safe from cats and birds.  The “waves” came from broken pieces of blue tiles that we were given back when we pruned hydrangeas for the blue-roofed house on the bay, and from some broken pottery from the old Raven and Finch wine bar at the Port.

Next project…I thought I might weed shotweed out of the center bed.

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The green haze of seedlings is not all good.

I took a panorama from the fire circle, looking north toward the house.

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Then, postponing the center bed, I began to weed this bed (below) under a big alder tree.  A windless day is advantageous for weeding under these brittle trees.

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before

I have a feeling that I will regret having planted the ranunculus ficaria from my mother’s old garden.

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also known as Lesser Celandine

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After being polite for five years, it has gone on the run.

An hour and quarter later, a gardening friend dropped in.  I had gotten quite a bit done.

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after

My friend and I sat on the patio.  I gazed upon the fig tree that Allan had planted for me in the barrel yesterday.  Eventually, its branches will be in front of my view window and I will be filled with regret.

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fig tree against lattice

All day long, I had missed having the cats with me out in the garden.  Beverly Nichol’s words are true for me:

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by the south cat ramp

This cat ramp’s entrance is boarded up till Smokey can go out again…maybe five more days.

The center bed and the hydrangea pruning did not get done.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

I am incorporating three old garden diaries of my mother’s into this year’s blog.

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Ginger’s Garden Diaries

Feb 7, 1997 (age 72)

Only two hours!  It was a beautiful day!

Brought firewood up to porch.  First I had to move branches so I could get to the woodpile. I got the 100 new strawberry plants in trays under the lights in greenhouse.  I also planted five of the new raspberry plants but was too tired to plant the 10 left so I put them in soil in buckets.

Feb 7, 1998 (age 73)

I weeded and raked the upper driveway and also cleaned out some old plants, such as glads, so the area will look more presentable when Skyler and Robert arrive tomorrow.  She has been in Seattle this week to attend the Garden Show.

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Wednesday, 13 May 2015

I was eager to get on with the cosmos Annuals Planting Time as they were getting tall in the six packs despite pinching.

The Depot Restaurant

Cosmos lined up to plant

Cosmos lined up to plant


cosmos in

four six packs of cosmos in

Long Beach

I’d found some Cosmos ‘Purity’ (all white) at Seven Dees yesterday so 12 went into the corner garden at Veterans Field.

Not even sure if I am supposed to make this corner red white and blue.

Not even sure if I am supposed to make this corner red white and blue.

Jo’s Garden

The biggest project of the day was to plant about eight six packs of cosmos, some painted sage, and a few perennials at Jo’s.  She was at home and had some ideas.

"Let's get that azalea out, what do you think?"  Looks like a job for Allan.

“Let’s get that azalea out, what do you think?” Looks like a job for Allan.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Azalea gone, annuals in (and deer ferns showing that were hidden before)

Azalea gone, annuals in (and deer ferns showing that were hidden before)

Next, Jo turned her eye to an ever growing conifer.

before, Allan's photo, with me bringing cosmos in

before, Allan’s photo, with me bringing cosmos in


before, Allan's photo

before, Allan’s photo


after, Allan's photo

after, Allan’s photo: Jo says that next time, that barberry can go!  It’s in a barrel, and can be cut to the ground and will come back small.


some painted sage and a chocolate cosmos

some painted sage and a chocolate cosmos

Note how Allan’s third project of the day had been to clean up more of the back part of this bed, removing running rugosa rose, Japanese anemone, and a running pink phlox.  Below shows how it looked on May 6th:

before

before


before, Allan's photo

before, Allan’s photo


after, Allan's photo

after, Allan’s photo

Meanwhile, some tall white phlox had to go in the northwest bed because they looked diseased.  This also turned out to be a job for Allan.

Three or four more clumps had to go.

Three or four more clumps had to go, and were replaced with cosmos.


I was pleased and surprised to see that Jo's Zaluzianskya (night scented phlox) had come back.

I was pleased and surprised to see that Jo’s Zaluzianskya (night scented phlox) had come back.


northwest garden after planting

northwest garden after planting

You might wonder what my job was in all this: to figure out how to squeeze in and then plant all the cosmos and painted sage.

Jo herself.

Jo herself.

The Anchorage Cottages

what we did not get done: weeding and pulling scilla along this area.

what we did not get done: weeding and pulling scilla along this area.


Allan's photo: Mitzu

Allan’s photo: Mitzu


I added lots of annuals to the containers in the courtyard and office entry.

