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Posts Tagged ‘Georgetown Seattle’

Monday, 23 June 2014

Hardy Plant Study Weekend presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

The last garden of the tour…approximately garden number 20 or 21? I’ve lost count!…was one of my favourites.  (My other favourites were Froggwell, Hummingbird Hill, and the Tucker garden and the Galicic garden.)  All of my favourites are busy rather than completely serene, green gardens.  It’s a matter of personal taste.

We leave the Steen garden and walk past just two or three houses, admiring the extra wide parking strip.

We leave the previous garden and walk past just two or three houses, admiring the extra wide parking strip.

We leave the previous garden and walk past just two or three houses, admiring the extra wide parking strip.

looking down the block toward Jon's garden

looking down the block toward Jon’s garden

Jon Dove’s garden

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This luscious parking strip bed announced that we had arrived.

This luscious parking strip bed announced that we had arrived.

looking back along the sidewalk

looking back along the sidewalk

the enviably extra wide parking strip

the enviably extra wide parking strip

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the house

the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the front walk

the front walk

Allan's photo: front porch

Allan’s photo: front porch

narrow side yard

narrow, leafy side yard

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

 

hazed out purple Clematis

hazed out purple Clematis

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

into the back garden

into the back garden

Jon his very self

Jon his very self

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in the corner, a tiny cottage

in the corner, a tiny cottage

I was immediately drawn into the small building in the back corner of the garden.

I was immediately drawn into the small building in the back corner of the garden.

This tiny cottage is what popped this garden up into my top five favourites of the tour.

This tiny cottage is what popped this garden up into my top five favourites of the tour.

mirror over daybed

mirror over daybed

and old books!

and old books!

in the corner, a cabinet of little houses

in the corner, a cabinet of little houses

view out the front windows

view out the front windows

overhead

overhead

looking out the side

looking out to the side porch

rabbit with carrot laptop

rabbit with carrot laptop

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; Jon’s mother had contributed this

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

view over the rabbit's head

view over the rabbit’s head

beside the retreat

beside the retreat

looking back to the house

looking back to the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in the back corner

in the back corner

On the other side of the fence was a parking lot and some sort of offices or warehouse.

a hideway from the city

a hideaway from the city

the back wall of the house

the back wall of the house

second story balcony

second story balcony

and out the front walkway

and out the front walkway

in the parking strip garden

in the front garden

Allan's photo:  You can just glimpse the commercial/industrial building to the left of and behind Jon's house.

Allan’s photo: I think that you can just glimpse the commercial/industrial building to the left of and behind Jon’s house.

Jon's parking strip from across the street

Jon’s parking strip from across the street

What a paradise!

What a paradise!

For more on Jon Dove’s garden, see this article by Valerie Easton.

Jon is instrumental in organizing the Georgetown Garden Walk.  I’d love to go back, but have another gardening event to attend that very weekend.

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I found a blog entry here with more photos of Jon’s garden.

For more about the study weekend garden tours, see:

Bonney Lassie’s overview of all the agaves and other popular plants, and her post about several of the gardens, which includes links to others’ blog posts on the subject.



 

Georgetown postscript

Just down the block from Jon's garden, on a lawn; I believe the hedge hides a commercial parking lot.

Just down the block from Jon’s garden, on a lawn; I believe the hedge hides a commercial parking lot.

I would really enjoy living in this neighbourhood, despite the planes flying low overhead.

I would really enjoy living in this neighbourhood, despite the planes flying low overhead.

the door even has its own code

the door even has its own code

Allan's photo of me nosing around across the street from Jon's garden

Allan’s photo of me nosing around across the street from Jon’s garden

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across the street, more wide parking strips

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peace sign mailbox

rustic gazebo in the peace sign garden

rustic gazebo in the peace sign garden (fence festooned with bindweed)

another house across the street

another house across the street

I like the way the chainlink fence is softened with wood.

I like the way the chainlink fence is softened with wood.

I feel like a lot of soulmates live in this block.

I feel like a lot of soulmates live in this block.

further down, a set of townhouses

further down, a set of townhouses

softened with Cotinus 'Golden Spirit' (if that is what it is, must note that mind could get big!)

softened with Cotinus ‘Golden Spirit’ (if that is what it is, must note that mine could get big!)

Someone's big stand of Euphorbia

Someone’s big stand of Euphorbia

a lively door

a lively door

a coop for city chickens

a coop for city chickens

parking strip by the chicken coop house

parking strip by the chicken coop house

with list of bee friendly plants

with list of bee friendly plants

and a little free library

and a little free library

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With that, we left Georgetown (where I could have browsed for well more than a day) and headed for the West Seattle ferry and home.  The Northwest Perennial Alliance had outdone themselves with fabulous study weekend garden tours.  If you live in the Seattle area and join them, you will find out about all sorts of garden tours that they offer all season long.

