Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘hardy fuchsias’

Wednesday, 24 September 2014

Even though we had barely gotten back to work, I welcome a day off at home….so that I could blog about my recent stay at the Sylvia Beach Hotel.  I took a brief walk around the garden first.

behind the garage

behind the garage

My big idea is to build a garden shed here.  Well, to have a garden shed built, not build it myself.  If it is tall enough, as tall as the next door garage, it could block the maddeningly bright security light that shines all night long.  One of my inspirations is the shed at Rhone Street Gardens.

tall and narrow with a green roof

tall and narrow with a green roof, Rhone Street Gardens

Nora’s back lawn is going wild.  I will be interested to see it turn into a meadow and I actually hope the non-mowing continues.  (I may regret that thought later.)

yard

My other dream is to buy Nora’s house, if it ever goes up for sale.  Then I would just turn off the security light instead of adding a light-blocking shed.

one of our gates near Nora's driveway

one of our gates near Nora’s driveway

Rose 'Paul's Himalayan Musk' with hips

Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’ with hips

back garden, west side path

back garden, west side path

very late blooming Aconitum (monkshood)

very late blooming Aconitum (monkshood)

This aconitum is one late bloomer that I daren’t add to the garden at Golden Sands Assisted Living or even Klipsan Beach Cottages; it is poisonous, and I am afraid someone would pick it for a bouquet.

Verbena bonariensis brought low by rain and wind

Verbena bonariensis brought low by rain and wind

I planted a batch of seeds but only got this one sunflower.

I planted a batch of seeds but only got this one sunflower.

looking east over the back garden

looking east over the back garden

Yesterday late afternoon in the rain, I had pruned enough blue potato vine to be able to see out my window.

Yesterday late afternoon in the rain, I had pruned enough blue potato vine to be able to see out my window….

and succeeded in breaking some cattails in one of my water gardens.

and succeeded in breaking some cattails in one of my water gardens.

Another idea of mine is to replace these low wheeled containers that I acquired somewhere for free with handsome big shiny feed troughs.

someday!

someday!

inside one of the back gates

inside one of the back gates

in the front garden, a hardy fuchsia

in the front garden, a hardy fuchsia

Hardy fuchsias would be the perfect plant to add to Golden Sands garden, and they are easy to start from cuttings just stuck into the ground.  I could even get divisions from some of the larger clumps.

Hardy fuchsia magellanica

Hardy fuchsia magellanica

There is much to do in the garden…none of which got done today.

For example...my beloved white sanguisorba struggled in the front garden, where it's too dry.  It must be moved to the back.

For example…my beloved white sanguisorba struggled in the front garden, where it’s too dry. It must be moved to the back.

Allan ran some errands and had a look at the CranMac cranberry farm just north of Black Lake.  He reported back that the cranberry bogs were full and the level of Black Lake was down:

P9240005

P9240010

floating those cranberries

floating those cranberries

The dry bogs are flooded the night before the harvest. The following day, the farmers use water reels nicknamed egg beaters to dislodge the berries from the vines so they’ll float to the water’s surface. The farmers then wade through the bog and round up the fruit with large wooden or plastic brooms. This process is called corralling. (howstuffworks.com)

P9240011

Black Lake is lowered.

A certain quartet of kitties was thrilled to have me home all day.

Frosty in bliss

Frosty in bliss

 

 

Read Full Post »

I could get used to three days off, and then it would not seem like such a momentous event.  For now, it is still a new and exciting twist to our lives.  I even left the property on one of the days.

Saturday, 30 August 2014

I woke at nine thirty to the sound of intense wind and had immediate sympathy for the vendors down at the Saturday Market.  The tents are hard to handle during wind.  I checked my local weather and learned the gusts were up to 22 mph.  Sure enough, later on when I walked through the market, about a third of the vendors had given up and gone home during that hour of wind.  It’s a shame they could not hold on, or wait it out in their vehicles, and the weather was pleasant from noon onwards.

a rather empty market on a big tourist weekend (Labor Day)

a rather empty market on a big tourist weekend (Labor Day)

peppers at De Asis produce

peppers at De Asis produce

lilies for sale

lilies for sale, and puddle evidence of overnight rain

flowers from The English Nursery

flowers from The English Nursery

succulents

succulents

My real mission was to meet Garden Tour Nancy for lunch at Olde Towne Café.  On the way, I passed the storage yard for old boats and for the first time ever I saw the gate open.  Of course, I nopped in for a closer look.

boat

boat2

Wouldn't this make a great garden shed?

Wouldn’t this make a great garden shed?

Outside the fence, a family looks at a very old boat.

Outside the fence, a family looks at a very old boat.

a poignant sight

a poignant sight

on the way to Olde Towne, a planter and building do a colour echo

on the way to Olde Towne, a planter and building do a colour echo

I’m planning to take the catmint out of the planters, as it goes through an awkard stage in midsummer and takes up too much room.  It looks awfully good right now though.

At Olde Towne, Allan happened to come in and sat with his friend Chris to talk of boats (of course); Chris is the one who gave Allan the little sailboat that he takes out on Black Lake.

boat talk

boat talk

Nancy and I talked about garden tours, gardens, chickens, and what makes us happy.

