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Posts Tagged ‘hardscaping’

Saturday, 20 July 2019

Gardens, Sea and Art tour

presented by the WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties

Ocean Shores

garden three: At the Fore Front

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Every garden has this notice.

tight, well laid cobblestone style paving (Allan’s photo)

This garden was the first of three on the Ocean Shores canals.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

a clear deck railing for unimpeded views

the view across the neighboring yard

The dog sculpture by the canal moved in the breeze; we all thought it might be an effective raccoon deterrent. (Allan heard it is a geese deterrent.)

Allan’s photo

Looking back from the waterside:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

manicured to the water’s edge (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

The waterfall cascaded into the canal.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

This was the first of three gardens on the Ocean Shores canals.  I think it would be grand to live on one of them, 23 miles of interconnected waterways that were dug out over half a decade in the 1960s. Read more here and here. The second article has a map with the charming names of the inland passages.  You can read about Allan’s 2018 canal adventure here.

I was so enticed by the idea of living on one of the canals that I looked up real estate prices and found them to be surprisingly affordable.  This lot is pretty amazing, and only lacks one thing—a house.  And this is my little dream house.

I was enamored with the house right next door to the tour garden.

next door, but not for sale

Next: gardening neighbours on the canal

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 19 July 2014

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for Water Music Festival

We had switched up the order of garden touring as we wanted to be sure to get to our friend Ed’s garden in good time, so we drove back to the ocean side and worked our way north.

Seal House Garden

Seal House

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

This is too funny not to share.  In the photo below, that is me in the blue shirt walking purposely up to the garage to say that car cannot be in the middle of the garden (unless it belonged to a physically challenged guest, which it did not).

Allan's photo: I'm on a mission.  The car got moved to the side.

Allan’s photo: I’m on a mission. The car got moved to the side.

Giving the car the old fish eye.

Giving the car the old fish eye. (Allan’s photo)

The garden is on the end of a cul-de-sac.

The garden is on the end of a cul-de-sac.

The garden gets its name from these sculptures.

The garden gets its name from these sculptures.

seals

garden

a windswept landscape

a windswept landscape

shells2

crocos

looking north from the neighbours’

front

north side of driveway

north side of driveway, looking northwest

looking northwest over the beach grass

looking northwest over the beach grass

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

oyster shells

oyster shells

Susie was hosting an art exhibit in her garage.

Susie was hosting an exhibit by the Northwest Artists Guild.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

and had a refreshment table set up outside.

and had a refreshment table set up outside.

Garden Tour Nancy and I partake.  (Allan's photo)

Garden Tour Nancy and I partake. (Allan’s photo)

She offered guests a list of plants in the garden.

She offered guests a list of plants in the garden.

looking south from the driveway

looking south from the driveway

rock

looking south from the driveway

rocks

path to front porch

path to front porch

musician Jennifer Goodenberger

musician Jennifer Goodenberger

j

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, looking northeast

Allan’s photo, looking northeast (you can see the car that got moved!)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

drive

by the front porch, nasturtiums and a pot with an artichoke

by the front porch, nasturtiums and a pot with an artichoke

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a porch on the southeast corner of the house

a porch on the southeast corner of the house out of the north and the west wind

Shelter from the north wind is summer is most comforting here at the beach, because it is a cold and frequent wind.

looking north from the southeast corner

looking north

looking southeast

looking southeast

Changes in texture of paving make an interesting walk through the garden.

Changes in texture of paving make an interesting walk through the garden.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

She offered guests a list of plants in the garden.

The owner offered guests a list of plants in the garden.

She also offered a list of plants that failed to thrive.  It is always useful to know what is successful or not in a beach side garden.

plant list

I love this sort of transparency!  I think the cold winter killed her Senecio greyii (did the same to mine in a more sheltered spot).  And I usually find that poppies of all sorts do well, but this year I did not have much luck with poppies in beach side gardens.

So of course, I must now regale you with one of my favourite poems; thanks so much to Seal House Susie for reminding me of it:

Why Did My Plant Die?

