Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘gazebo’

July 20, 2013

from the program: Laura Deemer is a passionate gardener who never has trouble finding time to work in her yard. As you enter through a gated archway you will be greeted by a cottage garden in small raised beds. Circling the property to explore the many planted areas and shady retreats you will find specimen trees, original metal garden art by husband Don, a quirky mix of mounted birdhouses and a gazebo perfectly suited for music in the garden. A pond built by Don and Laura is fed by a small recirculating stream.

The Deemer garden was discovered by tour organizer Nancy Allen when she was going down a tiny local road looking for an estate sale. She knew by peeking into the garden that something good was going on there, so she introduced herself and asked Laura if she would like to be on the tour. Nancy and I visited the garden again about a week later and were both impressed with Don and Laura’s garden artistry. Happily, Laura did agree to open her garden for tour day. (Again, because I did not photograph every last thing on tour day, I have included some photos I took of details on the two occasions that I visited the gardens before the tour.)

roadside fence

roadside fence

From the driveway, the main garden has two entries, one, below, leading to the front porch. The Deemers extensively remodeled their home and added decks over the years.

entry, looking south

entry, looking south, with garden tour guest

Entering through the gate above, you will see garden beds on your right.

entering

entering

Kathleen Sayce got a good angle on the symmetrical flower beds.

Kathleen Sayce got a good angle on the symmetrical flower beds.

looking southwest

looking southwest

Another gate leads you below the flower beds, and that is the one we entered through on tour day.

looking south from the other gate on a pre-tour visit

looking south from the other gate on a pre-tour visit

barberryNow the flower beds are to our left, and on tour day, Laura had put out informative signage about her favourite plants.

Geranium

Geranium psilostemon

This is information that I did not know!

This is information that I did not know!

My friends were especially smitten with the Deemers’ artisitic birdhouse posts. Laura told me she had made this one since my previous visit which had only been a couple of weeks earlier.

shell birdhouse post

shell birdhouse post

post

mosaic post

mosaic post

On my previous visit, Laura told me they had also made the leaf and round pillar birdbath.

birdbath

birdbath

They also built their pond and streamlet water feature.

pond

pond on an earlier visit

pond on tour day with garden art by Don Deemer

pond on tour day with garden art by Don Deemer

pond on tour day

photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

head of recirculating streamlet

head of recirculating streamlet

the tiny stream on a pre-tour visit.  I love this!

the tiny stream on a pre-tour visit. I love this!

stream and pond

stream and pond

Our friend Kathleen Shaw caught a slightly different angle.

Our friend Kathleen Shaw caught a slightly different angle.

another birdhouse

another birdhouse creation
coming around from the front porch and deck to the south side of the house

coming around from the front porch and deck to the south side of the house

east of pond

looking west back to the pond

Above, the shady southwest side of the garden used to be a vegetable patch until Laura decided to turn it into a woodland.

On the south side of the garden, where she has planted specimen trees and shrubs, she set up a table with before photos of the garden. I remember seeing this garden in its early days, over the fence, before it was surrounded with trees and shrubs…maybe 18 years ago as it is near Andersen’s RV Park, one of our longtime jobs.

before pictures

before pictures

rustic birdhouses in woodsy south side garden

rustic birdhouses in woodsy south side garden

another birdhouse with fanciful post

another birdhouse with fanciful post

People could walk all around the house via what is usually fenced off as a dog yard where two Australian Shepherds romp.

dog yard

dog yard

Laura told me she likes to create sheltered places to get out of the sun. Below is an outdoor room behind the house.

outdoor room

outdoor room

The wall was painted by Susan Wallace of the Painted Lady Lavender Farm, which would be our last stop on tour day.

wall

Leaving that room, we go along a shady walk, still in the dog yard. Laura told us one of the two dogs has been quite a problem with digging, but she has still managed to grow hydrangeas, ferns and hostas.

a shady walk

a shady walk

more good signage in the shade garden

more good signage in the shade garden

Leaving the dog yard, we enter a large, square sunny garden room on the north side of the house….a secret garden that you might not even find it you did not look for it. Along the back fence (to the right in the photo below) is a low area that is used as a debris and compost pile. I am hoping our friend Sheila may have photographed that, as we both like to see the work areas of a garden! The main part of the garden here has another outdoor shelter, a gazebo large enough to have dinner in…or place a Music in the Gardens tour musician.

Laura herself approaches as we leave the dog yard.

