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Posts Tagged ‘Gearhart Oregon’

29 July, 2012, a benefit for Clatsop County CASA

formal patterns

formal patterns

The fifth garden we visited was supposed to be garden six, which would have bracketed the tour with green and white gardens.  But we wanted to end up at Back Alley Gardens nursery, so we switched the order.  The programme says of the garden of  David Hopkins and Rick Young:  “The strength of this beautiful green and white landscape is laid out in a pattern you will not soon forget.”

palm planter by front fence

palm planter by front fence

palm planter detail

At one side of the front yard, a tidy work area

At one side of the front yard, a tidy work area

In the work area, a potting bench and woodshed

In the work area, a potting bench and woodshed

looking back to the garden from the work area

looking back to the garden from the work area

 

Next to the area with potting bench and woodshed stood the most exquisite guest house, which was open for tour guests.

guest house

guest house

inside...perhaps a Murphy bed?

inside…perhaps a Murphy bed?

inside, showing door to back deck

inside, showing door to back deck

Garden tourists kept poking around the guest house, peering through side windows to try to figure out whether or not a Murphy bed hid behind the tall doors. One gentleman said, “It looks like storage back there.”  Perhaps some sort of rollaway bed is deployed?

 

 

 

On the shelf atop the cupboards (right), a photography book was on display.  We were not sure if the choice of photograph had been selected by the owners, or had it been opened by a tour guest, and in what way was it a glimpse into the lives of the couple who had opened their garden and guest house to our inquiring minds?

from this book

from this book

 

 

 

 

 

the photo book

the photo book

the bathroom

the bathroom

and out the back door to a secret deck

and out the back door to a secret deck

I love the simple, sandy path that runs along the back of the guest house.  So beachy!

path from deck to potting bench

path from deck to potting bench

and from potting bench back to deck

and from potting bench back to deck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the main house from next to the guest house

the main house from next to the guest house

boxwood circle

boxwood circle

On the other side of the guest house from the work area the formal intricacies of the garden began again with a boxwood circle, Lutyens bench, and clipped backdrop.

Next to and behind the house the strong white and green theme probably takes some dedicated upkeep to be so pristine.

 

 

white on white patio

white on white patio

around to the back

around to the back

garden tower

garden tower

back garden

back garden

Around the main house we strolled...

Around the main house we strolled…

passing a fountain that I imagine is viewed from a dining table.

passing a fountain that I imagine is viewed from a dining table.

an elegant view

an elegant view

returning to the front garden....

returning to the front garden….

boxwood in a box

boxwood in a box

Allan took a close up lawn shot for lawn expert Tom Hornbuckle.  And then we were off to the final garden of the day.

Interlude:

window?box

window?box

I loved this windowbox on a hour across the street.  Wait, it is not a windowbox without a window, is it?  A planter then.  I want to get some little trees and do an offset design like this.

After the formality of the green and white garden, I found it differently pleasant to gaze upon an unlandscaped scene of trees and floats.

 

tree floats

tree floats

the old red house

the old red house

Driving, we took a wrong turn and saw the back of the old red house I had remarked upon earlier in the day, that it might be an affordable Gearhart house, but probably not.  The lot does not go all the way through as I had imagined.

We stopped the car to take photos of a beautiful house and a garden that I liked best of all, even though I did not get to enter it.

a dreamy garden

a dreamy garden

detail of dreamy garden

detail of dreamy garden

A neighbour caught me lurking outside the fence on this dead end street and just said, “Liking the garden?” as he walked by with his dog.

veg patchBack in the car, we drove to the final garden, right across the street from our destination nursery, and next door to the tour garden, we admired this geometric landscape.

Next: the last tour garden of a very good day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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29 July 2012, benefit for Clatsop County CASA

outside the gate

outside the gate

in the gate

in the gate

About the “bonus garden” created by Nancy Draper, the programme says “This fairy tale garden makes you believe in garden elves.”  Why a “bonus garden”?  Perhaps because it was not groomed to garden tour perfection.  Its humble cottage and the fact that it was clearly the work of its owner endeared it to me immediately, and if the back yard had had more plants, it might have been my favourite.

No matter how grand a garden, I do most admire one that is created by its owner, when physically possible, with no outside help (other than the ideas we all swipe from each other).

front garden

front garden

front garden detail

front garden detail

a simple cottage

a simple cottage

a beautiful cobalt blue front door

a beautiful cobalt blue front door

tree trunk in fence

tree trunk in fence

While some of my gardening friends will turn their noses up at red geraniums (pelargoniums), they always remind me happily of my grandmother’s garden, where she even had a rectangular section in which she bedded them out.

