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Posts Tagged ‘gardens’

Sunday, 26 March 2017

More exceptionally wet weather kept me indoors.  Even though I’ve heard of our region being described as the Pacific NorthWET, I feel (without checking statistics) that February and March have been exceptionally rainy.

I took the briefest of walks out into the front garden.

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Pieris and flowering plum


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pieris


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needs detailed weeding!


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one showy tulip


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pleased that my rosa pteracantha has leafed out; I had been worried about it.


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narcissi


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Japanese maple


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also relieved to see Tetranpanax leafing out after a cold winter


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No feline had come outdoors with me.


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Skooter


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Smokey

I applied myself to finishing Thank You for Being Late…

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Parts of it were good…

…and then turned to a much shorter book that I’d been looking forward to and that was soon due at the library.

BECLOO

I had read all of Betty’s books, enjoying both her acerbic wit and the Seattle and Vashon Island settings.  (Warning: The Egg and I, her most famous book, published in 1945, has some passages of racism toward the local native tribe that bothered me very much when I read it.  This is addressed in just one page of the biography.)

As I had always suspected, there was a more harrowing truth to the egg farm story than was revealed in Betty’s fictionalized autobiography.

I had started young on Betty’s books, with Mrs. Piggle Wiggle being a favourite of mine in grade school.

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I was astonished to read that in the 1930s, Betty lived just three blocks east of where I grew up (6317 15th; I lived at 6309 12th).  I must have walked by the house many times.

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Betty’s home, as it was

I was even more astonished to read that the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle books might have been an influence on the name I chose in 1994 for my gardening business.

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In spring of 1994, I somehow ran across (before I had internet!) a mention of a place in England called “Tangley Cottage”.  I wonder if my memories of Mrs. Piggle Wiggle’s “tangly garden” is why the name appealed to me so much.

Paula Becker felt compelled to find Betty’s story.  That is just how I felt about Mass Observation diarist Nella Last, and about Gladys Taber’s memoirs.

“Why do some moments in history, some people’s stories, resonate for us more than others?  Perhaps because on some level, our own histories are deeply listening for them.  Listening to the quiet voice saying, Find me.”  —Paula Becker, Looking for Betty McDonald

Someone else that I found more about this week was Samuel Mockbee.  First, he was mentioned in the real estate listing of a hidden garden paradise we recently toured, and then his Rural Studio was mentioned in the great book, Deep South, by Paul Theroux.  Last night, we watched Citizen Architect,  a video about him.  It made me want to be young and a student at the Rural Studio.

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As you can see, rainy days are in many ways quite perfect.

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Saturday, 25 March 2017

Much as I longed to go the weekly political postcard party, I did not want any of our friends to get our colds.  By now, Allan’s was worse than mine as it got passed down the chain.

With the first really nice day all week, I decided to explore the potential compost bin area by our greenhouse.

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yesterday

It used to be a raspberry patch that had not done at all well.  Last year, it became an axiliary frog home with a free pond (the sort meant to be dug into the ground) that we had gotten from a friend.

I had started poking at the weeds when Allan emerged and asked if I wanted the pond emptied out.  Why…yes!  (I had carefully checked for frog spawn and found none.)

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We set the waterlogged pots of water loving plants to one side to drain out; they are too heavy to lift into the water boxes right now.

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waiting

One of the water boxes has a leak toward the top.  Having the big pot of water hyacinth in there will hide that problem.

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sadly one inch low water box

Many snails had found a home on the bottom of the plastic pond form.

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Allan’s photo

Not long after they were deposited into a bucket, the snails embarked upon a daring escape.

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Allan took them to the big field out back.

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on the way, standing water in the swale (Allan’s photo)

Devery popped over from next door, and when I mentioned that I was going to give away the preform pond, she happily took it to make a planter.  From looking through my grandmother’s old scrap books, I have realized that if I do have a pond sunk into the ground, I would like it to be a simple shape, like these photos that she had cut out from magazines long ago.

Back to the preparation for the compost bins: I was cursing the thick, ropy, hard-to-cut hops roots that coursed throughout the old raspberry patch from the hops and honeysuckle poles at each end.  It was not an easy weeding job.  Allan helped by hacking clumps with the big pick.

Every time I have assembled pallet compost bins before, I’ve tied them together with rope and let them sit there all wonky.  Allan had a different idea.

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his tools (and the pick handle)

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a trench dug to make the pallets level

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proper assembly

With the first bin done, I began to fill it up…an exciting prospect.

