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Posts Tagged ‘Garden of Surging Waves’

 

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

I was thrilled to have the Astoria garden tour return after a couple of years on hiatus.  Over the course of our tour day, we overheard that a newcomer to town had revived the tour.  Whoever she is, thank you so much!  We also heard that next year it might return to its usual week, which was always the Saturday after the Fourth of July weekend. We hope so, and we also hope it never conflicts with the excellent Grays Harbor Master Gardener tour.  That would be a painful choice to make.

The new LCPS office is on the corner of the Hotel Elliot building.

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picking up our tour maps

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Kindly note that our friend and fine gardener Jessica is credited in the program.  We looked forward to seeing her at one of the gardens, as three of the tour gardens were ones she works on.

garden one: Garden of Surging Waves

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approaching along the sidewalk

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Rosa mutabilis, I think

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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I wondered if the water puddle around the gingko was intentional.

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The Pavilion of Transition

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The coloured strips have the names of donors to the park project.

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Allan’s photo

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This pleasant woman thought I was a volunteer because of my green shirt.  She wanted an ID on the Siberian iris.

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the north side

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looking west

My favourite part of the Garden of Surging Waves is the wall of words about local Chinese history.

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Allan’s photo

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interlude

Astoria abounds with historic information, whether you look down….

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…or to the side for signs along the way.

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Downtown Astoria is rich in container planting.  We enjoyed some as we returned to our van.

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Allan’s photo

Because the garden tour coincided with the busy Astoria Regatta weekend and its parade, we were eager to leave downtown and drive up the hill to see three private gardens.

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 27 August 2015

Astoria, Oregon

ilwacoastoria

From the 4 mile long bridge: lots of little fishing boats on the Columbia

From the 4 mile long bridge: lots of little fishing boats on the Columbia


buzzing about

buzzing about

Carol has a sore foot…an injury from too much walking, as walking is one of her hobbies.  So we looked for activities that required little walking, and a good restaurant where we could park right outside.

The Bridgewater Bistro

The Bridgewater Bistro

The Bridgewater Bistro

I had a cougar burger, a reference to a sports team.  Owner Tony Kischner glided by, still as graceful and personable as when he and his wife Ann operated the Shoalwater Restaurant in Seaview.  I miss having their fine establishment closer by.

made with Cougar Gold cheese

made with Cougar Gold cheese


Carol pronounced her fish and chips to be delicious.

Carol pronounced her fish and chips to be delicious.

We then took in the view from the deck on the restaurant’s north side.

The building to the north is a fine hotel.

The building to the north is the Cannery Pier Hotel.


the Astoria-Megler bridge

the Astoria-Megler bridge


the restaurant's herb garden

the restaurant’s herb garden on the sunny, sheltered south side of the building

Carol was able to walk a block to the trolley stop, as we had decided that a ride on the Astoria Riverfront Trolley would be the perfect use of our afternoon.

Astoria Riverfront Trolley

The trolley stop was by the Maritime Memorial park.

The trolley stop was by the Maritime Memorial park.


Under the bridge. A sign warned to beware of falling objects. (!!!)

Under the bridge. A sign warned to beware of falling objects. (!!!)

Carol sang a line from The Trolley Song as we waited.  It had been lurking in my mind since the last time we saw the trolley with Debbie Teashon. Later that evening, I found a delightful video that shows almost the entire run of the riverfront trolley, speeded up, accompanied by the song.  Enjoy!

The trolley runs about every 45 minutes on good weather summer days, so we chatted and waited.  The ding ding ding announced its arrival.

All aboard!

All aboard!


old boat at the west end of the line

old boat at the west end of the line

boat2

The conductors, drivers, and tour guides are volunteers.

The conductors, drivers, and tour guides are volunteers.  Carol, a Seattle Metro bus driver, said she would love to do this if she retired in Astoria.