Laura herself approaches as we leave the dog yard.

Between the two raised beds of ferns, to the left, a path leads to another gate out to the driveway. This garden is enclosed with a tall fence, and the construction of the pergola is absolutely solid.

musician Jennifer Goodenberger

musician Jennifer Goodenberger

Jennifer Goodenberger

Jennifer Goodenberger

An elegant garden of shrubs and ferns with a dry creek bed runs along the north fence of this garden area.

Note the hydrangrea blossoms in the birdbath

Note the hydrangrea blossoms in the birdbath

dry creek

dry creek

dry creek with bridge

dry creek with bridge

gazebo...note fire circle just beyond it.

gazebo…note fire circle just beyond it.

looking northeast through the gazebo windows

looking northeast through the gazebo windows

I don’t see many “outdoor rooms” that are this beautifully built with windows…a perfect shelter from the beach wind.

another of Don's old garden tool birds

another of Don’s old garden tool birds

The skills of Don and Laura are evidenced in everything from the well built structures, to the paths and decks and paving, to the birdhouses and pond and Don’s playful metal sculptures.

Read Full Post »

from the program (the garden of Frank Jagodnik and Liz McCall):  Shakespearean Cottage Garden:  The owners’ passion for theatre inspires old-world wonder introduced by a dramatic front arbor spilling over with vigorous Clematis evergreen and sausage vine.  Unique fragrant lawn of Roman chamomile tolerates low traffic and dogs.  A nursery garden to the west includes lavender, asters, forgot-me-nots, peonies, sweet peas and anemones.  Chinese wisteria entwines hydrangea vine to frame the front porch.  A woodland haven of sweet woodruff,  Brunnera, ferns and bluebells lures you to the back garden inspired by flora-filled scenes of Ophelia, Oberon and the like.  Beds and bowers display English daisies, nine daylily varieties, blue potato vine, chocolate vine, climbing roses, honeysuckle, creeping Jenny, nasturtiums, Dianthus, leopard’s bane and sea thrift, bordered by old brick found on site.  A kitchen-handy herb garden thrives near the beautiful grape-covered gazebo.  A Sargentina crabapple tree, chives, pincushion flowers and cosmos take center stage, surrounded by lush chamomile.

from the street

from the street

over the fence

over the fence

from the inside looking out

from the inside looking out

front windows

front windows

front door

front door

Fleur Haven House

Fleur Haven House

I absolutely love quotations in the garden and this particular garden had mine beat in sheer number of well displayed signs.  I think I found and photographed every one of them except one turned out blurry so I will never remember what it said.

by the front walkway

by the front walkway

sign

weed

sign

sign

just inside the side gate to the front garden

just inside the side gate to the front garden

Inside the side gate to the front yard, we were pleased to find a fairy garden.

fairy door

fairy door

door

Here is where we lingered for a little while as we both took photos.

rabbit

village

village

We then made our way into the back garden, which as I recall meant stepping back out onto the sidewalk and in another gate.

inside the back gate

inside the back gate

I had not carefully read the description (I usually don’t read them thoroughly till later in my eagerness to see the gardens), so I was surprised and pleased by the chamomile lawn.

a fragrant chamomile lawn

a fragrant chamomile lawn

Allan found out that they maintain it with a strimmer rather than a mower.  (Note: from now one I am going to use the much nicer UK word for string trimmer AKA weedeater.)

on the lawn

on the lawn

a curving path

a curving path

some wilde thyme

some wild thyme

a little friendly bird

a little friendly bird

floriferous corner

floriferous corner

sign

rose

an even more floriferous corner

an even more floriferous corner

sign

sign

sign

back porch

back porch

I went up the back porch steps to get an overview.  They were interestingly made out of concrete blocks and were very stable.

view from porch

view from porch

gazebo

gazebo

digression:  I like the colour of green on the neighbours' house.

digression: I like the colour of green on the neighbours’ house.

The little bird was sitting on the bench just beyond that arbour, above, and in the corner hangs the basket of nasturtiums.

looking down to the patio

looking down to the patio

thyme-softened patio

thyme-softened patio

wall fountain

wall fountain

patio bench

patio bench

bench

by the gazebo

by the gazebo

inside the gazebo

inside the gazebo

and a view from the gazebo

and a view from the gazebo

another view of the chamomile lawn

another view of the chamomile lawn

on the house wall

on the house wall

sign

I like gardens that reflect the owners’ particular interests and this garden certainly did that.