Geoffrey B. Charlesworth
You walked too close. You trod on it.
You dropped a piece of sod on it.
You hoed it down. You weeded it.
You planted it the wrong way up.
You grew it in a yogurt cup
But you forgot to make a hole;
The soggy compost took its toll.
September storm. November drought.
It heaved in March, the roots popped out.
You watered it with herbicide.
You scattered bonemeal far and wide.
Attracting local omnivores,
Who ate your plant and stayed for more.
You left it baking in the sun
While you departed at a run
To find a spade, perhaps a trowel,
Meanwhile the plant threw in the towel.
You planted it with crown too high;
The soil washed off, that explains why.
Too high pH. It hated lime.
Alas it needs a gentler clime.
You left the root ball wrapped in plastic.
You broke the roots. They’re not elastic.
You walked too close. You trod on it.
You dropped a piece of sod on it.
You splashed the plant with mower oil.
You should do something to your soil.
Too rich. Too poor. Such wretched tilth.
Your soil is clay. Your soil is filth.
Your plant was eaten by a slug.
The growing point contained a bug.
These aphids are controlled by ants,
Who milk the juice, it kills the plants.
In early spring your garden’s mud.
You walked around! That’s not much good.
With heat and light you hurried it.
You worried it. You buried it.
The poor plant missed the mountain air:
No heat, no summer muggs up there.
You overfed it 10-10-10.
Forgot to water it again.
You hit it sharply with the hose.
You used a can without a rose.
Perhaps you sprinkled from above.
You should have talked to it with love.
The nursery mailed it without roots.
You killed it with those gardening boots.
You walked too close. You trod on it.
You dropped a piece of sod on it.






On the way back to our van, we saw a mallard duck in the pond fronting a neighbouring house.  She wanted to be in the blog, so Allan obligingly took these photos.

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Saturday, 19 July 2014

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for Water Music Festival

Goelz Garden

photo 2

We had driven right by this garden many times without realizing what a beautiful landscape is  there.  The Goelzes do all the work themselves and have created a peaceful, spacious space for wandering and entertaining.

as one enters through the front gate

as one enters through the front gate

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a sign on the porch

a sign on the porch

around the side of the house

around the north side of the house

north side garden bed

north side garden bed

looking due north to a long pergola

looking due north to a long pergola

dahlias along the pergola

dahlias along the pergola

pergola4

pergola3

To the north of the pergola, a Eucalyptus grove leans gracefully over the music tent.

To the north of the pergola, a Eucalyptus grove leans gracefully over the music tent.

When Nancy and I pre-toured the garden, we were told that one or more of the eucalyptus trees had fallen in a winter windstorm years ago and then had regrown from the base.

The music at the Goelz garden was performed by the Mozart Chicks.

music

“The Mozart Chicks started as a duo and multiplied into a trio, then a quartet, and finally a quintet over the past 12 years.  They all live on Long Beach Peninsula and each has her foot in various other musical groups as well as other pursuits.

Their instrumentation is an unusual one, but Hannelore Morgan, the group archivist, has managed to find some wonderful arrangements of pieces that span many musical periods. “

mozart

 

chicks

Tootlers make me think of my favourite blog, the Tootlepedal blog.

Tootlers make me think of my favourite blog, the Tootlepedal blog.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

view east from the musicians' tent

view east from the musicians’ tent

seating area at the east end of the lawn

seating area at the east end of the lawn

Allan's photo, looking back toward house and music tent

Allan’s photo, looking back toward house and music tent

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a fort at the east end seating area

a fort at the east end seating area (Allan’s photo)

I saw local writer Sydney Stevens and her husband strolling toward the musician’s tent across the lawn.

sydney

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo from one of the island beds

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

view

looking east-ish

island beds in a vast lawn

island beds in a vast lawn

looking south below the house

looking south below the house

The natural pond lies to the east of the house.

The natural pond lies to the east of the house.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

That's Allan taking a photo.

That’s Allan taking a photo.

goelz

with a viewing dock on its west side.

with a viewing dock on its west side.

dock6

dock5

dock2

The pond is a natural one and its water level falls over the course of the summer.

bridge

The little island is what makes this pond the best I’ve seen on the peninsula.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

sland5

island

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

island2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

island3

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The pond is encircled by a walking path.

The pond is encircled by a walking path…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

..and the pond has landscaping and seating all around.

..and the pond has landscaping and seating all around.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

chair

looking toward the bridge from the back of the pond

looking toward the bridge from the back of the pond

pond4

 

ond6

 

Allan's photo: When we returned to this garden in the afternoon, we were pleased to encounter Prissy from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.

Allan’s photo: We were pleased to encounter Prissy from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart. (Prissy and me, in the distance, discussing plants.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo during his stroll all the way around the pond.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

P7190157

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: garden detailing all the way around

Allan’s photo: garden detailing all the way around

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, coming around the south side of the pond

Allan's photo of bird sculptures made of river rocks

Allan’s photo of bird sculptures made of river rocks

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo.  (He walked the pond path while I was busy chatting with Prissy.)

