Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Hardy Plant Society study weekend 2015’

Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

The Jane Kerr Platt Garden

platt

Parking for this garden scared the jeewhillikers out of me; fortunately, after difficulties down on the curving road (which I’ll describe in my next post, so as not to detract from this garden), we were able to drive up and park in the upper parking lot.  That is where most visitors would be able to park, since most garden events here would probably not draw such large numbers all at once.  I’ve heard about this garden for years, so despite arrival problems was glad to be able to enjoy it.

From the parking lot, we walked a bit uphill and through a gap in a hedge to view the expansive garden.  It reminded me of the garden on Whidbey Island whose creator had died and left a mature garden behind, and like the Froggwell garden it gave me a poignant feeling.

looking across the lawn to the house

looking across the lawn to the house

lawn2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

garden beds to the side of the lawn

garden beds to the side of the lawn

path

leaves2

beds2

echinops (blue globe thistle)

echinops (blue globe thistle)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

crocosmia

crocosmia2

rosa

poppies

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

poppies2

rose

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

scree

trees

branches

scree2

the rock garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

rockgarden

fern

rocks

rhodo

rhodo2

smitten with the sun on this rhododendron

smitten with the sun on this rhododendron

easy steps to climb

easy steps to climb

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

at the top

at the top

woodenbench

platt2

platt3

sedum

bench2

Allan taking photos

Allan taking photos

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

descending to the house level

descending to the house level

trilliums

trilliums ripening

leaves4

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another rhododendron gleaming in sunlight

another rhododendron gleaming in sunlight

path3

rhodo6

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

returning to the lawn, as others begin to climb the stairs

returning to the lawn, as others begin to climb the stairs

I think that's an enormous stewartia.

I think that’s an enormous stewartia.

lilies4

an old character of a tree

an old character of a tree

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the house

the house

acer

I see an Acer griseum.

I miss the paperbark maple that I left behind at my old house, and keep forgetting to replace it.  I had a long admiration session with this one in the Platt garden.

acergriseum2

acer3

acer4

acer5

urn

vista across the lawn

vista across the lawn

just below the house

just below the house

conifer

behind the house

behind the house

bay

house2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

weeping

in

out

mesmerized

mesmerized

returning on the path below the house

returning on the path below the house

lawn5

back to the paperbark maple

back to the paperbark maple

paperbark2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

patio and pond at front of house

patio and pond at front of house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

It was still so hot that this tour guest was putting a bag of ice on her head.  (Allan's photo)

It was still so hot that this tour guest was putting a bag of ice on her head. (Allan’s photo)

frontpatio2

frontpatio3

We had a sudden rain shower—a blissful moment in the heat.

Allan rejoined me and we walked down the lawn to the parking, hoping to leave at a quiet traffic moment before a number of folks wanted to leave at once.

platt5

platt6

one last rhododendron

one last rhododendron

The study weekend was over and the time had come make our way home and get back to work.  Tonight: one last short bonus post before the work blog begins again.

For another view of the garden tours, see Alison’s Bonney Lassie blog about the art in the gardens and about touring gardens in the heat.

 

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

Floramagoria

(or, Return to Floramagoria)

DSC05333

2

I was thrilled to return to the gloriously colourful Floramagoria garden.  Last year, during the Garden Bloggers Fling, I was so taken with the garden that it got three whole blog posts which show the garden in much more organized detail than today:

the front garden

the back garden

and the farm area

During the Bloggers Fling, we were divided into groups of (I think) 50…or 80…and since everyone was blogging, there was a lot of everyone moving out of each other’s photos.  Today, the garden was more crowded with possibly 400 people touring at approximately the same time.  It was fun to see how well it absorbed the large number of people, as it is a garden made for entertaining.  This time, just walk with me here and there through the garden, and look at my favourite bits from many angles, and you can have a browse through the old posts if you want a careful explanation of how it all fits together.

entering the front garden

entering the front garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

signs made of styrofoam (Allan said)

signs made of styrofoam 

dog

as one walks around the side of the house

as one walks around the side of the house

clematis at the side of the house

clematis at the side of the house

entering the back garden

entering the back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

slug

slug

glass

little greenhouse/shed at corner of house

little greenhouse at corner of house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in the greenhouse: Allan's photo

in the greenhouse: Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the back garden

the back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pitcher plants...I want any and all of them.

pitcher plants…I want any and all of them.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I think this is crambe maritma.

I think this is crambe maritma (sea kale)

crambe2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

kniphofia

kniphofia

looking back at the corner greenhouse

looking back at the corner greenhouse

a stunning grass

a stunning grass

I figured that grass was a Stipa, and indeed, one of the garden owners told me it was a Stipa…something or other….I must do some Googling because I must have it.

must...

must…

have...

have…  (Is it Stipa pennata??)

nigella seed pods

nigella seed pods

water2

the Little and Lewis-y water feature

the Little and Lewis-y water feature

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

water3

That’s what I want for my garden.  My budget runs more toward plastic tubs.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

yellow

Allan's photo  (What is it?)

Allan’s photo (What is it?)

at the corner of the dining pavilion

at the corner of the dining pavilion

photo appreciation

photo appreciation

daylily (one that made me think, last year, that I need some frilly ones like this)

daylily (one that made me think, last year, that I need some frilly ones like this)

hakmak

one of two matched pillars near the dining pavilion

one of two matched pillars near the dining pavilion

I know little about the different varieties of pitcher plants, because we cannot get them anywhere around here....

I know little about the different varieties of pitcher plants, because we cannot get them anywhere around here….

(looking down from above): I want them ALL.

(looking down from above): I want them ALL.

pitcher3

I wonder if they are hardy?  I seem to recall that when I did have a few, they came back after winter.

I wonder if they are hardy? I seem to recall that when I did have a few, they came back after winter.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pitcher7

pitcher8

(Two weeks later, when we stopped by Garden Tour Nancy’s to see her recent plant acquistions from her visit to Dancing Oaks nursery, what did she have?  YES, a pot of pitcher plants!!  ARGH!

Okay, enough obsessing about this one area.

Okay, enough obsessing about this one area.

(Looks like maybe I can mail order them from here: Sarracenia Northwest, which tells me that they are indeed cold hardy.)

cannas

 

blue

 

into the shade, having walked through the dining pavilion

into the shade, having walked through the dining pavilion

the shade and bubble corner

the shade and bubble corner, so welcome because the day, while overcast, was hot

looking up into the sequoia

looking up into the sequoia  (bubbles were floating down)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

shady bench

shady bench

on the walls of the shade corner

on the walls of the shade corner

shade corner stucco walls painted green; this is the back of the blue water feature wall

shade corner stucco walls painted green; this is the back of the blue water feature wall

leaves

flower

Maybe I just need to settle for this kind of pitcher plant.

Maybe I just need to settle for this kind of pitcher plant.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back through the dining pavilion

looking back through the dining pavilion

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, Dan Hinkley and one of the garden owners

Allan’s photo, Dan Hinkley and one of the garden owners

dining pavilion chair

dining pavilion chair

from the pavilion

from the pavilion

the solidly floriferous side of the garden

the solidly floriferous side of the garden

daylilies3

daylilies

flowers3

my favourite shape of dahlias

my favourite shape of dahlias

flowers4

flowers5

another ruffly daylily

another ruffly daylily

After seeing this garden last year, I swore I was going to paint some bamboo poles and put them in the garden.

After seeing this garden last year, I swore I was going to paint some bamboo poles and put them in the garden.

Did I?  No.  Will I this year? I surely do hope so.

Did I? No. Will I this year? I surely do hope so.

poles5

poles6

cobalt

stripes

an astrantia for Mr. Tootlepedal

an astrantia for Mr. Tootlepedal

combo2

astrantia, closer

astrantia, closer

looking over the garden to the dining pavilion

looking over the garden to the dining pavilion

at the end of a dead end path in the floriferous garden

at the end of a dead end path in the floriferous garden

in the shade at the back of the flower garden

in the shade at the back of the flower garden

the covered deck behind the house

the covered deck behind the house

from up on the deck

from up on the deck

from the deck: the patio right behind the house

from the deck: the patio right behind the house

one of the hosts (Allan's photo)

one of the hosts (Allan’s photo)

near the back door

near the back door

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

corner2

on the corner of the deck (from where I had sat down)

on the corner of the deck (from where I had sat down)

another sitting down view

another sitting down view

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I spy Dan Hinkley!

I spy Dan Hinkley!

from my comfy couch seat

from my comfy couch seat

tour guests and host

tour guests and host

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo (he entered the garden via the farm area and this side entry to the deck)

more garden gazing

more garden gazing

crowds

Allan rejoined me and we exited via the “farm” side of the house.

the farm greenhouse, at the back corner of the covered deck

the farm greenhouse, past the back corner of the covered deck

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bouquets in the greenhouse

bouquets in the greenhouse

duck

the farm

the farm

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bee hive

bee hive

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back on the farm

looking back on the farm

farm3

around the corner into the front garden

around the corner into the front garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

front garden ferns

front garden ferns

front5

tiered fern planter near front door

tiered fern planter near front door

screen for front door privacy

screen for front door privacy

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

While I can’t afford a stucco wall and dripping column water feature (and lack the skills to make one), I leave this garden (again) with the ideas that I could paint some bamboo poles and perhaps buy some metal livestock troughs to grow veg in…and get me some sarracenias.

Tomorrow: our very last garden of the 2015 study weekend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

Barrager garden

Just up the street from Barbara Ashmun’s garden, her nearby neighbour Doug Barrager’s garden was also on tour.  I do love when tour gardens are walking distance from each other.

DSC05230

from the street

from the street

sideslope

lilies

lilies

lily and dogwood

lily and dogwood

rose borders

side garden rose borders

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

into the shade

into the shade

shadegarden

more shade beds: Allan's photo

more shade beds: Allan’s photo

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

I want this hydrangea.

I want this lace cap hydrangea.

I like the precisely cut flowers.

I like the precisely cut flowers.  Allan overheard some tour guests saying this is an unusual cultivar.

Jeanne and I marveled at the perfection of the hostas.

Jeanne and I marveled at the perfection of the hostas.

hostas2

more perfect hostas

work area around the side of the house

work area around the other side of the house

the sunny side of the house

the sunny side of the house

variegated dogwood at the corner

variegated dogwood at the corner

roses along the front street

roses along the front street

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another starry dahlia

another starry dahlia

bonus garden

We enjoyed the view over the picket fence of a garden across the street.

DSC05331

another gardening neighbour

Next: We return to Floramagoria, one of our favourite Portland gardens.

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

Barbara Blossom Ashmun garden

DSC05229

front garden from the street

front garden from the street

from the street

from the street

Just a hint that she loves daylilies

Just a hint that she loves daylilies

aylily3

Barbara had won a raffle prize plant during the morning lecture series.  Usually one does not get the prize if one is not present at the drawing.  A kind exception was made because “she’s home getting her garden ready for the tour.”  I later overheard someone speculating that she had been home deadheading her dozens of daylilies, as they were absolutely perfectly deadheaded and dead-leafed.

On the front lawn, a tour guest made much of Barbara’s cat.

I wished I had gotten to the cat first...

I wished I had gotten to the cat first…

But I did not want to intrude.

But I did not want to intrude.

Allan's photo; I missed this opportunity.

Allan’s photo; I missed this opportunity.

path to back garden

path to back garden

clematis arch

clematis arch

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

clematis close up

clematis close up

clematis

clematis

This reminds me of a poem that I once read in a Heronswood catalog:

Because it grows on a lattice, some people call it clemAtis, 

But Mr. Webster will not cease to hiss until they call it CLEMatis.

A poem for Barbara herself was mounted at the beginning of the back garden.

poem

emerging to the back garden

emerging to the back garden

stunning flower brought lots of "what is it?" questions.  Did I write down the answer?  No...

stunning flower brought lots of “what is it?” questions. Did I write down the answer? No…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

lilies

lilies

the back garden

the back garden

Barbara her ownself

Barbara her ownself

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Barbara had a thoughtful gift for tour guests: a copy of one of her books.

Book: Married to My Garden

Book: Married to My Garden

Barbara is also the author of The Garden Design Primer, a book that I own and enjoyed.

511DYS30W4L._SX315_BO1,204,203,200_

How I covet her circular greenhouse!

How I covet her circular greenhouse!

I’ve never seen a greenhouse like that anywhere else.

inside

inside

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

(Allan and I tour each garden at a different pace, and sometimes in different directions, so it always amuses me when we get almost the same photo.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Barbara displayed a collection of conifers and other small trees in pots around the greenhouse.  Here are some photos for Steve and “conifer man” John.  (My memory is weak, but I do believe that John is the most avid conifer collector of the two.)

conifer

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

trees

conifer2

conifer3

Moonlight Lace Hinoki Cypress

conifer4

conifer5

The enormous back garden has a series of swirling beds of perennials, with an emphasis on Barbara’s daylily collection.

beds

beds2

beds3

 

heart

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

daylily1

daylilies

peach

daylily2

picotee

daylily5

gold

aylily6

looking back toward the house

looking back toward the house

a lattice house and a plant sale

a lattice house and a plant sale

from the other side of the lattice house

from the other side of the lattice house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a path by the lattice house

a path by the lattice house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

astilbe and irises

astilbe and irises

redbud

back2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

at the beginning of a natural wildlife area

at the beginning of a natural wildlife area

toward the back of the garden

toward the back of the garden

a conifer with personality

a conifer with personality

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

exploring the furthest back path

exploring the furthest back path behind the natural swale

along the back of the garden

along the back of the garden

the compost/debris heap at the very back corner

the compost/debris heap at the very back corner

turning to head back to the main gardens

turning to head back to the main gardens; the boards hint that this is probably wet in the winter

a wild (wetland?) area for birds and critters

a wild (wetland?) area for birds and critters

Dragonflies abounded in there (and were buzzing around at top speed)

Dragonflies abounded in there (and were buzzing around at top speed)

re-entering civilization

re-entering civilization

allium with its little hat

allium with its little hat

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

plant tag examination (Allan's photo)

plant tag examination (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a daylily sales table was almost sold out

a daylily sales table was almost sold out

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

botanical illustration cards for sale

botanical illustration cards for sale

by the house again (Allan's photo)

by the house again (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We exited the back garden by the other side of the house, through another clematis arbour.

looking back

looking back

DSC02191

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

DSC02192

Allan's photo.  I like little dahlias of this type.

Allan’s photo. I like little dahlias of this type.

front garden daylily

front garden daylily

float

 

daylilies and hosta

daylilies and hosta

colour echo

colour echo

in the front garden

in the front garden

departing from Barbara's Playground

departing from Barbara’s Playground

sedums by the street

sedums by the street

streetside garden

streetside garden

Tonight: a bonus post of the tour garden just up the street from Barbara’s, as we hope to eventually get back to the present day in this blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

a bonus post for friends who missed the weekend, including photos of Dancing Oak Nursery (location of next year’s study weekend garden party)

Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

On the walk from the hotel to the college, Allan photographed this water trailer set up used in Portland.

On the walk from the hotel to the college, Allan photographed this water trailer set up used in Portland.

Allan says it was powered by a gas motor, not a battery like ours; the guy started it with a pull like a gas mower.

Allan says it was powered by a gas motor, not a battery like ours; the guy started it with a pull like a gas mower.

lecture notes

For friends who couldn’t attend, here are the particular takeaways from the three lectures we attended Sunday morning.  As with Saturday, we barely got there in time, but Our Todd had held seats for us.

Todd's VIP seat holding method

Todd’s VIP seat holding method

C. Coleston Burrell: Redefining Right Plant, Right Place

Cole Burrell at last night's garden party (Allan's photo)

Cole Burrell at last night’s garden party (Allan’s photo)

Burrell’s lecture was wonderfully vindicating for me.  Here are the fragments transcribed from my notebook, all quickly scrawled and only exact quotes if I enclose them in quotation marks.  His slides were exquisite, so do go a speech of his in person if you can.

He spoke of a tree planting group with the clever name of Neighborwoods.  Perhaps it was this one.

He recommended a book by Bebe Miles called Bluebells and Bittersweet: Gardening with Native American Plants as informative and also a good read.

He told us about the Biota of North American Program and showed us a slide of one of the maps that shows which plants are truly native to which area.  I think it would be useful for people who want to be very specific in using native plants that grow in their own particular spot.  (That’s not me, of course.)

He said that “Reginald Farrer was the first to give plants human characteristics…this plant prefers this…or that plant is miffy.”  Before Farrer’s writing, we did not anthropomorphize plants.  [I remember well enjoying the effusive prose of Reginald Farrer’s My Rock Garden.]

He spoke of the North America Rock Garden Society’s phrase “moving scree” and said you could achieve it by putting scree on top of an old fashioned motel bed with magic fingers.

Checks and balances like drought keep native plants from being invasive.  [I thought about salal in a few terribly dry gardens still infuriatingly poking its way into other plants.]

He recommended the book Noah’s Garden by Sarah Stein for information like this:  Robins eat the fruit of native dogwood, but Cornus kousa, the fancier cultivar, has fruit that is too big for them to eat.  I read that book years ago and am due for a re-read.

Friends of mine (who know I’m not in the native plant brigade) might wonder why I say a lecture about native plants was so vindicating.  Here comes the part I loved.  Burrell quoted from Joni Mitchell:

Back in 1957
We had to dance a foot apart
And they hawk-eyed us from the sidelines
Holding their rulers without a heart

and said that making sure plants don’t touch in a public landscape is typical, but “we need to let them touch,  bumping and grinding.  Health and vitality depends on plants being integrated horizontally.”

[Oh yes!  We quit one job, a local credit union, because the new director said he did not want any plants to “touch or come up through each other” in the landscape which we had created to be floriferous and Piet Oudolf-y.  He then fired a friend of ours who had taken on the job, because our friend (having removed many plants already to make the don’t touch guy happy) refused to cut down a Shasta daisy in full bloom.  That Shasta daisy was so old and well established that it pre-dated my work in the garden, and I praised my friend for refusing to butcher it.

that garden on June 29 2015

that garden on June 29 2015

The way it looked when we did it, in 2010

The way it looked when we did it, in 2010 (further back, which is now also changed to a barkscape with fewer plants).  This was an early photo that does not even show its later lushness.

We got “let go” from another commercial job whose garden, under our care, had won the company’s regional landscaping award.  A new manager had been hired and wanted the garden returned to plain, plant-less bark.

the way their fast food drive  through looks now

the way their fast food drive through looks now

July 29: bark and horsetail

July 29 2015: bark and horsetail against rhododendrons

the way it looked when we took care of it (

the way it looked when we took care of it: flowers in front of the rhododendrons

m2

entry to the drivethrough (garden now completely gone)

m

Sometimes remarks have gotten back to me of sniffy uptight people in whose gardens the plants are separated from each other and who disapprove of our gardening style.  I appreciated Burrell’s full support of letting plants get up close and person with each other.]

Burrell recommended the book Sand County Almanac and shared this quotation:

one of Cole Burrell's slides

one of Cole Burrell’s slides

Evelyn Hadden:  Hellstrips to Havens:  Paradise at the Curb

As it happens, I own her book Hellstrip Gardening and was particularly looking forward to her lecture.  It lived up to my expectations with lots of information and great, inspiring photographs.

Smokey at home with the book.

Smokey at home with the book.

Hadden describes herself as an “avid pedestrian.”  She writes for the Garden Rant blog.  She credits Lauren Springer, author of The Undaunted Gardener, for coming up with the term “hellstrip” and referred to an 800 foot long hellstrip, or curbside planting, I think made by Springer (but not sure; you know how notes are).

She calls cut off areas “fragments” (little pockets of dirt in a concrete environment).

Lawnless blocks make her heart leap.

Hellstrips and fragments in public places provide

beauty….expansion…xeric zones….more space…emotional benefits…respite…

giving people a new experience….

transforming a public sidewalk into a path through your garden (by planting on both sides)

front yard gardening is contagious.  [I wish it were more so!; it was slow going when I first started curbside gardening at my house in Seattle, and when I left there were no others on my block, but when I go back now, curbside gardens are all over the city.]

Even a smallest pocket can make a landscape; otherwise there is no “place”.

The challenges of curbside gardening:

heat, roots, critters, flooding, litter, compacted soil, dog poop, access to cars, access—how to get across,  wind, foot traffic, Home Owners Associations, power lines.  [Oh yes, I know them all, except for HOAs.  I had my original boatyard garden torn up and destroyed by the necessity to put in a new power line and fence.)

She advises “don’t put your best stuff out there.”

She mentioned a “pervious paving” that lets water through to tree roots and said that service berry is a good public tree.

Sh advised using well adapted plants and using nitrogen fixers to improve your soil.  To my surprise, ceanothus is a nitrogen fixer (as are lupines).  She also proposed the idea of using one season taprooted plants to penetrate compacted soil, an interesting idea that she says is untried.  One plant she proposed trying was rutabega!

It is good to cover old soil with plants (and topsoil, I assumed at the curbside because it has years of lead contaminants.

Re watering…how to make it absorb…where the run off falls is where it is absorbed…  Curb cuts let water in from the street side gutters.

More ideas: incorporate ledge seating, have a green driveway.

She says some plants are ambassadors for winning public acceptance of hellstrip gardening: “Grandma plants” (that remind people of their childhood), big flowers, color, fuzzy texture, curiosities…to make people like the garden.

People are reassured if a group volunteers to maintain a public garden.

She suggests giving lavender bundles to neighbours.  Hey, I took a bundle of lavender to Salt Hotel because they are so supportive of watering at the port.

Hellstrips provide wildlife habitat…pollinators (early blooming crocus is good for pollinators), larval food, milk weed, plant diversity…

And [I love this]: Pest-free plants = no bugs = NO BIRDS.

Curbside gardens provide nest materials for birds.  Hummingbirds use hairy leaves and plants with threadlike foliage.  Leave the seed heads up, don’t tidy up.

Tree frogs drink from the drops of water on alchemilla (lady’s mantle).  [I guess I will start liking that plant again!]

More about good plants for hellstrips: Communities of self sowers….plants that heal themselves if broken off…

[At the port, we also have to consider traffic sightlines in our curbside gardens.]

On her trip to Portland, she had been able to see the Wright garden for herself, after having used photos of it in the book.

She spoke about an earlier book in which she wrote about “having to move because of the stares”.  It just might be this one, which I am going to acquire as soon as I get home.

book

What a wonderful lecture.  It made me so glad that here on the peninsula where there are hardly any sidewalks with strips of curbside lawn, I am lucky to have the Port of Ilwaco curbside gardens to play with (and the beach approach in Long Beach, difficult though that is because of the way it used to get trampled before it became almost all rugosa roses…

I will re-read her book, and I advise you to get it if you have any sort of hot, dry, difficult gardening area, because the ideas can be translated into solving the problems of challenging home gardens.

I am fortunate to also own her other book, which I haven’t read yet but will in short order! (I got it as a free book at the Bloggers Fling and the only reason I haven’t read it is that replacing lawns is not something that comes up in my work.)

no mow

no mow

breaktime

The silent auction was finalized.

I took a last close look at the stage display.

I took a last close look at the stage display.

stage2

 Allan took some photos.

DSC02161

DSC02160

DSC02165

Jonathan Wright: Design by Detail

Jonathan Wright plants and maintains gardens at the famous Chanticleer public gardens, with 7 full time gardeners working for him.  He accompanied his speech with 237 exquisite slides.  I could have happily viewed twice that many.

The promotion of a new restroom building at Chanticleer, to fit into a Japanese style garden area:  “Come enjoy the flush of spring—the Asian pee house.”

The plant lists for Chanticleer are kept in beautiful boxes, instead of labels being stuck in all over the garden.

He said a garden like Kensington is meant to be seen from overhead—no details, no surprises.  At Chanticleer, things that need further inspection slow visitors down in the garden.

They would rather use willow hoops than signs to keep people out of an area.

using rivers of white anemone to trace the pattern made by tree roots

peony stakes from hammered in copper tubes interlaced with copper wire

If you can see mulch you don’t have enough plants. [Yay! Thank you!]

Sometimes the detail is in what you remove.

reusing old things, like an old chain…thingie…with pockets filled with little succulents.

(Every single one of his 237 slides was amazing.)

Plants that I coveted:

Schidoxys, like a red allium…phonetic spelling; must find

rye seed interplanted with bulbs to hide old foliage

Echinacea ‘Rocky Top’

Little bluestem ‘Ovation’ and ‘Blue Heaven’

Gladiolus ‘Atom’

Scadoxus multiflorus (looked like a red allium)

dwarf amber sorgham

Gladiolus calianthus

He plants summer plants into the spring plants (like pansies and alyssum) and then the spring plants turn into mulch.

He repeated that he hates seeing bare soil.

Put sod in a basket, cut holes in the sod and then plant in it…

“You don’t notice the details immediately, but you feel them.”  

His book The Art of Gardening is coming out in September, and I can’t wait!

my favourite quotations from the three lectures:

We need to let plants touch,  bumping and grinding.  Health and vitality depends on plants being integrated horizontally. -Cole Burrell

You don’t notice the details immediately, but you feel them. -Jonathan Wright

Even a smallest pocket can make a landscape; otherwise there is no “place”. -Evelyn Hadden

preview of the 2016 Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

After the lectures, a spokesman from the Salem, Oregon chapter of the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon spoke to the crowd about next year’s study weekend.  It will be in Salem instead of Eugene because of some sort of Olympics trials being in Eugene that month.  The online registration will open early, on January 15th, and will be limited to 400 attendees. I have already set a reminder on my phone.  The spokesman told us some enticing information:  The seminars will be held in an old mill, and Sebright Nursery will be on the tour list, and the Saturday night soirée will be held at Dancing Oaks nursery.  Dancing Oaks is a plant nerd’s mecca, one that is so far from where I live that I have only visited it once, in 2008.  Garden Tour Nancy was there last month.  This is the perfect opportunity to share her photos.  I hope we will all be there for study weekend 2016.

Garden Tour Nancy’s visit to Dancing Oaks (late June, 2015)

the long road to the nursery

the long road to the nursery

 

 

photo 2

 

the welcoming gates

the welcoming gates

photo 2

gate detail

gate detail

photo 1

photo 3

photo 4

photo 1

Nancy's Phil, with "gorgeous, deep green bamboo".

Nancy’s Phil, with “gorgeous, deep green bamboo”.

bamboo

bamboo

photo 1

photo 2

photo 3

photo 1

Fremontodendron

Fremontodendron

photo 3

photo 4

photo 1

double flowering Philadelphus (mock orange)

double flowering Philadelphus (mock orange)

Nancy brought some of these pitcher plants home. I was jealous!

Nancy brought some of these pitcher plants home. I was jealous!

Nancy says they have a large collection of hens and they sell the eggs.

Nancy says they have a large collection of hens and they sell the eggs.

So…we hope to see you at Hardy Plant Study weekend in Salem next year.  I’m already so looking forward to a garden party at Dancing Oaks (and a major garden spending spree).

Our next post will get you back to garden touring, with four gardens yet to go before our return home.

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

study

Saturday, 27 June 2015

evening soirée at Blooming Junction Nursery

DSC02110

I have a great fondness for Blooming, having bought plants from them for years.  They will send a delivery truck to the Peninsula, and the Basket Case Greenhouse not only carries their plants but lets me look at the availability list and order my favourites.  Therefore, it was a special pleasure for me to go the Saturday garden party at their retail nursery in Cornelius, just west of Portland.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

annual beds at the front entrance (Allan's photo)

annual beds at the front entrance (Allan’s photo)

annuals (Allan's photo)

annuals (Allan’s photo)

strawberry fields (Allan's photo)

strawberry fields (Allan’s photo)

Blooming Junction

Blooming Junction

The perennial display garden by the parking lot made me decide again to turn my front garden into a gravel garden.  (Deciding and doing are such very different things.)

display

display

display

display

rocks

rocks

display

plants maturing and intermingling

verbena

DSC02110

entering the nursery (Allan’s photo)

In the  nursery, we were turned loose among the aisles of plants for sale with the wonderful bonus of a 15% discount.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo of a window sticker in the parking lot

rudbeckias

rudbeckias

one

These were gorgeous...and would probably have thrived in our extra warm dry summer here.

These were gorgeous…and would probably have thrived in our extra warm dry summer here.

soft

view

petunia

I had to have this variegated Joe Pye Weed.

I had to have this variegated Joe Pye Weed.

Heucheras (Allan's photo)

Allan was taken with the number of heucheras. (Allan’s photo)

Heucheras (Allan's photo)

Heucheras (Allan’s photo)

Gallardia 'Coral Spark'

Gallardia ‘Coral Spark’

Of course, I got one of each Agastache that I did not already possess.

Of course, I got one of each Agastache that I did not already possess.

Could not resist just one spiky blue veronica.

Could not resist just one spiky blue veronica.

Now I wish I had gotten one of each (pink and blue).

Veronica ‘Darwin’s Blue’ Now I wish I had gotten one of each cultivar (pink and blue).

Why oh why did I not buy this Pittosporum 'Wrinkle Blue'?

Why oh why did I not buy this Pittosporum ‘Wrinkle Blue’?

Allan pointed out how the plant tables started filling with water.

tables

What a clever and labour saving way to water.

What a clever and labour saving way to water.

(I got me one of these ornamental oreganos.)

(I got me one of these ornamental oreganos.)

water bubbling up

water bubbling up

pretty darn cool

pretty darn cool watering method

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I tried to resist a big shopping spree, and ended up with a shopping trolley full of plants anyway.

My cart (Allan's photo)

My cart (Allan’s photo)

Todd had put a big Phormium in the middle of the cart, knowing that I have completely gone off them.  He and Allan waited to see if I would notice.  I saw it while in the check out line and thought “What the heck?!” then figured Todd was buying it, as another plant of his was on my cart.

the prank Phormium

the prank Phormium (Allan’s photo)

"What the heck?"  (Allan's photo)

“What the heck?” (Allan’s photo)

waiting in line (Allan's photo)

waiting in line (Allan’s photo)

Fortunately, Allan removed that darn Phormium before I bought it!

watering can fountain (Allan's photo)

watering can fountain (Allan’s photo)

As the sun lowers, the temperature…which started out even hotter than in Portland…took on a welcome touch of evening.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

shade

large shrubs for sale...I resisted these through lack of energy to move them.

large hydrangeas for sale…I resisted these through lack of energy to move them.

Hydrangea 'Edgy Orbits'

Hydrangea ‘Edgy Orbits’

Even the loos were charming.

Even the loos were charming.

The delicious dinner was catered by Vibrant Table, the catering company of Kurt Beadell, whose garden we had toured earlier in the day.

food

Two large outdoor dining areas were soon filled with Hardy Plant people.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

dinner

view from our table

brug

 

our table (Allan's photo): That's Kurt Beadell in the middle.

our table (Allan’s photo): That’s Kurt Beadell in the middle.

dessert (Allan's photo)

dessert (Allan’s photo)

After dinner, Dan Hinkley spoke.  I had left my notebook way far away in the parking lot in Todd’s truck, so I borrowed a piece of paper from Alison and a pen from Allan.  I took notes on Dan’s witty remarks, but since the paper was one loose piece I now cannot find it.  I am sure it will turn up someday.  He spoke about plant exploration trips and his new introductions in his Monrovia plant collection and proved that he does not need slides to give a scintillating speech.

an eager audience

an eager audience (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo (If only I could find my notes!!)

Allan’s photo (If only I could find my notes!!)

dan

We were each given the choice of one of four new, exciting plants from Monrovia.

Allan's photo: Dan with Holboellia coriacea 'Cathedral Gem'

Allan’s photo: Dan with Holboellia coriacea ‘Cathedral Gem’

The “sausage vine” was the gift plant that especially caught my fancy.  He said it blooms in sun or shade.  I hoped there would be enough because it sounded so enticing that I feared everyone would want that one.

A close second in my interest was a new Prostrathera; I had one that survived several winters and smelled so delicious…

Allan's photo, because we cannot ever get too much of Dan.

Allan’s photo, because we cannot ever get too much of Dan.

One I did not get, but do want.

One I did not get, but do want.

This is the one that Allan picked: Leucosceptrum japonicum 'Golden Angel'

This is the one that Allan picked: Leucosceptrum japonicum ‘Golden Angel’ (Allan’s photo)

I cannot for the life of me remember what the fourth plant was.

Allan's photo: An audience member was chosen by a nursery cat.

Allan’s photo: An audience member was chosen by a nursery cat.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: plantsman Sam stands to ask a question.

Allan’s photo: plantsman Sam stands to ask a question.

the line to get gift plants

the line to get gift plants.  Thanks, Monrovia!

There were plenty of plants, so we each got our first choice.

There were plenty of plants, so we each got our first choice.

Later, at home, I looked at the Monrovia site and was thrilled to see you can order online and they will deliver to a participating nursery near you….until I saw that the nearest nursery for my zip code is in Olympia, two hours away.  I wish 7 Dees garden center in Seaside were a participant.  (I tried decreasing the “within x number of miles” to 25 and got the same results…Olympia.)  I have a feeling that next year I may be bribing Our Kathleen, who lives near Oly and has a weekend cottage here, to bring me a Monrovia order.  Perhaps a delicious dinner at the Depot will do the trick.

oly

 

By the time the party was over, the air had become bearably cool and I would love to have done more shopping.

Allan's photo: Grace, the owner of Blooming

Allan’s photo: Grace Dinsdale, the owner of Blooming

departing at 9 PM

departing at 9 PM

the parking lot

the parking lot

Allan's photo, as we drove out of the parking lot

Allan’s photo, as we drove out of the parking lot

Back at the hotel parking lot, Allan brought down the bucket of water from our room, and I added the water from a large jug in the van to make enough depth to burble all the new plants.  Because we were checking out of the hotel the next morning, we loaded all our plants down from the room into the van to join the new acquisitions from Blooming.  They’d have to stay in the van during the morning lectures; fortunately, the weather was predicted to be slightly cooler.

I want to show you how packed the van was, even though the photos came out blurry.  Allan said “Remember, we do have luggage.”

all our plants

all our plants in the van

Tonight: a bonus post for you garden nerds who might be interested in my notes from Sunday’s lectures.

Tomorrow:  four more tour gardens.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 27 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

studyFischer-Vernon garden

fischer

I meant to tell the owners that there is a boat often docked here in Ilwaco called the Ankeny Street (the street they live on).

The Ankeny Street in the Ilwaco marina

The Ankeny Street in the Ilwaco marina

Okay, now for the garden!  We did not do it justice in photos because we got there only about fifteen minutes before tour time was over, and the evening party was due to begin, all the way out in Cornelius, an hour later.  I can see things in my mind, like the Mediterranean plantings as I climbed the entry stairs, that I did not pause to photograph…darn it!

arriving

arriving  (Allan’s photo)

from the street

from the street

plant inspectors (Allan's photo)

plant inspectors (Allan’s photo)

front garden

front garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

draped in flowers

draped in flowers

rock wall

rock wall

around the side of the house

around the side of the house

wall detail

wall detail

at the corner leading to the back garden

at the corner leading to the back garden

coming from the cool, mossy side of the house into the back yard,.

coming from the cool, mossy side of the house into the back yard,.

a garden of levels

a garden of levels

tour guests above

tour guests above

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

urn

urn2

urn4

Perhaps I was feeling the need for an urn.

Perhaps I was feeling the need for an urn.

walls

walls4

walls5

I wanted to go up but did not…just looked from below at more energetic folks.

I found out later that Allan was not one of the energetic folks who went up there.  Fortunately, Todd did brave the heights so we do have some photos to share of the top level.

Todd's photo

Todd’s photo from partway up

Todd's photo

Todd’s photo

Todd's photo

Todd’s photo

Todd's photo

Todd’s photo

Meanwhile, from back on the lowlands:

folks

Lochroma...I used to have this...O how I wish I still did!

Lochroma…I used to have this…O how I wish I still did!

Lochroma: totally tubular (and tender)

Lochroma: totally tubular (and tender)

exit:  Allan's photo

exit: Allan’s photo

Coming around the other side of the house, and reaching this point, I turned back!

Coming around the other side of the house, and reaching this point, I turned back!

back down the walk by the shady mossy wall

back down the walk by the shady mossy wall

I apologize to Mr. Tootlepedal for not thinking till now of how I could take some close up moss-scapes here.

At street level, I walked to the base of the “steep and narrow” steps that I had avoided.  Todd later told me they thought I made the right decision.

looking up

looking up

They certainly are beautiful, though.

looking down from above (Allan's photo)

looking down from above (Allan’s photo)

Tom has a witty blog.  (I just wish there were more of it, but he seems to have a life that does not lead to time for daily blogging….)

I was glad, considering we did not photograph as thoroughly as usual when we visited the garden, to find two excellent articles by Tom himself that will tell you more about it than I ever could.

the front garden

the back garden

an article from the Oregonian about his garden

Now, if only I had put two and two together and realized I was in the garden of the writer of the entertaining Overplanted blog, I would have been able to tell him how much I enjoy his sense of humour.  Dad blast it!  What a missed opportunity.

Next: the evening soirée.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »