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Posts Tagged ‘Great Escape coffee drive through’

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Our Thursday began with a shock when the computer uninterrupted power supply boxes started beeping at 6:30 AM.  The power was out.  Why?  The weather was calm, and as the sun rose I checked my local Facebook newsfeed on my phone till I found out that the power was out to Raymond, Naselle, Chinook, and Ilwaco all the way to Oysterville…pretty much all of southwest coastal Washington.  Then I tried to go back to sleep.  Night owl that I am, I had been up till 2 AM and I could not function well at work on four and a bit hours of sleep.  But it was so cold!   The previous night had been the first truly nippy autumn night (as we had discovered when we were out looking for Stubby the neighbourhood cat by flashlight.)  I was unprepared and had to find more blankets and then huddle in layered extra socks and sweatshirt and sweatpants underneath them.  A long time passed before sleep was regained, and so we got a very late start on the work day.

Our plan had been for an Ilwaco day and a coffee klatsch with friends at Olde Towne Café.  The earliest projection that I had read for the power returning was “early afternoon”.  Knowing we could not count on the seven person coffee date happening, we decided to do the north end jobs and save our Ilwaco work for a rescheduled coffee day.  Also, I needed coffee without spending time setting up a propane grill, and I could not find the car charger for my phone, which had already gone down to 20%.  Beach Batteries shop was open and for a mere $10 and some change, saved the day for my internet communication.

Facebook’s local network had let me know that Great Escape drive through espresso stand in Long Beach was up and running with a generator.  Bless them!!

saved by the Great Escape!

saved from coffeelessness by the Great Escape!

Even though our work does not depend on electricity, we were fortunate to have gotten gas the evening before so that we could make it all the way up to Klipsan Beach Cottages.  There, I channeled my discombobulation with the day’s changed schedule and the uncertainty about power into redoing two garden areas.

during and after

during and after

Allan did the part above.  It does not look like much of a change, but under that soil had been a huge patch of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.  It had been dormant when I planted a Rosa Mutabilis and I had forgotten how much there was.  It had then swamped the rose during the summer.  So it had to go.  Allan sifted the corms in a wheelbarrow and managed to save a lot of the soil, enough to make the area level again.  (We will add some good mulch later.)  I thought we were going to have to go get soil to fill in, but his careful work saved us that trip.

I dug up two big lilies that were too close to the front of the garden.  The lily bulbs had gotten enormous.

with Allan's size large glove for comparison

with Allan’s size large glove for comparison

Meanwhile, I removed lots of reseeded chive plants, lady’s mantle, and pink scabiosas from the bed below.

after

after

We were both miserable for awhile during this job because, unlike the morning when being TOO COLD had kept us both awake during the earliest morning part of the power outage, now the weather was TOO HOT, hot enough to make us dizzy and uncomfortable.  The  fenced garden seems to gather heat; the local weather station reported the afternoon temperature had only gotten to sixty degrees, but I find that hard to believe!

In other areas inside the deer fence, I got some cutting back done.  The second reseeded ornamental grass has to come out, but not till I have a good place to put it.

too much grass...swamping a hardy fuchsia

too much grass…swamping a hardy fuchsia in the background

I did remove a smaller one with a Port of Ilwaco destination in mind.

inside the deer fence...looking more autumnal

inside the deer fence…looking more autumnal

I think the driveway garden is the prettiest spot right now.

driveway garden, re-done this year by owners Mary and Denny

driveway garden, re-done this year by owners Mary and Denny

The Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ in the driveway garden was cut back in early summer because Mary did not want anything really tall in here other than the Tiger Eyes sumac.  So now the Lemon Queen is in full bloom, while the taller patches of it elsewhere in the garden are completely done!  The sumac is on the run but there are plans for every new sprout.

Oh the joy when the power came back on at about 1:30!  (I had been messaging our coffee klatsch friends all morning…Maybe we could have had our get together after all, but I was far away with other plans by now.)

Even though we did not have to get soil for KBC today, I did want to get some for the hole left by big plant removal at the port.  We left with just time to swing by Wiegardt Gallery for a quick check up to make sure it looked good for the weekend.

Wiegardt Gallery...haze of blue from all the Bad Aster that escaped the yank.

