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Posts Tagged ‘gardening’

Thursday, 7 September 2017

The prediction of “less than an eighth of an inch of rain” would not stop us from watering the Long Beach and Ilwaco planters.  They are so thick with foliage now that rain has to be substantial to penetrate into the soil.

I got to pet local dog Frosty at the post office on the way to work.

Long Beach

At the welcome sign, I pruned down a lot of the silly cosmos that were tall with no buds.  Why do some of them do this, when they are all the same sort (Sensation mix)?

front

from the sidewalk

back

bucket o’ prunings

We split up to water the Long Beach planters.

Lavender and the Herb N Legend Smoke Shop

Even though Rod Run does not officially begin till tomorrow, downtown Long Beach was full of fancy vehicles going round and round or parked to show off.

Folks were already sitting and watching the vehicles.

Allan’s photo

my own agastache admiration

Allan’s photo

Agastache labeled as ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’, that came back from last year.

same planter, new Agastache labeled as ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’. Huh.

Rod Run window at NIVA green

triple batch of cuteness

another trio (Allan’s photo)

sweet pea success (Allan’s photo)

A City Hall VIP walked by and said to me, “The planters look beautiful.  I am so sorry a bunch of asshats will be sitting on them this weekend.”  (That is why it felt urgent to get photos today.)  She added, because she is one who used to do a volunteer planter, “I used to cry after every Rod Run.”

The planter damage is not as bad as when the Run used to be an official parade through Long Beach for hours on Saturday afternoon, coinciding with Labor Day.  The last time that happened, maybe fifteen years ago, the crowds were so chaotic that the local law enforcement said they would no longer police the event unless it was moved to the weekend after Labor Day and no longer had a parade up one side and down the other of the Peninsula.  It’s not the shiny car folks who caused the chaos.  They don’t want to get their vehicles scratched or smudged.  It was a certain element of heavy drinking audience; the other problem was that gridlock stopped emergency access.

Despite Rod Runner’s disappointment with the change, and their loss of a three day weekend, the new schedule has worked out well in extending the tourist season for one more week and has been a great boon to our planters.

Verbena bonariensis and Melianthus major, Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

We paused after watering, followed by tidying Fifth Street Park, for a coffee and cookie break at Abbracci.

Abbracci Coffee Bar

a nice big batch of coffee grounds for our compost bins (Allan’s photo)

I got to pet darling Sophie.

car spotting (Allan’s photo)

and so it begins (Allan’s photo)

We had an amusing chat with this pleasant fellow, who said he was looking carefully before stepping and that his wife would kill him if he stepped on a plant.  Others over the weekend may be less cautious.

Twice I had seen a most interesting truck drive by.  After coffee, while clipping rugosa roses by the police station, I saw it park across the street.  I dropped my clippers into the roses and toddled over there as fast as possible to photograph it, and later I could not find my clippers.  They will turn up next time we prune the roses down low (probably October!)

I see it and rush to catch it!

saw-topped truck

old vs. new

I do hope this truck shows up at Slow Drag tomorrow night.

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ in Veterans Field

Vet Field flower admirer (Allan’s photo)

Figs behind Lewis and Clark Square (Allan’s photo)

a “rat rod” (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

We watered the planters on Sid Snyder Drive.  A couch sits there, having recently appeared.  It would be more useful downtown for viewing Rod Run.

Waterlogue

I got to pet this darling dog, who has a tremendously soft coat.

my new friend Buddy

Ilwaco

I watered and weeded at the boatyard while Allan watered the street trees and planters.

This frog hitched a ride from home on Allan’s water trailer, to where it gets filled up at the boatyard.  Allan caught him in a jar and took him back home again.

It was four o clock when we got started in Ilwaco, and, as a passerby pointed out, the four o clocks were open.

Mirabilis jalapa ‘Salmon Sunset’

Helenium (sneezeweed)

The watering started well, because the long hose for the south end was available.  (When we arrive after the staff departs, the end of it is locked into a shed).

Then I walked further along the fence and found the two middle hoses going up into boats.

hose going into the Tlingit Princess

and into the Sea-Jac

But, oh joy, the long northernmost hose was available today!

Joy and rejoicing!