In a front corner of the garden, you can see the tree trunk that went through to the other side into the previous tour garden.  Clearly, the tree had fallen, so it interested me that the fence had been built around it.

Maybe all it meant was that no one owned a big enough chain saw.

verbascum

verbascum

The fallen verbascum in the side garden looked like a string of beads.

The fallen verbascum in the side garden looked like a string of beads.

Coming around the side of the cottage...

Coming around the side of the cottage…

shed

in the back yard, a sweet little shed

in the back yard, a sweet little shed

On the other side of the wooden fence is the big garden we just visited.

shed window with roses

shed window with roses

Just after entering the back yard, Allan stopped to take a photograph...

Just after entering the back yard, Allan stopped to take a photograph…

of this...

of this…

a string of (toilet) plumbing balls

a string of (toilet) plumbing balls

The back of the cottage

The back of the cottage

The little cottage was humble enough that I could imagine living there, and oh! what I would do with the back yard!  It has a beautiful mossy tree behind the shed…

mossy tree with Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

mossy tree with Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

mossy tree limbs

mossy tree limbs

back yard with so many possibilities

back yard with so many possibilities

front garden corner

front garden corner

We departed after some more time spent in the front garden…

front garden art

front garden art

Then we had another entertaining Gearhart garden interlude as we made our way back to our car; it was too long of a trek to walk to the next garden in time.

Interlude

a garden home

a garden home

red and white

red and white

the ridge path

the ridge path and Roger’s garden

We followed the peaceful Ridge Path for four blocks, again passing Roger’s garden where a new group of garden tourists had stopped to admire his Eryngium patch, as must have happened all day long.

Right by our car down on a main street, we took time to admire a garden and home with a stone foundation.

on the main street

on the main street

a house with a stone foundation

a house with a stone foundation

Now on to two more gardens and a visit to a favourite Oregon coast nursery.

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29 July 2012, a benefit for Clatsop County CASA

from outside

from outside

After a pleasant walk we arrived at Lisa Cerveny and David Russell’sgarden.  You may have noticed that almost every house in Gearhart is clad in cedar shakes; it is the law, we think.  From the programme:  “An abundance of dahlias and an extensive rhododendron collection feel so at home in this well designed gardener’s garden.”

lilies inside the front gate

lilies inside the front gate

to the left of front gate

to the left of front gate

front porch, with me (oops)

front porch, with me (oops)

good dahlia cages

good dahlia cages

front garden

front garden

front garden

front garden

Walking to the right from the front gate, we reached a big porch between house and garage.

Walking to the right from the front gate, we reached a big porch between house and garage.

Beside the stair rail twined vigorous sweet peas.

Beside the stair rail twined vigorous sweet peas.

From street to garage, the driveway had one of those center plantings that I like so very much.  I still wonder if I could try this at home or if our little driveway is too narrow.  But since in winter I use the driveway for a mulch pile dumping area, I guess I cannot have this:

driveway planting

driveway planting

To get to the back yard, most people went up and over the deck, but we went to the far side of the garage.

between deck and garage

between deck and garage

utility path by garage

utility path by garage

into the light

into the light

A squeeze effect is always good, and the utility path led us from the shade out into the light.

To our right, a big dahlia garden, and head, lawn, hedges, rock walls.

To our right, a big dahlia garden, and head, lawn, hedges, rock walls.

pink dahlias

pink dahlias

dahlia patch

dahlia patch

dahlias

dahlias

Most of the tour guests came down the stairs from the side porch past this glorious clematis.

clematis

clematis

back garden entry point

back garden entry point

clematis and hydrangea

clematis and hydrangea

dahlia patch from back porch

dahlia patch from back porch

Partway across the expansive lawn with dahlia garden at one end.

Partway across the expansive lawn with dahlia garden.

another overview

another overview

Allan got up close with the lawn to photograph the beautiful lush grass for our friend Tom Hornbuckle…he who mows his own perfect lawn every third day.  He wondered, upon seeing the photos, what kind of grass it was.  This would be a big one to mow that often!

a lawn view for Tom

a lawn view for Tom

another lawn view

another lawn view

rock wall enclosing the lawn

rock wall enclosing the lawn

and a look back at the multi-level garden

and a look back at the multi-level garden

We stepped up to the top of the low rock wall to a shady level and looked back on the expanse of lawn and the far away patch of dahlias.  You can imagine in my garden much lovely green turf would have been displaced by garden beds…which is not to say I do not admire the restraint required to preserve such an emerald carpet.

Coming around the other side of the house...