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newspaper base will help keep roots from coming up

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The new bin inspired some clipping

I was startled to learn that we only had four pallets, not the five needed to make two bins.  Allan had dismantled the fifth one to repair the other four’s missing slats.

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The project at a momentary standstill

On his errand to pick up the mail, Allan decided to quest for three more pallets.

He saw this down at the Port:

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Soon, Allan triumphantly returned to the garden, carrying a pallet, and began to finish the second bin.

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In order to continue to use one of the clotheslines for blanket drying, we had to place the bins so that there is only a narrow space between the back and the greenhouse.  I am hoping to reach in with a hoe from each end to get weeds and am aware that it might be a future problem.

The second clothesline will now only work for smalls.

Skooter had emerged to inspect the project and to monitor the frogs in the water boxes.

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I had clipped more plant matter in the greenhouse and on the patio to add to my first bin when me legs suddenly seized up, and I had to hobble into the house and have a sit down.  Little did I know that Allan had actually acquired three pallets.  As he stayed out to finish the project, I felt guilty but incapable.  I did not realize he was able to complete the third bin till he showed me the photos.

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done 

Eventually, there will be big horizontal boards that slip in along the front to hold the debris in place.

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I was well chuffed to have three compost bins, like Mr Tootlepedal.  Later in the evening, I caught up reading the last week of the Tootlepedal blog and was reminded that he has four bins: A, B, C, D.  It has been his compost turning and sifting exploits over the last few years that reminded me how much I do like having proper compost bins.  It’s so satisfying and makes faster compost, something that will be beneficial as we work less and can afford to buy less readymade mulch.

I will be shifting the debris pile from next to Devery’s driveway into the new bins.

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the old debris pile, soon to be some sort of garden

It would be fun to have a shared kitchen garden there, but it is outside the deer fence.  Perhaps herbs and flowers.

I look forward to the future filling of the bins and shifting piles from one to the other and then the sifting of the finished product through a screen placed over a wheelbarrow.

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My mother sifting compost in 2008, age 83

At my house in Seattle, which was once my grandma’s house, I had two compost areas separated by a narrow concrete path, and  I still remember the pleasure of tossing the partially decomposed clippings from one pile to the other and then sifting finished compost.  As a small child, I dreamt one night that I was one of the wriggling red worms in Gram’s compost pile.  That sounds like a nightmare.  It was not.

At 3 AM, I could not fall asleep because my mind was so busy imagining the collecting and layering of compostable material into my new compost bins.

 

 

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Thursday, 23 March 2017

I might have tried to work if the weather had been good.  I did not want to go out, feeling poorly, in rain and wind.

When the sun appeared in the mid afternoon, Allan departed for Long Beach to do some weeding and deadheading.

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returning a book to the Ilwaco library (Deep Survival, I read it, did not love it)

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Long Beach welcome sign

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He laid out the deadheads to show me how many there were.

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welcome sign

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Long Beach city crew putting up banners.

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deer-pulled tulips in a planter on one of the main deer intersections (where we no longer plant new tulips)

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Narcissi and primrose.  It is hard to get ALL the tatty hesperantha (formerly schizostylis) foliage pulled.

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crocuses chomped by deer.  Pretty sure they had flowered first.  Also on one of the main deer intersections (7th South)

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tulips

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deadheads. so glad Allan went to pick them

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after, with grape hyacinth

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Muscari (grape hyacinth) and lavender

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Tulipa sylvestris, one of my favourites

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snail damage

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Sluggo got applied.

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lilies emerging in Fifth Street Park

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Muscari, one narcissi, scilla (which I did not plant…it goes back to volunteer days).

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by Fifth Street Park

 

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the rain returned

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narcissi and rhododendron

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more white and blue scilla (which would take over if I let it)

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more banners, with Fitz and Parks Manager Mike

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in a street tree garden

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tulips and crocuses 

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By Stormin’ Norman’s. Calocephalus brownii came through the winter.

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under a street tree

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Allan checked on the Veterans Field gardens:

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anemones

Meanwhile, at home:

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I’ve never seen Skooter and Smokey snuggle up before.  It was Smokey’s idea; he tucked himself in under Skooter’s head.

I had read about Jaywick, a semi-derelict English seaside town recently in A Kingdom By The Sea by Paul Theroux and decided to look at a video about it, which turned into watching several.  I could actually afford a bungalow there.