Wiegardt Gallery…haze of blue on left side from all the Bad Aster that escaped my pulling.

Schizostylis and badaster at Wiegardt Gallery

Schizostylis and badaster at Wiegardt Gallery

Fortunately for our schedule, the gallery garden just needed a little deadheading and we had plenty of time, despite our late start, to get to Peninsula Landscape Supply during business hours.

Peninsula Landscape Supply

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We just needed one scoop of soil.  While Allan dealt with that, I hand picked four buckets of attractive river rock to add to the roiled up landscaping at the Powell Gallery.

Allan then loaded the half filled rock buckets.

Allan then loaded the half filled rock buckets.

I really do not make them too heavy.

Mt St Helens river rock...I only picked the prettiest.

Mt St Helens river rock…I only picked the prettiest.

Back at the Port of Ilwaco, we filled in the hole by the Ilwaco Tuna Club where a big grass had been removed, and replaced it with the nice medium sized grass salvaged from a crowded garden bed at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

replanted

replanted

We dumped the river rock on the Powell Gallery garden and then took a few extra buckets of soil down to fluff up an area at the boatyard garden.  From there, I could see my old house and for the first time observed that the new owner has a wood stove!  We never did manage to get that house warm in the winter (and warned him so when we sold it).

our old Tangly Cottage...warm at last?

our old Tangly Cottage…warm at last?

almost sunset over the boatyard

almost sunset over the boatyard

I could tell from the sky that it might be another good sunset, so after dropping off our trailer at home, we went down to the south parking lot at the port by the boat launch.

There, the weather was at last JUST RIGHT, a comfortable, calm, windless and warmish evening.

My sunset photos:

looking toward the Cape Disappointment Coast Guard Station

looking toward the Cape Disappointment Coast Guard Station

pre-sunset light, low tide

pre-sunset light,  very low tide

a little boat comes in

a little boat comes in

sunset light

sunset light

a well placed gull

a well placed gull

Allan’s sunset photos:

gull on the move

gull on the move

low tide

low tide

mud flat

mud flat

Ilwaco Landing

Ilwaco Landing

more birds

more birds

flying birds

flying birds

bird, trees, water

trees and water

The sunset was not as spectacular as we had hoped, but we both appreciated the low tide and silvery light out at the entrance to the Ilwaco marina.

When we got home I felt bereft at the lack of Aunt Dorothy and Uncle Hal!  After having dinner with them for three evenings in a row, at three fine restaurants, it now seemed rather dull to just end up at home at dusk.  Nevertheless, I particular enjoyed electric lights, and a nice cup of tea, and getting to watch Big Bang Theory on telly, and the house being warm (from the sun! We still have not had to turn on the heat).  I love electricity.

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The rain fell with force till about noon today, and I tried (and failed) to catch up on my sleep.  By catch up I mean just get a solid eight hours for once.  That would be so very healing.

After a shockingly late breakfast, I suggested we go to Cheri’s garden and dig up some plants where Charlie is going to build an outdoor cat room.  Cheri (who was our realtor for selling our old house and buying our new one) has kindly agreed that I could take as many starts as I wanted to the courtyard garden at Golden Sands.  I figured we would dig them in the rain, bucket them, and wait till tomorrow to plant them.

future outdoor cat paradise

future outdoor cat paradise will go about as far over as the end of the window

To our surprise, the edges of the sky quickly lightened and by one PM the rain had ceased and we had raided a goodly pile of astilbe, phlox, and alstromeria.  Some went into other areas of Cheri’s garden and the rest came with us to Golden Sands.  I had also raided my own garden a bit AND had found the Lost Perennial Sunflower.  After being missing for three days, it turned up in a bucket in the garage, where both Allan and I could swear we had looked before.

the cat corner after the plant raid

the cat corner after the plant raid

On the way north, we did a quick narcissi deadheading at Long Beach City Hall.

city hall

city hall

Already I needed a boost, so I had to have a double mocha to go at The Great Escape coffee drive through.

cuteness at The Great Escape

cuteness at The Great Escape

coffee...coming up

coffee…coming up

At Golden Sands, Allan wheeled two barrows down the longest hallway.  We use the long red corridor on which my mother had a room.  The other corridor is green; that helps new residents who might have a little memory loss find the right room.