After I got home, I did not set foot off my property for two and a half days, and that makes me quite happy indeed.

I admired some of my many hardy fuchsias:

fuchsia

fuchsia2

fuchsia3

fuchsia

fuchsia2

DebRon's Black Cherry

DebRon’s Black Cherry

Chillerton Beauty

Chillerton Beauty

fuchsia3

and other plants:

clematis heracleifolia 'New Love'

clematis new love

Chelone (pink turtlehead)

Chelone (pink turtlehead)

Persicaria 'Firetail'

Persicaria ‘Firetail’

a late, lone flower on Mermaid rose

a late, lone flower on Mermaid rose

I noted that the cat quotation is not entirely blocked by the new support for their platform.

I noted that the cat quotation is not entirely blocked by the new support for their platform.  But you can’t read that it is by Beverly Nichols.

I even tackled some very late afternoon weeding, digging the chives that had in such a silly way seeded themselves in a shade garden.  It looks much better without them.

also pulled about a million forget me not starts

also pulled about a million forget me not starts

Allan’s day was spent in a leisurely way of doing errands and little things like moving the house numbers so they show, since I planted a conifer in front of them and it grew.  Oops.

On the way to and from the post office, he had the pleasure if seeing the Ilwaco tortoise that lives in a private yard.  Neither of us have seen it this close up before; it came right up to the fence.

P1110159

P1110160

P1110162

P1110163

P1110165

The tortoise moved very fast when it decided to return to the back yard.

The tortoise moved very fast when it decided to return to the back yard.

Sunday, 31 August 2014

Island Lake

Allan went boating on Island Lake with his styrofoam boat (that I disrespectfully call the picnic cooler boat).

Screen Shot 2018-03-13 at 3.23.35 PM.jpg

P8310001

Looking north with island in background.

P8310003

Looking south.

P8310004

Leaving the launch. I had the lake to myself on a very pleasant sunny Labor Day Sunday.

P8310005

Approaching the peninsula that makes the lake look half the size it is.

P8310012

Over half the lake seemed less than 3 feet so I steered with the oars leaving the daggerboard & rudder in the bow. Over fifty years of dents on the styrofoam hull from my dad and the scouts he loaned it to.

P8310007

The shallow passage around the peninsula

P8310017.JPG

Checking out something unusual on the northwest shoreline.

P8310019

a shipwreck by the shore of the lake

P8310023

This is the north shore of Island Lake. I couldn’t find a dry place to beach and check out Lost Lake to the north. For a sense of scale, the ‘shipwreck’ is up on the left. I tied up (reefed) the sail to make rowing upwind easier.

The north shore with the sunken hull on the left

Looking south from the north shore. I need to row home and start the fire for dinner.

rose wind sock that flies from the boat

The rose wind sock that indicates wind direction.

A visitor from Portland with a camper and a kayak helped carry the hull back.

A visitor from Portland with a camper and a kayak helped me load.

Meanwhile, at home:

I woke up and started to debate with myself again about a certain clump of salmonberry back by the bogsy woods:  Should I cut it or not?

The one to the left.  It looks extra tatty.

The one to the left. It looks extra tatty.

I cut it.

I cut it.

I think I liked it better to have the salmonberry there.  Cutting it is not a problem in the long run, as it will grown back and look fresher and greener next year.  Allan says we could plant something better there; however, I feel the root clump will be just about impossible to remove.  He is welcome to have a go at it with the pick.

Speaking of how “When you cut it, you can’t put it back”, I went too far cutting the poky sharp rose by the rain barrel at the back corner of the house, and spoiled the feeling of surprise when you all of a sudden come through between shed and house and see the back garden. Fortunately, it, too, will grow back.

You can see too much from here now.

You can see too much from here now.

I decided to have a fire so mowed the lawn first.

our fire circle

our fire circle

Two thirds of the way through, the mower seized up from too much wet grass and I was not sure how to clean it.  There is a certain way of tipping it that floods the carburetor…or some such thing.  So I got my mom’s little rechargeable electric mower to finish.  I was reminded why we gave in to buying the gas powered mower.

difference in cutting

difference in cutting height; the lowest height on the electric one is not low enough for my taste.

difference in cutting width; the electric requires more passes.

difference in cutting width; the electric requires more passes.

As you can tell, I was having a very exciting day.  I managed to get the fire started even though my wilderness survival skills are low.

At last, some flames!

At last, some flames!

For the rest of the late afternoon,  I fed the fire with twigs and bits of dried salmonberry and alder wood, and sat and admired my view of the garden (facing north, as the wind was from the south, unusually so).

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' on the east fence

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ on the east fence

fire3

east

looking from my chair toward the west fence

Allan returned and we had a typical campfire dinner of beer from local North Jetty Brewing, hot dogs and chips (crisps).

dinner

dinner

It's incredibly relaxing to watch a campfire burn out.

It’s incredibly relaxing to watch a campfire burn out.

Monday, 1 September, 2014

Allan went off to see a boating event in South Bend; it needs its own post, as he took lots of photos.  I’ll make it into a bonus post for today, publishing this evening.  While he was gone, I weeded a bit, visiting for a long while with J9 when she came over (and shared some Yukon Gold potatoes and some tomatoes), and weeded some more, and took only this one photo.  I distinctly recall digging out these huge clumps of Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ last fall and moving them to the east fence, and yet here they are again.

