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Saturday, 25 April 2015

Black Lake, Ilwaco

We had to get up EARLY for us, and even then we were twenty minutes late for the Grassroots Garbage Gang beach clean up.  We might have made it on time, for once, had we not been distracted by the end of the Black Lake Fishing Derby.  We had to stop and take a few photos of the last of the boaters at this annual event for children; it had started at 7 AM.  The lake had been stocked with nice big fish the previous week.

Black Lake

Black Lake

fishing from shore

fishing from shore

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Beach Clean Up

cleanup

We started our clean up from the Seaview beach approach, as my knee had been hurting a lot the evening before and even though a wilder area would be more fun, I did not want to have to walk in on a half mile long trail.

check in point on the Seaview approach

check in point on the Seaview approach

looking northeast from the beach

looking northeast from the beach

Looking north, we could see lots of trash-pickers up toward Long Beach, so we turned south.

Looking north, we could see lots of trash-pickers up toward Long Beach, so we turned south.

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We like to see beach cleaners starting young.

Despite the dramatic light and clouds, we were spared any rain or wind.

Despite the dramatic light and clouds, we were spared any rain or wind.

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looking south toward North Head

looking south toward North Head

The beach was strewn with piles of little dead jellyfish, the blue sailed velella velella which had arrived in droves recently.  As they die off, they can create quite a stench.  Fortunately, that part was over.  They were still slippery and squelchy, though.  A book in my collection, Beachcombing the Pacific, says that when velella wash ashore, debris from Japan is not far behind.  Nowadays, debris is likely to be from the tsunami and thus associated with sadness rather than the romanticism of finding a glass fishing float.

drifts of velella

drifts of velella (Allan’s photo)

from Wikepedia.  They are stunningly beautiful when they wash ashore.

from Wikepedia. They are stunningly beautiful when they wash ashore.

From a local Facebook page

From a local Facebook page

drifts of dessicated velella

drifts of dessicated velella

The gulls seemed to find them quite tasty.

The gulls seemed to find them quite tasty.

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Allan’s photo

Allan walked along the edge of the dunes seeking (and finding) debris that had washed up that far in last Thursday’s storm.  We did not find as much debris as usual, however.  Later, the clean up organizer, Shelly Pollock, told us that this length of beach has been adopted by some regular volunteers who have been reliably collecting all the big stuff.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

wild beach peas, Allan's photo

wild beach peas, Allan’s photo

Horse riders are a common sight on our beach.

Horse riders are a common sight on our beach.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

horses

The beach was covered with tire tracks; perhaps there had been clamming earlier in the day.  I do not like driving on the beach for ANY reason other than to pick up trash.  One of the big arguments for beach driving is that seniors and disabled cannot get out there on foot, so perhaps there could be a section of beach open for vehicles with “handicapped parking” stickers.  That is as far as I can concede on that topic.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo:  These are the sort of tracks I do like to see on the beach.

photo by Rose Power: deer tracks

photo by Rose Power: deer tracks

Eight city blocks south of the Seaview approach, Holman Creek flows into the ocean.

creek

looking up Holman Creek

When I lived in Seaview in 1993, this was my favourite place to walk.

When I lived in Seaview in 1993, this was my favourite place to walk.

It is shallow enough at low tide to wade across, with one's shoes off.

It is shallow enough at low tide to wade across, with one’s shoes off.

This time, we did not wade it but instead turned upstream to trash pick along the edge.  Again, we found not much trash compared to previous beach clean ups.

a little further upstream

a little further upstream

Note the car to the right. probably on a valuable mission to pick up the trash bags left by volunteers.

Note the car to the right. probably on a valuable mission to pick up the trash bags left by volunteers.  Any other day, I would feel that having a car there wrecked the photo.

looking south

looking south

gulls having a bath

gulls having a bath

gulls

gulls2

gulls3

a flock of noisy birds flew overhead

a flock of noisy birds flew overhead

Their swirling flight pattern made me think they were something like sandpipers.

Their swirling flight pattern made me think they were something like sandpipers.

Allan was still up at the edge of the dunes.

taking a photo of the flying birds

trying to get a photo of the flying birds (didn’t turn out; he says it was just blue sky)

He did get this photo of a woolly bear in the dune grass.

He did get this photo of a woolly bear in the dune grass.

He says he hoped his flying bird landing would be as clear as Mr Tootlepedal's photos.    No...

Later: He says he hoped his flying bird landing would be as clear as Mr Tootlepedal’s photos. No…

Allan

Allan, back to trash picking

grass

beach grass trying to colonize a new dune

Again, we did not find as much trash as usual, even though we did not see the back-and-forthing footprints of any beach cleaner who might have walked ahead of us.  Finally, along the grassy edge of the dunes, I found a treasure trove of small plastic bits.

lots of little bits of plastic in these grasses

lots of little bits of plastic in these grasses

Just walking on that bit of rough ground got me knee in an uproar.  Fortunately, Allan found me a perfect piece of driftwood to use as a cane (and I used it all the way back!).  A little bird kept us company from the top of a nearby beach pine.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo:  This little bird regaled us with song while we picked up little plastic bits.