Next: a garden with a phemonemal view, and meanwhile, another reminder that the excellent Peninsula garden tour is coming up this Saturday, July 20th!  I hope some of the Astoria people will come to our tour.

a reminder

a reminder

Read Full Post »

The day began with a stop at the Basket Case to check out the new availability list. We pored over it page by page, although I do skip certain plants entirely. (Phormiums and Agaves. I know there is probably still an Agave fad but they do not call to me.)

perusing the list

perusing the list

Whatever shall we do when Fred and Nancy retire?

Nancy was planting the last of the baskets…

Nancy

and had rigged up a board to keep the three poodles from leaving the back greenhouse.

Walter

Walter

We bought some Sanguisorbas, of which I never have enough. And some more grasses for Andersen’s Rv Park. There will be some excellent plants of all sorts (including another new-to-us Sanguisorba) arriving Friday.

And then, at last, we went to one of those four clients whose gardens we had not yet set foot in this year. At Steve’s garden, we got an unexpected greeting.

Last time I saw them they were babies!

Last time I saw them they were babies!

They had gotten quite large.

They had gotten quite large.

I thought of the time my friend Sheila had been knocked down by a sheep…

QUITE large.

QUITE large.

I was actually fascinated because I like animals, but I did wonder how they would behave because when they were younger, they would jump up on Steve when he fed them.

I have been doing Steve’s garden for a long time, going way back to when he owned the house that later became Laurie’s, and way back then two little goats used to nudge and butt me while I gardened. These two large goats would pack quite a wallop if they were in a nudging mood.

They were interested in everything. Allan later realized that they had peeled all the reflective tape off the back of the trailer.

trailer

wheelbarrow

shovel handle

I felt sheer delight when they let me pet them. The only truly disconcerting moment was when I opened the car door to get some plants. I had decided earlier that Steve’s garden should have some (deer candy) Sanguisorbas because his garden is never bothered by deer. I did not even have the plants all the way out when there were two goats next to me, standing on their hind legs with their front feet on top of the car, leaning on me and chewing the leaves off the plants. Ok, no Sanguisorbas then. Perhaps Steve could only have a Cistus. The deer on Discovery Heights do not bother assorted Cistus at all.

The goats followed us to the garden.

Down the slope by the garden I was thrilled to see someone else had weeded the raspberry patch and the blueberry patch! There are advantages to being late to the garden job.

fenced blueberry patch

fenced blueberry patch..usually thick with creeping sorrel

raspberry patch

raspberry patch

The goats followed us to the garden and showed a great interest in the raspberry canes…and our lunchbox.

I think they could have figured out how to open it.

I think they could have figured out how to open it.

Allan planted the Cistus and we got down to weeding (befores and afters coming up, of course). Meanwhile, the goats wandered through the garden chowing down…on daylilies, Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, a Buddliea…

goats

goats

They stood on hind legs, broke long branches off the variegated Buddleia (time to prune it anyway!), ate a few leaves from each, and moved on…soon discovering the new Cistus. Allan barely rescued it as they greedily began to consume it, so back in the car it went. It can live at Discovery Heights or Marilyn’s among the deer. I am not sure what we can plant to fill in empty spaces in Steve’s garden, because the only thing that seemed to be goat-proof were narcissi and (boring) rhododendron.

At lunchtime, Steve came home and put the goats away in their indoor-outdoor pen. (I told him I would have put them away myself if they had had sharp horns.) Allan pointed out to me later that (aside from my joy in petting them!), it was a good thing they were out, or we would have planted a bunch of nice new plants with no idea that they would soon be eaten.

And now, some garden photos. I have been doing this particular garden since creating it for Joanne. While I will always think of her there, and miss her gardening presence, I have finally segued into calling it Steve’s garden instead of Joanne’s garden.

Due to our late-season arrival the garden had gone all blurry with weeds.

before

before, looking south

before, looking west

before, looking west

before, looking north

before, looking north

before, the path by the stream

before, the path by the stream

This garden has a wonderful layout with an upper pond with waterfall, created by Steve and Joanne and a backhoe, and then a long stream that runs under a bridge down to a small natural lake.

the streamside path after Allan's weeding

the streamside path after Allan’s weeding

On the other side from the path we have Siberian and Japanese irises in a planting inspired by a lovely photo in a book called The Stream Garden.

iris bed is on other side...very hard to keep the pasture grass out

iris bed is on other side…very hard to keep the swamp grass out!

looking upstream

looking upstream

weeded pond bed

weeded pond bed at head of stream

pond bed

The front bed was made by leveling the mound of soil left from digging out the pond.

pond

Five and a half hours later…

across the pond

across the pond; driftwood marks the waterfall

reflected iris

reflected iris

I wonder if there will be any flowers at all this year with those goats?