“Ding ding ding goes the bell!”


the Columbia River

the Columbia River

riverview

the old net building

the old Uppertown Net Loft

That building was purchased by artists who were fixing it up as an art studio when the roof blew off in the 2007 windstorm. A couple of them were in it during the storm, and barely escaped, crawling along the wooden bridge to shore.  The trolley tour guide told us that quantities of art blew out of the building and were lost in the river.  The dramatic story is told here: “Around town, telephone poles snapped and car windows caved in under the pressure of the hurricane-force winds. Eddie Park, a friend of the Nebekers who had been helping board up the windows was thrown 40 feet and broke his arm against a wall. Royal and Park were trapped in the loft as winds raged around them. After 20 hours, they escaped by strapping themselves to a ladder for weight and then crawling on their bellies down the long gangplank to shore.”  Two days after I took this photo, part of the gangplank was lost in an unusually powerful summer windstorm.

The east marina, with sea lions all over the docks.

The east marina, with sea lions all over the docks.


cropped to show the mass of sea lions

cropped to show the mass of sea lions

When the trolley reaches the end of the line, passengers are instructed to take the handle on the seat backs and gently swing the back to the other side of the bench, thus enabling us to sit back down facing forward again.

turned around

turned around


passing the Mill Pond Village

passing the Mill Pond Village


Millpond Village and its many little gardens

Millpond Village and its many little gardens


the old mill pond

the old mill pond


the west end of Mill Pond Village

the west end of Mill Pond Village


historic train station (I wish the train to Portland still ran.)

historic train station (I wish the train to Portland still ran.)


by the Maritime Museum

near the Maritime Museum, a bar pilot boat


I love this mural.

I love this mural.


mural, part 2

mural, part 2


Wet Dog Café

Wet Dog Café

Note the man to the right, waving.  As the trolley clangs along by the River Walk, many passersby wave and trolley passengers wave back.

cafe

Every time people waved, I felt all choked up and teary eyed.  It really gets to me and reminds me of this line from What a Wonderful World:

The colors of the rainbow, so pretty in the sky,
Are also on the faces of people going by.
I see friends shaking hands, sayin’, “How do you do?”
They’re really sayin’, “I love you.”

And I think to myself, What a wonderful world.

on the deck of the Wet Dog Café

on the deck of the Wet Dog Café with the trolley reflected


We were waving back.

We were waving back.


looking south up an Astoria street with a fellow photographing the trolley.

looking south up an Astoria street with a fellow photographing the trolley.


The industrial waterfront is fascinating.

The industrial waterfront is fascinating.


There's another trolley reflection.

There’s another trolley reflection.

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We disembarked back at the Maritime Memorial.  The wonderful trip had cost us only $1 each. For a slightly higher fee, you can ride back and forth on an all day pass.  Due to a non-waterproof roof, the trolley only runs in good weather.

We paused at the memorial wall.

Maritime Memorial

The Maritime Memorial park

The Maritime Memorial park

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1

flowers taped to the wall for loved ones

2

She loved the river.

She loved the river.


Here comes the trolley again: Clang, clang, clang!

Here comes the trolley again: Clang, clang, clang!


Ding, ding, ding!

Ding, ding, ding!  These folks were not quite into the swing of waving yet.

Garden of Surging Waves

Carol moved her car to a spot downtown that was a short walking distance to The Garden of Surging Waves.  I knew she would be interested in the Chinese heritage of Astoria.

on our way to the park, some of Astoria's excellent planters.

on our way to the park, some of Astoria’s excellent planters.

Next to the park, around a soon to be developed plaza, we stopped to read some informative signs.

sign

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The Garden of Surging Waves

The Garden of Surging Waves

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I love the wall of words.

I love the wall of words.


contrasting styles of architecture

contrasting styles of architecture

learn

“To learn and to practice what is learned time and again is pleasure, is it not? To have friends come from afar is happiness, is it not?”

Carol, visiting from afar=happiness.