Allan’s photo: This little bird regaled us with song while we picked up little plastic bits.

Warning, sad bird carcass photo below, posted to illustrate why we pick up the little bits of plastic. Birds eat them and dead birds have been found with a gut full of plastic bits.  Because they cannot digest the plastic, a bird can starve from eating it.

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little bits of plastic, Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

Nearby, we saw a woolly bear on the sand.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the bear in question

the bear in question

Just as I was about to pick up the woolly bear and take him to the dune grass, a hummer drove up with a volunteer who took a full garbage bag from us.

guy

guy2

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Allan’s photo

A lot of erosion took place on the dunes along the creek estuary over the winter.

A lot of erosion took place on the dunes along the creek estuary over the winter.

On the way back, more gulls eating velella.

On the way back, more gulls eating velella.

Some more volunteers were just arriving.

Some more volunteers

These folks speculated that the reason for the lack of trash was that Thursday’s windstorm had buried it, so they walked along poking mounds of sand with their pick-up sticks.

people2

people3

We met a little dog named Ellie or Alfie.

Of course, I was smitten.

Of course, I was smitten.

The dog was tied to a tonka truck which “slowed him down”, according to his people.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo (omitting the car that was parked right next to this scene)

Just about then, I recalled that I had forgotten to rescue the woolly bear from the sand.  By now, it was seven blocks back, so that mission was abandoned.

Leaving the beach, we drove north to the Peninsula Senior Center for the soup lunch provided for volunteers.

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inside the center

inside the center

volunteer soup servers (Allan's photo)

volunteer soup servers (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

dessert.  Someone made fudge, and I do dearly love iced animal cookies.

dessert. Someone made fudge, and I do dearly love iced animal cookies. (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Rose Power is in blue.

Rose Power is in blue and is, quite thrillingly for Anglophile me, originally from England.

We sat at a table with local artist Rose Power and shared our best finds.  Ours were both paper.  We had been amused to find, on the beach, a grocery store receipt that spoke of a beach trip.

Note the three pails and shovels and sandwich making food!  And Doritos, of course.

Note the three pails and shovels and sandwich making food! And Doritos, of course.

Allan found a paper brochure for hospice care in Hawaii; it can’t have washed all the way from there!  He also wishes to know what that white piece of plastic is for:

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Allan’s photo

Rose Power found the coolest item: a bottle with a message in it.

Rose Power found the coolest item: a bottle with a message in it.

Rose had gone out to the Klipsan beach and had found much more debris than we had.

Rose picked up all this.

Rose picked up all this.

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beach

Three hundred and twenty five people had signed in at the check points to clean the beach, and we are sure that others had walked out from their beach houses and resorts without signing in.  That is an impressive turnout.

Because the Senior Center is conveniently located right next to Golden Sands Assisted Living, we went to work right after lunch…but that, and a large number of photos of Ed’s new puppy, will be the next post.

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Friday, 18 July 2014

My knee hurt like blazes, or perhaps I just wanted to stay home and work on the Garden Bloggers Fling garden tour posts…or perhaps both.  So Allan cheerfully agreed to do the Port of Ilwaco gardens by himself.  Here is his day.

He saw all sorts of interesting action while weeding the Ilwaco boatyard garden, starting with the garbage truck accidently dropping the entire garbage can into the truck and the driver having to fish it out again:

Oops!

Oops!

Then the mast was lifted off of a sailboat whose owner always has nice things to say about the garden.

A crane truck pulls up next to the beautiful twin masted sailboat ‘Mystique’

A crane truck pulls up next to the beautiful twin masted sailboat ‘Mystique’

Steve, the owner / restorer buckles up.

Steve, the owner / restorer buckles up.

By pulling on two handles, he slowly winched himself up to where the crane’s hook waited

By pulling on two handles, he slowly winched himself up to where the crane’s hook waited.

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He fastened the crane’s hook to the mast and lowered himself down.

He fastened the crane’s hook to the mast and lowered himself down.

the mast being removed by the crane

the mast being removed by the crane

The orange at the base of the mast was below deck and indicates the lift required to raise the mast.

The orange at the base of the mast was below deck and indicates the lift required to raise the mast.

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the mast being lowered

the mast being lowered

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Allan moved away from his weeding buckets while the mast was being lowered.

Allan moved away from his weeding buckets while the mast was being lowered.

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mast laid across sawhorses

mast laid across sawhorses

the boatyard garden!

the boatyard garden!

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more action: a new boat comes in to the boatyard

more action: a new boat comes in to the boatyard

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Rain is predicted overnight so tarps are put up to protect a paint job.