Either route is a long indoor run for a wheelbarrow.

Either route is a long indoor run for a wheelbarrow.

new plants ready for the courtyard gardens

new plants ready for the courtyard gardens

Phlox starts went to the back of the four quadrants, with the pesky beach strawberry dug out to make room.

expanding to the back

expanding to the back

I dug lots of strawberry and rose campion out of the northwest quadrant.  (I like rose campion but there is just too, too much.)   With phlox and astilbe and Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ starts added, it is already looking better than two days ago when we ran out of mulch for this section.

much improved

much improved

The windows straight back are to the dining room and a meeting room where I hope residents enjoy the garden view.

mulitflowering Tulip 'Red Bouquet' looking good against the new mulch

mulitflowering Tulip ‘Red Bouquet’ looking good against the new mulch

I am stressed that outside the quadrants, much weeding also needs to be done, but we have for sure used up the money/time budget for this month.

weedy areas

haze of tiny weeds

I had such plans to do a volunteer day during January removing every beach strawberry from the quadrant garden beds, and as with my big plan to do the mulching in January, my staycation won out.

By the time we were done with our weeding and planting, the drizzle returned and I simply felt too, too tired to go on and weed and deadhead Wiegardt Gallery and Klipsan Beach Cottages.  We will be up the same way tomorrow for the soup feed that follows the Grassroots Garbage Gang volunteer beach clean up, so we can do the rest of the north end public gardens then.

Beach clean up is an early morning for us so it will be another night with not enough sleep.  Sleep is the prize that is always just out of reach.

On the way home we stopped at Ann’s garden and planted some perennial sunflower (Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’) starts.  I think the deer will leave it alone.

admiring Ann's fine new birdbath

admiring Ann’s fine new birdbath

But what is this, in Ann’s front garden?  Those horrid lily of the valley are popping back up again.   Someone once told me that an old tale claims that if you transplant lily of the valley, you will die within the year.  Making up that tale was probably a way of expert gardeners trying to discourage people from sharing this hugely invasive pretty plant.

They're baaaack....

They’re baaaack….

Home at last, I knew I needed to visit my elderly beloved neighbour and yet I felt so tired I wanted to just plop down in this chair.  Out of the distant memory of Sunday school, a voice said “When I was sick, ye visited me” so I picked a bouquet of rain-spangled flowers and brought it to her.

a casual bouquet of back yard tulips

a casual bouquet of back yard tulips

I must plant more tulips in the back yard.  I can rarely stand to pick a flower from the front yard and decrease the showy (show-offy) display.

Nora had company so I did not stay long.  I’d noticed when photographing the tulips out of the rain that the greenhouse plants needed watering, and while gathering the water I brooded briefly over the weedy state of the patio, something I had noticed from my window this morning.

Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear.

Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear.

When will I get to THAT?   I’m fretting a lot about how this coming week, I will be taking three days off for an annual getaway with my friend Carol.  It’s the best time for her, but not a good time for me to leave the garden (mine or others) for even a day.  Last year I brooded so much I was sure I would not enjoy a minute of it and then I had a grand time, so this year I remind myself that three days gone will not destroy anyone’s garden.  (And yet…there is a Clam Festival in Long Beach next weekend and I won’t be here to deadhead at the end of the week!)  Allan will continue to do some weeding and deadheading but he will also enjoy his time alone, a pleasant thing now and then when one lives AND works with one’s partner.

I still have not weeded the horsetail out of this bed in my back garden:

You can see the gear shed neighbours have now covered their crab pot stack with a silver tarp.

You can see the gear shed neighbours have now covered their crab pot stack with a silver tarp.

I won’t get a day off this weekend so here are three more garden photos from today’s evening garden time at home:

buds on variegated honeysuckle

buds on variegated honeysuckle

Not horsetail: Restio

Not horsetail: Restio

baby Bartlett pear tree

baby Bartlett pear tree

The young pear tree will grow and provide shade for Allan’s garden, which did not turn out as shady as we thought it would be (due to how very low the roofline of an old manufactured home is).   I have been waiting for the flowers and indeed one sniff took me back to my grandmother’s big Bartlett pear, in spring, in my Seattle garden.

pear tree from my back roof, Seattle 1989

pear tree from my back roof, Seattle 1989

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