Allan’s photo. (He had walked the pond path while I was busy chatting with Prissy.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

On the south side of the garden between the house and the pond, the owners had created a garden area especially for their daughter’s wedding.

with a fire circle

with a fire circle

fire2

tree

 

and water features in the area where the wedding was held.

and water features in the area where the wedding was held.

a waterfall

a waterfall

with stream

with recirculating stream

leading to a fountain

leading to a fountain

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Note that there absolutely no liner showing under the rocks; I admired that very much when Nancy and I pre-toured the garden.

tree2

Around the south side of the house, with some shade from tall trees, a bank of hostas.

Around the south side of the house, with some shade from tall trees, a bank of hostas.

the back steps

the back steps

and here we go out the gate..

And here we go out the gate and on to the next garden.

 

 

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Saturday, 21 June 2014

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

Garvey garden

IMG_4809

from the lower entry

from the lower entry

IMG_4813

IMG_4814

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

At the end of the lawn below the house, tour guests walked around the pool to stairs and a path up the hill.

At the end of the lawn below the house, tour guests walked around the pool to stairs and a path up the hill.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back to the lawn

looking back to the lawn

climbing the steps

climbing the steps

from the hillside path

from the hillside path

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

IMG_4820

further up

further up

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo of impressively huge white flowering tree

Allan’s photo of impressively huge white flowering tree

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a vine against a stucco wall

a vine against a stucco wall

arriving on a plaza at the level of the house

arriving on a plaza at the level of the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

garden anchored by silver weeping pear

garden anchored by silver weeping pear

stucco walls by the house

stucco walls by the house

a passageway....

a passageway….

Allan's photo of a Nandina

Allan’s photo of a Nandina

Allan's photo of Nandina ('Plum Passion"?) foliage against the stucco wall

Allan’s photo of Nandina (‘Plum Passion”?) foliage against the stucco wall

leading to an inner courtyard

leading to an inner courtyard

The weather was hot for we beach folk...

The weather was hot for we beach folk…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

colourful annuals

colourful annuals

in the courtyard

in the courtyard

the porch

the porch with water feature

an arch leading to the back of the house

an arch leading to the back of the house

along the back

along the back

IMG_4835

IMG_4836

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

 

I do love a purple wall.

I do love a purple wall.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

outdoor fireplace under an arbour lattice

outdoor fireplace under an arbour lattice

a path leading to the other side of the house

a path leading to the other side of the house

Sheila had texted me and said the way down was comprised of steep steps with no railing.  I took a look and…yes indeed.  So I went back to the courtyard and asked the kind owner if there might be a gate to the street.  She clicked a remote control and viola, the big wooden gates opened and I was able to walk down the street and meet Allan and Sheila on the lower lawn.

Meanwhile, Allan continued to tour down the the stairs.

P1080575

P1080576

P1080577

looking down to the grotto

looking down to the grotto

P1080582

Thanks to Allan, we have seen the whole garden!



 

There was one more garden on the east side/Bellevue tour for Saturday: The Northwest Perennial Alliance border at the Bellevue Botanical Garden.

photo

Unfortunately, we did not have time to see it and still get back to the hotel with a slight turn around time before the evening soirée.  We decided we might be able to see it after touring on Sunday afternoon…and we were simply too tired then, as well.

 

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garden two:  Nybakke Garden

from the program:  A few grand native fir trees, salal and wild huckleberries welcome you to this thriving garden, a tribute to its generous owners.  Before the gale of 2007,  this 1.3 acre plot was basically a natural forest garden.  Destruction of nineteen old growth firs opened the canopy and the Nybakkes created new garden beds, terraces and stone steps where stumps were removed.  A central vintage basketweave patio invites exploration of diverse paths around the house and lower gardens.  Profusions of flowering plants abound, including lilacs, rockroses, cranberry bushes, peonies, daisies, daylilies, fuchsias, carnations, irises and chrysanthemums.  Bird feeders and baths help make this a sanctuary for feathered friends.  Striking foliage of Japanese maples, spirea, grasses, lady’s mantle, thyme, moss, rosemary and lavender enhance dazzling floral displays.  Down pas the shed beside the rolling lawn, meander through another lovely garden with ferns, ajuga, new and recovering rhodies, firs and fruit trees.

We parked at the bottom of the road that leads up to the Astoria column and walked up this driveway.

garden entry

garden entry

rock wall by driveway

rock wall by driveway

A few trees remained after the storm.

A few trees remained after the storm.