Rain is predicted overnight so tarps are put up to protect a paint job.

a long weeding job...about three city blocks.

a long weeding job…about three city blocks.

a load of weeds to haul off

a load of weeds to haul off

Allan then went to work along Howerton Way (the street that runs east-west along the landward side of the port buildings.

He heard lots of excited seagulls:  the fish guts truck had arrived.

He heard lots of excited seagulls: the fish guts truck had arrived.

on the fish processing plant

on the fish processing plant

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squabbling gulls

squabbling gulls

He worked his way down some of the Howerton Way gardens:

and ended up with this large load of weeds to dump at the east end of the marina.

and ended up with this large load of weeds to dump at the east end of the marina.

In the evening light, the guy who walks flying a kite every evening strolled by.

In the evening light, the guy who walks flying a kite every evening strolled by.

The next day, Saturday July 19th, was the Music in the Gardens tour (about which I have already published an entry for each garden) and I hoped my day of rest would make it easier for me to walk around the gardens.

 

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Tuesday, 29 October, 2013

I awoke to white frost on the back lawn, as predicted.  All the tender plants in pots were safely in the greenhouse.  The ones that I want to save, anyway:  scented geraniums, tender salvias…

frost

frosty morning

Great, thought I, the annuals will perhaps be done in Long Beach.  I have wearied of their tired looking appearance; they have still been looking too colourful to pull as it might make shopkeepers and passersby said if I dispose of them them prematurely.

But NO!  They still look mostly wonderful.

painted sage, Agyr. 'Butterfly', nasturtium

painted sage, Agyr. ‘Butterfly’, nasturtium

still a tangle of colour by Home at the Beach

still a tangle of colour by Home at the Beach

Even a few of the cosmos still look good.

Even a few of the cosmos still look good.

Allan cut back the Panicum ‘Heavy Metal‘ ornamental grass back in the one street tree under which it grows.  I like the name of the grass and its metallic sheen.  However, I think that to most people it probably looks weedy.

Heavy Metal grass

Heavy Metal grass

This particular tree has no working water and has to be bucket watered from a nearby planter.

The park by Marsh’s Free Museum and one of our favourite little cafés, Captain Bob’s Chowder, still looks fine.

obelisk tiles by Renee O'Connor

obelisk tiles by Renee O’Connor

The work in the frying pan park is coming along….By spring, that clam statue will spout every hour on the hour again.

park

Allan took a break from Long Beach city work and pulled Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’ from the Summer House  garden while I checked the rest of the planters.  I swear I did not plant the darn hardy geranium at Summer House.  It probably had one little seedling inside another plant.

Below:  Allan stands where a rose trellis should go IF Erin (who owns this vacation rental) wants to keep the rampant climbing rose in there:

I asked him to look like a trellis, but he is sideways.

I asked him to look like a trellis, but he is sideways.

Then he dropped me off to tidy up the Veterans Field garden while he dumped debris.

Veterans Field garden

Veterans Field garden

still very faintly red white and blue

still very faintly red white and blue

We had an appointment at NW Financial and Insurance regarding the Affordable Care Act (which I believe will be very beneficial to us).  The main website was down again, even though it had been working all day.

My friend Bella greeted me at the insurance office!

My friend Bella greeted me at the insurance office!

The best thing I have read about this is:  “War is a crisis.  Poverty is a crisis.”  And then something about the computer problem being an inconvenience.  We will go back next week.  If anyone local (Southwest Washington or Northwest Oregon) needs help figuring out the Affordable Care Act paperwork, Shelly Pollock is a wonderful helper and her services are free.

We concluded our work day by pulling some Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ foliage clumps and a doing a bit of weeding on the Bolstadt beach approach.

Bolstadt approach buoy

Bolstadt approach buoy

two birds

two birds

another two birds

another two birds

bird

Bolstadt beach approach garden, looking toward town

This walk is so popular with townfolk and tourists alike.  One can walk up Sid Snyder Boulevard ten blocks south, then along the boardwalk with its view of the beach and back down this street….or vice versa.

rugosa rose autumn colour

rugosa rose autumn colour

with dwarf mugo pine

with dwarf mugo pine

Something amazing happened when I pulled a weed from the easternmost Bolstadt planter….

full of chocolate mint planted back in volunteer days

full of chocolate mint planted back in volunteer days

The mint started to peel up just like taking up a carpet!   I was thrilled!!

before and after

before and after

Next year we can make this planter right by the arch look so much better.

Next year we can make this planter right by the arch look so much better.

While Allan tidied that up, I cut back a few lily stalks on the south side of city hall and observed with dismay that a purple ajuga had gone aggressively running through the whole bed.

Anyone want some purple ajuga??