Coming around the other side of the house…

By the shady path at the side of the house grew special rhododendrons and a fern collection.  Note, bottom left (above) a tree trunk coming through the fence, which is built around it.  We will soon see this from the other side.

rhododendron

rhododendron

hydrangea at front corner

hydrangea at front corner

Coming around to the front again.

Coming around to the front again.

dahlia cage

dahlia cage

After another pause to admire the excellent dahlia cages, we left to see the next garden, right next door!

********************************************************************************** Human interest story!  As may not be clear except for when I occasionally mention this, I have spent the last year catching up on my blog by adding retroactive garden tour posts from 2008-12.  As this entry was written in January 2013, my six and a quarter year old Mac finally plotzed with an ominous clunking sound in the hard drive area.  Call the WAHmbulance because, like many whose heads are in the garden, I have not been very good at backing up, although I did better than some and may have “only” lost the originals of 2000 or so photos.  My staycation may be cut short by the dire economic reality of buying a new computer.  (If I had not turned whole heartedly to the Mac, it would be cheaper…but I can’t go back to PC.)  Thanks to Allan for letting me take over his computer to finish this entry and move on with the blog on these rainy winter days.  (30 January, 2013)

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29 July 2012: Gearhart, Oregon, a benefit for Clatsop County CASA

front porch

front porch

Garden three, our favourite!!!! The Dee Madden garden: “It’s not hard to imagine being at the perfect outdoor party as you walk around this entertaining garden.” Might I add that the greeting table had, along with yummy cookies, a container of Red Vines just like Allan picked out to include with our tour day snacks!

walking around the house

walking around the house

my garden by the sea

my little garden by the sea

garden sign

garden sign

beside the back deck

beside the back deck

side garden

side garden

southeast corner

southeast corner

On the way into the garden, we had  the man who creates these rock stacks (behind the chair, right, and below). He was the same man, mentioned two entries ago, who is good friends and works with Steve Clarke. These rocks are NOT bolted together; they are perfectly stacked in balance.

He said he does not install them in gardens with children or rambunctious dogs, but he added that he can press on them and not have them topple. (I assume he meant press down, not sideways).

stacked rocks

stacked rocks

stacked rocks

stacked rocks

From the corner with the double adirondack chair and the stacked rocks, we turned left and walked behind the walled back deck.walkway behind the deck, looking north, and then south

walkway behind the deck, looking north, and then south

The back deck, enclosed in cedar shake walls, had at least three access points.  I think that it is what made this my favourite garden.  That, and the friendly and winning personality of garden owner Dee herself.

on the deck

on the deck

view to back path from the center of the deck

view to back path from the center of the deck

deck insetI loved the way the deck had an inset garden bed, and the simplicity of the big table and benches and the variety of interesting plants in bed, containers, and windowboxes, including one of my favourites, Salvia patens (lower left).

deckgarden

on the deck

on the deck

inset garden, handsome table

inset garden, handsome table

the table of perfection

the table of perfection

At the northeast corner of the deck (if I don’t have my directions all turned around), an opening led to a river rock fire circle.  Now I could so clearly picture wonderful parties here.

to the circle

to the circle

fire circle

fire circle

fire circle

fire circle

looking back at the generously proportioned deck

looking back at the generously proportioned deck

the north side garden, with another rock stack

the north side garden, with another rock stack

and another

and another

garden

rustic birdhouse, north of deck

rustic birdhouse, north of deck

At the corner of the house we came upon a table with delicious cookies, photos of the rock stack man’s creations on the beach and a postcard for Harvest Moon Designs, Dee’s helper with garden ideas.

refreshments

refreshments

We did not want to leave Dee’s garden, but of course, as usual, we had more gardens to see and the tour ended early (for us) at 3 PM.  With a last look over the fence…

from outside

from outside

On the way around the corner, we lingered briefly to admire a round rock edged garden bed.  It might be a pain to weed, but it looks so nice.

beach rock bed

beach rock bed

Interlude

On the walk to the next garden, we enjoyed a house with a simple but effective planting of roses and Stipa tenuissima,

Stipa and Roses

Stipa and Roses

two tiny cottages....

two tiny cottages….

and a pair of garden benches that would make even an ungardened yard a pleasant place to be.

benches

And now on to garden number four…

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29 July 2012, in Gearhart, Oregon, benefit for Clatsop County CASA

street view

street view

From the programme:  Donna and Alan Kinsel garden: “This garden deserves an award for right plant, right place. The composition reads like a well written story.”  From the street view, I immediately liked the well weeded and edged tree circles.  I am a believer in going all out for perfection on a garden tour.

front walkway and porch detail

front walkway and porch detail

We entered the garden through the driveway.