I added lots of annuals to the containers in the courtyard and office entry.


a bright orange calibrachoa

a bright orange calibrachoa


a lemony-pink osteospermum

a lemony-pink osteospermum


the weird 'Coralberry Punch' callie

the weird ‘Coralberry Punch’ callie


12 cosmos planted in this garden

12 cosmos planted in this garden

Meanwhile, Allan cleared a narrow bed of scilla and planted more cosmos.

before: Allan's photo

before: Allan’s photo


after:  Allan's photo

after: Allan’s photo

Usually I put something tall in the windowboxes (by tall I mean a few inches taller than the trailies…)  Not this year because the new liners are so narrow that there is no room to set a tall thing a bit to the back.

narrow plastic liners

narrow plastic liners

Ideally, I would like to see the wooden frames rebuilt to hold full sized plastic windowbox liners for more root room.  Maybe next winter?

more Long Beach

We did more weeding and a bit of planting in the raised planters along Boldstadt. I averted my eyes from the beach approach garden’s understory of weeds. No time for that! Below: a planter backed with the naturescape of dune grass.  

some tall armerias added to the Bolstadt beach approach planters

some tall armerias added to the Bolstadt beach approach planters

Ilwaco 

Eager to cross off two small jobs from the work board, we planted the cosmos in the Time Enough Books garden boat, working around the still-blooming Tulip ‘Formosa’.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Allan's photo: This small dog has appeared in the Geranium 'Rozanne' next to the boat

Allan’s photo: This small dog has appeared in the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ next to the boat

We added 12 or 18 or ?? cosmos to our volunteer garden at the post office.

Our audience got bored and left.

Our audience got bored and left.


Just as I had feared, the new fence slats had made a mess of my sweet pea area.

Just as I had feared, the new fence slats had made a mess of my sweet pea area.

I put little bamboo stakes around the remaining sweet peas but I don’t have much hope if someone goes in to paint these boards.  Sigh….

with cosmos added

with cosmos added


the work board, with a few items erased

the work board, with a few items erased

 

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Friday, 12 September 2014

Larry and Robert’s Garden

Just five doors down is where we began the hot dry day by watering, weeding and deadheading. We maintain this garden so regularly that the weeding is minimal.

What I feel would make it just perfect is if it had a fence across the property on the west side, with an entry arbour; it already has a wisteria in place to grow on it.

From corner of house to west side of garden, fence with gate would be perfect.  It could be tall with the wisteria growing on it.

From corner of house to west side of garden, fence with gate would be perfect. It could be tall with the wisteria growing on it. I have no idea why wisteria in lower right corner is there with nothing to grow on.

Such a fence would prevent the deer from browsing this newly cleaned up bed.

Such a fence would prevent the deer from browsing this newly cleaned up bed.

Deer have been walking in from the front of the house and eating the Fuchsias...

Deer have been walking in from the front of the house and nibbling the Fuchsias…

..and the roses.

..and the roses.

Right where Allan is standing is where the fence could go...

Right where Allan is standing is where the fence could go…

The east side of the house, planted with deer resistant plants.

The east side of the house, planted with deer resistant plants.

the corner that gets way more sun that I thought it would...

the corner that gets way more sun that I thought it would…

I am going to move a few plants from here over to the shadier beds this fall.

The Verbena bonariensis in the boat amuses me by being tall and vertical where a sail mast would be, even if no one else notices.

The Verbena bonariensis in the boat amuses me by being tall and vertical where a sail mast would be, even if no one else notices.

Long Beach

By watering the Long Beach planters today, we hope that they will last till next Wednesday. If they can wait for watering till then, Allan won’t have to water them from Thursday to Sunday when I have gone with a dear friend on a four day trip to the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

planter in front of the smokeshop with 'Star Cluster' Coreopsis.

planter in front of the smoke shop with Coreopsis ‘Star Cluster’.

one of my favourite planters...and across from it, one that we plan to redo this fall.

one of my favourite planters…and across from it, one that we plan to redo this fall.

another angle

another angle

note to self: more patio dahlias next year

note to self: more patio dahlias in the planters next year

Basket Case Greenhouse baskets on the Long Beach gazebo

Basket Case Greenhouse baskets on the Long Beach gazebo

I noticed for the first time that Mexigo has corn planted in their half barrel.

I noticed for the first time that Mexigo has corn planted in their half barrel.

Just north of Mexigo and Scoopers Ice Cream is another problem planter; not only is it windswept, for some reason it is one of our most vandalized planters. It’s planted with two full sized escallonias and is infested with red clover amid the creeping succulents that are the only thing that thrives here.

little sempervivums all infested with clover...what a pain.

little sempervivums all infested with clover…what a pain.

I’ve managed this year to get a lavender and a santolina to grow here without being yanked out by someone, so perhaps whoever used to bother this planter so much has moved on.

The planters at the west end of the Bolstadt beach approach that we redid last fall look good even with very little water. Once a week, we are told, the city crew mists them with their water pump trailer.

not too bad for almost total neglect

not too bad for almost total neglect

Ilwaco

We were hustling because we had an early dinner engagement. Ilwaco would neatly fill up the rest of our workday. While Allan watered the planters, I checked on them closely for the first time in a couple of months. He has been doing a fantastic job on his own and I found very few, tiny weeds.

This planter in almost full shade on Spruce Street is doing remarkably well.