Between that and our own long hose hooked up to the faucet by the sanican, the watering was easy.

Our local paper recently had a good article about stories from the boatyard this past summer.  This red boat was painted in the favourite colour of the boat owner’s wife, who had died of breast cancer not long ago.

in memory of Mary Lou

Author Luke Whittaker: “The boat had been sitting in Sitka, Alaska since 1989 awaiting a buyer, when 82-year-old Astoria fishermen Roger Marshall, became the unlikely owner last fall. Marshall was simply one fisherman who just wasn’t ready to retire. In October, Marshall bought the boat and nearly died during a desperate 800-mile journey home.

“Coming down I ran into terrible southeast winds all the way,” Marshall said. “I ran into some bum weather coming out of Candle River and I thought I bought the farm.”

Fortunately, Marshall made it home, after all — he had a promise to keep to his late wife Mary Lou.

“I told her when she was dying I would paint it red,” Marshall said. “It was her favorite color.” Mary Lou died from breast cancer in March. In August, Marshall fulfilled his promise with help from Fred Wiest. The bottom is burgundy with white sides and a bold, red stripe stretching bow to stern.”

 

sweet peas reaching the top of the fence

Someone keeps messing with my elephant garlic. Now every single one has been pulled, and a few left behind.

When I see a plant pulled and dropped, I wonder if a driver passing by yelled at the plant thief to stop.

north end of boatyard

Seashells cosmos

looking north

Solidago ‘Fireworks’, a nicely clumping goldenrod

seen while watering planters (Allan’s photo)

one of the Ilwaco planters with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and diascias (Allan’s photo)

planter with Acidanthera (Allan’s photo)

Allan finished the planters and rejoined me.  I had had plenty of time to do some weeding and deadheading, too.  I’d been pondering the decision about whether to water the easternmost curbside garden.  Because of Slow Drag visitors tomorrow, we decided it must be done as only a slight drizzle of rain had arrived.  Allan went to accomplish that after dropping me at home.

He passed by our Jenna (Queen La De Da) who was setting up for Slow Drag.

fog rolling in and the shaved ice booth (Allan’s photo)

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ (Allan’s photo)

Home again, Allan watched Skooter go fishing.

Soon after, rain began and continued for hours.  That was both pleasing and, because of our boatyard and curbside watering today, mildly annoying.

Friday, 8 September 2017

pre-Slow Drag

I spent the early afternoon catching up on writing this blog, because with two big events coming up, we will have much to share.  Slow Drag happens tonight, Cannon Beach Cottage Tour tomorrow (and the blog will then be more like fifteen days behind Real Time).

Rain had filled most of the rain barrels.

This one, from the shed, is the slowest to fill.

official rain gauge

right: a recent clematis tragedy despite semi-diligent watering

puddle in street with ugly new big-citified yellow lines

on the front window (Allan’s photo)

I am looking forward to the Slow Drag and the Cottage Tour, two of my favourite events, and am also fervently looking forward to afterward, when we have no events for quite some time.

Thursday, despite flat light, we did take photos of all the Long Beach planters.  Tonight, I am publishing a bonus post of the planters for my reference.  It will be on interest only to the most dedicated planter fan.

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Sunday, 3 Sept 2017

As we passed through the town of Castle Rock on our way to Evan Bean’s garden, I remembered childhood camping trips for two weeks each summer at the Toutle River, a beautiful campground that got washed away when Mt St Helens erupted in 1980.

 After our garden visit, we returned to Castle Rock and stopped to admire the public gardens.  I was pleased to find a Facebook page for the volunteer (!!!) group that does these gardens.  And, oh, LOOK! They have an annual garden tour (which we have, tragically, missed).

 Next year!

The first garden runs along the parking lot and street of the Riverfront Trail.  Allan went up onto the trail and got photos of the river.

I think this might presage a boating trip.

One of them waved.

The bank below the trail is newly planted.

Allan’s photo

how it gets watered (Allan’s photo)

This looks like the work truck.

Gateway Park

It was 96 degrees as we walked through the garden.

We had driven up that curved road heading to Evan’s garden.

I noted that somebody does hose watering.

roses and hydrangeas

This park runs for several blocks along a one way street going into town from the north.

Feast your eyes on the hanging baskets!  The park shows to the left in this photo.

I realized that each pole has a round banner which appear to be made by locals.  Let’s look at the baskets along this street and then get back to the park.

The baskets have gold sweet potato vine and at the top, some pink gaura making a spray of flowers.

Many hands make light work.

Now for our walk through this most amazing park.  I think that despite what the map below says it is called Gateway Park.

It’s long and narrow, between Huntington Avenue and Front Street.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

around the base of a tree (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

One plant source is Tsugawa. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo, looking down from the road

Is this really all hose watered by volunteers?! (Allan’s photo)

white gaura (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We’ve walked south, and now we are walking back north.

On the way through town earlier in the day, my first hint of the great garden spirit here was a glimpse of the city hall garden, so we went looking for it.  On the way, we came upon what seems to be the same commercial street and stopped to admire its planters and baskets.

Castle Rock Blooms banner

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

dangling sweet potato vine (I think that is what it is)

painted rock (Allan’s photo)

 

It was 4:30 PM and we were the only pedestrians.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

sidewalk garden beds

We found City Hall a couple of blocks away.  It had been a great benefit of my freeway avoidance that we had glimpsed its garden on our route earlier in the day.

Allan’s photo

pink gaura, also used in the baskets

Digital cameras are weird. And WOW, what a garden.

The only other person we saw was a man across the street waiting at a table and holding a bouquet. There is a story there.

waterfall rock

Water rill goes under the entry walk.

seems like they get a lot of donations…

Allan’s photo

I was well and truly astonished by Castle Rock.

Here are a few bonus photos from our drive while looking for city hall:

On the way home:

The part of highway 4 (Ocean Beach Highway) between Longview and Cathlamet scares me, but what’s new….I’m no fun on the driving part of a road trip.

The 99 degree temperature as we passed through Longview dropped to 79 as we got closer to the beach.

In Naselle, we paused for a look at the big garden by the library.

They were having a party.

and the garden across the street….

with its big rooster.

I’m kind of in love with Castle Rock now, and I fantasized about moving in retirement to join that group of volunteers….if only it were not so hot there!  Here’s an upcoming event that you might want to attend.

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Sunday, 3 September 2017

We left on our day trip before 10 AM, along with a bowl of tabouli and some chocolate cupcakes for a potluck and open garden over two hours inland.

My next door neighbour, Royal, saw us off.

Our route: We had another 15 minutes still to go when we got to Castle Rock.

The first part of our drive, east of the Astoria bridge: The Columbia River abounded with little boats fishing.  (Taken while on the move; we were on too much a mission to stop for better pics)

As we passed through Castle Rock, I glimpsed some enticing public gardens.  We will visit those in tomorrow’s post.

Our destination was the garden of Evan Bean, who has worked at Longwood Garden, Plant Delights (with our friend Todd), Cistus, and now works for Plantlust.com.  His garden, at his family home about 15 minutes east of Castle Rock, was open for garden bloggers and friends.

When we arrived, met by heat in the high 90s, a few other guests had already arrived, including Sean, owner of the fabulous Cistus Nursery and Jane of the Mulch Maid blog.

Allan’s photo, as we approach the kitchen door

Needing to adjust to the heat, we indulged in the delicious potluck offerings before touring the garden.  In conversation with Evan’s mum, Nancy, we learned that the two headed calf in Marsh’s Free Museum (Long Beach, home of Jake the Alligator Man), belonged to her grandfather’s side show. Her father, “Pony Bill” Giberson, had pony rides where the Long Beach carousel now sits.  (I thought I had this right, but Evan has clarified that “my mother’s father, Leonard, donated the two-headed calf. Her grandfather, Bill, had the pony rides.”)  Nancy herself has had a career in forestry, and encouraged Evan as a child to appreciate nature.

Fortified and refreshed, we plunged into the heat and a full tour of Evan’s garden.

the impressively small ladies in waiting collection

Garden writer Amy Campion in the greenhouse, with Evan reflected in the door

The greenhouse has a mister for the plants that Evan is propagating.  I am pleased and hopeful that Allan took an interest in how it works.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

plant babies

treasures

Near the greenhouse, Nancy showed us a stump that had resisted digging out, so they burnt it to represent nearby Mount St Helens and planted a Mt St Helens azalea in it.

burnt stump

Jane photographing the circular front garden bed.