Carol, visiting from afar=happiness.


We sat for awhile on a bench.

We sat for awhile on a bench.


overhead

overhead


I like this screen with names of contributors to the park

I like this screen with names of contributors to the park

Astoria Coffee House and Bistro

We skipped checking out the River People’s outdoor market as Carol had already walked too much, and drove to park near the Astoria Coffeehouse…which had, since my last visit, transformed into a fancy dinner bistro and bar.

This took me by surprise!

This took me by surprise!

Fortunately, the excellent weather meant that we could sit outside in the early evening.

with delicious chocolate cake

with delicious chocolate cake

That is the end of Carol’s visit as she must return to Seattle tomorrow.  I gave her my certificate for a free night at the Sou’wester (a door prize that I won!) in hope that she can visit again this fall.

meanwhile, Allan’s day at home

a trip to Oman Builder Supply to be able to pick up posts without me or the trailer involved.

a trip to Oman Builder Supply to be able to pick up posts without a passenger or the trailer involved.


our post office garden

He watered and deadheaded our post office garden


Life Flight

Life Flight going over Nora’s house; we always spare a thought for whoever is hurt.


before the rain: painting the gate to match the new arbour; the reason will be even more clear tomorrow.

before the rain: painting the gate to match the new arbour; the reason will be even more clear tomorrow.


seen at the marina when Allan took the recycling to the bins.

seen at the marina when Allan took the recycling to the bins.

Allan’s productive day was perhaps not happier than this fellow messing about in a boat.

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a sign on the dock

a sign on the dock


making apple cobbler

making apple cobbler


It was delicious.

It was delicious.

We had gotten so much work done on Wednesday that we decided to take Friday off, as well.

 

 

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Saturday, 1 March 2014

Allan had gone to breakfast with J9 at the Long Beach Grange.

breakfast with J9 at the Grange

breakfast with J9 at the Grange

home

I slept longer and then took a stroll out to the bogsy wood.

It had definitely begun to dry out...

It had definitely begun to dry out…

I wanted to see some frogs in the bog but they were all hiding.

I wanted to see some frogs in the bog but they were all hiding.

Many the crab pot was stacked next door.

Many the crab pot was stacked next door.

I made another attempt at the crocus photo in the front garden.

the crocus run

the crocus run

also: narcissi

also: narcissi

crocus and hellebores

crocus and hellebores

more hellebores

more hellebores

and more

and more

tulips and narcissi

tulips and narcissi

Allan's garden

Allan’s garden

After my garden walk, I called Allan to suggest that we go overseas (to Oregon) rather than work, as the grey day’s weather was changing to drizzle. The work board still had some first time clean ups on the list (and I had forgotten to add the Red Barn).

skiving off from work

skiving off from the work board

Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart

After his breakfast, which of course had taken place at about 11 AM, Allan and I headed over the bridge toward Gearhart and our favourite north Oregon coast nursery, Back Alley Gardens.

Back Alley and The Natural Nook, formerly Fitzgeralds

Back Alley and The Natural Nook, formerly Fitzgeralds

March 1st at Back Alley

March 1st at Back Alley

plants

on the deck

a charming primula

a charming primula

double primula

double primula

inside the adjoining Natural Nook gift shop

inside the adjoining Natural Nook gift shop

The Natural Nook

The Natural Nook

We were so busy visiting with Pam and Prissy that we almost forgot our mission to buy a spare Birds Be Safe collar. Fortunately, Allan saw them after we had rung up our assortment of exciting hellebores and wee conifers.

see birdsbesafe.com

see birdsbesafe.com

Now look! There, to the left, is the new Ducly Mahar book and I did not even notice it till now.