The flower and shrub gardens wrapped all around the paths, lawn and patios.

two

At the end of the driveway, we came upon this path into the garden:

path

path

I wondered why there were paving rocks on top of other paving rocks.

interesting

interesting

From this path, one could either walk forward to the house or sideways into the garden.

side path

side path

Monarda

Monarda

looking over the garden to the house

looking over the garden to the house

in the midst of the garden

in the midst of the garden (house in background is downhill neighbours, I believe)

Here is a lawn photo for Tom Hornbuckle.  The lawn was surrounded by flower beds and lay to the south of the paver path.

garden tourists

garden tourists 

mixed border

mixed border; garden shed is below

bench

next to the lawn, the basketweave patio

At the west end of the lawn, people gathered on the basketweave patio.

by the patio

by the patio

by the patio

patio table

patio table

The books reveal the owners' particular garden interests.

The books reveal the owners’ particular garden interests.

more books

another path in the gardens on the same level as the house

another path in the gardens on the same level as the house led to…

a pretty little patio

a pretty little patio

fragrant thyme

fragrant thyme

The garden dropped in levels down the hill to the south.

descending

descending

The steps were well placed for easy descent.

The steps were well placed for easy descent.

At the foot of the mixed border that fell away from the house, I came to another lawn next to a garden shed.

by the shed, looking uphill toward the house gardens

by the shed, looking uphill toward the house gardens

Below the shed, a large lawn area rolled down hill next to another garden bed.

lower garden bed

lower garden bed

a river of gold

a river of gold

I could tell that the garden is being expanded here and look forward to seeing it again on a future tour.

garden in progress

garden in progress

looking back uphill

looking back uphill

walking back up toward the house

walking back up toward the house

back to the luscious house gardens next to stairs going up

back to the luscious house gardens next to stairs going up

stairs going back up to the house

stairs going back up to the house

beside the stairs

beside the stairs

back to the patio

back to the patio

dahlia

Allan had not noticed dahlias with dark foliage before.

Allan had not noticed dahlias with dark foliage before.

We walked around the east side of the house by a small back door garden bed.

east side bed

east side bed

Cotinus 'Golden Spirit'

Cotinus ‘Golden Spirit’

Note to self:  I need to get a new Cotinus ‘Golden Spirit’ as I lost mine in the move from my old house.  The author of one of my favourite blogs, The Miserable Gardener, calls that “transplantosis.”  My plants suffer a lot from that disease.

looking south to that garden bed with the Cotinus

looking south to that garden bed with the Cotinus

We find another big lawn on the south and west sides of the house.

We find another big lawn on the south and west sides of the house.

Strangely, we did not walk around to the west side of the house.  Nothing pulled me over there, and I might have missed another garden area.

looking southwest toward the Columbia River from that big lawn

looking southwest toward the Columbia River from that big lawn

It is odd indeed that we did not walk all around the house, but instead we turned back toward the patio.  To the east, the lawn was cast in shade.

a quiet cool sit spot

a quiet cool sit spot

We found steps leading back to the rock paver path.

We found steps leading back to the rock paver path.

And off to the side of that path, a grass path led to the big southwest lawn.

grassy path

grassy path

This was an excellent and impressive garden and I enjoyed every aspect of it.  I had to move house to get from a shade garden to a sunny garden; here, mother nature effected that change.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Coral’s garden

In midsummer, I took on a one-off job at a Surfside garden that was pretty much a blank slate except for a few trees.

before

before

I brought in two other garders and worked in coalition with them to get it done:  Carol of the Elves and my good friend Terran, who had a gardening business at the time.

before

before

I planned out the job according to Coral’s vision and drawings of a dry “waterfall” and creek bed with a berm along the street side.  Carol of the Elves and I plunged into the job and spoke after a day of moving rocks that we should merge our two businesses and change the name to Amazon Gardening. I could move rocks for 8 hours back then, at age 49, and only feel tired in the last hour…

during

during

Carol left halfway through the job because of a crisis pertaining to her friend and my ex: She thought I was awfully cold-hearted to not want to be involved.  So Terran stepped in and helped finish the job.  That was the end of my work association with the Elves, although I continued to pass extra jobs onto them.

Coral's new creekbed

Coral’s new creekbed

bermTerran helped me finish the berm that the owner wanted along the front of the garden.  I could have finished myself, but did not have the time as I was sandwiching this in among all my regular jobs.

Coral's creekbed

Coral’s creekbed

Coral was happy because the job came out just as she planned.  She would complete the rough edges herself after having a deck built next to the house.

after

after

Below:  Coral’s garden, January 2010…still there!  By this time, the deck which we had left space for had been built along the house. Coral was there and I told her the true story of the drama behind the making of her streambed, and she said she had no idea, and was just impressed that this assorted crew of women kept showing up to do the work.  I’m pleased that I successfully hid the crisis going on behind the scenes.