Anyone want some purple ajuga??  will fix this later

Just west of city hall, reflections of sunlight fell on the sign for the upcoming new coffee shop.  I was excited to see that Pink Poppy Bakery’s logo had been added to the sign.  My ultimate loyalty still likes with Ilwaco’s Olde Towne coffee café but I will love being able to get Pink Poppy treats while working in Long Beach.

Akari Space

Akari Space

Although I could tell a great sunset was brewing, the dumping of debris had to take priority.

looking west from city hall

looking west from city hall

While at the city works yard, we could see the sunset developing.

over the water treatment plant

over the water treatment plant

With work done, we went back to Bolstadt.

Another sunset watching group had gathered on the big picnic shelter.

crows

closeup

The sunset started as a moody grey and pink one, and I thought it would continue that way.

Allan’s photos:

bird

grey

grey

grass

west of the boardwalk

buoy

my photos:

from the end of the Bolstadt approach

from the end of the Bolstadt approach

pink

boardwalk

boardwalk

band of colour

band of colour

Thinking it was fading, we turned to go back to town and saw the tail lights of the cars of other sunset watchers driving away….

Long Beach from the boardwalk

Long Beach from the boardwalk

One glance back and we turned to the west again as the colour suddenly intensified.

colour

bright

And then it did fade.

last

At home, I took a quick walk along Spruce and Lake Streets to check out progress in the Ilwaco flatlands Halloween preparations.

the J's house across the street

the J’s house across the street from ours

on Spruce

on Spruce

Soon would come the yearly Halloween extravaganza.

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Thursday, October 3, 2013

Our Thursday began with a shock when the computer uninterrupted power supply boxes started beeping at 6:30 AM.  The power was out.  Why?  The weather was calm, and as the sun rose I checked my local Facebook newsfeed on my phone till I found out that the power was out to Raymond, Naselle, Chinook, and Ilwaco all the way to Oysterville…pretty much all of southwest coastal Washington.  Then I tried to go back to sleep.  Night owl that I am, I had been up till 2 AM and I could not function well at work on four and a bit hours of sleep.  But it was so cold!   The previous night had been the first truly nippy autumn night (as we had discovered when we were out looking for Stubby the neighbourhood cat by flashlight.)  I was unprepared and had to find more blankets and then huddle in layered extra socks and sweatshirt and sweatpants underneath them.  A long time passed before sleep was regained, and so we got a very late start on the work day.

Our plan had been for an Ilwaco day and a coffee klatsch with friends at Olde Towne Café.  The earliest projection that I had read for the power returning was “early afternoon”.  Knowing we could not count on the seven person coffee date happening, we decided to do the north end jobs and save our Ilwaco work for a rescheduled coffee day.  Also, I needed coffee without spending time setting up a propane grill, and I could not find the car charger for my phone, which had already gone down to 20%.  Beach Batteries shop was open and for a mere $10 and some change, saved the day for my internet communication.

Facebook’s local network had let me know that Great Escape drive through espresso stand in Long Beach was up and running with a generator.  Bless them!!

saved by the Great Escape!

saved from coffeelessness by the Great Escape!

Even though our work does not depend on electricity, we were fortunate to have gotten gas the evening before so that we could make it all the way up to Klipsan Beach Cottages.  There, I channeled my discombobulation with the day’s changed schedule and the uncertainty about power into redoing two garden areas.

during and after

during and after

Allan did the part above.  It does not look like much of a change, but under that soil had been a huge patch of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.  It had been dormant when I planted a Rosa Mutabilis and I had forgotten how much there was.  It had then swamped the rose during the summer.  So it had to go.  Allan sifted the corms in a wheelbarrow and managed to save a lot of the soil, enough to make the area level again.  (We will add some good mulch later.)  I thought we were going to have to go get soil to fill in, but his careful work saved us that trip.

I dug up two big lilies that were too close to the front of the garden.  The lily bulbs had gotten enormous.

with Allan's size large glove for comparison

with Allan’s size large glove for comparison

Meanwhile, I removed lots of reseeded chive plants, lady’s mantle, and pink scabiosas from the bed below.

after

after

We were both miserable for awhile during this job because, unlike the morning when being TOO COLD had kept us both awake during the earliest morning part of the power outage, now the weather was TOO HOT, hot enough to make us dizzy and uncomfortable.  The  fenced garden seems to gather heat; the local weather station reported the afternoon temperature had only gotten to sixty degrees, but I find that hard to believe!

In other areas inside the deer fence, I got some cutting back done.  The second reseeded ornamental grass has to come out, but not till I have a good place to put it.

too much grass...swamping a hardy fuchsia

too much grass…swamping a hardy fuchsia in the background

I did remove a smaller one with a Port of Ilwaco destination in mind.

inside the deer fence...looking more autumnal

inside the deer fence…looking more autumnal

I think the driveway garden is the prettiest spot right now.

driveway garden, re-done this year by owners Mary and Denny

driveway garden, re-done this year by owners Mary and Denny

The Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ in the driveway garden was cut back in early summer because Mary did not want anything really tall in here other than the Tiger Eyes sumac.  So now the Lemon Queen is in full bloom, while the taller patches of it elsewhere in the garden are completely done!  The sumac is on the run but there are plans for every new sprout.