This planter in almost full shade on Spruce Street is doing remarkably well.

bright sun made the nasturtiums glow at First and Main.

bright sun made the nasturtiums glow at First and Main. The lotus vine is less rampant in the sun than in the shade, perhaps because the shady planter stays more moist.

same planter, backdrop of Don's Portside Café

same planter, backdrop of Don’s Portside Café

kitty corner: yellows and oranges to tone with the café

kitty corner: yellows and oranges to tone with the café

Because the planter by the Portside Café has a clogged drainage hole, it stays moist. We will have to dig it out this fall if we want to have any bulbs in it. For the summer, I took advantage of the problem by planting mimulus there.

mimulus

mimulus

more mimulus; it was a mixed batch so we could not make it all yellow.

more mimulus; it was a mixed batch so we could not make it all yellow.

Down on First and Eagle, the planter that got all its plants torn out (and then we discovered it in enough time to replant them) has sort of recovered.

The nasturtium grew again but not floriferously.

The nasturtium grew again but not floriferously.

Sunflowers grow on the south wall of the house next to that planter.

Sunflowers grow on the south wall of the house next to that planter.

Just across the street from that house is the boatyard's north fence.

Just across the street from that house is the boatyard’s north fence.

Steve was up working on his mast.  He told me he often forgets to take some tool or other up with him.

Steve was up working on his mast. He told me he often forgets to take some tool or other up with him.

I weeded the garden along the east fence of the boatyard and still had time to water it again, which I felt it sorely needed due to the heat.

boatyard garden; we water from inside of the fence.

boatyard garden; we water from inside of the fence.

Because Allan needs an hour and forty five minutes to water the Ilwaco planters with the pump trailer, I had plenty of time. I realized I could even do some weeding along the inside by pulling weeds away from the fence.

pulling grass clumps and horsetail and bindweed away from the inside

pulling grass clumps and horsetail and bindweed away from the inside

I met a new boatyard dog who condescended to be briefly petted.

I met a new boatyard dog who condescended to be briefly petted.

A mast was being raised by a crane.

A mast was being raised by a crane.

And I chatted with a woman who has two boat cats on her boat.

And I chatted with a woman who has two boat cats on her boat.

We actually ended up with fifteen minutes of turn around time at home before doing to dinner. Usually we have a later dinner; tonight, we were dining at the unusual hour of 5:30 PM at the Depot Restaurant.

Depot Restaurant

By picking an earlier hour, we had gotten the Chef’s Table at the Depot for Kathleen’s two-weeks-early birthday dinner. Chef Michael, from the open kitchen window, served us a special plate of bread and an upscale bleu cheese.

cheese

Then began the birthday feasting:

Carne Asada appetizer

Carne Asada Negro: Sautéed tender chunks of marinated, grass fed, hormone free Rib Eye on Cumin Scented Black Beans topped with mild Mama Lil’s Goat Horn Peppers and Cilantro with Fried Tortilla Chips

Thai calamari appetizer

Thai Calamari: Fried wild sustainable Calamari tossed in Thai Peanut Cilantro Sauce on fresh Spinach and Napa Cabbage mix topped with Crispy Won Tons

for Kathleen: Southern Comfort Pork with enough for tomorrow's dinner, as well

for Kathleen: Southern Comfort Pork: Braised Pork Shoulder in Southern Comfort Bar BQ Sauce on Yam Mashers seasoned with Brown Sugar surrounded by Jalapeño Creamed Corn topped with Green Onion, Maple and Bacon Salsa (enough to provide tomorrow’s dinner, as well)

for me: spicy prawns

for me: Bangkok Prawns: Sweet Lime Chile Glazed Fried Prawns on Rice Noodle Sesame Seaweed Salad topped with Crispy Fried Chinese Noodles

for Allan: Parmesan Artichoke Risotto: Vegetarian Risotto with Artichoke Flowerets, Imported Parmesan Cheese and topped with Micro Greek Salad

for Allan: Parmesan Artichoke Risotto: Vegetarian Risotto with Artichoke Flowerets, Imported
Parmesan Cheese and topped with Micro Greek Salad

lemon bundt cake with blackberry puree backed with flourless chocolate cake

lemon bundt cake with blackberry puree backed with flourless chocolate torte

sorbet

sorbet

After such a scrumptious feast, we still had more talking to do so we moved to a table on the deck for another hour or more. It was an unusual angle to me to see the hops vines from the inside of the deck; I decided it was truly a stroke of genius to have planted them against the lattice.

The other side is the garden we deadhead and water.

The other side is the garden we deadhead and water.

They look quite wonderful draping overhead.

They look quite wonderful draping overhead…

and dangling down

and dangling down

and they looked even more romantic when darkness fell.

and they looked even more romantic when darkness fell.

It seems we lead a life of luxury with constant dining out; tomorrow would be another such dinner. We’ll make up for it this winter by being frugal (I hope!)

 

 

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Tuesday, 5 November, 2013

We overslept yet again, fooled by rain and…just tired.  Thus we missed perhaps an hour of good working weather.   Our mission for today: to fill Erin’s new garden boat with soil.