They came back.

They came back.

When he returned, Allan loaded the salmonberry debris into the trailer to be disposed of tomorrow, and cut two lower branches off of Nora’s maple tree, one dead and one hanging low over our fence.  Oh dear, once again, I re-learned the sad lesson that once you cut it, you can’t put it back.  I had just been thinking of the shade for my east garden bed, not of how that bit of foliage hid the view of a big house way up on the hill.  (Eventually, the flowering currant underneath will thrive in the extra sun and grow up to fill that space.)

I’ve been reading a book called Eden on Their Minds, recommended in the Danger Garden blog.

610FZD6Y8EL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

This quotation by Louise Goodall Smith of Birmingham, Alabama, spoke to me of my various efforts in the garden this weekend:

quotation

Read Full Post »

Friday, 14 March 2014

I was so sure I would have a rainy day off to finish my book.  Instead, bright sun slipped into my room and woke me all too early and then my utter shock re having to go to work kept me awake, so I functioned all day on just five hours of sleep.

Allan cheered me up with a decorated breakfast.

breakfast (vegetable patty with cheese, a dried plum (nice words for prune) and Dave's Killer Bread.

breakfast (vegetable patty with cheese, a dried plum (nice words for prune) and Dave’s Killer Bread.

Because the annual quilt show will draw many to the museum near the post office from Friday through Sunday, I felt I had to do one thing that has been bothering me in our volunteer post office garden:  cut back a Cistus.  It looked somewhat tatty from freezing, and was a donated plant that I probably would not have chosen.  It’s the one with rather nondescript pale pink flowers and a short bloom period and it was taking up rather a lot of space.

in the midst of pruning...

in the midst of pruning…

and after.  We may completely remove the cistus later one.

and after. We may completely remove the cistus later one.

I’d piled rocks in back to hide how the bottom of the wall was not painted; back when the painting was done, lawn grass hid the bottom.   I guess the Cistus did some service by hiding that ragged edge!

I had been so sure we’d get the day off that I had not made a work plan.  However, I did remember that one of the Ilwaco street tree pocket gardens had been bothering me with its weeds as we drove by at the end of each recent work day.

tiny tree garden, a mess indeed!

tiny tree garden, a mess indeed!

Allan tackled that square while I weeded a couple of the street planters and seven of the other tree gardens.  None of them were as terribly weedy as the one that had been on my mind.

This was the first planter to start blooming with narcissi a couple of weeks ago or more and is still going strong.

This was the first planter to start blooming with narcissi a couple of weeks ago or more and is still going strong.

I also popped into the Antique Gallery to take some photos for its Facebook page.  The Gallery’s owners are our gardening clients, Larry and Robert; they have a second antique shop around the corner on Spruce Street.

The ornamental pear street trees are in bloom.

The ornamental pear street trees are in bloom.

inside the Antique Gallery at First and Lake.

inside the Antique Gallery at First and Lake, just one corner out of several rooms.

Allan kept soldiering away on that one messy garden bed; I suggested just removing the golden marjoram that was terribly infested with grass.

tree, after

tree, after

We were still operating without much of a work plan for the day.  Because we had some buckets of plant starts with us,  we went to the Sid Snyder Ave. beach approach to add some sedums and catmint to one of the planters that we redid last fall.

It had been full of Vinca and creeping Jenny.

It had been full of Vinca and creeping Jenny.

From there, we were inspired to weed and tidy up the 7 other planters along Sid Snyder, and then to add sedums and catmints to two other planters on the Bolstadt beach approach.

The city crew was hard at work, too, putting lights on the arch on the Bolstadt approach.

the iconic Long Beach arch

the iconic Long Beach arch

There is some debate about whether or not we really do have the world’s longest beach.  It is an old and traditional slogan.

Last fall, we had removed sheets of boring Vinca (planted by volunteers some years ago) in the two westernmost planters, so each got some sedum and catmint.  They get little water in summer….only when we haul it out in buckets.

Looking west: There's a planter between the Discovery Trail and the boardwalk.

Looking west: There’s a planter between the Discovery Trail and the boardwalk.

looking east toward town

looking east toward town (the arch is between those two big buildings)

Next, I remembered that we could further the weeding project and control of rugosa roses in the big popout on Ocean Beach Boulevard.  While Allan got set up there, I stopped at Pink Poppy Bakery, just east of the arch, and learned of a local event which we will likely attend (the evening part of it):

eventI brought two cupcakes to the big popout.

chocolate Guinness cupcakes with Bailey's Irish Cream frosting

chocolate Guinness cupcakes with Bailey’s Irish Cream frosting

Could I keep the cupcakes as a reward for a job well done?

center of the big popout, before.

center of the big popout, before.

No, I ate mine right away, for strength.   Allan did the hardest part of the job, swinging a pick to remove rugosa roses, leaving them standing only at the back of the garden.  I used to love Rugosa roses and still would appreciate any that are not such vicious runners as this one, Rosa rugosa ‘Alba’.  They are immune to disease, don’t mind salty winds, and are pretty much left alone by deer.

after

after

I know the soil is still thick with deep rose roots and the rhizomes of couch grass, and I wish the Pampas grass was not the centerpiece.  However, with diligence, we may be able to turn this into some sort of lovely eye level display of charming rock garden plants.

