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Posts Tagged ‘Hamamelis’

Monday, 13 February 2017

Cold weather, a brief back problem, and an intense desire for hide out and read postponed our starting work this year.  I was using the excuse that the whole peninsula has been economically affected by the lack of clamming tourism this winter so no one would mind if we started up two weeks later than usual. (The clams have tested positive for a toxin, which happens sometimes, and so clam season has been delayed and delayed again.)

I’d written the first work board of the year several days ago.

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Allan had loaded the tools into our van on Saturday.  As he loaded buckets into the trailer, I talked through the window to Jasmine, one of two new neighbours right next door.

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introduced myself to Jasmine

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in our garden (Allan’s photo)

Ilwaco

We began close to home with the Ilwaco street trees and planters.

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Allan’s photo

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weeding at First and Eagle

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The boatyard garden can wait for a couple of weeks.

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Ilwaco boatyard, north side

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crocuses in the planters

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Allan’s photo

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in front of Azure Salon, before

I had been looking forward to tidying the alyssum from under the tree and to pulling a dead erysimum from this planter.

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Rosemary blooming in front of Azure

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Nn front of City Hall, the plant offerings are not from me.

Anchorage Cottages

The Anchorage garden got some clipping and waking up because this coming weekend is a three day holiday (Presidents Day) which will surely attract guests.

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tidied center courtyard in 60 degree sunny weather

Allan trimmed a buddliea at the entrance.

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before

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after

I hadn’t intended it to go that far back but I think it will be fine and probably quite refreshed. If not…well…buddlieas of the old fashioned seedy kind are considered noxious weeds now, anyway.

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Allan pruned one large-ish ornamental grass….harbinger of many to do the same thing to soon.

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after

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spring bulb windowboxes

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Iris reticulata

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I was pleased to see there have been snowdrops.

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In bright sunshine, a hamamelis scents the Zen Courtyard

Long Beach City Hall

We trimmed another grass (Allan) and a hydrangea (me) before heading back to Ilwaco.  Allan’s photos:

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before

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after

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before

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pruning

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after

Ilwaco again

We finished with a tidying and clipping of sedums and ferns at the Ilwaco Community Building.

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hamamelis, probably ‘Diane’

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crocuses

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Allan’s photo

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Iris reticulata (Allan’s photo)

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by the entrance to the library

At home, I clipped back my Melianthus major, which, as Melissa had put it, was “not amused” by this winter’s heavy freeze.

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That is one small area clipped. So much more to go in our own garden.

We are expecting two more good weather days and are going to focus intensely on Long Beach town next.

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work board t0night

 

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Saturday, 11 February 2017

I got these in the mail from a friend:

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On my last full day of uninterrupted staycation reading, I finished the huge history of WWII and then felt restless because of the sudden emergence of sunshine.

No winter gardening had taken place because of unusually cold weather.  Books (and a sore back, now all better) had won out over my plan to mulch with 6-8 yards of topsoil.  Now the first crocuses are out and can’t be buried with mulch.  I emerged from the house to see them.

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the first crocuses

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at the base of tetrapanax

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more clumps, and shotweed

The apricot scent of Hamamelis (witch hazel) wafted all over the front garden.

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raggedy yellow flowers with the most powerful scent

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a bronze Hamamelis

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not as fragrant as the yellow

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another pale one

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I added several new ones last summer.

I found myself gardening and got some more hellebores clipped back.

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before

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after

Soon, though, one more book called me back inside.  It had been recommended by a friend, had 450 small print pages and was due back at the library in four days.  I had intended to have it all read by now and instead was just beginning.

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By the end of the day, I can tell you that this is a shocking must read for citizens of the USA who were not taught by life or by school about the enormous number of small towns (many in the north and in the west!) which through violence and discrimination remained almost totally white even into the 1990s (and beyond?).

Meanwhile, in Oysterville, Dave and Mel were helping to dig up and move an enormous rhododendron several blocks down the road to THE Oysterville garden.

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Melissa’s photo

Sunday, 12 February 2017

Good weather would have had us starting work today had not two events intervened.  The first was a two hour long meeting of a local Indivisible group.  The town of Naselle, a half an hour away, had been chosen for the meeting because that location allowed an easier drive for folks from north county.  We had a group of thirty concerned citizens, sprung out of a larger Indivisible group from north coast Oregon.  Indivisible groups are forming all over the nation by those of us who are deeply concerned at the dark and ominous and non egalitarian turn our country is taking.

It was a joy to attend a gathering of like minded folk from as far north as Aberdeen, as well as the Peninsula and South Bend and Rosburg.

Next door to the meeting place was a most glorious private garden which we admired from the parking lot.

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a large Naselle garden

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Allan’s photo

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next door: the Naselle Library garden

Back in Ilwaco, we went straight (and late for the party) to Salt Pub, pausing only to look at work waiting for us in a curbside garden at the port.

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pondering work

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soon….

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Allan’s photo

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5 PM view from Salt Pub

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a private party at Salt

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Allan’s photo

The occasion was the birthday of Boreas Inn Bill, who said he did not even know he had that many friends on the peninsula!  Dave and Mel joined us because they now care for the Boreas Inn garden.  It has been good for us to have their great gardening business, Sea Star Gardening, to recommend as we cut back to a manageable amount of work.

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Pink Poppy Bakery cakes

In  the evening, I got through another 75 pages of Sundown Towns.

The cats are going to miss staycation reading days, as will I.

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lapcats Frosty and Smokey

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Frosty at bedtime

Sundown Towns is going to be a couple of days overdue by the time I’m done with it. On Monday, work season begins (with more rainy reading days sure to come before too long).

 

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Sunday, 6 March 2016

Although I was obsessed with the scrapbook project, clear weather called me out into the garden to plant the new shrubs from Gossler Farms.

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I was so eager I did not even put on gloves.

What I had to plant:

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Allan’s photos: emerging lilies

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weeded and old stalks removed

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Allan’s photo: Gunnera in the bogsy woods (with seasonal puddle)

Looks like the gunnera is finally going to size up this year.

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The hamamelis Teresa gave me, back by the bogsy wood (Allan’s photo)

It was nerve wracking planting under the alder trees in the roaring wind, so it went quickly.

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so many weeds

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walking around with a shrub trying to figure out where the heck to put it

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back garden, east bed

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lilies and horrible horsetail emerging

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Paperbark maple by the old Danger Tree. Will be able to see it backlit when having a campfire at sunset.

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Dranunculus vulgaris from Allan’s mum coming up

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really need to move this sign…

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…just need to shift it over to the next post to the south…

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Ribes sanguineum (flowering currant)

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Middle bed needs monster shotweeds removed..

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west bed

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east bed

I had so many hamemelis, all different, and wanted most of them in the front garden where I can see them easily in winter.  I put one in the back corner of Allan’s garden:

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But that is just not right as one would have to walk way in there to smell the flowers.

Big accomplishment: I dug up a huge Mutabilis rose that was languishing under that tree, planted there in fall of 2010 when I had no deer fencing.  Moved it into now-fenced front garden…

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Melianthus ‘Antenow’s Blue’ with cut back newly transplanted rose to its left. Melianthus will be cut back once it is done blooming.

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Decision: The hamamelis cannot stay hidden way back there.

Moved it to along the fence, where it will get too big for the path.  Can it be esapaliered?  This was a special one called ‘Glowing Embers’.

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It’s re-planted  but I am having doubts.

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Allan’s photo, a primrose given me by Jayne Bailey (Bailey’s Café)

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double hellebore and a fish given us by Allan’s sister, Pam

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Lamprocapnos spectabilis

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Lamprocapnos spectabilis ‘Alba’, and more

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The huge melianthus is falling open and may also have to be cut back.

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from the front porch

I retreat as the wind gets stronger, and I am so glad because I want to get back to my grandma’s scrapbooks.

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just outside the front door

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on my desk chair

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They must be moved…

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A good rain says I can work on scrapbooks with no gardening guilt.

Still not happy thinking about where I planted ‘Glowing Embers’!

Meanwhile, Allan had gone out on errands and done a bit of narcissi deadheading in Ilwaco.

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Tulipa sylvestris

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narcissi deadheads

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tree garden

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boatyard garden: from last night’s windstorm

In the evening, I began to weep (to my surprise) the moment the telly announcer said “Series finale of Downtown Abbey.

Tomorrow is supposed to be windy and rainy: a scrapbook blogging day, I hope.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

 from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago:

1995 (age 70):

March 6: Brought (into porch) several wheelbarrows of wood. Stacked some wet wood separate and there is enough for a couple of loads to porch. Then I tilled under the winter rye behind garage and in “tomato area” where I’ve been putting the kitchen compost all winter. Weeded the winter carrots, leeks and celeriac.

1998 (age 73):

March 6:  Store day.  Paid power and phone bill, went to Tim’s, both banks, Rite Aid and QFC.  Spent $98 at QFC—They had MMOJ [Minute Maid Orange Juice] on sale again.  It was sunny but cool.  Received Park Seed dahlias (2) and begonias.  They aren’t nearly as big as the Dutch Gardens.

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Sunday, 28 February 2016

After a long and delicious sleep during a blustery windstorm, we realized during brunch that the sun had come out and that it might be a good day to put in an afternoon of work.  While Allan hooked up the trailer, I took a turn around the front garden.

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Ribes speciosum

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Ribes speciosum, closer.  It has mean barberry-like thorns.

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lily foliage emerging along with weeds that I don’t have time to pull.

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Melianthus major and Anthriscus sylvestris ‘Ravenswing’

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Melianthus major is budding, overhead…

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and at eye level

A strong gusty wind blew up again just as I got in the van.  I was ready to abort the beach approach mission and gardening in general.  Allan said he would do the community building garden, so I agreed to help because it’s easy to bail out of a place so close to home.

Just as we parked and started to unload our tools, a passerby arrived (not someone we know) who wanted to chat and ask questions and chat some more, very close within my personal space (like looking over my shoulder while I was getting my gear out of the van).  I’m kind of Aspergian about that.  Thinking of my own comfort rather than contributing to the other person’s enjoyment, it seemed like a time to tactfully and pleasantly depart to go plant some lilies up at Golden Sands.