2010

January 2010

Discovery Heights

I had taken on the job of making a series of entry gardens for the new Ilwaco development called Discovery Heights.   Below,  the north side of the lower entry garden after the developers had put rocks in place. 

new garden, south side

new garden, south side

Discovery Heights lower garden, north side

Discovery Heights lower garden, north side

I got started on the project so late that the clients must have wondered whether or not I was really going to get around to it.

I would not have taken it on at all had I not known that a new partner was going to join my business in January (more on this later).  Meanwhile, Roger of Clean Cut Services helped with clearing the ground and adding a nice layer of washed dairy manure.

Roger helping out

Roger helping out

In 1992, Roger had been the bartender at the Heron and Beaver Pub who had helped inspire Robert and me to move to the beach with his tale of having moved here with no job and little money and living in a place with a leaky roof and cold water only, just to be here.

middle garden

middle garden

Meanwhile, the middle garden waited clearing.   Roger went up one day and did it, and then it was ready for me to plant it up as one of the first projects of 2005.

the middle garden awaits, late December 2004

the middle garden awaits, late December 2004

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My old friend Mary (since age 12!) met me at the train in Seattle and the next day we went to the garden open at Heronswood near Kingston. I almost wept when entering the long driveway….It was a pilgrimage onto sacred ground.  I had been mail ordering plants from Dan Hinkley since the nursery first offered them but had never been there.  By the time it had become a tour mecca, I had already moved to the beach.

trees along the Heronswood entry driveway

trees along the Heronswood entry driveway

under the trees

under the trees

A few years before I had heard a lecture by Anne Lovejoy, in Seaside, Oregon, not about gardening but about her trip to the Cloud Forest in Costa Rica (AND she had given me an Edgeworthia chrysantha which she lugged down for me on the train, bless her!). The idea of a cloud forest made me feel way better about my shady Ilwaco garden, and so did the woodsy sections of Heronswood.

Pulmonaria 'Cotton Cool'

Pulmonaria ‘Cotton Cool’

Heronswood

the Gunnera with tiny leaves!

the Gunnera with tiny leaves! magellanica, I think

To be at Heronswood was like a happy dream.  I was thrilled to see in person the famous Heronswood lawn with Hakonechloa macra aureola grass along the edge.

the lawn border that I had seen in many photos

the lawn border that I had seen in many photos

approaching the house garden

approaching the house garden

Mary and I also got to hear Dan Hinkley give a lecture, and she finally experienced first hand how very witty he is.  I was pleased to see that even though she was not at all a gardener obsessed, she laughed and laughed!

the famous (not so) clipped Hornbeam hedge

the famous (not so) clipped Hornbeam hedge

adorable ferns near the house

adorable ferns near the house

In the back of the vegetable garden, you can see the famous hand washing sink created by Little and Lewis.

the vegetable garden

the vegetable garden

Aeonium 'Schwarzkopf'

Aeonium ‘Schwarzkopf’

details

details

The Little and Lewis pillars in the boggy garden

 Little and Lewis pillars 

the top of more pillars

the top of more pillars

I think you would have to go out on the nearby pond in a boat to photograph this whole glorious structure.

detail at the base of the pillars

detail at the base of the pillars

Blue Himalayan Poppy

Blue Himalayan Poppy

poppy

poppy

After Heronswood, Mary and I had a delicious meal at Molly Ward Gardens restaurant.  The food was wonderful. I seem to recall a cold melon soup. The restaurant was housed in an old barn that had once housed a yard shop.

at Molly Ward gardens

at Molly Ward gardens

Peeking into the Molly Ward courtyard

Peeking into the Molly Ward courtyard

the courtyard

the courtyard

Phormium contained

Phormium contained

The Phormium in a small garbage can is an idea I have used several times since then.

in the Molly Ward garden

in the Molly Ward garden

courtyard seating

courtyard seating

And then….back to Bellevue and Seattle for more garden touring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Arcadia Court Hotel

In early summer 2001, we were contacted by the then owners of the Arcadia Court Hotel who asked us to make a garden out of the plants and materials that she had already acquired.  We looked at the piles of ingredients, and since I was busy doing the regular maintenance of various jobs, Robert said he would like to tackle this one on his own.

