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Posts Tagged ‘garter snakes’

I am only running 14 days behind on the blog now!!

August 1

We begin by watering and deadheading at Larry and Robert’s, just half a block east.

garden boat looking pretty good!

garden boat looking pretty good!

liking the look of the back entry

liking the look of the back entry

The fence to the back yard is not done and is stapled shut, and of the two of us only Allan is agile enough to climb over it to weed.

Next, we go east to the garden called Casa Pacifica, near the Wallicut River. As always, Dusty greets me.

my friend

my friend

I decide the entry needs an edge desperately. We don’t do much here because it will be in the way of a future home remodel. So tidying is all we can hope for.

before

before

after

after

In the back garden, I weed along the border atop the rock wall.

daisies and hydrangea in back garden

daisies and hydrangea in back garden

daylilies

daylilies

The garden gets pretty baked due to lack of well water, so I no longer attempt to add a lot to it…but what is already planted is tested and does pretty well.

As I work my way along the top of the rock wall (which unlike the one at Discovery Heights has one easy access point), I realize I am in a sort of nest of snakes.

two out of several

two out of several

You might envision much screaming but actually they just interest me. Now, if I were in a room with one large brown fluttering moth, then you would hear screaming.

They are non poisonous and they eat slugs.

They are non poisonous and they eat slugs.

snake

snake

and also a bee

and also a bee

slithering back to the hidey place

slithering back to the hidey place

Before leaving, I try to get a photo of the ever-shy Great Dane, Spook. Dusty, my shadow, has another idea.

spook

Perhaps I might like to throw a small piece of stick?

Perhaps I might like to throw a small piece of stick?

I won’t, because Dusty gets over excited and then nothing can happen but stick throwing. Instead, I take photos of some of the 12 whiskey barrels of plants.

by the driveway

by the driveway

with a volunteer daisy

with a volunteer daisy

another one

another one

As we leave, we see a very big thing in a tree. Could it be a nest?

way up high...what giant bird?

way up high…what giant bird?

To get to our next job, Allan wants to take the one lane road through a cranberry field area.

I think it is called Jim Road

I think it is called Jim Road

narrow

and it is very narrow

Jim

A driver of a car coming the other way gives us, rather an annoyed look as she pulls over to let us pass. I doubt many people other than cranberry people drive here.

Next, we do some weeding and deadheading at The Anchorage Cottages

two of four windowboxes at Anchorage

two of four windowboxes at Anchorage; why can’t the lobelia match? looks better on left one.

on the way south again, a cute dog waiting for its people

on the way south again, a cute dog waiting for its people

Now we are about to do a job I had muttered about for two days ever since Susie at the Boreas Inn asked us to fit it in. I had no idea at all how we would find the time for something extra, but we had managed to juggle jobs and I think a bit of rain had helped us delay watering Long Beach for just one day.

The job: To weed by a cottage just south of the Boreas, between the Boreas and Jo’s garden in fact. We had last weeded this tiny garden literally years ago. It is not at all part of our regular route.

I had tried to fob it off on our friend Ed Strange (Strange Landscaping) who mows the lawn there. He also shows up to have a look and sympathize.

Ed and his ice cream

Ed and his ice cream

He most certainly did not want to do it, and is thrilled to hear we are going to take it on.

He leaves us to our misery with a few sympathetic words.

He leaves us to our misery with a few sympathetic words.

the Yett job

the Yett job, before

I work on it for half an hour, pruning the ferns. I can’t get into that tall grass for fear my eye will swell shut again like it did the night before the Gearhart tour!

after half an hour (one person-hour of work)

after half an hour (one person-hour of work)

front, before and after

done

done

Meanwhile, I have done a lot of weeding and deadheading over at the pretty Boreas Inn garden.

Boreas Inn entry courtyard

Boreas Inn entry courtyard

Boreas west side garden

Boreas west side garden with hot tub hut

Lobelia tupa in bud!

Lobelia tupa in bud!

west garden bed

west garden bed

eastward view toward inn

eastward view toward inn

Agastache 'Blue Fortune'

Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’

assorted cosmos

assorted cosmos

I like the way the flowers appear over the long grass as we depart at almost sunset.

I like the way the flowers appear over the long grass as we depart at almost sunset.

August 2

Leaving for work in the morning, I admire a little container in bloom containing a groundcover dogwood.