Pam’s Gardens in Seaside

After visiting with Pamela Fleming of Back Alley, also the gardener for Seaside, Oregon, we made our usual detour down Broadway to check out her curbside gardens. The photos are strangely composed and blurred because we were on the move. We always used to tour these gardens by car even before we met Pam in person. They never fail to impress.

nicely mulched, with Heucheras

nicely mulched, with amber Heucheras

pocket

 

an impressionistic blur by the river bridge

an impressionistic blur by the river bridge

driving west on Broadway with gardens ahead

driving west on Broadway with gardens ahead

seaside

ever westward

ever westward

shrubs

one of several welcoming sit spots

one of a few big, welcoming sit spots

thick clumps of narcissi

thick clumps of narcissi

Seaside's famous Candy Man (handing out samples from the Candy Man store)

Seaside’s famous Candy Man (handing out samples from the Candy Man store)

turn

the western end

the western end

hydrangeas on the shady side, with nary a weed

hydrangeas on the shady side, with nary a weed

Seaside 7 Dees

While I had gotten some extra choice small hellebores from Back Alley that will bloom next year, I still was on a quest for larger ones in bloom now. When we arrived at 7 Dees (part of a Portland-based chain), blooming hellebores awaited us along with something very exciting, indeed, breathtaking: Edgeworthias!

Hellebores and Edgeworthias

Hellebores and Edgeworthias

more Edgeworthias inside!

more Edgeworthias inside!

I think I got the only one of this colour:  Edgeworthia chrysantha Rubra

I think I got the only one of this colour: Edgeworthia chrysantha Rubra

(The tag says Edgeworthia c. Rubra, which I assume is chrysantha, which is I believe supposed to have larger flowers, but Google tells me it’s Edgeworthia papyrifera Rubra.)

and I got myself this Edgeworthia papyrifera

and I got myself this Edgeworthia papyrifera

I was so very chuffed to find these. I used to have a precious Edgeworthia chrysantha; it had been brought to me on the train from Seattle to a Seaside spring garden seminar by none other than my gardening idol Ann Lovejoy. I adored it in my old garden and of course had to try to move it to my new one, and killed it. All I have left is one little branch; I had used its carcass, painted purple, as garden decor till it disintegrated. While these won’t have the emotional attachment for me, at least I have the excellent winter blooming shrub again.

mine!

mine! waiting to be rung up

and a pretty and fragrant wallflower came along, too...

and a pretty and fragrant wallflower came along, too…

Last year I would not have been able to buy such shrubs as we then shopped in the small two door Saturn. Look at us now!

van

load

While shopping at 7 Dees, I’d gotten a text from our friend Jenna (Queen La De Da)informing me she was on her way to Olde Towne Café in Ilwaco. When I told her we were at 7 Dees she asked if they had any of “those swirly trees”…and so we were even able to fit THIS into the van for her new shop, along with all our plants, with room to spare.

would not have fit in the Saturn!

would not have fit in the Saturn!

Astoria

One of the glories of the day was not having to buy frozen food at Costco; Allan had shopped on his own earlier in the week. Thus we were able to have an early dinner in Astoria. We chose Blue Ocean Thai.

Blue Ocean Thai at the west end of Commercial

Blue Ocean Thai at the west end of Commercial

The ambience of the restaurant is perhaps a little lacking.

a big sparse room

a big sparse room

Allan pointed out that the chandelier’s shape reminded him of an Allium.

Allium shaped chandelier

Allium shaped chandelier

The food was exquisite. I wish the Thai restaurant that is closer to us was this good. I almost wept with joy; it had been years since I had Thai food of this quality.

so delicious

so delicious

Top left: cucumber salad… The Larb Gai (bottom) was served at a cool temperature, as it should be. The Pad Prik King (green bean dish, top right) and Allan’s dish with peanut sauce filled me with joy, and there were leftovers for later.