Next: the road home and my plant bounty

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Monday, 23 June 2014

Hardy Plant Study Weekend presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

We continued on a short drive through Georgetown to the next two gardens, which were only a few houses apart.

a well planted Georgetown traffic circle

a well planted Georgetown traffic circle

Or maybe not so well planted if the shrub prevents traffic views, but it is certainly attractive.

The garden descriptions in the booklet are presented in the reverse order of the order in which we viewed them.  I tried to reverse the gardens  in the blog to reflect the order (since one description refers to the other) and found that I could not.  This blog is all about presenting events in order as they happened and I found I could not mess with that without feeling uncomfortable.  We saw Jon’s garden after the Steen garden and I have to be honest about that.

Steen garden

The Steen garden

On the curbside of the Steen garden.  Have you EVER seen such a wide parking strip?  I think I never would have left Seattle had I possessed a parking strip of this width by my old house.

On the curbside of the Steen garden. Have you EVER seen such a wide parking strip? I think I never would have left Seattle had I possessed a parking strip of this width by my old house.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo of a different part of the parking strip

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

entering the garden

entering the garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: Clematis tangutica, I bet.

Allan’s photo: Clematis tangutica, I bet.

along the side

along the side

an attractive rain barrel

an attractive rain barrel

Allan's photo; of course it caught his eye, as well.

Allan’s photo; of course it caught his eye, as well.

a soothing square of water

a soothing square of water

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: "a very slender tree for a very slender space"

Allan’s photo: “a very slender tree for a very slender space”

looking back

looking back

Allan's photo (We almost always end up walking through gardens separately because I am shy and just look, whereas he likes to chat with the hosts at the entrance.)

Allan’s photo (We almost always end up walking through gardens separately because I am shy and just look, whereas he likes to chat with the hosts at the entrance.)

entering the back garden

entering the back garden

more water

more water

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looking back at the house

looking back at the house

looking from the small shed to the other back corner of the garden

looking from the small shed to the other back corner of the garden

a sit spot

a sit spot

overhung with fragrance (jasmine?)

overhung with fragrance (jasmine?)

now looking back at the small shed

now looking back at the small shed

a gathering room with natural light

a gathering room with natural light

Next, our last garden of the four day tour.

 

 

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Monday, 23 June 2014

Hardy Plant Study Weekend, sponsored by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

After a frustrating misadventure between Normandy Park and Georgetown, with an important small bridge over the Duwamish Waterway being closed for construction, with no detour sign pointing anywhere useful, and going in circles (“Recalculating! Recalculating!” cried our New Zealand accented GPS guide, because she neither knew or believed the bridge was closed), we finally asked for directions and got out of the mess. Sometimes one can drive far enough from a detour to have the navigator find a new route, but that method did not work for us; I almost gave up and said “Let’s just head south, to home” (on the horrible freeway!); I am so glad we preservered.

Georgetown was all I hoped it would be: a neighbourhood that I would be very happy to live in. I have read that it gets lots of railway noise from a couple of train tracks, and it has frequent airplanes flying low overhead to Boeing Field. That might have kept the property values lower, although certainly not low enough for us to move back to the city (should we ever so desire).

Seattle neighbourhoods; Phinney Ridge was where I lived till moving to the beach in December 1992.

Seattle neighbourhoods; Phinney Ridge was where I lived till moving to the beach in December 1992. Bellevue, where the Hardy Plant weekend took place, is to the right across Lake Washington.

First Georgetown garden: Reiquam garden

This description had me curious and excited all weekend, looking forward to the Monday tour.

photo

I pictured a slice of ground between two buildings reminiscent of the tiny sliver of garden next to the old Café Septieme in Seattle’s Belltown neighbourhood (just north of downtown). The garden turned out to be more residential than I had expected, and to my sorrow:

NOOOOOOO!!!!

NOOOOOOO!!!!

the posture of sorrow

the posture of sorrow

and again NOOOOOO!!!!

and again NOOOOOO!!!!

We had heard a rumour while at the Normandy Park gardens earlier in the day that a garden was closed. This one was, it turned out, perhaps the best one to not be able to enter because we could see some of it from the street.

I poked my camera lens through the fence.

I poked my camera lens through the fence to photograph the front garden. (The advantage of a tiny pocket camera!) There was a raised round pool (metal, I think) to my right, hidden behind some greenery.

The narrow beds were barked.

The narrow beds were barked.

the house

the house, passiflora in bloom

the side garden with motorcycle sculpture

the side garden with motorcycle sculpture

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We wish the Reiquams the best for the emergency that must have arisen, and we enjoyed every bit that we could see of the garden.

interlude

We strolled down to the other end of the block for the next garden.

two lovely painted ladies

two lovely painted ladies on the way

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Wiley garden

I had NO unsureness about the colours and combination in the little city garden we toured next. I found it so refreshing to be in a tiny garden in a working class style house.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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purple!

purple!

a simple house

a simple house; garden owner in red shirt

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the owner's card!

the owner’s card!