As we drove north, we had barely left Ilwaco when an earnest rain began.  Now it seemed like a good time to get a little grocery shopping done.

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parked by Sid’s Market

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Weather being decidedly miserable

Allan returned to the vehicle with a grocery bag, saying that he was committed to returning home, having bought ice cream to go with some pie.  I thought contentedly of my comfy chair and the several library books awaiting me on the living room table.

When we got into our driveway, the sun came out, and it seemed like a good time to go back to the community building, so we did.

Finally getting down to work, we accomplished a great deal in just three and a half hours.  I especially wanted to get rid of a lot of the kinnikinnick, as it looks battered and dead after winter, and it is so hard to weed amongst its stems.  The soil in all these beds is infested with quack grass and sorrel and, in some of the beds, bindweed and horsetail.

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before

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after some VERY hard work, with some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ added.

The Sedum should be excellent here, drought tolerant, with interesting flowers, and every now and then it will be easy to remove and clean up, in order to get more of the accursed long white grass roots out of this area.  Added some coppery coloured California poppy seeds, too.

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before: an area heavy with kinnikinnick, with salal planted below at sidewalk level

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another view of the same area….AND I got some of the salal out below!

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North of the wheelchair ramp to the parking lot: I have a Fuchsia magellanica start at home that can fill in there where a big tatty clump of salal came OUT.  And a lovely ornamental grass, low and goldy-red, that go into the bed above.

The garden beds have so much heather.  Indeed, heather dominates every bed but the tiered bed in the lower parking lot and the shade bed by the front door.

As I weeded, something began to bother me along the sidewalk garden.

From the ramp south to the bus stop:

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salal salal salal rhododendrons heathers mugo pines….

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past the salal: rhodos heather mugo pines

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other side of sign…mugo pines, heather rhodos and…what the heck is that huge salal doing in there?? and then heather and rhodos.

“Allan!!!!!” I called, “I have a big idea!!!”

While sitting on the wall, weeding, I had seen a rhododendron languishing hidden in the pines.

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in the pines, in the pines, where the sun never shines, a little lost rhodie.

A half an hour later, Allan had that huge clump of salal OUT, and I had dug up the little lost rhodie.  (I think what happened is back when the garden was planted, a volunteer did not know how big the pines would get compared to that little rhododendron.  As for the oddly places salal, who knows.)

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Allan’s photo, before…

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Goodbye, huge clump of salal!

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Allan’s photo, after, with the rhodie relocated

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A little lost heather had been consumed by the salal.

Allan said the salal runners had gone all the way to the bus stop under the  heather and rhododendrons planted next to it.  He teased the runners back out; they were several feet long.

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What an improvement!

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rhodo where the salal was

We will not let that salal come back, even though it will want to.  (Allan mentioned that the area also has bindweed which was so hard to pull out of that big salal patch.)  The humans will win.  That’s something our Melissa says after a great battle with weeds or invasives:  “Humans win!”  I like to see nature win sometimes, but not when it comes to bindweed or salal or sorrel in a garden bed.

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No more little lost rhododendron.

Meanwhile, I had removed two medium clumps of salal, below, that were all up in a rhodo’s business.

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The rhodo was free, with good breathing room, when I was finished.

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Hamamelis, planted by locals Ann and Butch Saari, matching the library door and arch

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The last 20 minutes of the job took place in a strong cold wind and heavy rain.

I had coppiced some of the red twig dogwood and it seemed that a good home for the long and decorative red stems would be with Laila at Salt Hotel; she excels at incorporating branches and stems into floral displays.  On the way there, a rainbow displayed itself over the port.

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Rainbow over Jessie’s

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fading rainbow over Salt

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo, south side of Salt with pub on second floor

Of course, after delivering the dogwood stems, we could not resist warming up our cold selves in the Salt Pub.

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hot toddy with a fresh ginger infusion made at the pub

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the view

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Desire

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a new larger format menu, and at the next table, our friend Heather Ramsay, artist and owner of the NIVA green shop

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the ever changing clouds

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Heather and me

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Allan and I split the burger, which was exceptional.

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I think Allan’s photo is the most exceptional.

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clouds going pink, 5:50 PM

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6 PM

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A Pink Poppy Bakery cupcake

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delectable

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6:25 PM

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I love that there are books to borrow in a corner of the pub (from owner Julez’ mother’s collection). And that the telly is not turned on all the time.  I much prefer a restaurant to not have a television on.

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at the hotel desk

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6:30 PM, on the way home for an evening of blogging and movie

Tonight, Interstellar or Jurassic World, DVDs borrowed from Ilwaco Timberland Library.

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later, during Jurassic World (loved it!): Smokey displays how well healed his paw is.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1995 (age 70):

Feb 28:  “Store” day.  Watered houseplants.  I planted a lot of the tiny trailing begonias that I started from seed into one of the terracotta planters and set it above the Floralight [indoor 3 tiered lighted plant tray].  I’m curious if they will grow and trail.

Our next blog post will be the expanded and illustrated version of Ginger’s Garden Diaries for February 1995, 97, and 98.

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