Allan’s photo

The round bed was Evan’s high school senior project, on which he spent much more time than most seniors did on theirs.  He has enhanced and improved it since then.  (He’s now in his almost-late 20s.) It had much plant interest to offer us.  We walked around it admiring everything.

Sesli gummiferum (Moon Carrot), which I very much wish I had.

Notice all the pleasing rocks in the garden.

Jane noticing the details

continuing around

two kinds of ornamental oregano

Allan’s photo

The garden bed seems round but is actually more complex.

Allan’s photo

Having made it all the way around, I turned my attention to the bed by the house.

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some form of Melianthus next to the house (Later: Evan says it is Melianthus villosus.

easy access and I like the railings

The shade of the lower garden enticed me and others.  The rest of the garden that we will see is less than a year old, except, says Evan, “a section of the rhododendron border behind the hakonechloa bed, and a scattering of trees through the rest of the garden”.

the hakanechloa bed

By now, our friend Ann (the Amateur Bot-ann-ist) had arrived, with Paul Bonine, owner of the glorious Xera Plants, from whom I would buy one of every Xera plant if I lived in Portland.

Ann in the red checked shirt

The dry creek was installed to solve some drainage problems.

starry detail

sunny wall of house

In Evan’s words: “The annual wildflowers, and even some of the fast-growing perennials and subshrubs like Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’, Salvia officinalis ‘Purpurascens’, and similar plants, were mostly put in place to fill in space and cover the ground to help reduce weeds while longer-lived plants grow. They were plants I could obtain cheaply and easily propagate more of. In some cases, I’m not even sure yet what the longer-lived plants should be, so they obviously haven’t even been planted. In most of the garden, the longer-lived plants will have to be ones that can adapt to dappled shade as the cork oaks and other trees grow. I picture layers of relatively drought-tolerant evergreen shrubs like Elaeagnus, Choisya, Mahonia repens and nervosa, mixed with a few tough, easy-care evergreen herbaceous plants like various carex for textural contrast, and here and there some deciduous perennials or ephemeral plants for added seasonal variation. Some of those plants are already in place. Some have yet to be selected and planted.”

the path back to the shady patio

 

As I knew it would be, this was the sort of garden where I could not identify a fair number of the plants.  Any mistakes are mine from when I was too shy to ask.

Tricyrtis ‘Blue Wonder’ (I asked Evan for IDs on some of these plants.)

Allan’s photo

heading into the sunshine

looking back from whence I came

The fence encloses about two acres and keeps the deer out. Evan’s mom, a forester, says that our west coast deer are lazy and that a six foot fence is enough. She also said they have a fear of breaking their legs.  Other species of deer WILL jump a six foot fence.

A group of gardeners clustered around this plant pronounced it some sort of gentian.  Evan later IDed it for us: Gentiana asclepiadea, the willow gentian.

a young castor bean

seed heads of Dranunculus vulgaris

Dranunculus vulgaris

Mimulus cardinalis

Calceolaria arachnoidea

I am smitten with this plant.

Evan recommends orange Calceolaria ‘Kentish Hero’.

kniphofia

castor bean with beautiful airy coreopsis

Brachyglottis greyi, or it might be Brachyglottis ‘Otari Cloud’, says Evan.

These beds which are full sun will eventually have a bit of shade.

Allan’s photo

more lovely free flowing coreopsis

Heptacodium miconioides, which I knew, because I have one, thanks to my friend Debbie Teashon of Rainyside Gardeners.

This little guy got lots of attention.


Evan says, “”The wildflower look is sort of nice, but really not my style. It’s a planned successional stage in the gardens development, filling in space while the real garden grows.””

I must have been mad during my phase of not liking rudbeckias.

This poppy got lots of attention.

Allan’s photo

new growth.  Later I got the ID from Evan: Glaucium flavum var. aurantiacum

The shady patio is where we would soon be sitting again.