The longest and most official Jaywick video is here.

From that, instead of reading, I segued into the Bill Bryon Notes from a Small Island series on youtube.  I meant to watch only the first one and ended up watching all of them in my comfy chair. Partway through my watching, Allan returned with a tasty crab roll for me from Captain Bob’s Chowder.

In closing, here is a public service announcement from Steve of the Bayside garden:

There are two upcoming special events which Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden hosts — the “Early Show” and “Mother’s Day” events.    Details on one-sheet, attached.    Both have judged flower shows and plant sales.  Info on rules, etc., on both at:  http://rhodies.org/chapter/pdx_activities_detailed.htm#early a page available at www.rhodies.org, the Portland Chapter’s website.

 It could be a worthwhile day trip for Peninsula people.

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Thursday, 16 March 2017

At the post office, on our way to work, Allan found a note in our box asking him to talk to the postmaster.  A postal patron had urgently needed to know the identification of a plant “that looks like a coleus”.

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Here it is: a greigii tulip.

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The foliage is as great as the flower to come.

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I realized it was time to apply some sluggo.

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Ilwaco City Hall ready for St Patrick’s Day

Long Beach

We hoped to accomplish two tasks on the project list today.  The first was pruning and weeding the five roses in the back of Coulter Park.  They are exceedingly difficult because of weeds, including salmonberry, coming under the fence.  The neighbouring house has but a tiny strip between house and fence that would be almost impossible for the homeowner to maintain, and in that strip dwell salmonberries, blackberries, and birds-foot trefoil that long to join up with the roses.

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the dreaded rose bed, before

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south side of park with pieris

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Pieris and Ribes (flowering currant)

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There was another ribes in that gap that turned up its toes a few years ago, as ribes are wont to do.

Allan trimmed up in the garden next to the old train depot.

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before

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after trimming sword fern

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rose bed; line cut with half moon edger (Allan’s photo)

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I was inspired to do two lines of half moon edging.

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after

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a pretty patch of primroses

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One dead rhododendron (azalea) has thrown this old threesome off balance.

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one of the two good rhodos (Allan’s photo)

We had two cold and windy squalls of heavy rain pass through; we sat them out in the van to avoid getting drenched and miserable.  (During the second one, we went to the Great Escape espresso drive through for invigorating sustenance.)

To add to our load of debris, we decided to do a bit of pruning on an escallonia at city hall.

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city hall, west side

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before (Allan’s photos)

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and after

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city hall hellebore

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telephoto through the arch (Allan’s photo)

We dumped our debris at city works and filled up all our buckets with Soil Energy mulch.  (The crew had got us a pile from Peninsula Landscape Supply.)

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a pile of riches

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first load 

On the Bolstad approach, we filled up the lower spots in the planters.

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before

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after

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looking east

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not a good day for a picnic

And we added some mulch to city hall west side garden.

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city hall after pruning, lily bulb planting, weeding, mulching

The last five buckets went into Fifth Street Park.  Yesterday, drenched from rain, we had left behind a messy patch of sorrel:

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yesterday

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today

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mulched

A lily bulb had worked its way to the top of the soil.  This is just one third of how big it was, after I divided it:

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Allan’s photo

We followed our first load of mulching with a break for delicious crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder.

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Captain Bob’s crab rolls

Back we went to city works to get another load of mulch.  Jackpot! I saw two good pallets on the pile.

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Thank you, Allan.

Now I need just two more for my triple compost bin.

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A red wing blackbird serenaded us.  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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Full load of mulch buckets (Allan’s photo)

This load went to the big welcome sign garden.  It had gotten low after pulling out last year’s annuals and absorbs a large amount of soil.

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before

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We found loads of shotweed to pull.

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mulching carefully around bulbs

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after

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back side

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after

I am sorry to report that deer are eating the tulips along the east end of the front side.  I hope they don’t eat them all.  One of these years, we may have to give up on tulips here.

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well chomped

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So glad deer do not eat narcissi, my favourite flower

On the way home, we stopped briefly at the Depot Restaurant to pour some water on the two sheltered window boxes, and there we discovered a sad situation.

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a flattie!

The spare is weirdly located under the front seats.  Everything there had to be moved and the t-bar thingie assembled to loosen a bolt in the floor that holds the spare tire in place.

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complicated!

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underneath

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the culprit

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Fortunately, Allan had all the tools (even two jacks for extra safety).