Allan's photo:  Wiley Youngblood

Allan’s photo: Wiley Youngblood

Allan's photo, front of house

Allan’s photo, front of house

from the front gate

from the front gate

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

going around the side; the stakes are tree stakes from the Chihuly garden, painted purple

going around the side; the stakes are tree stakes from the Chihuly garden, painted purple

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo with Eryngiums 'Sapphire Blue' and 'Jade Frost'

Allan’s photo with Eryngiums ‘Sapphire Blue’ and ‘Jade Frost’

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, bright and dark coleus

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 chicken coop in back yard

chicken coop in back yard

Allan's photo of me taking a chicken photo

Allan’s photo of me taking a chicken photo

chickens!

chickens!

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

on the shed

on the shed, another touch that made me happy

corner of back yard

corner of back yard

Looking down over the back fence...veg growing in hay bales.

Looking down over the back fence…veg growing in hay bales.

in the alley behind the back fence

in the alley behind the back fence

I love alleys. My house in the Phinney Ridge neighbourhood had an alley behind it and I used to take alley walks throughout the neighbourhoods. Alleys are rare, perhaps non existent on the Long Beach Peninsula. I miss alley walks.

looking back at the sweet little house

looking back at the sweet little house…

the back yard gathering place is to my right

the back yard gathering place is to my right

back porch

back porch

The silhouette is of a hen who had run up the back stairs and gone into the kitchen to drink from a bowl on the floor!

The silhouette is of a hen who had run up the back stairs and gone into the kitchen to drink from a bowl on the floor!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

interlude

a nearby grocery store

a nearby grocery store

We drove off (could have walked) to the next stop, passing this cute little grocery store that would be so handy to walk to.

art in the traffic circle

art in the traffic circle by the grocery store

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more traffic circle art (reward of being too lazy to walk)

more traffic circle art (reward of being too lazy to walk)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo. I am loving Georgetown

and walked down the block to see...this!

By our next parking spot, we walked down the block to see…this!

a stunning house

a stunning house

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detail of grand house

detail of grand house and an outbuilding? set further back

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an impressive tetrapanax papyrifer

an impressive tetrapanax papyrifer

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Could it be for sale?!?  No, this turned out to be for a tiny house tucked back in the deep shade next door.

Could it be for sale?!? No, this turned out to be for a tiny house tucked back in the deep shade next door.

We thought this was part of the garden but have now realized it's a walkway to the house next door.

We thought this was part of the garden but have now realized it’s a walkway to the house next door.

from the realtor: tiny hidden house

from the realtor: tiny hidden house

real estate photo

real estate photo

“Fabulous condo alternative. Next to the Castle in Georgetown you will find this remarkable carriage house. Cute & cozy. Set off the street and very private. Across the way, you will find the community pea patch and “The Hat and Boots”, local icons. Come live in this hip neighborhood near restaurants & services. ” See more (while it lasts) at: http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6422-Carleton-Ave-S-Seattle-WA-98108/48822160_zpid/

When I learned that the tower house is called the Georgetown Castle, I found some articles about it here, here, and a tour of the inside here.

Oxbow Park (Hat and Boots Park)

While not one of the tour gardens, the Hat and Boots was a suggested stop, and I was pleased to find a P Patch (allotment garden) there.

from Seattle Parks and Recreation: In 1953, Seattle artist Lewis Nasmyth was hired to “rustle up” a design for a western-style gas station in Georgetown. Featuring a 44-ft. wide cowboy hat and 22-ft. high boots, the Hat n’ Boots opened the next year to a stampede of customers. In fact, for a time it was the biggest selling station in the state. Legend has it even Elvis dropped by when he was in town during the World’s Fair in ’62. But in the early 60’s, a brand new interstate, I-5, started diverting traffic away from the station. By the late 80’s it pretty much looked like trail’s end for the Hat n’ Boots. That’s when some Georgetown residents saddled up to rescue the soul of their community. “The Hat n’ Boots is as important to Georgetown as the Golden Gate Bridge is to San Francisco,” says Allan Phillips, former director of the Georgetown Community Council. “If the Hat n’ Boots were ever to be gone from Georgetown, it would be like losing our soul.”

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“Respect the Hard Work of Your Neighbors; Please Do Not Disturb the Gardens”

mosaic retaining wall

mosaic wall

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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the back of a bench made of recycled plastic

the back of a bench made of recycled plastic: “378 milk jugs were recycled to make this nice place to sit”

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Oh, yes, and the hat and boots

Oh, yes, and the hat and boots

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

 

 

 

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