Zauschneria

Allan’s photo

a hardy geranium of some sort

the path back to the shady patio

looking out from our shady chairs

Allan’s photo

patio corner

outside the kitchen window

When we walked down to our van to depart, Nancy walked with us and, because we showed interest, took us to the kitchen garden.  It is located below the garage because the rest of the property used to be so shady.

tomatoes

yacon

That was a fine day out, with more to come, as we will tour some Castle Rock gardens on the way home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 28 August 2017

Long Beach

With the terrible flooding in Houston going on, I’d feel like a wretch if I complained about the weather here.  So let me just share:

And let me add that calling this “warm” is nuts.  “Smoke” was also in the forecast for today and created a haze around the edges of the sky.  We think this time it is from wildfires in Oregon rather than in Canada.  Later, someone said we had had “100% humidity”.  It felt very different from any hot weather that I have experienced here.

Fortunately, most (but not enough) of our work day involved watering.

We began with two north blocks so that I could buy some spray paint on sale.  I need to repaint the tall bamboo poles in our garden before winter.

I briefly popped into the always fascinating NIVA green shop to add to my photo collection for the shop’s Facebook page.

in NIVA green

Today we watered the planters and the street trees.

My walkabout photos:

across the street in Fifth Street Park: the classic frying pan photo being taken

Those folks getting their photo taken do not know that they are supposed to fling their arms up like they are clams frying in a pan.  Not that clams have arms.  But that’s what people do.

A fellow walked by and, as often happens, complimented the planters.  Then he asked, “Do you take care of the big pansy buckets, too?”  I somehow knew he meant the big hanging baskets from the Basket Case Greenhouse, which the city crew waters every morning.

Herb ‘N Legend Smoke Shop

My friend Tam from the smoke shop showing off his whiskers.

California poppies

more California poppies

Agastache ‘Blue Boa’

the carousel

Eryngium and Agastache in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter

Why don’t I plant more eryngiums in the regular sized planters?  How odd that I do not.  Must fix that.

Allan and I met up halfway through and had a break at Abbracci Coffee Bar for refreshing iced coffees.

a black labrador to pet

in Abbracci

Allan’s walkabout photos:

Geranium ‘Rozanne’

deadheading

Cosmos ‘Sonata’

The bees go round and round the center of the cosmos.

by Wind World Kites

With the trees and planters watered, we moved the van to park by Veterans Field, where I did some weeding while Allan pulled old Crocosmia ‘Lucifer from a corner of Third Street Park.

Veterans Field with Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’

Crocosmia project, before (Allan’s photos); looked like a bear had sat in it.

after

We walked along the Bolstad beach approach garden, clipping any rugosa rose stem that had strayed into the street.

the Bolstad approach, looking east

The city crew was dismantling kite festival…(Allan’s photo)

We think this selfie was with the rugosa roses instead of with the arch! (Allan’s photo)

While I went into city hall to sort out some paperwork, Allan pulled some more Crocosmia.

before

after (The gold shrub is Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’

Ilwaco

I had intended to walk the planter route, checking on them for chickweed and so forth.  However, my foot hurt too much so I went home, watered, and belatedly did our B&O quarterly tax forms.  Allan watered the Ilwaco trees and planters:

Pennisetum macrourum at the boatyard

poppies reseeded in the street at sunset

A kind local friend gave me the sort of foot brace you wear while sleeping in order to help cure plantar fasciitis.  I think it is helping…but it is slow going getting better.

 

 

 

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Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

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I have always loved this little rose garden.


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in the garden, a dog that “loved to be held ALL the time”


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Allan’s photo

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bachelor buttons and hops


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glass art in the garden just for the day

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hops and lilies


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hops


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Melianthus major


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the ramp up to the upper floor of the pub


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Jessica serving Fort George beer tastings


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Allan’s photo

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a glimpse of the river


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hops and compost


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looking down from the ramp at Seaside Pam in the garden


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My camera could not handle the bright sunlight.

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looking down from the ramp


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hops towering overhead


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overlooking the melianthus

This had been the final garden.  We three were hungry and thought of having lunch at Fort George.  Because of a 45 minute wait (due to Astoria Regatta and a Fort George Block Party), we instead repaired to our favourite Blue Scorcher Bakery, in the lower corner of the same building.