Despite having to look at the instruction book, Allan got the tire changed in 40 minutes and we were back on our way home.  But tomorrow will be devoted to getting a the good (fairly new, now punctured) tire repaired.

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one more big  task on the workboard

When the boatyard spring clean up is done (I hope by Sunday evening), the board will be gloriously blank for a moment and will then fill up with the beach approach clean up and more.

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Monday, 13 March 2017

As I write the first part of this in the mid afternoon, the rain is not as fierce as it was this morning.  In my youth…maybe five years ago…I would have leapt out to do some work.  Now, I feel less like working in the drizzle.  I added last week’s one day of work to the time sheet and was shocked to see we’ve eight rain and windy bitter cold and even snow days off.  Meanwhile, I’m embarrassed to report that Dave and Melissa bundled up in rain gear and worked through almost ALL the weather.

My excuse today: The soil is boggy and the plants are all drenched.  What a wimp!

I did take a walk in the soft rain throughout the garden.

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Skooter looked startled that I opened the front door.


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hyacinth basket


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looking south


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soggy footing


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lots of crocuses


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Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick (contorted filbert)


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way too much fried egg plant reseeded in the bogsy wood


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narcissi, and monster shotweed


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Slippery ground prevented the shotweed pulling and fern clipping from starting up.

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pulmonaria (spotted dog)


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hard to even imagine when we’ll be able to have a campfire


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The swale path is a pond.


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Looking north.  Water on the center path is over the top of my boots.


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south gate

The top of the south gate represents a Chinook tribal canoe, the sort that used to ply the river when this very spot was river front, before the port parking lots and building sites were built on fill, in the early 1950s.

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I do wish this water stood all year long.

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coming round the west side


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more pulmonaria


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corydalis foliage


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crocuses

As you can see, the chop and drop method looks pretty messy.  I look forward to the future three compost bins which will be made as soon as we get six more free pallets…from somewhere.  I have decided the bins will tuck in nicely next to the greenhouse.

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They will replace the wonky tadpole pond set up…


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I love my new stop the eye fence.


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Euonymus ‘Wolong Ghost’ is seriously climbing the front of the house, which is vinyl clad.

As I had walked all around the garden, I had collected one flower from every hellebore.  I’m sorry to report that many had minuscule snails hiding inside, putting paid to the idea that a cold winter would mean fewer snails.

Here is the full collection of hellebore blossoms.

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Skooter appeared.

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The center one is last year’s birthday present from Our Kathleen.

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Because my camera has been finding it hard to capture the glory of the corylopsis in bloom, I asked Allan to photograph it.

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Corylopsis and crocus, my photo

He returned with these:

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Corylopsis pauciflora

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with some fill in flash

Smokey snoozed through all of it.

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I’d like to read for the rest of the day in this most wonderful book:

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I can already tell you I am going to be rating this book at 20 stars.  As a former housecleaner for 18 years, I find deep familiarity in the stories of doing housework for richer folk.  And as the protagonist, Mildred, talks with her best friend about race, I keep marveling in a furious way that 70 years after it was written, how very much about racism is still the same.  Read it; it is wonderful and it’s funny despite its serious topics.  Read about it here.

My reading hours are curtailed because tonight is the local Democrats meeting.  I know Mildred would want me to go.  Here are her thoughts on a meeting:

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Sunday, 12 March 2017

Because we had a political meeting in Naselle this afternoon, we had decided to leave home in time to drive half an hour further and visit a museum in Skamokawa.

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driving along the Columbia River

I was not best pleased that it was a beautiful day and would have been excellent for weeding the boatyard garden.

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two wrecks?

Here is what the white remnant of a boat looked like in 1995, in the same little bay:

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For some reason, it had been deemed unsalvageable.

As we drove along, I pondered the fact that the many conifers along our roads are why our landscapes look more somber than the airier ones that Mr Tootlepedal photographs in Scotland.

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scenery heavy with evergreens

We arrived at our destination in Skamokawa: Redmen Hall, which I had read was hosting an exhibit about tugboats and steamers on the Columbia.

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The view from the parking lot

A back door offered easy access without all those stairs…and a disheartening sign.

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NOOOOOOOO

Across the highway, below, is a general store and café where we have stopped before.  I thought that, because of Skamokawa being such a small town, I might luck into a museum docent there.

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looking down on the grocery store and post office

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Redmen Hall from below

In a room right on the river, behind the store, an antiques sale was on for the day.