Oh the joy when the power came back on at about 1:30!  (I had been messaging our coffee klatsch friends all morning…Maybe we could have had our get together after all, but I was far away with other plans by now.)

Even though we did not have to get soil for KBC today, I did want to get some for the hole left by big plant removal at the port.  We left with just time to swing by Wiegardt Gallery for a quick check up to make sure it looked good for the weekend.

Wiegardt Gallery...haze of blue from all the Bad Aster that escaped the yank.

Wiegardt Gallery…haze of blue on left side from all the Bad Aster that escaped my pulling.

Schizostylis and badaster at Wiegardt Gallery

Schizostylis and badaster at Wiegardt Gallery

Fortunately for our schedule, the gallery garden just needed a little deadheading and we had plenty of time, despite our late start, to get to Peninsula Landscape Supply during business hours.

Peninsula Landscape Supply

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We just needed one scoop of soil.  While Allan dealt with that, I hand picked four buckets of attractive river rock to add to the roiled up landscaping at the Powell Gallery.

Allan then loaded the half filled rock buckets.

Allan then loaded the half filled rock buckets.

I really do not make them too heavy.

Mt St Helens river rock...I only picked the prettiest.

Mt St Helens river rock…I only picked the prettiest.

Back at the Port of Ilwaco, we filled in the hole by the Ilwaco Tuna Club where a big grass had been removed, and replaced it with the nice medium sized grass salvaged from a crowded garden bed at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

replanted

replanted

We dumped the river rock on the Powell Gallery garden and then took a few extra buckets of soil down to fluff up an area at the boatyard garden.  From there, I could see my old house and for the first time observed that the new owner has a wood stove!  We never did manage to get that house warm in the winter (and warned him so when we sold it).

our old Tangly Cottage...warm at last?

our old Tangly Cottage…warm at last?

almost sunset over the boatyard

almost sunset over the boatyard

I could tell from the sky that it might be another good sunset, so after dropping off our trailer at home, we went down to the south parking lot at the port by the boat launch.

There, the weather was at last JUST RIGHT, a comfortable, calm, windless and warmish evening.

My sunset photos:

looking toward the Cape Disappointment Coast Guard Station

looking toward the Cape Disappointment Coast Guard Station

pre-sunset light, low tide

pre-sunset light,  very low tide

a little boat comes in

a little boat comes in

sunset light

sunset light

a well placed gull

a well placed gull

Allan’s sunset photos:

gull on the move

gull on the move

low tide

low tide

mud flat

mud flat

Ilwaco Landing

Ilwaco Landing

more birds

more birds

flying birds

flying birds

bird, trees, water

trees and water

The sunset was not as spectacular as we had hoped, but we both appreciated the low tide and silvery light out at the entrance to the Ilwaco marina.

When we got home I felt bereft at the lack of Aunt Dorothy and Uncle Hal!  After having dinner with them for three evenings in a row, at three fine restaurants, it now seemed rather dull to just end up at home at dusk.  Nevertheless, I particular enjoyed electric lights, and a nice cup of tea, and getting to watch Big Bang Theory on telly, and the house being warm (from the sun! We still have not had to turn on the heat).  I love electricity.

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And with this I officially catch up with the present day…and a good thing too, because the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is coming up and there will be much to write about and many photos to share.

September 9:  Long Beach

First we did weeding and deadheading and grooming to perfection of Jo’s garden because she was expecting very special company…a group of old friends from college.

Jo's garden, looking west

Jo’s garden, looking west

and looking east

and looking east

My photo of Coco the dog did not turn out because she was wiggling so much!

wish!!

wish!!

I do wish that Rod Run was not so destructive to the Long Beach planters.  I knew it would be, and it was…as we discovered when we went to the downtown planters after Jo’s.

We were greeted by another diaper bomb left in the parking lot.  I will pick up trash that I see around town but I draw the line at these.

!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!

Just change the baby in a parking spot, drop the diaper out the door and drive away!  I remain utterly astonished.  Do they think about the city worker who has to pick this up?

So…the planters:

sat upon

sat upon

Okay, there were cars going by all weekend….hot rods, classic cars, etc.  People who love cars were all lined up to watch.  According to two shopkeepers we spoke with, the town was reeling with drunk people and they needed a place to sit to watch cars, and there are the planters…very comfy indeed.

shasta daisy

shasta daisy

I am so pleased that some of the nasturtiums survived!

I am so pleased that some of the nasturtiums survived!

another planter:  I pulled the nasturtium over the smashed plants

another planter: I pulled the nasturtium over the smashed plants.