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By the way, the name Blue Scorcher refers to a bicycle craze:

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more sidewalk history outside the café


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lunch at an outdoor table


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breakfast burrito (Allan’s photo)


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Pam’s salad and pizza (Allan’s photo)


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Astoria Regatta celebrants passing by (Allan’s photo)

We were entertained by beautiful dogs whose people were at the next table.

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Allan’s photo


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friendly (Allan’s photo)

After lunch, we said goodbye to Pam and had a look at the rest of the plantings at Fort George Brewery.

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Will West and the Friendly Strangers playing for the outdoor block party.

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white cyclamen and hardy begonia

As we left, I saw a stand of sunflowers at the back of a parking lot across the street.  I am sure these are also Jessica’s work.

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a garden right on the edge of a sunken lot


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held up by boards


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Allan’s photo

Near where we parked, Allan photographed some interesting Astoria architecture.

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With the garden done, the day still held a treat for Allan: The early evening Highwater Boat Parade on the river.  That will be a bonus post, tonight.

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Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden five: Lower Columbia Clinic

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I have noticed this garden before when its Crambe cordifolia was in bloom—a plant I have been unable to grow since leaving my Seattle garden because here, the slugs and snails always get it.  So I have Crambe envy.

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Allan’s photo

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Lower Columbia Clinic curbside garden

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a bit closer

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I used to have that lavish Buddleia in my old garden behind the boatyard.  I’m sure it is still there, growing by the sidewalk; I must go back this fall and get a cutting.

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Pretty sure it is the same one I got from Heronswood once upon a time.

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Here comes Pam!

There was much discussion, once Pam arrived, about the identity of this plant (below).  Osmanthus? We think Steve and John of the Bayside Garden have one.

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Below is the Crambe cordifolia which fills me with envy.

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Earlier, it would have been a cloud of white.

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And it is spreading.

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looking down the sidewalk

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roses

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rose hips

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bamboo supports keeping the sidewalk clear

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looking up from the parking lot

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Allan’s photo

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a sit spot by the clinic parking lot

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south side of parking lot

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by the front porch

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window box (and me)

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window box decorated with poppy seed pods stuck in

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pot decorated with elephant garlic, blue globe thistle and cardoon ( I think) stuck in

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The windrows, as Jessica calls them, of composting debris are held up by bamboo poles.

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composting

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from below (Allan’s photo)

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more Crambe cordifolia envy

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that buddleia again

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Allan’s photo

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curbside

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apples

I enjoyed taking a close look at this garden which I had admired in passing in years past.

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Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden four: a garden recreated after the 2007 storm

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entering from the lower driveway

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Allan’s photo.  Garden owner John is above.

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Liatrus (Allan’s photo)

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common name Kansas Gayfeather (Allan’s photo)

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Stone steps lead up through the garden.

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a patio surrounded by garden

By now, we were touring at the same time as our friend Pam Fleming, the Seaside, Oregon city gardener (who had brought us some plants from Xera Plants in Portland, to my delight!).  We were stumped at the identity of the shrub in the photo below. We and the owner had some discussion with the garden’s owner and decided it is a Rhus (sumac).

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John, Pam and I

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It will have bright berries later.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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looking back at the stone path

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a bright salvia at the base of steps going to a higher level

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looking down at the brick patio

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the sunroom

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the patio and sunroom

I love that the garden owner had put out a selection of her favourite gardening books.

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I wish I had carefully photographed this entire article:

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Oh, but look! I found it online, and you can read it here.

(I usually remove garden owners’ surnames from tour posts; it’s ok if the names are in a newspaper article.)

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at the edge of the patio

Jan said her daisies looked perfect until our recent 95 degree day.

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golden foliage by the house

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the delectable sunroom

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Columbia River view from the front yard

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I spy Pam Fleming talking with garden owner John far below.

I saw some other guests, too, and pointed them out to Allan who was much closer to them.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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The deer decided to go to the Astoria Column road. (Allan’s photo)

By now, I had made my way down to the lower level.

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a woodsier garden below

The Astoria regatta parade had finished, resulting in a steady stream of traffic up the hill.  I figured out an alternate route to get back to the flatland for the last two gardens.

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looking back at the tour house after successfully crossing the road

Next: a delightful small semi-public garden

 

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