Here’s the before photo, from the owner’s balcony:

Arcadia garden, before

Arcadia garden, before

They had piles of blocks and rocks and bricks that they wanted used in an empty patio area, and this is what he put together. It was one of those gardens one creates but does not maintain so one does not see the end results. (I try never to do gardens like that these days!)

after

after

I helped with the planting toward the end of the project.  (When you see me wearing a headband, it is not a fashion statement.  It means I have, or am trying to avoid the beginnings of, a headache.  I find a cold wet headband to be enormously helpful at those times.)

planting

planting

Robert and I both liked Ann Lovejoy’s garden design advice to “keep the center open” so he left a nice space for the table and chairs that were also in the stash of garden ingredients.

after

after, with motel units in background

Arcadia garden

Arcadia garden

After the motel changed hands, this garden area was fenced and we could no longer see if it even existed.   The name of the motel changed to something with the word Discover in it.  But then it changed hands again and returned to the lovely name “Arcadia Court Hotel“.  It is getting excellent reviews on Trip Advisor, like this one:  “The rooms are clean efficiency rooms. Many of them have porches that make perfect play rooms. The rooms are cute and clean. Its an old place but well maintained. Quick walk to the beach or town and the owners are very friendly and inviting.”    I would recommend it as a great place to stay in Long Beach.

We have heard from the nice new owners that the old garden is no more.

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January 1999

January 1999

Sometimes there would be years when work was all consuming that plans to improve our own garden were put on hold.  This was especially true during the years when I did most of the gardening work so that Robert could work on his artful welding.  I would realize halfway through the summer, “This is another lost year in the garden”, and the bindweed, horsetail, and creeping buttercup would win again.

January 1999, snow on a water feature Robert had built by our upper patio

January 1999, snow on a water feature Robert had built by our upper patio
Maddy

Maddy

Our new cat, Maddy, continued to like small baskets.  She was now our only cat because my beloved Orson, my best cat ever, died in spring of 1999….I came home to find him sleeping in the same spot as in the morning, and when I patted him to tease him about it, he was cold. He had only recently forgiven me for getting Maddy and started sitting on my lap again; he was only 14 and I hope the stress of my having brought a kitten home did not hasten his demise.  We buried him near the pond.

a new water feature right outside the front door

a new water feature right outside the front door

Thalictrum 'Hewitt's Double' by our upper patio, spring '99

Thalictrum ‘Hewitt’s Double’ by our upper patio, spring ’99

upper patio water feature in spring

upper patio water feature in spring

Over the summer, backhoe madness continued on the properties to the north and south of us (both owned by the same person).  Below, this is what the hills looked like on both sides of us by the end of that summer, with just one block’s thickness of trees that belonged to the city between us and the scalped hill to the south; this was the view to our north.

RV Park

RV Park

Fortunately, our house had only one window looking in that direction, and the others looked into our garden to the east, south, and west.

cats

Dumbles, Miss Marble, Maddy

In late 1999, I adopted two feral kittens who had born and lived their early kittenhood under the Shelburne Inn. I thought Maddy WANTED company, but she hated them intensely. They were so shy that I despaired of ever making friends with them; first, they lived under the bathtub, and when outside they would hide under the porch until patiently lured by me, often standing in the rain, with canned catfood.

Dumbles, slowly deciding to trust me.

Dumbles, slowly deciding to trust me.

2000

The biggest personal gardening event for me was the acquisition of my first computer in January, 2000.   I had been partly inspired by Ann Lovejoy‘s amazement when she learned in 1999 (at the workshop in Cannon Beach) that I did not have an email address!

my first computer!

my first computer!

The first online community I discovered was the gardening groups at Onelist, which soon because yahoogroups. It took awhile before I found my best online community, though, in a social e-list that sprung up from Seattle Webgrrrls (which I had joined on the advice of my friend Mary to try to understand computers).   I don’t think I opened up much about my personal life the first year, but later they would give me invaluable advice on escaping my increasingly difficult relationship.
flowering currants on north side

flowering currants on north side

The shrubs along the mid-north side of the garden were finally starting to grow up  enough to hide the neighbours house…. just in time for a major sewage back up which in that winter required us digging a ditch through the garden, in pouring rain, all down one side. Thank heavens Robert had been a plumber and knew how to lay the new sewer pipe. It turned out the old line had gone under the huge spruce tree area and a big root had crushed it. The culmination was, when buying the last section of pipe (and sinking further into debt), someone at the lumber store closed the back end of our van and pushed the pipe right through our windshield. Another $300.  All I craved was one peaceful winter with no car breakdown or home repair crisis.  Perhaps such a winter would make Robert happy at last.