Some plants are so destroyed that all I can do is cut them back to the base.

Some plants are so destroyed that all I can do is cut them back to the base.

not very happy Autumn Joy sedum

not very happy Autumn Joy sedum

Half a block up from Home at the Beach, one of their hanging baskets was upside down and broken, and another was completely missing.

casualty

casualty

As for the trees….

Some sort of melee under one had completely laid out half of the ornamental grass and broken the electrical box.

Panicum 'Heavy Metal' ladi flat

Panicum ‘Heavy Metal’ laid flat

Another had its lavenders smashed so flat they were just gone…

where once was lavender...

where once was lavender…

If anyone feels my pain especially well, I know it will be Pam, Seaside’s gardener!

Under another tree, this is all that was left of a hardy Fuchsia.

where once was a Fuchsia

where once was a Fuchsia

Allan found this much of it off to the side.

Allan found this much of it off to the side.

Another was broken and battered with some stem left.

Another was broken and battered with some stem left.

Allan watered the north half of downtown.

one of the planters in his "section"

one of the planters in his “section”

In Fish Alley, this is just one example of the many cans and remnants of snack debris that we found.

Fish Alley...and the Sedum still looks bad; I had better just cut it back!

Fish Alley…and the Sedum still looks bad; I had better just cut it back!

In Ilwaco there are only two public garbage cans on the main street; Long Beach has several per block but apparently not enough for some!!  The Long Beach city crew had been through daily over the weekend to pick up what I am sure was an enormous amount of trash.

This is nothing compared to the damage that Rod Run used to inspire.  I think the last time that the event coincided with Labour Day Weekend was 1998.  Before that it was always a three day event on the three day holiday.  The official Rod Run went all the way from Ocean Park down to Ilwaco and back on Saturday afternoon, and all over the Peninsula gridlock occurred at every intersection.  Over the years, the event built up to a more and more riotous occasion, which had nothing to do with the hosts, the respectable and upright citizens of The Beach Barons car club, and everything to do with hangers on who were drunk and destructive.  The planters were sat upon and stood in and the plants turned to blackened mush.  Finally in 1998, the situation got so bad that emergency vehicles had no way to getting through the traffic and as I heard at the time, the police said they would no longer be able to function at the event at all unless it were changed to the weekend AFTER Labour Day, and that there would never again be an official “run” of cars up and down the whole Peninsula.  There was a great outcry of objection, but in the long run I think it worked out well for the merchants to have it the second weekend in September, thus extending the tourist season.  The “Run” now takes place only at the North end of the Peninsula (Ocean Park to Surfside to Oysterville and back to Ocean Park) but throngs still gather in Long Beach as many drivers choose to parade round and round the Peninsula in an unofficial and unscheduled manner, late into Saturday evening…..thus the damage to the street tree gardens and planters.

Veterans Field was out of the fray being set back from the main street and was untrampled.

Veterans Field acidanthera and Salvia 'Hot Lips'

Veterans Field Acidanthera and Salvia ‘Hot Lips’, Allan’s photo

On Monday, another car club circled round and round the town; we saw several of these cars more than once.  I don’t think these people look at all like they would be Planter Sitters or Tree Tramplers!

car

car

car

car

street

We saw some of the same cars putt putting around Ilwaco the next day.

After the Long Beach planters,  Allan did the necessary bucket watering of the Ilwaco planters.  I pulled a few bricks out from the Ilwaco street tree plantings (tired of weeding between them!) but decided that we had better not leave the dropped level of the edges  overnight in case someone tipsy stumbled!  Instead, I went home to catch up on some very overdue billing.

Tuesday, September 10:

On the way home the previous evening, I had noticed that Larry and Robert’s garden looked quite dry, so Tuesday morning began with Allan watering there.

This garden is scheduled sometime soon for a Fall Project mulching so it will hold water better!

This garden is scheduled sometime soon for a Fall Project mulching so it will hold water better!

the long lasting bloom of Echinacea 'Green Envy'

the long lasting bloom of Echinacea ‘Green Envy’

Hydrangea and autumn crocus

Hydrangea and autumn crocus

An unusual thing was going on in the sky….dozens and dozens of gulls, impossible to capture with my camera.

each white speck a gull, circling and calling

each white speck a gull, circling and calling

They were over an even bigger portion of sky than shown above.

While Allan finished watering, I walked down Lake Street heading west to First Avenue to start pulling up bricks from the edges of the street tree squares.

at Lake and Myrtle, looking west

at Lake and Myrtle, looking west

a large Fuchsia magellanica

a large Fuchsia magellanica

and a pretty front porch

and a pretty front porch

the sound of water right by the sidewalk

the sound of water right by the sidewalk

Nerines at Lake and Williams

Nerines at Lake and Williams

our volunteer garden at the Post Office

our volunteer garden at the Post Office

Now that the lilies are gone, the post office garden has gone dull.  It needs Solidago ‘Fireworks’ in the background.  The Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ should be two feet taller but it did not get enough water despite our nagging  the maintenance guy and postmistress about it.  I guess next year we might just as well reconcile ourselves to adding supplemental watering.