We entered the garden through the driveway.

from the driveway

from the driveway

Around the big lawn, the garden beds are tidily mulched and there is usually space between each plant.  My gardening bestie Judy says “Oh, yes!”  Her own garden is just this neat.

tidy garden beds

tidy garden beds

lawn beds

lawn beds

by the house

by the house

I appreciated that no red bark was used as mulch in the Kinsel garden.

by the porch

by the porch

fire circle

fire circle

plant combination

plant combination

garden path near porch

garden path near porch

by the porch

by the porch

Picture 19

a rock wall and path

a rock wall and path
white daisies with white hydrangeas; basset hound statue

white daisies with white hydrangeas; basset hound statue

a rustic gate...I very much like this

a rustic gate…I very much like this

Gearhart house

Gearhart house

The typically handsome house above was right next door to garden number three, which was my favourite garden of the day….

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29 July, 2013: Gearhart Oregon, a benefit for Clatsop County CASA.

outside the garden

outside the garden

front courtyard

front courtyard

After a happy chance interlude in a non-tour garden just up the block, we began the official Gardens by the Sea tour in Ron Stefani’s garden, described in the programme as having “Masses of hydrangeas and sweeping tall grasses surround the front yard seating and in the back, a deck that makes your heart sing.”   A soothing garden, it consisted of boxwood, Hydrangeas, and Miscanthus.

front gate

front gate

front porch with hydrangeas

front porch with hydrangeas

back garden: boxwood

back garden: boxwood

It is a tidy, clipped garden. I could do this for a client. In fact, we had a client who wanted this sort of garden and we succeeded. ‘Twas very soothing. But I need to go wild to be a happy gardener!!  I enjoyed this garden very much but would not have the discipline to stick to the three plant scheme.

back deck, container with Euphorbia

back deck, container with Euphorbia

other side

Boxwood and Hydrangeas

The other side of the back garden continued with the clipped boxwood, banks with white hydrangeas, and then a gently sloping mound topped with Miscanthus.

white Hydrangeas, Miscanthus

white Hydrangeas, Miscanthus (Ornamental grass)

Interlude

next door

next door

As we walked on to the next garden, a few blocks west, we passed several gardens that inspired me to get out the camera.  Just east of the Stefani garden, the neighbours had a simple, beachy landscape (left) with some bags of soil set out but not yet applied.  Up the block and just next to Roger’s fabulous garden, an exuberant cottage garden contained a white and green variegated member of the mint family that  I used to have, and no longer do, but I could not and cannot remember its name.  (below, right)

cottage garden

cottage garden

Sheila thinks the mystery plant is a variegated Agastache and she might be right!

Walking on....a pretty, simple driveway garden

Walking on….a pretty, simple driveway garden

Could this be a Gearhart house that we could afford?

Could this be a Gearhart house that we could afford?

Like Cannon Beach, but moreso, Gearhart is an expensive town with a reputation for exclusivity.  Even the rare derelict house probably costs a fortune.  But oh, what I could do with the one above…and look at all those windows!

beachy arbour and driftwood

beachy arbour and driftwood

wildlife habitat

wildlife habitat

Walking on, and almost to the second tour garden, we passed a house with such a beachy, weathered arbour.  Judy’s friend Liz observed that, in the photo above, the driftwood piece by the gate looks like a sea lion balancing a yellow beach ball on its nose.  On the fence, a sign (left) informed us that the garden is an official wildlife habitat.

Directly across the street from the second tour garden, a newly planted landscape (below) caught our eyes.  Later in the day of touring we learned that it had been installed by Steve Clarke, from Seaview, former owner of an excellent Willapa bayside nursery called Clarke’s that we had frequented often back in the day.  He has now gone mostly into creating gardens and while touring, we met a nice fellow who works with him.

a Steve Clarke garden

a Steve Clarke garden

detail, Clarke garden

detail, Clarke garden

Now at last, after much distraction, we turn our attention across the street to tour garden number two…

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approaching the garden

Standing in the driveway we could glimpse a lovely garden…

just outside the garden

…but to the right we saw and could not resist this boardwalk.  On one side a spur path ended mysteriously in beach grass; on the other, hostas were planted against the house.

boardwalk of mystery

The boardwalk segued into a gravel path and as it came round the side of the house…Ah, paradise.

paradise

When I saw the garden’s decorative touches I felt I had found a gardening soul mate.  Did I not have an old door of exactly this same faded red in my own garden (but without the clever sign).