After dinner we had a quick look, in the uncomfortably chilly dusk, at the Garden of Surging Waves. The ropes that kept us from going in last time have been removed from the new Chinese Heritage garden and many more plants added.

waves

now open to the public

waves

view

statue

rocks

fish

my favourite part: the wall of words

my favourite part: the wall of words

words

words

More words: metal tables (or benches?) inserted into the wall inscribed with quotations:

tables

words

words

temple

The last time we had looked at this garden, a big 7 Dees truck delivery truck had been parked nearby. And here, in the garden today, we saw several Edgeworthias (Chinese paper bush, so perfect for this garden’s theme). Maybe that is why they had been available for me to buy at the Seaside garden store.

edgeworthia

Edgeworthia

Edgeworthia

home

My lovely plant haul, photographed the next day:

haul

I had just seen Ciscoe rave about the Brazleberry on telly.

Hellebores small (very collectible) and large

Hellebores small (very collectible) and large

I am still taking Pam's advice and adding more columnar conifers.

I am still taking Pam’s advice and adding more columnar conifers.

Back Alley had two tables of fabulous Xera plants.

Back Alley had two tables of fabulous Xera plants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 22 December, 2013

We awoke late morning with a mission to go across the river to, as I suggested vaguely, “look at stuff”.

Fog on the 4.1 milebridge to Astoria hides the upper part of the bridge.

Fog on the 4.1 milebridge to Astoria hides the upper part of the bridge.

fog on the north hill of Astoria

fog on the north hill of Astoria

All the way over, Allan wanted to know what I had in mind.  Just “to look at stuff!”

We found the Astoria Christmas indoor market near the Ship Yard (bar?) entrance.

shipyard

Astoria Christmas Market

Astoria Christmas Market

Inside, we recognized vendors from the spring and summertime Astoria Sunday Market and even the Ilwaco Saturday Market.

"Niceland", an Ilwaco Market regular

“Niceland”, an Ilwaco Market regular

basket maker from the summer Sunday market

basket maker from the summer Sunday market

holiday songs on the banjo

holiday songs on the banjo

Allan's holiday market photo

Allan’s holiday market photo

After a few small acquisitions, we set out through the town in quest of lunch.

east end of downtown Astoria

east end of Commercial ondowntown Astoria

It tickled me to see a sign for a late night breakfast:  shades of my olden days at Beth’s Café or The Doghouse in Seattle.

breakfast

 While I had had my mind set on Himani Indian Cuisine, I was open to Allan’s suggestion that we go to the Columbian Café, a famously quirky eatery where he had only eaten once before.

east end of downtown Astoria

east end of downtown Astoria

We passed the Astoria coffee house on the way.  Allan noticed the outdoor knitting!

knitting or crocheting

Note how it matches the building.

fiber art

fiber art

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I have told that this could be an incident of Yarn Bombing.

I was thrilled to see weeds in a curbside garden on Marine Drive, as it made me feel better about any that might sprout in our Long Beach and Ilwaco public gardens during staycation.

Marine Drive, one block north of commercial, runs east-west.

Marine Drive, one block north of commercial, runs east-west.

I was less thrilled that the Columbian was closing in 15 minutes and had a small waiting line inside.

Columbian Café....too late for us

Columbian Café….too late for us

So back we went to Commercial to dine at Drina Daisy, the Bosnian restaurant where I had dined once, years ago, and where Allan had never dined.

Drina Daisy

Drina Daisy

What an excellent choice.  My faint memories had not included images of all the beautiful plants inside.

drinainsidedrinainside

It would be odd to sit next to strangers with the big plant in between.

Big plant in between two two-tops.

I have a frog piece almost exactly like this and now I have an idea...

I have a frog piece almost exactly like this and now I have an idea…

Allan ordered a coffee to start.  It came with a cookie, so I decided to have mine at the end.  It also arrived with a small palate cleansing glass of a flavoured mineral water.  I had a large glass of the same water and found it so delicious that I could have drunk a pitcher of it.

coffee tray

coffee tray

coffee

While placing his order, Allan made some indication that he might like the starter course of smoked meats and a dipping sauce.   Our server, who I believe is also the owner, strongly suggested he choose one of the main courses instead because it would be more intricately flavourful.  Allan followed his suggestion, and then the server/0wner brought us a sample of the appetizer anyway!

a gift!

a gift!