We had scheduled the job of brick removal and pallet had been laid out for us at Ilwaco public works yard to load the bricks onto, and so we went ahead with it….even though it was 85 degrees Fahrenheit.

the pallet when we were done

the pallet when we were done

We pried out, wheelbarrowed to our utility trailer (parked as close as we could get, but rarely could we find parking right by a tree), loaded into the trailer, and unloaded at city works, about 800 bricks.  Allan says that is 3470 pounds of bricks.

Because it is never efficient for two people to go to get a load of mulch (one drives, one just sits), I went to coffee while Allan drove up to The Planter Box and got a yard of cow fiber.

Okay, I will admit that I had scheduled an Ilwaco day because I knew that our friends Patt and Kathleen would be in town and we had planned a 2 PM coffee klatsch.

Allan, Donna, Kathleen, Judy, Tom, Patt

Allan, Donna, Kathleen, Judy, Tom, Patt at Olde Towne

When the above photo was taken, Allan had returned with the mulch.  Somehow, over two hours had gone by for me at Olde Towne Café and the rest of the group were still there when Allan and I left to return to work.

We got some water in buckets at the boatyard so that we could settle the mulch in around each tree.

What a view from where we park to get water from the boat washing hose.

What a view from where we park to get water from the boat washing hose.

a fishing boat offloading at Ilwaco Landing

a fishing boat offloading at Ilwaco Landing

the cute little Port of Ilwaco truck

the cute little Port of Ilwaco truck

a boat being loaded onto the Marine Travelift

a boat being loaded onto the Marine Travelift

That boat would be put into the water from where we were parked by the hose…but by then we were out of there putting mulch around the trees.

On the way to the first tree, I got a flying bird photo (always inspired to do so by the Tootlepedal blog).

flying bird of the day!

flying bird of the day!

The gulls were congregating over a truck that hauls fish guts away from Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company.

hoping for a snack

hoping for a snack

In the boatyard garden, one of my favourite asters is in bloom.  I have divided and divided this well behaved cultivar for so many years that I have forgotten its name.  Unlike the BadAster, it does not run perniciously.  It might be ‘Harrington’s Pink’.

a very good aster

a very good aster

I must remember to divide this clump and add some to various clients’ gardens.

After we had finished mulching all ten of the street trees, they all looked rather like this:

sans bricks

sans bricks

rather than like this:

before

before

How satisfying!

Even more satisfying was when a woman who rides all around town on her bicycle stopped to talk to us.  We have seen her for years but have never engaged in conversation.  She stopped her bike and said to us that she had seen the people and their trash in Long Beach on Saturday night and it made her want to cry to see the way they were treating the town.  She said she would never go to another town and behave that way.  She was almost in tears talking about it.  She said the plants are living creatures and she sees how hard we work on them, and that some of the planters in Long Beach are memorials to people, as are some of the memorial benches around town, and that the town should not be treated so rudely.   It was gratifying to hear this from her and to know we are not alone in having noticed the damage to the plantings over the weekend.

We had just a bit of mulch left so added it to Larry and Robert’s garden.

It will get a whole yard later!

It will get a whole yard of mulch later!

Allan went to water the Time Enough Books garden and I to water our own.

from my window:  looking southeast

from my window: looking southeast

south

south

and southwest

and southwest

Next it will be back to the regular rounds of city and resort garden maintenance until next week when I hope to get back to some fall projects (even though it is not yet autumn and felt more like summer today).

After we had added the Cow Fiber (washed dairy manure) to each tree, they looked like this:

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My previous two blog entries were placeholders from my phone.  Not easy!   Here’s the real deal.

On Wednesday, I would like to have taken more photos going down the coast, but we were eager to reach our destination and I did not want to pester Carol to stop for each lovely ocean view.  We did take this photo behind a restroom in, I believe, the Nehalem area:

river view

quite a view from a restroom deck

I found it oddly amusing that the sign was for “WOMAN” and “MEN”.

Screen Shot 2013-04-26 at 6.17.19 PM

a beautiful fence on a side street in the same little town

a beautiful fence on a side street in the same little town

On the way, I looked for a house that I had seen the previous year so that I could get a photo for my Purple House Society page.  I thought it was in Nehalem, and when I did not see it assumed it had been painted or demolished, but in Cloverdale, there it was!

There it is!