 On our way out of Ilwaco, despite being late, we had to stop when we saw two hens on Williams Street.

Inn at Harbour Village hens taking a stroll

Inn at Harbour Village hens taking a stroll

a friendly and unskittish pair

a friendly and un-skittish pair

At Peninsula Landscape Supply, we got a yard of Soil Energy…

soil

load

Next, a stop at The Planter Box as they have the best and thickest landscape fabric.

Teresa rolls up a length of fabric for us.

Teresa rolls up a length of fabric for us.

I realized we still did not have good scissors with us!

Teresa revealed to us the true weight of the pumpkin in her “guess the weight” contest.

150 pounds of pumpkin

150 pounds of pumpkin

She said she had ordered 150 pounds of pumpkins, but someone had left the “s” off on the receiving end of the order….

And then we drove to Erin’s, and up the side yard of her neighbours’ house (who does not seem to mind the traffic across their lawn) and rather suspensefully, across Erin’s lawn to park near the boat.  I have heard horror stories about vehicles sinking into old septic fields at old houses, so we stuck to the path that Chester’s truck had tested out when he delivered the boat!

Allan drilled some strategically placed holes in the bottom and soon I was able to start filling it.  I soon realized that I did not need to have soil in the dark spot under the prow of the boat (if that is the right term for inside the front of the boat).

filling the boat

filling the boat   

I told Allan my brainstorm and he went to the ruins of the original garden boat for reusable lumber.  (That boat has disintegrated over the  more than a decade since Robert and I first turned it into a garden boat.)

 scavenging the old boat

With his rechargable chainsaw, Allan was able to cut old wood to fit at the end of the open area of the new boat and save us from wasting a considerable amount of soil.

a fix it job on the spot

a fix it job on the spot

Eventually, when it’s needed as the old wood rots, he can make something better.

When I went to scavenge for a few small pieces to jam into a couple of holes in the makeshift wooden barrier, Felix appeared.

Felix

my friend Felix

my friend Felix

He hung around and helped us for awhile.

Felix and the boat

Felix and the boat

We had gotten the landscape fabric tucked underneath before making the boat heavy with soil.  As soon as we can (I hope tomorrow) we’ll cover the fabric with gravel and then decorate with river rock to make it look (with a lot of imagination) like it has washed up on a rocky beach.

Then came the careful backing and turning to get out of the yard without hurting the sprinkler heads.

the van and trailer in the big yard

the van and trailer in the big yard

Felix kept a careful eye on the proceedings.

Felix escorting us...

Felix escorting us…

on the fence at the northwest corner...

on the fence at the northwest corner…

and saying goodbye for now.

and saying goodbye for now.

We had a longish discussion about where to get the remainder of the soil to fill the boat.  If we went back to Peninsula Landscape Supply for another load of soil energy, the cost of material would be smaller but the cost of time and labour would be higher.  To make the soil richer, we could go to the Planter Box and get a load of cow fiber, but then we would have way more than we needed.   We decided that bagged soil from The Planter Box would be so time saving that it would pay off the extra cost of bags vs. bulk, and we would could buy enough for two other projects at the same time.

the drawback:  Allan loads the heavy bags

the drawback: Allan loads the heavy bags

Below:  Here’s the boat holding one yard of Soil Energy, two big bags of Gardner and Bloome potting soil and two bales of Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Compost.

ready to plant!

ready to plant!

Erin and I were discussing paint colours for the boat; she had said she liked white or green.  I realized today it should be white, with the red paint redone in the same green as the house’s shutters.

We had some daylight left and had only used two of seven bags of potting soil, so we went to The Anchorage Cottages where two containers awaited fresh soil.  While Allan filled them, I was suddenly inspired to tackle an annoying area of beach strawberry by some parking spots.  One of my goals in quitting some jobs this year is to at last be able to do some of the little things for which we just have not had time.   This was one:

before and 45 minutes later

before and 45 minutes later

The blue potato vine in this spot has a history of blowing over, and the courtyard garden has two others, so out it went.  I was sick of the schizostylis here, so it too was ousted.  When we have time to finish around the edges, the garden will be blank but for two Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and some lily bulbs.  Manager Beth saw the empty area and requested dahlias; I am not sure it will be enough sun (morning sun only) but we can give that a try…although I had had something more formal in mind.

I keep picturing small columnar evergreens.  Must be Pam Fleming’s influence.

We just had time then for a bit of Long Beach work.  Allan took potting soil to fill in the planter by the carousel (the one from which we had pulled vinca two days before).  I pulled Salvia viridis (painted sage) out of the planters in front of and across from the Home at the Beach shop.  I’d noticed driving past that they looked raggedy from Saturday’s wind.

Close up, a few of the blue ones did look quite bad, and one was still pretty.  And one of the pink ones looked almost as good as in midsummer…

In fact, the planter looked downright summery.

In fact, the planter looked downright summery.

Close up, you can see the pink one would need some deadheading to look perfect…

pink

And I was just tired of it, so out it came.  I almost immediately felt bad, and now feel worse looking at this photo…but it is NOVEMBER, for heaven’s sake, and these summer flowers are so last month!