Cornus canadensis

Cornus canadensis

I’ve always found it hard to grow, and this happy patch of it reminds me of my friend Mary Fluaitt who gave it and other plants to me when she had to move away for health reasons.

For work, we water and deadhead the Long Beach planters…

straighter than this in real life

straighter than this in real life

And we re-do one of them by the Scoopers ice cream shop with some annuals from the Basket Case end of season sale.

re-done

re-done

I could no longer stand the tatty old daylily ‘Stella D’Oro’ that had been there since the days when the planters were done by volunteers.

I do not like Stella.

I do not like Stella.

We stop at the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market at Veterans Field (Fridays, 4-7 PM) to get some treats from Wholesome Hearth bakery and who do we encounter but Phil and Nancy Allen (she who organizes the Music in the Gardens tour and has become a good friend).

Phil with some beautiful farmers market flowers

Phil with some beautiful farmers market flowers

We find time to deadhead and weed the fairly successfully drought tolerant beach approach planters.

sea thrift

sea thrift, sedums, yarrow

And then we get water at the Ilwaco boatyard to water the Ilwaco street trees and planters. This time, I also groom and deadhead the planters (usually Allan’s task while I do the boatyard.)

poppies at boatyard

poppies at boatyard

wondering why Agastache 'Blue Fortune' looks sick at the boatyard.

wondering why Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ looks sick at the boatyard.

Teresa at Planter Box gave me this plant to test out.

Teresa at Planter Box gave me this plant to test out.

fabulous, from a little six pack...a "strawflower"?

fabulous, from a little six pack…a “strawflower”?

I’m pleased with the Ilwaco planters. They got a slow start, as they often do: I have lots of bulbs in them to begin the spring show, and then they go through an awkward stage. Now they are good again.

Eagle and First

Eagle and First, SW corner

nasturtium, sanvitalia, diascia

nasturtium, sanvitalia, diascia (and painted sage, of course)

Eagle and First, NW corner (some poppies strayed from boatyard)

Eagle and First, NW corner (some poppies strayed from boatyard)

FINGER BLIGHT! at NW corner of Main Street and First. One year I planted what was labeled as Gladiolus nanus (small and delicate). They ended up being big yellow glads. I have lived with that as they are kind of amusing. But here, someone picked a big bouquet:

stolen glads

stolen glads

I just pulled the corms right out because I really am fed up. This happens most years, so why bother. I will replant them at Golden Sands.

Painted sage in this one has taken over all else, it seems.

Painted sage in this one has taken over all else, it seems.

perennial combo by Ilwaco Pharmacy

perennial combo by Ilwaco Pharmacy (catmint, sedum, golden marjoram)

As we drove home after watering in a cold unseasonal light foggy mist, we passed the post office and saw the woman with the dog and her boyfriend with their hands on the Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’…Yes, the woman who had recently been picking, with her red clippers, a big bouquet at the boatyard. We swung around the block and saw them walking away, she with a big handful of pink and orange flowers. “Hey” I yelled out the car window from half a block away, “Would you please, please, please STOP picking the flowers!” She called back something that sure sounded to me like “It’s a community garden.” As this sunk in, we had driven on a bit. “TURN AROUND!” I said to Allan. We turned and got across the street from them on Spruce, the main drag through town. “What did you say about why you picked flowers?” I called out to her, in a bemused and amazed (and I am sure aggrieved) tone. “Did you say it is a community garden?” “No, I didn’t,” she called back.

“I buy those plants with my own money,” said I (which is true of the post office garden). “Do you want me to pay you for these?” she asked from across the street. “No, I don’t! That won’t help. Just stop picking, please.” “Ok, but I didn’t pick these from the post office,” was her last rejoinder. “But I’ll stop.” Actually, she is right; her bouquet was not from the post office. I recognized what she had: They were from the boatyard or possibly someone’s private garden. With my head exploding, we drove off. I wish I could believe she is going to stop.

I am reminded of what the public gardener for another beach town told me. In her town, the police will actually call her if they catch someone with a bouquet from the gardens and will ask if she wants to press charges. (I would love it if our local police would do that!!) She says what good will that do; it won’t put the flowers back.

There are just not enough flowers in the post office and boatyard gardens combined to provide everyone in town with a bouquet and leave enough for passersby to enjoy.

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