There it is!

adorable and memorable

adorable and memorable

It goes back further than you would think, but the backside is not painted purple.

backside of the purple house

backside of the purple house

the view from a deck next door

the view from a deck next door

and next door to that...

and next door to that…

Lincoln City

Lincoln City

On we went, hungry, and Trip Advisor guided me to the Nepali Kitchen in Lincoln City.  In the bleak stretch of stores that seem to go on for miles on the highway through Lincoln City (sorry, but the least charming part of the coast), where even the streetlights are in a hurry and give the pedestrian a 15 second countdown, we found this oasis.   I had eaten there before when it was the Sun Garden Café.

Nepali Kitchen

Nepali Kitchen

Inside we found great ambience, Indian music (with two songs I recognized from Shah Rukh Khan films) and good food.

Nepali Kitchen

Nepali Kitchen

Nepali Kitchen

love

Nepali

The food was delicious.  I have found it rare to be able to get Puri, my favourite Indian bread.  Here, it is the bread of choice.

puri and curry rice

puri and curry rice

by our table

by our table

As with the former Sun Garden café, there is a back patio on which to sit.  If I had remembered that it had a cover, and would therefore be out of the wind, we would have sat there.

covered patio

covered patio

patio

patio

patio

covered patio

As you can tell, I was very taken with this place and wish them great success.

On the road again we passed more gorgeous scenery.  This video tour does a good job of capturing the Oregon coast in just four minutes, and at 1:31 is the view from our destination, The Sylvia Beach Hotel.

For two days I did not leave the hotel except to cross the street to April’s restaurant.  Carol did take a walk through the neighbourhood.  While the weather appeared nice, a strong cold wind blew on the beach and a small craft advisory was up.  And the spell of the hotel is strong.

After leaving the hotel today (Friday), we made it down to the historic bayfront for a morning walk.  If you drove through town and over the Newport bridge, you might think the main drag revealed a town as drab as the Lincoln City highway, but drop to the west into the Nye Beach neighbourhood where the Sylvia Beach resides or, north of the bridge, down to the old bayfront, and you will find several blocks of charmingly ramshackle shops, a marina of interesting fishing boats, and a herd? of sea lions.

Newport Bay

by Newport Bay

Newport

two blocks or more of charmingly ramshackle shops

bait and tackle dog

tavern

I had absolutely no desire to visit the Ripley’s Believe it Or Not museum but I loved the building that houses it, an arcade and a sushi restaurant.  It had the only bayside evidence of landscaping.

Ripley's building

Ripley’s building

Ripley's

The colour scheme of the waterfront buildings appears planned to be cobalt blue.

on the water

on the water

fish plant

fish plant

This was as close as Carol and I got to the Local Ocean restaurant.  We’d intended to take my friend Nancy’s recommendation and eat there…till the SBH worked its wiles on us.

Local Ocean

Local Ocean

We turned our attention to the docks and interpretive signs about fishing.

sleeping in the sun

sleeping in the sun

sign

sign

sign

boats

boats

boats

sign

fishing

sign

Some birds for Mr. Tootlepedal:

gulls

gulls

And a pile of sea lions, whose lives seem to consist of snoozing and squabbling with each other.

sea lion plea

sea lion plea

article

sea lion dock

sea lion dock

the biggest one

the biggest one

sea lion

The pile would not let a solitary one climb aboard.

The pile would not let a solitary one climb aboard.

It swam around with its back flippers up.

It swam around with its back flippers up.

rejected

rejected

It swam to the less populated end of the dock...

It swam to the less populated end of the dock…

and was allowed to climb up.

and was allowed to climb up.

We followed the sea lion viewing with some espresso at a place with a wonderful view.

espresso place

espresso place

And then we headed north.  Carol is a professional driver for Seattle Metro buses.  I would like to note that I feel quite calm while riding with her. For one thing, she never passes just to get ahead and save a few minutes.  This makes the trip very relaxing for me.   We got as far as Wheeler before stopping again for a late lunch at the Tsunami Bar and Grill, recommended on Trip Advisor.  There were two other places we would have loved to try:  Bread and Ocean in Manzanita or Wanda’s Café in Nehalem, but both closed at two, effectively cutting themselves off from most people making a trip from the south coast.  We do not understand this!  It is our woe every time we make the trip.  Happily, we now have a place to stop.  Tsunami had delicious food with a burger/fish n chips side to the menu and a selection of Vietnamese style dishes.

Tsunami Bar and Grill

Tsunami Bar and Grill

From the back deck. I saw a familiar view, almost the same angle as photos I had taken back in ’94 or ’95.

Wheeler

Wheeler

from the Tsunami deck

from the Tsunami deck

The estuary leads to the ocean

The estuary leads to the ocean

Over fifteen years ago, to take photos of the view, I must have stood where Carol stood today.

Carol reading interpretive sign

Carol reading interpretive sign

Closer to home, my mind began to return to work so we stopped at Gearhart’s Back Alley Gardens so I could briefly scope out what was on offer.

At Back Alley

At Back Alley

But before I get back to writing about gardening, I have at the very least two more entries to make about the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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