I wonder how long it would have lasted had I left it alone?  I am tired of the nasturtiums, too, but I left them.  I figure that some visitors will be impressed that we have blooming nasturtiums this late and perhaps will not notice that they are rather tatty by now.  I suppose the same could have been said of the salvia…darn it.

I am hoping that tomorrow we can get gravel and river rock to make that faux beach at Erin’s house.  The idea of a garden on that huge lawn has me wanting to neglect other jobs in order to get it done…

Wednesday, 6 November, 2013

Back to the boat project!  We headed straight up to Peninsula Landscape Supply to get some pea gravel and river rock.  We cannot carry much of something that heavy in our little old trailer.

 a small scoop of river rock

a small scoop of river rock

The river rock went in the bottom of the trailer as it would be applied second.  The pea gravel went on top.  Allan set up some buckets so that some of the gravel would arrive ready to go.

topping off with a scoop of pea gravel

topping off with a scoop of pea gravel

Meanwhile, I handpicked two buckets of larger river rock.  Had I wanted to, I could have gone into the bin of rainbow rock and got an even larger one.

I like the pink one at lower right!

I like the pink one at lower right!

I fished some fairly big ones out of the bulk pile, though.

Then we delivered our rocks to the new garden boat at Erin’s.  Yesterday, we had tucked landscape fabric under the edges of the boat.  Today, I tucked some newspaper underneath as well, just to make extra sure of smothering the turf.

The hardest part of using the newspaper method of garden building is acquiring enough for a big project.  The second hardest thing is laying newspaper in wind.  (Today was calm, so no problem.)  The third is resisting the urge to read every article that looks interesting.  We had The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal today and because I have several friends who have had cancer recently, my eye was particularly caught by this article.

paper

boat with pea gravel

boat with fabric and newspaper, and pea gravel application in progress

For several years, whenever doing a dry creek bed or any sort of river rock effects, I would lay down landscape fabric, and then medium to small river rock, and then spend the rest of the lifespan of that garden tweaking the rocks so that the “underwear” (fabric) did not peek through.  FINALLY in 2007, when doing a  garden with a dry creek bed in memory of a man who loved to fish, I realized that small gravel would hide the fabric and added it after the fact, then had to shift and fuss with the rocks to get the larger pretty ones on top.  Now we always put down a layer of pea gravel, or even plain crushed gravel, first, to completely hide the fabric, and then dress it up with larger rocks.

first: a solid sheet of gravel.  second: river rock.

first: a solid sheet of gravel. second: river rock.

The part of the fabric and newspaper left showing is where more thick layers of newspaper will get laid down and soil put on top to meet the gravel “beach”.

Allan screwed it one bit of the boat that had come loose.

 

And I rejoiced that I had found the blue scissors that cut the fabric well.  We had struggled without them while cutting fabric for some Long Beach planters on Monday.  They had been in the van the whole time, hidden under some papers (not in the box they were supposed to be in).

triumph!

triumph!

over the picket fence, the dunes, and then the beach

over the picket fence, the dunes, and then the beach

Felix made an appearance but did not linger so no cute cat photo for Wednesday.

By now, what I wanted to do for the rest of the day was to get a yard of soil and start making a garden bed around the boat.  I had not brought enough newspaper for that as it was not in my original plan.  Perhaps, I thought, we could scavenge some from the recycling bin.  First, though, I should check the weather.  Oh dear, high wind and rain warning for tomorrow.  We had better go to one of our weekly jobs, Andersen’s RV Park, in case we were rained out tomorrow…And it does make more sense at this point in the Erin garden job to have a really big pile of soil delivered to just outside the picket fence. Unfortunately, now it will have to wait till after Bulb Time, and I am burning to do this garden…

Oh well, on to Andersen’s.  I had a project in mind for there:  removing lady’s mantle and three tired Stella D’Oro daylilies from the garden shed garden.

1:44 PM and 4:06 PM

1:44 PM and 4:06 PM

The rain came on a little after two PM.  Without wind, I found it sort of refreshing (for awhile).  This is the hottest spot to work in on a scorching (well, 65 degrees and up) sunny day.

While Allan cleared the long bed, I cleaned up a little area by the garden shed door.  Somehow this year it got full of beach strawberry, and there was way too much of  boring old Bergenia.  The Bergenia has been there since before I started caring for the Andersen’s gardens.

before and after

before and after

In between pecking away at the beach strawberry and bergenia, I worked over the areas Allan dug out to prep them for receiving wheelbarrows full of cow fiber, as with every trip he made to dump debris, he returned with a wheelbarrow full of mulch.

before with hideous Stella D'Oro

before with hideous Stella D’Oro

after

after

before:  I am SO over lady's mantle (Alchemilla mollis)

before: I am SO over lady’s mantle (Alchemilla mollis)

after

after

We even got started on the eastern end of the garden.

one huge lady's mantle gone from the corner...

one huge lady’s mantle gone from the corner…

The rain had become harder and chilly, so we were not inspired to finish all the way to the end today.