To Life Boats

Every detail of the garden spoke to me.

gate and sit spot

Between garden beds and house a moss lawn grew in full sun.  I overheard the gardener telling other tour-goers (in left hand photo, to the right)that it was hard to grow the moss in full sun, but she had determination.

moss lawn

The back edge of the garden overlooked a swampy lake.  I wanted to sit on the red bench and talk plants with my sister gardener.

red bench with a view

Looking toward the house I realized that the cluster of other tour goers were acquaintances of mine from the Peninsula.  We all schmoozed for awhile but I was sort of glad when they meandered off and I could talk to the gardener with just her, me, and Allan!

garden tour-goers

I told her how much I liked the way the more casual area around the garden shed  flowed into the intensively planted beds near the house.

garden shed

A more private area at the corner of the house lay behind this magical gate which she said she and her spouse had constructed.

geared up gate

Well designed plantings afforded glimpses from here and there toward the central gazebo.

gazebo glimpse

The garden looked delightful from every angle.

different views

We expressed admiration for her garden, so perfect in every detail.

details

I even mentioned (I hope not in a scary way) my thought that she and I were soulmates in gardening style and gave her my card with email address and phone number.  She told us she sometimes visited the Peninsula and I said I would love her to come see my garden…which after all was looking really good that summer.  She looked a little more alternative and less polished than the very uspcale couple from the first garden…still glossier than me, but I could imagine us being friends.  Perhaps because I so missed the days when my friend Sheila had lived on the peninsula, I had high hopes for the fun and camaraderie of a new gardening friend.  I had not met anyone since Sheila who loved a spontaneous trip to a nursery (and who didn’t too much mind doing the driving while I paid for the gas).

gate

We left the garden with a last admiring look at another vignette of a unique gate backed with Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

I didn’t wait by the phone like someone lovelorn after a first date.  (I didn’t even check my cell phone for missed calls.)  For a few days I felt a frisson of hope when I checked my email but it was not to be.  I did not pine away but I do wish she had walked with me once through my garden.  I think in its way, in the summer of 2008, it was as good as hers, and I think she would have liked it.

I have never found a dreamy block to live on like that one in Gearhart where one would always have ready made gardener friends and gardens to visit back and forth.  From the first formal garden to the last cottagy and whimsical one this block in Gearhart was paradise indeed.

[2013 update:  In 2012 I finally made a gardening friend on my block in Ilwaco, Judy, whose political views and sense of humour also mesh well with mine!]

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At the beginning of August, I was fortunate to read a small notice in Coast Weekend  that a street of gardens in Gearhart was to be open to the public. Allan and I had considerable trouble finding it, ending up a few extra miles south in Seaside at first,  but it proved to be well worth the search.
Gearhart is an expensive and mostly residential beach town.  I expected the street to be in the older part of town but instead found a new development of modern homes. They were neither cookie cutter homes nor cookie cutter gardens.  Almost everyone in the street was mad for gardening and each had a different style.  This was the first garden…

garden 1: an entry grid

path around side of house, garden 1

further along the path

The first garden’s highly structured plan gave way to a naturalistic corner in the back yard.

beachy corner

From the beachy area (and I doubt they imported this sand!) you can see how the garden segues back to a formal patio.

informal > formal

The owners had a business importing pots and furniture, thus all the good pieces.

patio set up as if for a party

a corner of the patio

another grouping

no old rusty buckets for containers here!

Around the corner of the house, more seating areas.  From what we overheard it sounded like the gardeners on the street were all friends and we could imagine them gathering here on the rare warm coastal evening.

party central…in a dignified way

From the beachy area of the first garden one could look over into the neighbour’s yard, garden two.

second garden

in the second garden

I believe this was also the second garden:

overlook

Clearly the inspiration for the second garden had come from Japan.

a shady corner….and Asian inspiration

After the second garden we went back and walked all around the first one again.  I don’t think I could ever achieve such a crisp and upscale style, but I loved the way it went from the swale with grasses on one side to the sandy beachy area and then to the formal patio.

Whichever of the two gardens it was in, I love this sort of detail:

mossy inset rock

Moving on to the next garden, we met this friendly woman who told us she was going to be in charge of the garden section at the new Home Depot which was due to open shortly up the highway in Warrenton:

in the third garden

Here’s her very new and charming garden:

garden three

the front of the third garden

I wish I had taken a photo on one of the outer edges of a stand of dwarf fireweed which was glistening in the sun just outside her back gate.  It looked beautiful and the gardener and I had a good conversation about the beauty that can be found in weeds.  Especially ones that will be easy to pull after reseeding.

How I wish I lived on a street of gardeners!

As is usually true on garden tours, one garden…in this case, the last one…stood out as my favourite and will get an entry all its own.

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