We each had Sarma, cabbage rolls, with and without beef.

our table by the window

our table by the window

food

two servings of Sarma

table

Allan’s photo

in the planter next to our table

in the planter next to our table

Sarma

The owner told us that the chef, who “prepares the food just the way she prepared it for more than 20 years in her restaurant in Gorazde, Bosnia, near Sarajevo”, is very particular about the freshness and quality of her fruit garnish.

Toward the end of the meal, she emerged from the kitchen and gave us a box of chocolates saying “From my homeland.  Merry Christmas.”
another gift!

another gift!

part of the view from our table

part of the view from our table

from the website:

Why the name, “Drina Daisy”?


The Drina is a river in the south of Bosnia with significant geo-cultural importance. Historically the Drina River has been described as the dividing point between Eastern & Western cultures. We see it not as a point of division, but rather as the point where cultures meet & come together. The bridge depicted in our logo is one of the most widely recognizable structures in Eastern Europe, the bridge over the Neretva River in Mostar located in south central Bosnia.

The Daisy is a simple, yet elegant flower that flourishes both here & in Bosnia. Our Daisy, however, is this & a bit more. Our Daisy is a very special lady, she is “our” Mother. Our Daisy was “transplanted” in this great Northwest from her native Florida by way of Astoria & its Tongue Point Naval Air Station during its peak activities of the 1940s.

Our Drina Daisy experience remains strongly in my mind three days later and I have the urge to return there soon after such a wonderful time.

After lunch, we strolled east through a fine and not too cold mist along Commercial.  The west end of downtown is almost all derelict buildings, many owned by one historic family.  A long wrangle has been going on with the city trying to reclaim them.  Meanwhile, I admire the solution that someone has come up with of putting historic photos in the windows.  I would like to see this or something similar done in the empty storefronts in my town.

Astoria downtown, west end

Astoria downtown, west end

astoria

astoriaastoriaastoriaastoria

astoria

One of the old photos (below) is of the Astoria Plywood Corportation.

millpond

I am pretty sure that that is where Millpond Village is located now, the location of my favourite Astoria gardens.

[I found out several days later that my dear friend Jenna, AKA Queen La De Da, was instrumental in getting this photo project going back when her shop was in downtown Astoria.]

Ambling down Commercial, I marveled at the casual stringing of a few of the extension cords powering the holiday lights along the street.

extension

At a side street, white pillars caught my eye from a block away and we walked one block south to Duane Street.  I had been reading bits of news about the Garden of Surging Waves, a tribute to the Chinese heritage in Astoria, but had not realized that it will be right downtown.  It is “named for the famous Surging Waves Pavilion located in a classical Chinese Garden in Suzhou, China”.

garden in progress

garden in progress

surgingwaves

surgingwaves

waves

pavilion

pavilion with hand carved dragon columns

a stunning wall of words, juxtaposed with the American Legion building,

a stunning wall of words, juxtaposed with the American Legion building.

words

words

It is right next to the hole in the ground where the old Safeway store collapsed into the basement!  Somehow, this is going to be incorporated into the park, I believe.

perhaps a water feature?

perhaps a water feature?

I so look forward to seeing the project completed; it is already breathtaking.

On we walked along Duane.  In the distance, I saw the new-ish falafel lunch truck, a worthy stop if one can get to town before it closes for the day.

The O Falafel lunch truck

The O Falafel lunch wagon

Turning north again to return to commercial, we passed the elegant Elliot Hotel and I was reminded of another hotel lobby that I wanted to revisit.

Elliot Hotel

Elliot Hotel

As I quested for said hotel, we passed the always beautifully decorated windows of the pharmacy on Commercial.