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antiques in a light filled room

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I used to have an apple like this till my good friend Sophie (a dog) broke it…for which she was forgiven.

I found two things to buy.  One is a present so I cannot show it!

And sure enough, when I mentioned having driven from Ilwaco to find the museum was closed, I learned that one of the docents was ill, and another one offered to open it for us.

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behind the store/café

Off the deck by the store, a boater was buzzing around.  I am sure Allan wished he was out boating, too.

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Allan’s photo

We followed the docent back up to Redmen Hall.  The hall was once a school house.  Amazingly, it used be down where the highway is.  When the road was put through, the building got moved up the hill with “steam donkeys” (not really donkeys!).

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The old school house remembered.

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Allan went straight up to the bell tower. (I did not.)

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Step on a pedal to open the shutters for the view.

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The views from the bell tower.

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river town from high above (and a boat ramp)

On the second floor, well designed historical panels go all around the walls of a big open room.

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What Skamokawa means

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interpretive panels

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the kind docent who let us in.  The way the panels are put together reminds me of my grandma’s scrapbooks.

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when the road went through

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a dance where “ladies may walk on their partners feet, and no questions will be asked”.

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another strong woman

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river pictures (Allan’s photo)

A glass case held birds provided by the Audubon Society…

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an erstwhile Mr Grumpy had fine plumage.

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the view

We dropped a contribution into the money jar and also spent a pretty penny in the well -stocked gift shop, including two books (quiet, because one is a present), a documentary called Work is Our Joy (about gillnetting), and some notecards.  If we’d had time, we could have watched Work is Our Joy right in the museum.  I will enjoy it from my comfy chair at home.  I already identify with the title.

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One of three nooks of books.

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Well represented: the books of Grays River author Robert Pyle

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Musician Doug is the spouse of our friend Beth; they live nearby but we had had no time to look them up.

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river town art

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most of our purchases

The hall is open Thursdays through Sundays from noon to four.  We recommend a visit.

We had a little over half an hour to to get back to our Indivisible meeting in Naselle.  I could not resist a side trip to the historic 1905 Grays River covered bridge.

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on the way

Tying in with our visit to Redmen Hall: author Robert Michael Pyle lives in a house with a view of the covered bridge.  I thought it would be kind of nosy to add a photo of his house, so here is the bridge.

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under the bridge (Allan’s photo)

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The river running fast and high.  (Allan’s photo)

In particularly stormy times, the river has flooded the valley.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Here we go.

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the other end

Before we turned around, I had to get a closer look at two trees beside  the parking area.

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going in for a closer look

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moss and licorice fern

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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assorted critters

Ooops.  I suddenly realized time had slipped by and we would be 25 minutes late to the meeting at Hunters Inn, Naselle.  I told myself that it was ok; we have been to almost every liberal political meeting available since November so we could be late to just one.

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part of the gathering

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postcards laid out on three booths

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One member brought this.

We discussed, shared ideas, and laid some plans for future events.

On the way home, Allan and I detoured to look at a garden we had admired when attending last month’s meeting.

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The garden in question is next door to Naselle Timberland Library. (Allan’s photo)

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lots of narcissi about to bloom (Allan’s photo)

Next door: a large garden which I intend to look at every time we have a Naselle meeting.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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pieris and the church next door

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Right across the street sits another charming house.

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I wonder if there will be sweet peas on that fence in summer. Or that could be a dog path!

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wrap around porch

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a tree with personality

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Allan’s photo

As we got close to home, I looked at the weather forecast and must admit I did begin to fret about losing what might be the only nice gardening day this week.  Remembering that we now have light till after 7 PM (yay for daylight saving time!), I resolved to get two hours work done in my own garden.

While clipping some Joe Pye weed, I gave an experimental dig at a large fuchsia.

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one of two many fuchsia magellanica

To my surprise, it shifted, so Allan helped me pull it out.

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after…Ok, he pulled, I watched and encouraged.

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project: clean up middle bed, before…

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and after

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Woe!! One of two matched asophedels has disappeared from the right hand pot.

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I will snag this asphodel from a different pot.

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Frosty

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bogsy wood swale

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Oh for more time in the garden; so much to do.

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Skooter obsessing about the frogs.

The unfortunate forecast:

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Resolved: no more daytime meetings on nice days till we have spring clean up done!