Now, what to plant next year in the lovely blank slate?  Lorna loves bright flowers and is fond of cosmos (as am I).  I wonder how she feels about dahlias?  Something extra bright might get some attention drawn to the garden as people drive into the park.

At dusk, we went to our appointment at NW Financial and Insurance where our insurance broker, Shelly Pollock, was finally able to help us register for the Affordable Care Act.  Yes, the state website was working and we are now officially enrolled.  Even though we chose one of the mid range plans, we are still going to save (and this will not be a typo) $937 a month over what our cost for a similar plan would have been in 2014.  And our ACA plan will have a much lower deductible AND will help with prescriptions, which our old plan did not.  “Obamacare”, at least in states with a Health Exchange set up, will be so beneficial to the working class.  No more will we be paying 20 to 25% of our income for health insurance, and local friends who have never been able to afford insurance are now able to sign on.  We believe this will be an stimulus to the local economy.  I can guarantee Allan and I will have a dinner out to celebrate and raise a toast to Obamacare.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We are coming to the end of annuals planting hell.  The dregs of it will drag  into next week with the planting of a few six packs of cosmos here and there but today we finished a couple of jobs that can be crossed off the annuals list now.

First: two six packs of Cosmos, one of painted sage, and a Gaura ‘So White’ went into our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco post office.

post office

cosmos installed

cosmos installed

Ilwaco

Two partial buckets of weeds came out.  Reminder:  do not plant the charming Euphorbia ‘Fen’s Ruby’.  The bits that came in with plants from my mom’s garden, even though I had tried to eliminate every root, had marched halfway back into the post office garden.

beware

beware; nurseries still sell this bad guy

Next we planted Cosmos, painted sage, a Thalictrum ‘Black Stockings’, Phygelius ‘Snow White’ and a new Echinacea (coneflower) called ‘Green Jewel’ in Larry and Robert’s garden.  Green Jewel is supposed to keep its colour without fading the way Green Envy does.

We took the Heucheras and primroses out of the garden boat and planted them under the triangle of trees and put Cosmos ‘Cutesy’ and ‘Happy Ring’ into the boat for summer, along with one Salvia patens.

the boat garden

the boat garden

all cosmosed up

all cosmosed up

front porch

front porch

The tulip viridis is STILL in bloom.   I love the green tulips more than any others and yet this is the first year I have realized that they are also the latest to bloom.

Tulip Chinatown

Tulip Chinatown and Green Wave

watering aprés planting

watering aprés planting

I’m liking the new gold tree (Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’).

Here’s how Larry and Robert’s garden relates  to that of our good friends Tom and Judy:

Lake Street sidewalk

Lake Street sidewalk

looking east:  Hornbuckle garden is across Pearl Avenue.

looking east: Hornbuckle garden is across Pearl Avenue.

The Hornbuckles were home and showed me the new improved water feature in their courtyard.  I snuck back to get a photo.  With a wider basin and more rocks around it, bathing birds won’t splash all the water out.

a better bubbler

a better bubbler

Tom and Judy also redid their “back forty” to replace some junipers (I think? nice ones, not hideous “tams”) that passing dogs had sprinkled on.  Lavenders have taken their place.

the back forty

the back forty

Next, we replanted the Ilwaco planter that we had emptied of soil due to bad drainage.  I had emailed city hall to remind them to have a hole drilled in the base.  Turns out the hole HAD been drilled.  It was just so small we did not see it.  I forgot to photograph it from inside before Allan put the soil in, so I stuck my camera under the edge of the planter.  The hole is on the side and so small that Allan could not put his little finger in it.  Hmmm.

I couldn't see where I was aiming the camera under there.

I couldn’t see where I was aiming the camera under there.

newly planted and hoping for adequate drainage

newly planted and hoping for adequate drainage

It now has an Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’center, three painted sage, three Diascia, a Calibrachoa, two Sanvitalia and a trailing rosemary.

Next we went to Nancy’s home in Long Beach to deliver some Cosmos and painted sage to the new flower border we helped install last October.  She organizes the Music in the Gardens tour and we think next year her garden will be ready to be on it.

I am very impressed with her vegetable garden:

Nancy's potager

Nancy’s potager

potager

potager

potager

lilac in bloom

lilac in bloom

looking from the veg garden to the new flower border

looking from the veg garden to the new flower border

Viridiflora tulips still hanging on

Viridiflora tulips still hanging on

Design hint I learned from Ann Lovejoy:  always figure out the flow of your garden.  It was clear a path would be needed to the neighbour’s garden so we left two passages unplanted, one for garden access and one for neighbourliness.

path toward the neighbour

flower garden coming on

flower garden coming on

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I had been so smitten with Nancy’s veg patch that I forgot to take a long photo of the whole flower border.