Summer in the middle, shady part of the garden:  A Decaisnea which had grown large and would eventually tower over my head.

Decaisnea fargessii

Decaisnea fargessii

Below:  Rose ‘Ghislane de Feligonde’ had come with me from Seattle, to the Sou’wester, then Shakti Cove, and then my new garden.  I had acquired it at a wonderful old rose garden in Snohomish, probably in 1989, on the advice of the rosarian.

Rose 'Ghislane de Feligonde'

Rose ‘Ghislane de Feligonde’

I successfully brought it with me in late 2010 to my new Lake Street garden.

by the lower pond, 2000

by the lower pond, 2000

our house, summer 2000, from beside the pond

our house, summer 2000, from beside the pond

Dumbles in the garden

Dumbles in the garden

Our new cats, Miss Marble and Dumbles, had finally become friendly to us.  They were still skittish, and friends found it hard to believe they existed as they skedaddled at the sight of anyone but me or Robert.  When we took them to be spayed and neutered, we were told “Sorry, we could not spay Marble”…because she was a boy.   We tried to call her “he” and change her name to the “Masked Marble”, but Marble was a she to us for the rest of her life.

Miss Marble and Dumbles

Miss Marble and Dumbles

Can you see the resemblance to a cat’s eye marble in the swirl on her face?

upper patio, summer 2000;  Robert made a woven fence to hide the ugly RV park view.

upper patio, summer 2000; Robert made a woven fence to hide the ugly RV park view.

same area with some of Robert's ironwork

same area with some of Robert’s ironwork

Robert frequently changed the water feature outside the front door .  Eventually, we had to give up on the fountain aspect because wind would blow the water sideways till the reservoir was dry.  We were seeking a splashy sound to mask the daily backhoe noise as our neighbour, seemingly pointlessly, moved dirt from one side of his lots to another and back again.  (Within another year, he had tired of it and moved on to an area closer to his home further up the hill, and the alders grew back and after awhile you could not even tell what he had done.)

water feature outside the front door

water feature outside the front door

As I shared earlier, a big change to the middle garden was the building of Robert's welding shed.

As I shared earlier, a big change to the middle garden was the building of Robert’s welding shed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I must have started caring for the Shelburne Inn garden before 1999, because I have a polaroid of its sister establishment, The China Beach Retreat, from spring 1999 (and the Shelburne job began at least two years before the China Beach):

before, by the house

before, by the house

the same area in summer '99

the same area in summer ’99

I do recall that when I began to care for the Shelburne garden, it had four main perennials in the front garden:  Rudbeckia (Black Eyed Susan), hardy geranium, Shasta daisies and Campanula (bellflower).  From a small area, I removed a bushel basket of creeping buttercup.  Once the weeds were gone, I thinned out some of the four perennials and added some more to make the garden more diverse.

in my early days at the Shelburne

Shelburne garden, 2000

The owner loved gladiolas and bought a big bag of them from Costco for me to plant each year.

herb beds, Shelburne back garden, 2000

herb beds, Shelburne back garden, 2000

(Above) The square herb beds had been all taken over with orange montbretia, and I was making it my mission to make them more interesting.

spring, Shelburne 2000

spring, Shelburne 2000

late summer, Shelburne 2000

late summer, Shelburne 2000

I still worked at Carol’s garden on the bay:

Carol's on the bay

Carol’s on the bay

I still tended my volunteer garden at the Ilwaco boatyard.

boatyard garden summer '99

boatyard garden summer ’99

Euphorbia, boatyard, 2000

Euphorbia, boatyard, 2000

boatyard garden, 2000

Oriental poppy, boatyard, 2000

Oriental poppy, boatyard, 2000

According to the dates on my photos, this is also the year I started taking care of the gardens at the Anchorage Cottages just north of Long Beach, a job that had a connection to the famous Heronswood Nursery. I had been ordering plants from Heronswood since before I left Seattle, but had never been there. The Anchorage had been previously owned by the sister of Robert Jones, partner of plantsman Dan Hinkley, so Heronswood had done some redesign of the Anchorage gardens.

Anchorage garden, summer '99

Anchorage garden, summer ’99

I added perennials along the front of the courtyard garden.

Anchorage container by the office

Anchorage container by the office

February 1999, we started redoing the old herb garden at Klipsan Beach Cottages into a deer-proof garden.