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Saturday, 11 March 2017

I can tell you the library joke now, shared by Maggie Stuckey at her talk two days ago.  I found a version online:

A chicken walks into the library. It goes up to the circulation desk and says: “book, bok, bok, boook”. The librarian hands the chicken a book. The chicken tucks it under her wing and runs out. A while later, the chicken runs back in, throws the first book into the return bin and goes back to the librarian saying: “book, bok, bok, bok, boook”. Again the librarian hands over a book, and the chicken runs out. The librarian shakes her head. Within a few minutes, the chicken is back, returns the book and starts all over again: “boook, book, bok bok boook”. The librarian gives her yet a third book, but this time as the chicken is running out the door, the librarian follows. The chicken runs down the street, through the park and down to the riverbank. There, sitting on a lily pad is a big, green frog. The chicken holds up the book and shows it to the frog, saying: “Book, bok, bok, boook”. The frog blinks, and croaks: “read-it, read-it, read-it”.

Bad weather made me happy today because we had an afternoon meeting: an ACLU training session focused on supporting undocumented immigrants.

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The Long Beach welcome sign today

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both sides

On the way, we ran a couple of errands in Long Beach.  I was started to see that the planter just north of Dennis Company has been completely browsed by deer.

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The planter looked raggedy.

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every tulip nipped by deer

I am beginning to wonder if any place in Long Beach is safe for tulips.  I just hope they don’t take a liking to the tulips in the welcome sign garden.

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container outside the Adrift meeting room (Allan’s photo)

People Power ACLU meeting

Today’s ACLU  meeting was one of 2000 simultaneous watching parties across the country, with 200,000 people signed up to attend a broadcast of the actual live meeting in Florida.  We had 22 in attendance, one all the way from Westport.  We all appreciate Adrift Hotel providing the meeting room for free.

Since the election, membership in the ACLU has swelled from 400,000 to 1.2 million members (including me).

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sign in and cookies

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Resistance Training on the big screen

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discussion time afterward (A few folks had departed.)

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It saddened me to hear, again, that there have been immigration raids on at least five local families, with fathers taken away.  These are men who are known to be hardworking good folk, certainly not the stereotypical “criminal”. It is difficult and can take years to become documented, especially for folks from Mexico and Central America; it is not a matter of laziness or wanting to be “illegal”. (By the way, it is considered much kinder to refer to someone as “undocumented” rather than “illegal”.)  Many folks in the room had grandparents who were immigrants, in one case, by illegally stowing away on a ship.  Mine on my mother’s side were immigrants (and invaders)…of the Mayflower type.
If you would like to watch the presentation that we saw today, it is said to soon be available for viewing right here.

“Even when we lose we must not despair, for there is dignity in entering this battle”, said ACLU executive director Anthony Romero.

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“As DT is going about his amendments of hate, we need to live our love”, said Faiz Shakir, ACLU political director.

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Allan’s photo

We heard three other speakers as well, Louise Melling (deputy legal director), Andre Segura (an ACLU attorney), and Padma Lakshmi, a star of Top Chef,whose mother was an immigrant and who said “I want my daughter to live in a country of compassion, not fear.”

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I fell in love with audience member Daisy. (Allan’s photo)

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so soft

This is all going to lead to a whole ‘nother set of meetings, all with a productive and well informed agenda.

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the beachy view from our meeting room

at home

By the time we got home, we had an hour and a half of daylight and a cessation of rain and wind.  Some front garden clean up was suddenly possible.

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before

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Skooter inspects, 20 minutes later.

That was a favourite sit spot for Skooter.  He may have liked it better before.

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before

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after, much weeding still to do. I look forward to it.

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hellebore

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Clematis ‘Freckles’ has been blooming on west garage wall all winter.

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narcissi

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Skooter’s way in (where a bottom piece is missing)

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front path looking east

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hellebores

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the floppiest hellebore

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double white hellebore

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“black” hellebore…with mulch of last autumn’s apples

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Pieris finally sizing up and blooming (left)

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Iris histroides ‘Frank Elder’

Because it was at the same time as the ACLU training, we missed today’s postcard party.  Here are a couple of photos (by Michele) of the latest efforts.  You can stop reading now if you don’t like the postcard efforts, because they comprise the end of today’s post:

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ingredients

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Bannon is the most terrifying of all…

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Dang! I wish I’d been there.

Tomorrow (Sunday): an Indivisible meeting which we are planning to combine with a brief and, we hope, photogenic side trip to Skamokawa.

 

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