Next we went through downtown heading for Jo’s.  As I do every time we drive through town, I eyeballed the planters all the way looking for any problems.   I would be wealthy if paid for the amount of time I spend thinking about work!  The weather did this:

passing through Long Beach

passing through Long Beach

But not for long.  It was fairly pleasant working at Jo’s.  I did the planting while Allan weeded.  In went 18 godetias, 6 or more six packs of snapdragons, a few perennials.  It is a beautiful environment in which to work.

the best use of annual geraniums ever

the best use of annual geraniums ever

While planting in the newly revamped colourful entry area, I had a sudden brainstorm.  I was so excited I forgot to take a before photo, so dredged up this one from earlier this year:

before

before

I suddenly realized that one of the two red flowering azaleas had to go.  We had thought of this earlier but had decided to wait.  Now I was convinced.  Jo and Bob returned from an outing just then and agreed, and by then I already had my loppers and saw and just cut it to the ground.  A big fern came out as well.  It made a wonderful improvement as the focus is now on the new perennials and annuals.  The root mass can come out later or perhaps be kept as a very low shrub.  (I would definitely get rid of the oxalis too; it is very invasive.)

enormously better

enormously better (The blue pot is where the azalea was.)

When we were done…Well, not quite done, as we have more weeding to do that must wait till next week….I walked through and took some photos.

entryway

entryway, container by Basket Case Greenhouse

guest house windowbox

guest house windowbox

middle courtyard

middle courtyard

middle

to west garden

to west garden

wiggly Coco

wiggly Coco

and some birds for you know who:

feeder

bird

With that, we decided to quit work early (seven!) and have dinner at the Depot Restaurant.  On the way we did stop to bung seven plants into a couple of Long Beach planters, and after our delicious dinner (slightly work-related when we realized we must go back tomorrow to deadhead the last of the Depot tulips!!), we loaded the car at home with all the assorted plants we will need to finish the Long Beach planters tomorrow.

Annuals jobs finished today:  Jo, Ilwaco planters, Larry and Robert garden, Ilwaco post office!

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In 2001, we were hired to work on the garden at the Glenn House, that iconic house that I had photographed in 1974, a photo I had had on my wall for years back in Seattle.

1974 photo of the house

1974 photo of the house

2001 with empty boat

2001 with empty boat

boat planted up with cosmos

boat planted up with cosmos, 2001

boat with cosmos and perennials

boat with cosmos and perennials

view from the widow's walk of the house during 4th of July party.  Big flag marks the boat.

view from the widow’s walk of the house during 4th of July party. Big flag marks the boat.

It was Robert’s clever idea to add a sort of mooring post at the front of the boat, and idea I have used for garden boats since then.

the boat in early spring '02

the boat in early spring ’02

We also, in 2001, planted up this entry garden by the porch of the big house:

entry garden

entry garden

Behind the big house sits a little cottage, whose resident in 2001 was Paul Wainamo, then manager of the Sanctuary Restaurant.

Paul's cottage gate

Paul’s cottage gate

His tiny garden was exquisite.

Paul and Peaches

Paul and Peaches

cottage door

cottage door

gate to the street

gate to the street

in Paul's garden

in Paul’s garden

seating

seating

So sorry, can’t make the photos bigger unless I find the prints and rescan them!

In 2011-12, we took on the project of bringing back the little cottage garden, so I will be sure to photograph it this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We continued to improve the sidewalk gardens along Howerton Avenue at the Port, especially trying to make the sight lines safe by using smaller plants than the original plantings (which were not done by us).

14 April along Howerton, looking east

14 April along Howerton, looking east

Above, in the garden beds north of the Port of Ilwaco office and the Don Nisbett Art Gallery:  Santolina (lavender cotton), California poppies, Carex (bronze sedge), Armeria (sea thrift), Lavender, Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’

species tulips, April 14th, sidewalk garden

species tulips, April 14th, sidewalk garden

2 May with sea thrift in bloom (little pink balls in foreground)

2 May with sea thrift in bloom (little pink balls in foreground)

Meanwhile, on the 5th of May, we saw that the Harbor Lights Motel (which was trying to reopen but is now for sale) had their formerly messy and weedy patch of sand garden redone by Mike from Peninsula Landscape Supply.  The xeriscape looks much better than the weeds did!

Harbor Lights Motel gardenby Peninsula Landscape Supply

Harbor Lights Motel garden
by Peninsula Landscape Supply

Harbor Lights Motel landscape by Peninsula Landscape Supply

Harbor Lights Motel landscape by Peninsula Landscape Supply

Back to our Howerton gardens:  Here they are in summer.

Time Enough books garden, looking east, Ceanothus in bloom

Time Enough books garden, looking east, Ceanothus in bloom

looking east

looking east, 26 July

15 September, looking east

15 September, looking east

Gaura during the annual Slow Drag at the Port!

Gaura during the annual Slow Drag at the Port!

Above, the white spiky flowers of Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ caused a sensation among passersby.  (Not as much of a sensation as The Slow Drag, though.)