Pharmacy windows

Pharmacy windows

Here’s what I was looking for: the revitalized Commodore Hotel.  I do advise visiting the website and clicking on “story”.  Hint:  Use your cursor to turn the pages of the book.

The Commodore.

The Commodore.

It must have been our friend J9 who first took me in to see the lobby, where one wall is fashioned of artifacts found during the remodeling of the old hotel.

just inside the front door

just inside the front door

wall

Through the door to the right is a coffee shop.

holiday stars

holiday stars

Old suitcases, bottles, papers, books, boxes, and more are incorporated into the wall.

above the fireplace

above the fireplace

I did not photograph the fireplace below because people were sitting and knitting there (perhaps cozies for tree trunks and planters and trash cans!)

wall

wall

detail

I thought that the sign on the wall of artifacts might explain some of the history, so I took a telephoto shot.  Oops….and there I had been nosing all around the lobby when I fit neither of the allowed categories of people!

oooops

I did not realize my faux pas till I looked at the photo at home.

Leaving the hotel, the sight of the Columbia River to the north lured us down to the River Walk.

looking north across Marine Drive; who could resist?

looking north across Marine Drive; who could resist?

We passed a tableau in a window, something our friend Queen La De Da (queen of the mermaids) would like:

seascape

seascape

mermaid

And then we were right at the water’s edge with all sounds muffled by the fog.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

at the foot of the street

at the foot of the street

The thick fog almost obscured the view of cargo ships at anchor.

Allan's photo of ships in the fog

Allan’s photo of ships in the fog

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We were right next to the Bar Pilot Station.  I am in awe of these people who do one of the most dangerous jobs:  guiding ships over the rough Columbia Bar.  Briefly, and as I understand it, the pilots go out on a boat, and sometimes on a helicopter, to board ships out waiting at sea and skillfully pilot them over the treacherous bar.  The most dangerous part is the transfer from the pilot boat onto the ship.

pilot

headquarters of the brave

headquarters of the brave
Pilot boat

Pilot boat

We ambled west along the river walk, that runs for five miles along the river.  In the two block stretch that we traversed we found much of interest.

The River Walk

The River Walk

interpretive sign

interpretive sign

wild (noxious weed) buddliea

wild (noxious weed) buddliea on the river bank

I noticed the most glorious mural.

I noticed the most glorious mural.

mural3

mural2

mural4

dog

Allan noticed a detail that escaped me: information about the artist!

“Performed & Painted by Joanne Lumpkin Brown Local 729, 503-325-7885 painted June 1 thru July 30th, 2001, sistahpaint@hotmailcom”

muralart

flyer contains the artist’s name and contact information

Just west of the mural were the big windows of the Wet Dog Café, a place much favoured by our friends Tom and Judy.

The Wet Dog

The Wet Dog

The River Walk, looking west from where we turned inland

The River Walk, looking west from where we turned inland

The River Walk

The River Walk

Someone had brought two chairs to join a bench!

Someone had brought two chairs to join a bench!
dinnertime for ducks

dinnertime for ducks

Just up the street, I so wanted to get a photo of these two colourful storefronts and just as I raised the camera, as often happens, up pulled a car to park!

shops

shops

I’m sure the shopkeepers were happy to have another customer.  The shop called Cargo looked so colourful inside and bustled with people.  Only wanting to not drive across the bridge in the dark kept me from going in.

Cargo

Cargo

Just by where we parked, a window displayed a restaurant table set for dinner and a reflection of downtown (and me).

Twas either the Silver Salmon or T Paul's

Twas either the Silver Salmon or T Paul’s

The last photo, from the car, shows raindrops and Fulio’s Restaurant, another wonderful place where we have had many delicious meals, especially the Butternut Squash Ravioli.

Fulio's

Fulio’s

On every staycation, I think I will take the bus to Astoria and just walk around all day, stopping at different coffee shops and browsing here and there.  Perhaps this staycation, seeking blog fodder, I will finally do so.

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