We still need to get back, do some edging, and weed the backside of the garden….and am not sure when that will be.

While I sorted out the billing, Allan took some photos of the lake from points that I never take time to walk to while working.

by the gazebo, looking south

by the gazebo, looking south

the stream bridge

the stream bridge

When Joanne was alive, she had taught horse riding and had developed a bridle trail all around the large acreage.

from the trail, looking northeast

from the trail, looking northeast

Every now and then something jumps in the lake but we have never seen what it is!

and back across the very wet meadow toward the garden

and back across the very wet meadow toward the garden

The garden looks very small compared to the vastness of the property, but feels very large while we are weeding it. I am going to wait and see what happens with the goats before I worry about how the garden will survive their interest.

Tomorrow I hope to make the wake up call to another private garden. Or, should it rain, I will happily read back entries in Tootlepedal’s Blog. I had time today only for the most recent entry (excellent as always).

Read Full Post »

sweet poodle

Next we went into an exclusive Olympia neighbourhood along some “residents only” streets to the garden of Sharon and Ed Stanford. This friendly poodle greeted us.  To our left we could see a gravel and raised bed garden.  We turned right toward a gazebo.

Gazebo to right side of driveway

walking onto the lawn, looking back to the gazebo garden

the gazebo garden

outer lawn borders. I bet these beds were full before the harsh winter of '09-10.

Looking toward house from lower front lawn.

lower garden detail, Puget Sound view

getting closer to the house garden

from the tour guide brochure: “After you’ve been inspired by a visit to the Edinburgh Botanic Garden, what could you possibly do but create a 150-foot-long granite outcroppiong around your house with 130 tons of boulders?”  Why yes, of course, I would get onto that straight away!

the granite outcropping

at the base of the outcropping

granite outcropping detail

the granite outcropping

Wave Hill chairs at the base of the outcropping

Looking back, you can how small the gazebo is in the grand scale of this garden.

Sheila takes the high road

From the tour guide brochure: “How could you possibly respond to Adrian Bloom’s Foggy Bottom garden but go home and assemble a collection of rare conifers, perfectly complemented by perennials, ornamental grasses, trees and shrubs…?”  Indeed.

halfway to the back garden

toward the back, a sit spot

the back left corner of the house

toward the back, with Puget Sound view

Up we go onto the deck where brownies and lemonade are on offer.

Looking down into the granite garden, we see another path to explore. The garden from the house goes: border, path, granite outcropping garden, lawn, border, street.

the view toward the gazebo

looking toward the driveway where we entered

gazebo from the corner of deck

view of gravel garden by driveway

view from deck of driveway and gravel garden

Once off the deck, we walk the path we saw straight down....with the house garden on one side, the bed of granite rocks on the other. We enjoy this cute sign, humans one way and dogs another.

(We would love to have spend more time on that hidden path but we know we have an hour or more of driving left between the rest of the day’s tour gardens.)  Back at the end of the entrance driveway, we again head toward the back of the house; maybe this time we will make it all the way without being distracted.

end of driveway

On our right is a dry creekbed.

Sheila gives a sense of scale to the grand size of the creekbed.

Beware of affectionate dog!

At last we've reached the back garden.

beautiful back garden

                                       Off the back path, this was the only sign of a work area!

We would need hours to fully admire each plant combination.

Round and round the house we go...

We walk the hidden granite garden path again in front of the house because there is so much more to see.

Finally we have a look round the gravel garden to the right of the driveway from where we entered and saw the friendly poodle.

As with all other parts of this garden, it is perfectly lovely.

a final look

I wonder how much seeing the huge gardens of Monday influenced me to buy a new house later in 2010.  I don’t want a grand house but I would love to have a garden with so much room.  I certainly am unlikely to ever have this big of a lot, or the time or resources to develop it, but in the fall of 2010 I did increase my garden size from a 50 by 200 lot to an 80 by maybe 250 lot.  In another life, maybe I’ll have my own granite outcropping.

Read Full Post »