Autumn light in the Time Enough Books garden

Autumn light in the Time Enough Books garden

In October, the Port of Ilwaco crew cleared two more overgrown sections at the west end of  Howerton and we planted them up with divisions of plants from the other sections.

19 October, looking east

19 October, looking east

These two sections are to the north of Queen La De Da’s Art Castle and The Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

19 October, looking west

19 October, looking west

We also continued to care for the garden right next to our favourite bookshop, Time Enough Books.  In spring the garden boat sported a show of bright yellow tulips, either ‘Big Smile’ or ‘Mrs John T. Scheepers’ (the single one) and a double yellow Peony tulip.  (I could tell you exactly which ones had it not been for my computer crash!)

2 May

2 May

2 May

2 May

2 May

2 May

I don’t recall why there are some red tulips in there.  I usually go for yellow, because I learned from a gardening lecture way back when that yellow “stops the eye” for a split second and is therefore a good colour to use when you want to draw attention to a garden.

I do love a garden boat, and the new one at Time Enough inspired me (because it’s a little smaller than the old one) to try a more layered planting scheme with Cosmos, Salvia viridis (painted sage) and some Agyranthemum ‘Spring Bouquet’.

27 July

27 July

I don’t think the Agyranthemum shows up well enough, so next year I might try the bright yellow one called ‘Butterfly’.  At ground level, I used Geranium ‘Rozanne’ to simulate water.

Next: some photos of more public and private gardens to close out the year.

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October

After caring for the pretty new flower borders all summer long, mainly just fluffing and deadheading, we got back to the project in October and added a new shade area in a nook on the east side of the house.

October 9th

October 9th

October 11th

October 11th

Once again, we dug out the sod because I wanted to plant bulbs in November; the newspaper method would not have allowed that as the paper would not break down in just one month.

another after photo

another after photo

Next to the shrub that was already there, we planted Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’.  it is a great beauty. Got it years ago from Heronswood Nursery for Klipsan Beach Cottage; this one is the offpsring of that one.

the flower of Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'

the flower of Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

Now we just need a very special tree for the very back corner. Small, deciduous, choice, preferably at least a bit unusual. Thoughts: Robinia psuedoacacia ‘Frisia’, or a very special Japanese maple to tie in with Tom and Judy Hornbuckle’s beautiful garden across the street to the east; Descaisnea fargessii would be very fun. All probably require a trip off the Peninsula or mail order to acquire.

We used rock next to the house again.

We used rock next to the house again.

11 Oct: now the garden goes all down the east side.

11 Oct: now the garden goes all down the east side.

The whole day of October 11th we had an audience.

one of the three dogs

one of the three dogs

November

On November 28th, we started the next phase of Larry and Robert Garden 2012, and I almost forgot to take a before picture.

almost before

almost before

November 28th, 10:42 AM

November 28th, 10:42 AM

We were knocking ourselves out to do this project fast, because it came in the middle of bulb planting season and we needed to get back to planting thousands of bulbs in assorted gardens.  We probably would not have scheduled it for this time except that we happened to have unexpectedly acquired, from Chester Land at Olde Towne Trading Post, the main ingredient: a garden boat.

November 28th, 4:44 PM

November 28th, 4:44 PM

This was accomplished in heavy rain and a roaring wind sweeping up Pearl Street straight from the port.  The boat, a little fiberglass pram, was so lightweight that I fretted and stressed greatly to make sure it was well secured.  Allan drove rebar through the bottom into the ground to make sure that even an 80 mph gale could not budge it.   I hope it looks like it washed up in a storm.

29 November

29 November

On November 29th, we dug out beds around trees, which should make the trees healthier, and acquired more rocks from Peninsula Landscape Supply to soften the straight line at the west end of  the “beach”,  but darkness fell before we could apply said rocks.

29 November; I am still not satisfied with the shape of the rock beach.

29 November; I am still not satisfied with the shape of the rock beach.

On November 30th, we softened up the squareness of the beach and at last I felt pleased with the results.

30 November

30 November

30 November

30 November

We planted bulbs (deer resistant ones like Narcissi and Alliums) in these new beds and the beds we made earlier this summer.  By now we were hearing word around town that passersby liked the boat in the garden.  The old fisherman who make a daily trek on foot from an RV park at the east end of town to the grocery store at the west end of town were especially appreciative.  One told us how he used to have a garden and now that he lives in a trailer, he deeply misses having ground to putter in.

30 November

30 November

Above, you can see our good friends Tom and Judy’s historic house in the background.

On December 4th, we planted a few plants, at Larry’s request, for winter colour: a heuchera or two, some primrose starts, and a really cool plant with pink berries that I got from Back Alley Gardens, but whose label I lost.

December 4th

December 4th

In the spring, we will move these plants to the new corner garden in semi shade in order to make room for more showy summer annuals in the boat.

On December 19th when I was upstairs in Judy’s guest room admiring her exquisitely detailed miniature Christmas village, I got to see the great view of the Larry and Robert garden from next door.

December 19th

December 19th

The best thing for me is that it is just half a block from home so it is going to be a pleasure to see it every single day.

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