February 1999

February 1999, looking out of the garden

Robert is the one who made the garden level by using rocks and railroad ties to build up where the land sloped.  Over a couple of years, Robert build three rebar gates for the fence.

fenced garden, first summer

fenced garden, first summer

sweet peas, KBC 1999

sweet peas, KBC 1999

KBC birdbath

KBC birdbath

Oh!  There is some white Salvia viridis (painted sage); I must have heard, by then, the lecture by Lucy Hardiman at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show, and seen her slide of this plant, and gotten The Planter Box to start to grow it for me. In one lecture, she had shown both painted sage AND Cerinthe purpurascens, two annuals that I simply had to have.  Yes, I remember the excitement of a new friend, Tamara, who worked with me sometimes that summer, as we both fell in love with those two new (to us) plants.

below:  Spencer, the KBC cat, and catmint. The scrim of garden bed outside the fence was planted in deer-resistant plants to soften up the edge, an idea I had seen in Horticulture magazine.

Spencer and catmint

Spencer and catmint

Although we were trying to make time for Robert to do ironwork by me working part time with Tamara, photos show that we also began to make a grass garden for Bill P. who had a summer house in the Klipsan area.  The thing is, we needed to make money, and the ironwork was only paying pennies per hour.  I also needed Robert’s talent at making things level on a job like this.

Bills' beach garden, before

Bills’ beach garden, before

southwest corner of house, before

southwest corner of house, before

Bill wanted simple paths with square pavers.

making paths

making paths

fall '99, looking west

fall ’99, looking west

Much of the garden was right on the foredunes, and gave me much thought about how wonderful it would be to have an ocean view, but then I would envision a tsunami, so never mind.

dune garden

dune garden

southwest corner, summer

southwest corner, summer

and in summer 2000

and in summer 2000

I was still doing my four volunteer planters in Long Beach. I heard that city manager Nabiel Shawa had said in a council meeting that my particular planters were “magnificent.”

one of my planters.  Eventually I got sick of the Crocosmia in the planters.

one of my planters. Eventually I got sick of the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ in the planters.  It got too rampant.

In ’98, the city had hired me to water the city planters once a week.  The next thing I knew, the city had hired me to care for the gardens in all the city parks, including a new one which was just then being created by Marsh’s Free Museum. I had thought parks manager Mike Kitzman would have been sick of me always pestering his crew to keep their feet out of the planters when putting Christmas lights on the poles, but he told me he realized it just meant I really cared about the gardens.

Mike and his wonderful crew started making popout gardens along Ocean Beach Boulevard; below is a young planting in its first year of my making gardens for the city.  This one is just south of Boo Boo’s Putt Putt Golf.

big popout

big popout

Over by the playing field, there used to be a fence along which I planted godetia (one of Mike’s favourite flowers) alternated with Salvia viridis, painted sage, which I had gotten the Planter Box to grow for me.

painted sage and godetia

painted sage and godetia

(The yellow edge is from the crew using Round-up.)

I planted up this big planter in Lewis and Clark Square:

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Later,  I changed the look to ornamental grasses and perennials,  but when I found this old photo in 2010, I changed it back to the above look of annuals! I think a tourist town should have less tasteful planting and more cheery colour.  But that the colour should be provided by unusual and interesting annuals.

We (and by “we” in ’99, I often mean me and Tamara)  planted up a little corner garden in the patio belonging to Don Woodcock, Glennie’s brother in law, who summered at the Sandcastle, that gorgeous house with the tower just west of the Shelburne Inn.  He had bought this fountain at the Planter Box and just loved it.

Don's courtyard corner

Don’s courtyard corner

Sharon’s garden on the bay had gotten even more lush and glorious:

Sharon's

Sharon’s

I told the story of that garden in my previous entry.

Another job with a Heronswood connection came along in ’99, creating a rock walled semi circle in a clearing by the house of Cynthia, another sister of Dan Hinkley’s partner, Robert Jones. She was able to get an exciting discount on mail order plants from the nursery.

I definitely needed Robert’s help on this one.

Cynthia's, before

Cynthia’s, before

during

during

We had a load of supposedly one man rocks dumped off by Ollie Oman. I don’t know if Robert was imagining this, but he always thought Ollie was impressed that we managed to handle these large rocks and turn them into a garden on our own, with no machinery but a pry bar and a hand truck.

The semi circle of rocks in spring of 2000:

Cynthia's new garden

Cynthia’s new garden

This was one of those rather maddening jobs that I try never to do now, where we made a garden whose owner had the intention of maintaining it herself so we did not see how it turned out in the end.  The middle was intended to become a patio and firepit.

Cynthia's new garden, spring 2000

Cynthia’s new garden, spring 2000

She said we could come back and look at it any time, but as usual life became extraordinarily busy…

More of work 2000 coming up…

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