Next, after dumping a trailer load of debris at city works, we did the one thing that I had fervently wanted to do:  planted some free plant starts at Erin’s garden, site of the project of our previous two days.

erin

erin

In the brand new bed, we planted starts gleaned from recent cleanups:

*creeping sedum, Nepeta (catmint) and Lychnis (rose campion) and a toadflax from Jo’s garden

*golden marjoram and a small red leaved Euphorbia from my garden

*Helianthemum from the Picture Attic garden

I had dug up a precious Eryngium start and some Calendula seedlings from my garden this morning, put them in the bottom of an empty bucket for safekeeping, and somehow they had gotten mixed with weeds and discarded.  Maddening.  Other than than that, it was a successful start to a new garden.

We finished the day at The Anchorage Cottages.  I am looking forward to the results of manager Beth’s plan to have a backhoe remove these pampas grasses from the entry garden.  They’ve been there since before I took on the gardening job.

They will not be missed!

They will not be missed!

fragrant Hyacinths by the office door

fragrant Hyacinths by the office door

a well established patch of Trilliums at The Anchorage

a well established patch of Trilliums at The Anchorage

I finally cut back the hardy fuchsias at The Anchorage.  Sometimes the stems come through the winter fully alive and I can have fuchsias the size of (very) small trees; this past hard winter killed them to the base.  They will return and are already putting out new foliage at ground level.

We did not get as far as Andersen’s RV Park even though I thought we might.  Simply too tired (me, anyway) to go on, we quit at a little after five PM.

At home, I contemplated from my window the sad fact that all my tall hardy fuchsias may have to be cut to the ground as well.

Fuchsias in our back garden are the predominant plants in one of the large beds.

Fuchsias in our back garden are the predominant plants in one of the large beds.

window view to the southeast; the crab pots behind the gear shed have been covered with a tarp and are no longer a scenic backdrop.

window view to the southeast; the crab pots behind the gear shed have been covered with a tarp and are no longer a scenic backdrop.

I sat at the computer and caught up on two weeks’ worth of my favourite gardening blogs: Mr. Tootlepedal (in the Scottish borders) and The Miserable Gardener (in Colorado).

Tomorrow (Saturday, March 15th) is the March cash mob way up north at the Oysterville Store and therefore will not be an opportunity to catch up on rest.

P.S.  Late in the evening, our friend Michele Z posted this photo of how fabulous the arch looks with its new lights:

Long Beach arch at night

Long Beach arch at night

 

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 23 November, 2013

Tomorrow we will get back to some serious bulbing.  Enough were planted today to just barely qualify it as a bulbing day!  We had many distractions, in particular the monthly Peninsula Cash Mob event which we help organize.

Cash mob came almost first on the schedule.  We were distracted on the way by the site of the World’s Largest Dungeness Crab Pot Tree being decorated.

Allan took this photo.

Allan took I both took a photo from this angle; his came out better.

His photo of adding garlands and lights was also better than mine!

His photo of adding garlands and lights was also better than mine!

Then we arrived at the Don Nisbett Art Gallery.

nisbett

nisbett

nisbett

We felt the startlingly warm and pleasant weather may have gotten in the way of masses of people attending the mob.  For such a gorgeous day, it was reasonably successful.

a happy crowd

a happy crowd

The idea of cash mob is that just a small purchase helps.  Don had set out a number of lower priced things:  magnets, cards, tiles, and a special deal on handpainted wine glasses.

wine

Allan asked if Don had ever done a painting of the crab pot tree.  One of the cash mobbers found the painting to show us.  I loved the way his smile got bigger as I took the photo.

one

one…

two

two

three!

three!   This fellow is an expert in invasive plants.  The crab pot tree is non invasive.

Don was working on a new painting…

artist at work

artist at work

But we had to go to work for awhile at the boatyard.

The cosmos were completely done…

Cosmos season officially over!

Cosmos season officially over!

At the boatyard, we are leaving some architectural stems and dried flowers and seedheads up, at least till midwinter or the next big storm.

boatyard garden

boatyard garden

There was a horrific amount of creeping sorrel in some areas of the southernmost stretch of the long narrow garden.  We did not have time to deal with that today, and the sun’s low angle would have made it hard to weed.

not done!

not done!

At least we got the cosmos out…and ten Narcissus ‘Fragrant Breeze’ added to the garden, thus helping to qualify this as a “bulb time” day.

Back we went to the Nisbett Gallery, where we saw the painting Don had made:  by request, a steam punk crab!

don

Don with the purchasers, Dee and spouse.

Don with the purchasers, Dee D. and spouse.

Dee D. and her husband told us the steam punk crab had been their idea, for a relative who is very much into it.  I suggested they advise him to go to the Jules Verne room at the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

By the way, this is the view right outside Don's gallery.

By the way, this is the view right outside Don’s gallery.

We had lunch at the cash mob restaurant of the day, OleBob’s Galley, just a few doors to the west.

OleBob's

OleBob’s

my delicious crab cake lunch and some purchases of Don's art magnets.

my delicious crab cake lunch and some purchases of Don’s art magnets.

For years, I thought the restaurant was pronounced Ole Bob’s (like Old Bob) till I learned it was named after two fishermen friends, Ole (pronounced Olee) and Bob, the latter being the dad of the people who own the restaurant now.

Ole and Bob

Ole and Bob

Their boat the OleBob.

Their boat, the OLE BOB.

While we were dining, Allan (who was seated facing the water view) said “Dog!”  As in, Dog Alert!  I looked and saw the most amazing dog walking by and had to leave my meal to go meet him.

a Caucasian Ovtcharka!

a Caucasian Ovtcharka!

The enormous Caucasian Ovtcharka (a breed I had never heard of) was tail wagging and pettable and had exceptionally soft fur.

As I finished my crab cakes, I worried a bit that not many cash mob diners had gone to OleBob’s.  The weather had just been too fine, I think.  I hope some locals do a belated cash mob lunch there next week.  (They will be open only Monday, Wednesday, and Friday due to Thanksgiving.  And I think they are open on Sundays.)

We also stopped it at Time Enough Books, my favourite bookstore, which happens to be between OleBob’s and Nisbett Gallery.

Time Enough Books

Time Enough Books

Owner Karla told us that for $200, any local citizen can sponsor a boat to be decorated for the lighted boat parade (this year on December 7) and of the $200, $100 will be donated to the Ilwaco High School music program.  The students will decorate (and undecorate) the boat.

Back at Don’s gallery to take a few more photos for the cash mob page, we saw our friend Robbie, who as a “Critter Sitter” had also been impressed with the big dog and had taken his photo.  I’m hoping she will send it to me as it is better than mine.

She did!

She did!

Our friend Robbie who has a Critter Sitter business bought this wine glass with dogs.

Our friend Robbie who has a Critter Sitter business bought this wine glass with dogs.

Robbie's photo of me on photo detail, mainly to show the little camera behind most of this blog.

Robbie’s photo of me on photo detail, mainly to show the little camera behind most of this blog.

I got the classic photo of cash going over the counter:

Allan and Jenna

Allan and Jenna

North of the parking lot after leaving the gallery, the sunlight cast an intense tree shadow on a green house at the south end of Myrtle Avenue.

tree

tree house

tree house

And then we were on our way to work, or so we planned.  First we needed to stop at home (just a couple of blocks away) and pick up some fresh caught crab at the house of our neighbours Jeff and Mary.  Then I saw that New Judy’s front door was open and called out to our new neighbour, who had just moved in, and offered her some crab.  She was most pleased.  Soon Our Judy heard us talking and came over and the four of us had a good natter.  Allan was getting restless about work, while I adopted my new philosophy that many things are more important than work (if one has the luxury of having enough money to get through the winter).

With only two hours of daylight left, we finally got back into work mode and headed to The Depot Restaurant to pull their dead cosmos.

They're not only merely dead, they're really most sincerely dead.

They’re not only merely dead, they’re really most sincerely dead.

We planted some ‘Akebono’ tulips and some ‘Fragrant Breeze’ narcissi and cut back the Persicaria that had gone to mush.

All it needs is some cow fiber to be put to bed for the winter.

All it needs is some cow fiber to be put to bed for the winter.

I do think that in the kitchen garden, the rosemary are greening up after being given a tonic of Ironsafe and Lime.

greener?

greener?

And yet two are still quite brown.  The only other tonic I can think of is to add some magnesium sulfate (epsom salts).

brown, green(ish), brown

middle one greening up but flanked by two small browned off ones

It’s a mystery.  If I had more time, I would get the soil tested.  It is Soil Energy, which has always been just fine for rosemary, on top of whatever old soil was in there.  I am thinking maybe the sprinkler system was on too much this past summer.

After the Depot we went to the Anchorage Cottages and cleared all the frosted annuals out of the windowboxes and containers.  The hardy fuchsias were all hit hard.  That makes me sad, as they often bloom into December.

Phooey!

Phooey!

I refuse to cut them back even though they look dead because I want them to be tall next year.  Next on the agenda for this job is a nice layer of mulch; the soil has lacked this for at least two years and is looking sandy grey and paltry.

Ten more Narcissus ‘Fragrant Breeze’ and I have almost dealt with that package of fifty that I’d forgotten to count!

We closed the day back at the port where I planted an Oriental poppy in the garden by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle and Allan dumped out and arranged a bag of white marble rocks we had gotten Jenna for her belated birthday.

The Queen's garden glowing in the dusk.

The Queen’s garden glowing in the dusk.

Just to the north, crab pots in the parking lot

Just to the north, crab pots in the parking lot

Of course, I had to walk around to the other side of Jenna’s shop to see the sunset colours in the water.

the marina

the marina

Jessie's Ilwaco Fish Company

Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company

I was standing on the upper dock so could not back up enough to get the sky into this horizontal shot, so….

sky

and here is another composition with Christmas lights on the railing:

lights

lights

The temperature at sunset was still crazily balmy.

At home, I ate some of the crab from Jeff and Mary right over the sink and found it awfully hard to save any for dinner later on!  Then processed and uploaded the cash mob photos to the Facebook page and, of course, blogged.

Meanwhile, Allan went down the street and snagged a blue wading pool that had been set in a “free” pile outside the house of someone who is moving.  It will be perfect to set plants in, with the pots in shallow water, when waiting to plant them during next year’s annuals season.  Thanks to Sheila for this tip; I have awaiting the arrival of a free wading pool for quite some time.  Although it has a pinhole leak or two, as one might expect from something salvaged from a “free” (read “junk”) pile, Allan has some goop that will fix it.

Tomorrow should be a SERIOUS bulb day.  I have a huge order sorted for the A Frame (part of Klipsan Beach Cottages) and am hoping to also get a smaller but still substantial batch planted way up north in Marilyn’s garden.

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 9 November, 2013

I had set a goal of sorting bulbs from noon till six, then going to a community dinner, then some more sorting.  I even took a photo of the bulb room on my phone in case I had no time to blog other than from the phone app.  And then…  I went outside to take some photos of the garden so I would have an easy little something about which to blog at the end of the day.

Hebe in Allan's garden

Hebe in Allan’s garden

another of Allan's hebes, the one that looks just like a juniper.

another of Allan’s hebes, the one that looks just like a juniper.

side garden fuchsia

side garden fuchsia

another Fuchsia

another Fuchsia

a pretty Lysimachia blooming in a pot....Sorry so uninformative about the names!

a pretty Lysimachia blooming in a pot….Sorry so uninformative about the names!

Just a few tiny flowers still on the Dicentra scandens; most of it has died back.

Just a few tiny flowers still on the Dicentra scandens; most of it has died back.

heathers waiting to be planted

heathers waiting to be planted

Yes, heathers!  I was lured by these at Back Alley Gardens and they are the first heathers I have ever bought for myself.  I like the upright shapes, just cannot figure out where to put them.

Hydrangea 'Pistachio' waiting to planted because I have not found the perfect spot.

Hydrangea ‘Pistachio’ waiting to planted because I have not found the perfect spot.

my topiary bird, a gift from Sarah Sloane

my topiary bird, a gift from Sarah Sloane

The trouble started when I looked in the greenhouse and was reminded of the various plants I recently acquired at Back Alley Gardens and have not yet planted.

greenhouse

plants to winter over, and ones that should get planted

I lost the tag for the one below; it has been blooming blue for several weeks and I have no clue what it is, or how big it gets:

impressive blue thing

impressive blue thing

I continued my tour down the east side of the garden.

Penstemon backed with Euphorbia

Penstemon backed with Euphorbia

some kale I can't seem to get around to harvesting

some kale I can’t seem to get around to harvesting

Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns'

Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’

a color echo with Sedum 'Autumn Joy'

a color echo with Sedum ‘Autumn Fire’ (yes, Fire instead of Joy)

cotoneaster berries and rose hips

cotoneaster berries and rose hips

a Euphorbia in waiting to put on a late winter flower show

a Euphorbia in waiting to put on a late winter flower show

There is work going on next door on the crab pots and some have emerged all bright and ready from under the silver tarp.

with old debris pile in foreground

with old debris pile in foreground

Almost to the bogsy woods, I was reminded why I don’t go back there on windy days.

two of several branches down from last Saturday's windstorm...not even from the Danger Tree

two of several branches down from last Saturday’s windstorm…not even from the Danger Tree

Across the south end of the mixed beds:

a few Nicotiana langsdorfii flowers

a few Nicotiana langsdorfii flowers

"black" scabiosa

“black” scabiosa

tall and dramatic Eupatorium heads (Joe Pye Weed)

tall and dramatic Eupatorium heads (Joe Pye Weed)

a golden hydrangea reminds me I should (but did not) put out some Sluggo.

a golden hydrangea reminds me I should (but did not) put out some Sluggo.

Turning to walk up the west side path…

Schizostylis and Hebe

Schizostylis and Hebe

Escallonia 'Pink Princess' blooming ridiculously late

Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’ blooming ridiculously late

more hardy fuchsias

more hardy fuchsias

We just last night watched a Ciscoe Morris show in which he said Fuchsia ‘Lady Boothby’ gets 14 feet tall.  I must have it!

Physocarpus leaves backed with Leycesteria 'Jealousy'

Physocarpus leaves backed with Leycesteria ‘Jealousy’

Almost at the north end of the west path, major procrastination slammed headlong into my bulb sorting plans.  I took a photo of another hardy Fuchsia and pondered how there is nothing to stop the eye from seeing the white white white garage next door.

view through to garage

view through to garage

When Nora was alive, I liked to leave the views open for her to see the garden.  Now I realized this would be an excellent spot for three of the evergreens I got from Back Alley…the ones languishing in the greenhouse.

I tried to ignore the project, taking another photo.

golden pineapple sage and dahlia

golden pineapple sage and dahlia

One look  back did me in.  I could move the blueberry to the cleared area of the debris pile and oh, I should do it now on this mild, pleasant day, much too nice a day to be sorting bulbs in the garage.

I could just move that blueberry....

I could just move that blueberry….

An hour later, three new plants were in and the blueberry and a Kerria japonica variegata had been moved to the debris pile and the bogsy wood.  I madly pulled potatoes out of hole in the debris pile that the blueberry went into.

after....I just walked away from the mess when done planting.

after….I just walked away from the mess when done planting.

I planted a Eucryphia ‘Nymansay’ and a Olearia traversii…and a third little tree whose tag I HAD but I fear it may have gotten buried and I now have no clue what it is.  Maybe Pam Fleming of Back Alley Gardens will know:

It is silver and lovely

It is silver and lovely

with delicate brown stems and tiny leaves.

with delicate brown stems and tiny leaves.

[Next day: I found the tag: Leptospermum lanigerum ‘Silver Form’]

Oh, by the way, Stephen and John of the wonderful bayside garden that I visited with Nancy not long ago have now discovered Back Alley as well and bought some very cool plants there to enhance their garden….including a Mahonia ‘Dan Hinkley’ that escaped me!  Good find!

I had already changed my socks twice and shoes once.  Twice because I put feet in nice dry socks back into the first pair of wet shoes.  In watering the new plants in I managed to pour water into my shoe.

dagnab it

dagnab it

At 1:45 I finally entered bulb land, wet shoe and all, and buckled down to work, fueled by two of Allan’s brownies.

bulb central

bulb central

I applied myself pretty well except for a couple of walks down to Judy’s house (four doors down) to share some potatoes and the one rather small acorn squash.  She had had plants to dig up two old mugo pines and replace them with fresh dwarf ones, but football had intervened.

It is not as easy as it used to be to stand and sort for many hours, so I truly did need a couple of little walks.

Meanwhile, I thought Allan had been out goofing off or perhaps collecting the pile of bamboo left at the Depot Restaurant after yesterday’s job.  Instead he had been doing a hard slog at Ann’s garden clearing a rough area along the east side of the back yard.

Allan's before...

Allan’s before…

and after.

and after.

before

before

and an impressive after

and an impressive after

The next interference to my bulb sorting focus came at 5:45 when we went three blocks down Lake Street to the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum for the annual Chinook Indian Nation fundraiser and dinner.  This local tribe continues to struggle for federal recognition and their cause is one we believe in supporting.

Chinook Indian Nation dinner

Chinook Indian Nation dinner

dinner

salmon, oysters, coleslaw, fry bread...

salmon, oysters, coleslaw, fry bread…

and desserts

and desserts

I don’t like oysters, and a man at our table had gotten to the dinner just after they had run out, so I was able to give him my three oysters.  In exchange, I was offered  extra fry bread so it worked out well.

t shirts for sale

t shirts for sale

silent auction

silent auction

After dinner a group entertained us with drumming and a chant.

chant

I got choked up because it was so beautiful, especially when I looked around the room and saw audience members joining in.

joining in

joining in with hand gestures

Then…home to bulb land.  I lasted one more hour before my back hurt so much I had to give it up for the night.

bulbs

bulb central

bulb central

Unfortunately, the weather is supposed to be beautiful for two days, meaning we will have to plant bulbs during the day.  How much I would rather have three rainy days to get them all sorted at once.  That never seems to happen!

On the other hand, it may be a boon to break up the sorting with some planting because the sorting does make my back freeze up something fierce.  I have utmost respect for anyone who sorts bulbs in the bulb warehouse for eight hours a day.

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 27 October, 2013

Ah, a day off at home…After breakfast I started the breakdown of a big debris pile.  It began as Mount Sod when we dug up the front  lawn upon moving in here in October of 2010.  Then it became a spud hill.  Potatoes are said to “clean the soil” and they certainly did seem to help the sod break down in jig time.  Because it is in a spot convenient for  debris disposal from my own garden, and only somewhat inconvenient for hauling in clean garden debris from jobs, it has been growing, and sinking with decomposition, and growing again over three years.  I am moving the un-decomposed material to a new pile on the other side of the yard.

the former Mount Sod

the former Mount Sod (with full wheelbarrow in the foreground)

I have a selection of evergreens that I bought from Back Alley Gardens. I have had the best of intentions of trying Pam Fleming’s advice that columnar evergreens would look great in the big flower beds.  And yet, I resist.  I worry that the ones I chose, especially a couple of Eucryphia, will not be columnar enough.  And I want to block this truly unoffensive view:

crab pots under silver tarp behind the next door gear shed

crab pots under silver tarp behind the next door gear shed

There is absolutely nothing wrong with crab pots under a tarp.  They are, of course, much more picturesque when first stacked there in late winter after crabbing season.

colourful crab pots in spring

colourful crab pots in spring

But they have to be covered to protect them through three seasons of weather.   I do think a nice evergreen backdrop along that edge of the garden will look better than the tarped pots.

near the debris pile, cosmos as high as the fence

near the debris pile, cosmos as high as the fence

Nearby, in my usual easy distracted way (“something shiny syndrome”!), I started to dig out a great big Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’.  I do like Pam’s idea of replacing it with a columnar evergreen.  But…it was hard work.

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen'

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’

I imagined Allan might come help dig it, even though he was busy constructing the framework for our annual Halloween Avenue of Spooky Plants.  At least I got it all loosened up.  It had gotten, in just two years, much too big for the space, crowding a nearby Enkianthus.  In fact, it may be that when Lemon Queen comes out, I should just leave that space blank….

I took a break and checked on Allan’s project along the front walkway.

constructing Spooky Plant Avenue

constructing Spooky Plant Avenue

While in the front garden, I noticed my largest Melianthus major is blooming.  That is odd as when it does bloom, it is usually in very early spring.

mel

the odd flowers of Melianthus major (and the leaves smell like peanut butter)

the odd flowers of Melianthus major (and the leaves smell like peanut butter)

In early afternoon, Debbie Teashon of Rainyside.com came to photograph the autumn dishevelled garden.  We agree there is beauty to be found in late season dishabille.

Debbie at work...She has been a pro photographer for many years.

Debbie at work…She has been a pro photographer for many years.

Allan had finished the Avenue of Spooky Plants framework so I began to add the plants while Debbie wandered without me dogging her every step to see what she was finding good enough to photograph.  When she was done, we walked four doors down to Tom and Judy’s garden.

The Hornbuckle "kids", Towbeh, Stymie, and Beep

The Hornbuckle “kids”, Towbeh, Stymie, and Beep wanted to join us in the front garden

Judy's excellent patch of moss

Judy’s excellent patch of moss

two trees

two trees

The one in the background is right on the property line between two lots…

a hummingbird on Judy's porch

a hummingbird on Judy’s porch

I love Tom and Judy's porch sign

I love Tom and Judy’s porch sign.  Their garden is pure evidence of their industriousness.  In the typical way of small town talk, someone new to town who must have observed through the window that Tom and Judy sometimes watch telly put about that they were lazy people….and within less than a day the story had gotten right back to Judy!  One of the first lessons learned, often the hard way, upon moving here from a city is that remarks like that zoom quickly through the small town grapevine.

After a garden tour and visit with Judy, Debbie and I walked back to her vehicle for her drive back north to her home near Heronswood Nursery.  On the windshield, next to a little pot of Ajuga ‘Pink Silver‘ that I had given her a start of, we found the oddest note.

PiOnly the fact that it was on an index card, like we use for our daily time cards, tipped me off that it was from Allan.  I tracked him down weedeating in the back yard to tell him that we did not understand.  He said “It means if you don’t understand it, you don’t get any pie.”  Huh???   He had to give me a couple more hints before I got it…Pie on Porch!!  He had packaged some of his home made pumpkin pie in bite sized pieces for Debbie to snack on while driving.

(Judy’s review of Allan’s pumpkin pie:  “Allan’s pie is the best pumpkin pie I’ve had since my mom’s last which was probably 23 years ago. Excellent and more !”)

After Debbie’s departure, I moved a couple more wheelbarrows full of debris;  I had had no intention of finishing that project today.  It might get done on the next reasonably nice day off at home…or not until winter staycation time.

decreased pile

decreased pile

Now I can see the lower layer of good soil beginning to appear.

Now I can see the lower layer of good soil beginning to appear.

While collecting tall plants for the spooky avenue, I took some photos of the garden.

front garden rose

front garden rose

back garden, east bed

back garden, east bed

birdbath draped with fuchsia

birdbath draped with fuchsia

another hardy Fuchsia

another hardy Fuchsia

the spooky avenue, coming along nicely

the spooky avenue, coming along nicely

Before dusk, I took a four block walk to photograph some Halloween decorations on Lake, Spruce, and Willow Streets.

punkin

punkins

skulls

skulls

the scariest house

at the scariest house…I bet this thing will be in motion on Halloween night

Willows Street

Willows Street

I love this old house on Advent Avenue:

What stories it must have...

What stories it must have…

Hocus Pocus

Hocus Pocus

At dusk, I gathered the remaining Cox’s Orange Pippin apples from my little tree of that name.  The three orangey coloured ones were the ripest ones I had tried yet and oh MY!   I have never had an apple so good.  Allan agreed.  They have a citrusy overtone and put any other apple I have ever eaten to shame.

Cox's Orange Pippin

Cox’s Orange Pippin

Read Full Post »

August 13, 2013

After work I walked around the garden in the last light of the day and took photos, mostly of hardy fuchsias because one of my favourite bloggers likes them a lot…Had I known I would someday be blogging so thoroughly, I would have done better labeling.

fuchsia

Debron's Black Cherry

Debron’s Black Cherry

fuchsia

fuchsia

fuchsia

fuchsia

fuchsia

Fuchsia magellanica

Fuchsia magellanica

fuchsia

fuchsia fuchsia

Fuchsia magellanica

Fuchsia magellanica

fuchsia

fuchsia

fuchsia

I have them in almost every bed throughout the garden.

In other plant news:

Smokey came with me on my fuchsia walk.

Smokey came with me on my fuchsia walk.

a tomatillo in the greenhouse...like a green paper balloon...but what to do with it?

a tomatillo in the greenhouse…like a green paper balloon…but what to do with it?

astible

astilbe

that shrubby blue clematis...Sheila found the name for me, but now I have lost it again.

that shrubby blue clematis…Sheila found the name for me, but now I have lost it again.

sweet peas and Robinia pseudoacacia 'Frisia'

sweet peas and Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’

front east side garden: most frustrating area

front east side garden: most frustrating area (will be better when various winter blooming shrubs size up)

Dichroa febrifuga

Dichroa febrifuga

NE corner of house

NE corner of house

The very end of the day was made most pleasant when Mary from two doors down gave us some filleted salmon that her husband Jeff had caught that day out on the Columbia River.  It was delicious and made two wonderful dinners.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts