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Posts Tagged ‘Hardy Plant Society study weekend 2015’

Saturday, 27 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

study

Saturday, June 27 2015:  Schweppe garden

DSC05017

Allan's photo, from the street

Allan’s photo, from the street

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

entering by the front driveway

entering by the front driveway

I walked up the driveway and saw this gate but decided to go round the other way.  This is the gate by which we eventually exited.

I walked up the driveway and saw this gate but decided to go round the other way. This is the gate by which we eventually exited.

a hedge of Lonicera 'Hedge Hog'.  I love the name of it, and I love golden boxleaf honeysuckle, so I want this plant.

a hedge of Lonicera ‘Hedge Hog’. I love the name of it, and I love golden boxleaf honeysuckle, so I want this plant.

a volunteer hellebore by the front porch

a volunteer hellebore by the front porch

water

front garden fountain

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

front garden windowbox

front garden window box

barberry hedge in front garden

barberry hedge in front garden

Paris podophylla

Paris podophylla

At the corner of the house, the Paris podophylla stopped me in my tracks.  Fortunately, Todd was right behind me and was able to ID it immediately, and I then saw one of the gardeners’ good ID tags.

acquired from Heronswood

acquired from Heronswood

I remembered that it had been my list of top plants to acquire after seeing it in a slideshow by Dan Hinkley, and that I had ordered it from Heronswood and…then what?  It got lost somewhere in the move from my old house.  I MUST have it again.

Todd communing with the plant.

Todd communing with the plant.

looking out into the front garden

looking out into the front garden

We walked up the side of the house to the paradise of a small back garden.  The 50X100 foot lot is the size of my old garden in Seattle, and I remember what it was like to just have narrow side yards.

coming around the side, peeking through the sun porch into the back garden (Allan's photo)

coming around the side, peeking through the sun porch into the back garden (Allan’s photo)

the back garden

the back garden

in the back garden, a shady sit spot and outdoor shower

in the back garden, a shady sit spot and outdoor shower

Todd's photo

Todd’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

head

hydrangea

quicksilver

bamboo

corner of the back garden

astrantia

astrantia

astrantia and bee

astrantia and bee

I suggested to Allan that he make me a water feature like this.

I suggested to Allan that he make me a water feature like this.

It emerged from the shady corner.

It emerged from the shady corner.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo  (I hope he was thinking deep thoughts about this.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo of the balanced wind art

birds

Todd and Allan

Todd and Allan (perhaps discussing how to construct that water feature)

the garage wall behind the umbrella

the garage wall behind the umbrella

cabinet on garage wall

cabinet on garage wall

shelf with pots behind the umbrella nook

shelf with pots behind the umbrella nook

umbrella

a deck overlooks the garden

a deck overlooks the garden

sunporch overlooking the garden

sunporch overlooking the garden

looking diagonally toward a sunny corner

looking diagonally toward a sunny corner

DSC04988

potting bench

potting bench

Another tour guest said she had never seen borage this tall.  (You can use the pretty little blue star shaped flowers as a garnish on soup or salad.)

Another tour guest said she had never seen borage this tall.

detail

bee

low

inside the back gate

inside the back gate

egg

the inside of the gate by which we exited

the inside of the gate by which we exited

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo showing the door fitting the arch

As we departed, we paid attention to the curbside garden.

curb

at the curb

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo of  another way to highlight mondo grass

view across the street to a neighbour's garden

view across the street to a neighbour’s attractive garden

(Maybe to get a gardening neighbour, I need to just pick up and move to a new home with at least three good gardens in close proximity!)

Todd asking for a plant ID

Todd asking for a plant ID

If Todd, the former display garden curator at the famous Plant Delights Nursery, doesn’t know the name of a plant, I most certainly won’t!

looking back at the luscious paradise

looking back at the luscious paradise

a thoughtfully placed "garden advance" bench along the street

a thoughtfully placed “garden advance” bench along the street

 

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Saturday, 27 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

study

There may be nothing I love or envy more than a situation where next door neighbours share a love for gardening and a common gate between two versions of paradise.  We saw this with the Ernst-Fuller gardens during previous tours, and today we enjoyed going back and forth between the Hardiman and Beadell gardens.  Walk with us while we swirl around from one garden to the other…and wish me luck in someday having a gardening neighbour like that.  I’m 60, so time is getting short.

Hardiman‘s Horticultural Haven

IMG_9781

Allan's photo: So happy to get to see Lucy's again.

Allan’s photo: So happy to get to see Lucy’s again.

bench

The stone bench, Lucy’s gift to the street, with a heart inset in stone, is a much photographed feature of her garden.

Allan's  photo

Allan’s photo

up

up2

the curbside garden

the curbside garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

hebe:  Allan's photo

hebe: Allan’s photo

pebble Persian carpet

pebble flying carpet mosaic

curbside

curbside

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

lilies towering overhead

lilies towering overhead

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I remember attending Lucy’s wonderful lectures years ago and hearing how it took her and Fred years to be able to afford to have the stone walls built to create this raised garden.

Hellebore flowers would be at eye level from the sidewalk.

Hellebore flowers would be at eye level from the sidewalk.

water

up the front stairs

up the front stairs

Lucy has described sitting in this nook, behind shrubs, and being able to hear what passersby say about her garden, comments like “Wow, what’s that?”.  Her slideshows introduced me to two of my favourite plants, Cerinthe major purpurascens and painted sage and also to her concept of a “garden advance” (her welcoming bench for passersby) as well as a garden retreat (private spaces).

entry garden

entry garden

globe

at the corner where you walk around to the side

at the corner where you walk around to the side

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

table

the house walls facing the back garden.

the house walls facing the back garden.

Lucy got many questions about those planters.

Lucy got many questions about those planters. (Allan’s photo)

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detail

window

The temperature had been predicted to be 103, so we were grateful it was “only” about 97.  We all made a beeline to fresh cold water on the patio by the apartment building that is part of the Hardiman Horticultural Haven.

beeline

 

potting bench

potting bench

Lucy has a passion for mosaicing things.

Lucy has a passion for mosaicing things.

Have I mentioned that the sun was hot and bright?

Have I mentioned that the sun was hot and bright?

just off the porch

just off the porch

blue

ornate

from the lawn, looking back at the house

from the lawn, looking back at the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

tour guests clustered in a shady corner

tour guests clustered in a shady corner

spray painted alliums

spray painted alliums

gazebo

chair3

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back: Lucy chats with tour guests

looking back: Lucy chats with tour guests

back porch of Fred and Lucy's house

back porch of Fred and Lucy’s house with their apartment building to the left

I just remembered that Lucy said it was so hot that houseguests (speakers for the event) slept out on the lawn rather than in the upstairs guest rooms.

flowers

looking up at the apartment building that Lucy and Fred rent to fortunate friends.

looking up at the apartment building that Lucy and Fred rent to fortunate friends.

Lucy and Fred's delightful dog.  (I met this dog when it was a puppy, on a previous tour.)

Lucy and Fred’s delightful dog. (I met this dog when it was a puppy, on a previous tour.)

I think I met the puppy when a friend and I were in Portland and I just took her to see Lucy’s curbside garden, and Lucy leaned out the upstairs window and invited us to come in and take a tour!

After getting a belly rub from me, the dog found a place where cool drips from the water jug would fall on his head.

After getting a belly rub from me, the dog found a place where cool drips from the water jug would fall on his head.

kitty in the window

kitty in the window

looking over the garden

looking over the garden

a lovely sit spot

a lovely sit spot

rose and the tree with glass balls

rose and the tree with glass balls

tree2

resolved: to remember to finally swipe this idea, which has enchanted me for years.

It's around this tree that we find the gate to the next door garden.

It’s around this tree that we find the gate to the next door garden.

a respectful pause

a respectful pause

looking back from the gate to the Beadell garden

looking back from the gate to the Beadell garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Kurt Beadell garden

Kurt Beadell garden

Kurt Beadell garden

just inside the Beadell gate

just inside the Beadell gate

tropical

on the table

on the table

table

back porch

back porch

patio with fountain

patio with fountain

I think everyone took a turn at standing under the deliciously refreshing mister.

I think everyone took a turn at standing under the deliciously refreshing mister.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

tropical2

Check out the curved porch...I love it.

Check out the curved porch…I love it.

kurt

Kurt told me that all the electrical works, etc ("because the garden lights up at night") and the lawnmower are stored under the porch

Kurt told me that all the electrical works, etc (“because the garden lights up at night”) and the lawnmower are stored under the porch

same style of chair as in Hardiman haven

same style of chair as in Hardiman haven

lanterns

patio5

cool

around the side

around the side

side garden

side garden

plant

orange

trumpet

It always amuses me to see someone taking photos with a pad.  (I know they take good photos; it's just that the size of the thing seems unwieldy.)

It always amuses me to see someone taking photos with a pad. (I know they take good photos; it’s just that the size of the thing seems unwieldy.)

the door leading back to the side yard

the door leading back to the side yard

door2

Note the giant lantern on the right.

I’ve lost my party so I return to Kurt’s back garden.  There they are!

Todd and Allan under the table umbrella.

Todd and Allan under the table umbrella.

another tour guest enjoying the mist

another tour guest enjoying the mist

front porch

front porch

front of house

front of house

front2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Todd admiring the curbside planter.

Todd admiring the curbside planter.

Todd had parked at this side of the house, and thought, as he walked around the corner to enter Lucy’s garden, that he must show it to us…not realizing (because there was no signage on this side) that it was actually a tour garden house.

wish Ilwaco had planters like this.

wish Ilwaco had planters this size

planter3

A previous visit to Lucy’s garden in 2001 shows how much it has changed.

Next: onward to more SE Portland gardens.

 

 

 

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Friday, 26 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

Here’s a plant geek post with a great nursery and with lecture notes.  Tomorrow morning, we will get back to garden touring posts.

study

Back into Portland we drove on Friday afternoon, on a mission to get to a gardening mecca for the very first time:  Xera Plants.  Back when Pam Fleming had her own garden store in Gearhart, she would bring plants from Xera and I would buy one of everything.

The temperature kept rising!

The temperature kept rising!

Xera Plants and Contained Exuberance

Xera at last!

Xera at last!  “All plants grown locally by Xera.  Bee friendly.”

It was not till viewing my photos later that I realized that the owner of Contained Exuberance and Hyland Garden Design, the shop that shares the corner with Xera, is Bob Hyland whose garden we had just toured within the previous hour.  My reading comprehension of the program was low.  I will blame the heat.

containedexuberance

inside Contained Exuberance

inside Contained Exuberance

The fellow at the shop graciously accepted the Peninsula garden tour poster.  (You can see it on the desk.)

The fellow at the shop graciously accepted the Peninsula garden tour poster. (You can see it on the desk.)

Here it is, so you don't forget to come.

Here it is, so you don’t forget to come.

trough

next door at Xera Plants

next door at Xera Plants

It was so hot!  I wanted to browse and read every tag but couldn’t take the heat.  I’m so acclimated to beach weather.  I would pick out a plant and duck back into the shady side of the lot and put the plant on the concrete edge of the gorgeous shade display garden, then brave the heat again to find another plant.  The odd thing was that I had meant to collect shade plants anyway; the heat had addled my brain and made me think that my main mission should be to make my front garden more drought tolerant (which is not a bad idea).

the shady side

the shady side

in the sun

in the sun

medusa

potted tetrapanax

potted tetrapanax

I bought Melianthus major 'Purple Haze', as I'd lost mine in a cold winter.

I bought Melianthus major ‘Purple Haze’, as I’d lost mine in a cold winter. (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

some of my purchases

some of my purchases

The plants were all of a size that we could easily accomodate in our hotel room over the weekend.  We weren’t sure, just before we left, if Paul had charged us for them all.  He had, but I made that stupid nervous social anxiety comment “We wouldn’t have known if you charged us twice” (because we were confused).  As if he would have done such a thing.  Why couldn’t I say something intelligent??

Allan's photo of Paul Bonine

Allan’s photo of Paul Bonine

our plants (Allan's photo)

our plants (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo; I'm in plant nerd heaven.

Allan’s photo; I’m in plant nerd heaven, and also VERY HOT.

I wish I could go back and read every tag…and probably buy one of almost everything, as owner Paul Bonine’s taste in plants is impeccable.  I was thrilled to get to meet him in person; we’ve been Facebook friends for awhile thanks to knowing garden blogger Ann.

the rest of the day

a smokin' Cotinus, from our van on the way back to the hotel

a smokin’ Cotinus, from our van on the way back to the hotel

In the hotel bathtub, I used the two buckets I’d brought to burble all the new plants, one to dunk them and one to let the water drain out.  It took about an hour.

This saved having to commandeer the hotel's waste baskets and then try to clean the overflow soil out of them.

This saved having to commandeer the hotel’s waste baskets and then try to clean the overflow soil out of them.

Hydrangea 'Pistachio'

Hydrangea ‘Pistachio’

Allan brought up some floor mats from the van to set the plants on.

Allan brought up some floor mats from the van to set the plants on.

Because we had only a short while for dinner, as I was eager to check in to the HPSO event and to peruse their plant sale, we dined at the Chipotle restaurant across the street from the college.

It's a small chain restaurant with healthful Mexican food.

It’s a small chain restaurant with healthful Mexican food.

a green wall on the way to the HPSO check in

a green wall on the way to the HPSO check in

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo: vertical wall

a college eco-roof project

a college eco-roof project

After checking in, we explored the HPSO offerings.

checking in: Allan's photo.  One of my gardening idols, Lucy Hardiman

checking in: Allan’s photo. I’m being a star struck goof over one of my gardening idols, Lucy Hardiman

silent auction

silent auction

Why did I not bid on this last time or this time?  It would be worth a lot to me...Darn it.  I felt shy.

Why did I not bid on this last time or this time? It would be worth a lot to me…Darn it. I felt shy.

another silent auction item

another silent auction item featuring another garden idol

When I say idol, I don’t mean I worship them; well, I sort of do.  I can’t say mentor because they don’t know me.  What’s the word for someone who is an inspiration (other than the word “inspiration”?

botanical display table

botanical display table

specimens

Lilium 'Lankon': must add to my must have list

Lilium ‘Lankon’: must add to my must have list

Anthyrium 'Ocean's Fury' (Allan's photo)

Anthyrium ‘Ocean’s Fury’ (Allan’s photo)

Podophyllum 'Spotty Dotty' (Allan's photo)

Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’ (Allan’s photo)

Books.

Books.

I never found time to properly browse the books.  I did purchase a new collection of Dulcy Mahar’s columns.dulcy

Bottom row: Mr. Owita's Guide to Gardening is excellent.  It was given to me by Karla of Time Enough Books at the Port of Ilwaco.

Bottom row: Mr. Owita’s Guide to Gardening is excellent. It was given to me by Karla of Time Enough Books at the Port of Ilwaco.

Next, the plant sales rooms where collectors’ nurseries had set of tables of their choicest offerings.  My big question of Maurice Horn at the Joy Creek table was, “What was the name of your adorable dog?” (We had toured his garden earlier that day.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Roger Gossler, Gossler Farms

Roger Gossler, Gossler Farms

Sean Hogan, Cistus

Sean Hogan, Cistus

Sean Hogan, Cistus (Allan's photo)

Sean Hogan, Cistus (Allan’s photo), using tongs to groom cacti

Dancing Oaks (Allan's photo)

Dancing Oaks (Allan’s photo)

me, filled with longing for ALL the plants (Allan's photo)

me, filled with longing for ALL the plants (Allan’s photo)

Dan Hinkley, Windcliffe

Dan Hinkley, Windcliffe

Talkin' plants with Todd (Allan's photo); or maybe telling him about my watering woes at the Port!

Talkin’ plants with Todd (Allan’s photo); or maybe telling him about my watering woes at the Port!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I did not buy nearly as many plants here as I wanted.  This plant sale, unlike the one at the Bellevue/Seattle weekend, does not have a holding area, so the plants must be carried to the hotel, or one must send someone to drive up to get them, or….  The logistics were beyond me, so I only bought as many as I could (not so easily) carry for several blocks.

plants2

The vendors had ice cubes on the plants because of the heat.

The vendors had ice cubes on the plants because of the heat.

Aspidistra elatior 'Chicory Asahi':  WHY did I not buy this??  And then it was sold out.

Aspidistra elatior ‘Chicory Asahi’: WHY did I not buy this?? And then it was sold out.

a couple of rhododendrons for Steve and John’s enjoyment:

rhodo

rhodo2

Used to have lots of Crocosmia 'Solfatere'...should have bought one.

Used to have lots of Crocosmia ‘Solfatere’…should have bought one.  I like the brownish leaves.

Variegated Gingko...I bought one four years ago (still small)

Variegated Gingko…I bought ‘Summer Rainbow’ four years ago (still small); it’s still $95.50!

sebright

I got me a Pittosporum 'Tasman Ruffles', which I've so many times admired in Steve and John's garden.

I got me a Pittosporum ‘Tasman Ruffles’, which I’ve so many times admired in Steve and John’s garden.

At 7:15, it was time for the first seminar of the weekend.

the auditorium (Allan's photo)

the auditorium (Allan’s photo)

Before the lecture, as would happen with each segment of lectures over the weekend, names were drawn for a free raffle.  My name was drawn for the first time in six study weekends! and….I won ten zinc plant tags.  Todd’s name was drawn and he won a cool plant.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Later, Allan won a plant, so all weekend Todd teased me that we needed to get a photo of the three of us with our great prizes.  (Another coveted raffle prize given to a couple of lucky pups was a $100 gift certificate from Blooming Junction nursery, and in one case a plant which Dan Hinkley told the recipient was one of only two in production, the other of which he himself owned!)

I can’t recall who introduced the lecture, but she referred to this article from the Guardian, about natural words like “catkins” and “acorn” being replaced in a children’s dictionary by “blog” and “voicemail” and “chatroom”.

She said 491 people had signed on for the weekend.

The keynote speaker was Dan Hinkley, who is my ultimate garden idol, and about whom I hear all good things about his kindness as a person.

A Little Bit of Heaven lecture by Dan Hinkley

with Sam Decker and Nancy Davidson Short

His theme: “People who have influenced me and people who we as gardeners influence.”

Dan Hinkley (Allan's photo)

Dan Hinkley (Allan’s photo)

He has gone so far beyond slide show presentations.  On his mac, he had created an hour long montage of short films and interviews and garden tours interspersed with still photos.  He opened by saying that when he left his home in Indianola, Washington this morning to drive down, his marriage to his longtime partner, Robert, would not have been legal in all states had he driven east across the country.  By the time he got to Portland, it was legal across the whole USA. The audience erupted in applause and cheers and I got all joyfully teary eyed again.

We all laughed uproariously when he showed a slide of the Michigan Bulb Company ad from the early 60s showing bushel basket size mums.  As a child, he ordered those mum and said that he thought (after receiving an envelope of tiny plant starts instead of the bushel basket sized plants he had envisioned being delivered by a truck), “I could do this as a living someday, grow really small expensive plants and somebody out there would buy them!”

DSC01954

He showed films of plant collecting in China, and of Nancy Davidson Short, the now 102 year old former editor of Sunset magazine, whose warm and witty comments about gardening, and life, and death (which she “doesn’t worry about; it’s going to be OK”) were so inspirational.  His other interviewees were his own father, and a young man named Sam, who at age 11 is a knowledgeable plantsman who is in the enviably wonderful position of having Dan as his mentor.

Sam his own self

Sam his own self

Sam was in attendance, with his dad, and after the lecture Dan brought him to the stage and the whole audience stood in applause.  As has always happened when I have heard Dan give a lecture that has touched upon personal matters, it had filled me with joy and poignancy and brought some tears.

Takeaways from my lecture notes:

One of the few advantages of getting old is the opportunity to look back and connect the dots even though some places we have visited are dark.

Nancy Davidson Short said “My grandmother was a terrific gardener.  I have a rose that came from my grandmother.”  (So do I, from mine, that is; a “sweet heart rose”, probably Cecile Brunner.)

Dan showed a slide of Great Dixter’s Christopher Lloyd planting a tree at Dan and Robert’s Windcliffe garden.

On the way back to the hotel, we walked by a line of enchanting food carts, now closed for the evening.  I never did take the opportunity to eat at one because I needed to keep my digestion completely unruffled for garden touring.

food carts

food carts

rain

almost to the hotel: sedums in the light rail tracks (Allan's photo)

almost to the hotel: sedums in the light rail tracks (Allan’s photo)

Saturday, 27 June 2015

Before garden touring, we had three delightful and informative lectures to attend.  We were up at 7:30 and out the hotel door by 8:15, after the tasty hotel breakfast bouquet, and hustled like mad up the slight hill to the event.  We got there just at starting time, and I was sure we would be in the back row.  Our lovely friend and early riser Todd had saved us seats at the front!

Sam, in the audience with a plant purchase

Sam, in the audience with a plant purchase

DSC04853

Allan won his plant during the refreshment break,

Allan won this plant during the refreshment break,

I am going to swipe it for a sunny spot.

I am going to swipe it for a sunny spot.

Lucy raffling off plants.

Lucy raffling off plants.

Lucy Hardiman

Lucy Hardiman

the Saturday morning lectures:

You can read more about each speaker here.

Planting in a Post-Wild World by Thomas Rainier

my notes:

designing plant communities…

plant communities to evoke nature…

public gardens often made with no plan to maintain them (!!) …maybe I said that

painting by Albrecht Dürer: Great Piece of Turf

300px-Albrecht_Dürer_-_The_Large_Piece_of_Turf,_1503_-_Google_Art_Project

about weeds….We can’t stop this…The great exuberance of plants.

He showed a slide of a library planting mulched twice a year, maintained by Master Gardeners and lots of space between plants while weeds thrive.

Wild plants are social, not individual.  He spoke of plants, not mulch, covering the ground.  OH yes, thought I, thinking of jobs I had quit because clients did not want to the plants to touch.

Regarding native plants, he said that “imbedded in the argument for natives is the ideology of NO” (no peonies, no roses, etc).  So true!   …How to get natives beyond preaching to the choir.

“The best examples of north American native plants are in Europe.”

Relate plants to place, create a palette from similar habitats.

Book recommendations: Perennials and Their Garden Habitats by Hansen and Stahl and The Know Maintenance Perennial Garden by Roy Diblik

The SilberSomer (silver summer) perennial mix by Piet Oudolf

To relate plants to plants: vertically layer, compatible species, don’t have plantings missing the ground layer. [Yes! Why oh why do even beloved clients insist on seeing soil in between the plants!]  He and other speakers liked sweet woodruff as a ground cover.  I may have to stop being anti-sweet woodruff.

Wild plantings in orderly frames can make people more comfortable.

He spoke of satellite views of the world that show dark unlit spaces that people might think are still wild, but instead they are vast areas of fuel production land, and food production land, not wilderness.

Thomas Rainier’s blog

Thomas Rainier’s book: Planting in a Post-Wild World.  I intend to purchase it post-haste.

quote

Old Dog New Tricks by Maurice Horn

Maurice spoke of his experience moving to Sauvie Island home and garden that he shares with his husband, George.

my notes:

Joy Creek Nursery founded in ’92, overlooks Joy Creek Canyon

He used to live on a city lot on Portland, now on Sauvie island, “the size of Manhatten but mostly wildlife preserve.”

I’ve gone back and added to the post about touring their garden these insights that he shared with us:

The original garden design called for a belvedere.  (I had to google that.)

The windows go from knee height to over (most) human’s heights.

The house is all windows except for a central bathroom.

He realized that the garden is a mandala.  The garden has Buddhist iconography because George is a Buddhist. The bolsters of shrubs are earth, the yellow and red flowers are fire, Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ is water.

Clematis integrifolia and viorna resist the root nibbling the moles that eat other clematis roots.

The window views remind him of Japanese woodblock prints that were in his childhood home.

Maurice says he is a populist gardener who wants to create gardens anyone can do (I probably don’t have that quite right).

He describes his garden as “an old man’s garden who feels like a child in his heart.”

He read part of a poem called The Current by Wendell Berry

Having once put his hand into the ground,
seeding there what he hopes will outlast him,
a man has made a marriage with his place,
and if he leaves it his flesh will ache to go back.
His hand has given up its birdlife in the air.

He misted up when he said “I love my partner and my home” and then the whole audience misted up.

He and George met dancing.  He showed a photo of Garrya elliptica in bloom and said “I want to dance like that.”

He showed a slide of a burnt tray of roasted vegetables and told the story how he and George stepped outside, got lost in gardening and came back into the house to a cloud of black smoke.  “What I wish for all of us is that we can get lost in the garden like that.”

He played a song called “Let’s Think About Living, Let’s Think About Life.”

I get choked up just reading my notes about his lecture.  Lucy was all misty when she got up to introduce the next lecturer, Mike Kintgen, of whom she said that Panayoti Kelaidis called “the greatest horticulturalist I know.”

Garden Gems from the World Dry Regions by Mike Kintgen

My notes:

Kintgen works at the Denver Botanic Gardens and his specialty is the alpine garden.  When he spoke of the snowstorm in May and the hailstorm in June this year, I had already heard about this awful weather in The Miserable Gardener blog.  He said that the DBG sits on a former cemetery and that the temperature can go from 64 degrees F to 0 on one day.

He’s been a member of the North American Rock Garden Society since he was 12.  Plants in “cushions and buns”, he said, are a way of adapting to the cold.

Persian rugs were inspired by the plants of the steppes.

Plants he inspired me to seek out:  More erigerons and penstemons, arctosis, ursinia, erodium, zauchnerias, Euphorbia rigida, Sesili gummifera (moon carrot).  Each lecturerer who spoke of many plants provided a plant list to refer to later.

Sesili gummifera (Moon Carrot) as seen at McMenamin's Kennedy School garden in 2014.

Sesili gummifera (moon carrot) as seen at McMenamin’s Kennedy School garden in 2014.

We had a bit of time before garden touring to go to the plant sale again, where I bought a few more plants to schlep to the hotel.

other joyous attendees

other joyous attendees

Sam shopping (Allan's photo)

Sam shopping (Allan’s photo)

Allan thanked this nursery owner for his raffle plant donation (the one Allan got)

Allan thanked this nursery owner for his raffle plant donation (the one Allan got)

I bought three plants from his booth.

I bought three plants from his booth.

cameron

lav

We’d ordered the pre-packed lunch from the event, to save time; as we walked back to the hotel to join Todd for the afternoon of garden touring, I realized that we would have had time to eat at the darling food carts.

like a little village in the city

like a little village in the city

DSC04870

cart

I did not realize til now, looking at the photo below, that I had captured Todd having his lunch of a tasty shawarma.

todd

on the street across from the hotel

on the street across from the hotel

Next: touring Lucy Hardiman’s garden

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Friday, 26 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

study

Hyland-Beckman garden

hylandbeckman

We will proceed through the garden in a more or less orderly fashion.

the entry driveway

the entry driveway

street

by the street

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the lower side of the entry garden

the lower side of the entry garden

garden art, Allan thought a ball made of firewood chunks.

garden art, Allan thought the ball was made of firewood chunks.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking up (Allan's photo)

looking up (Allan’s photo)

upper side of driveway

upper side of driveway

driveway

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

view to the northeast

view to the northeast

grasses

house and greenhouse

house and greenhouse

These were for sale.

These were for sale.

pot

pot2

swirl

Oh!  I fall in love immediately.

Oh! I fall in love immediately.

love the containers, too

love the containers, too

wall

plants

wish my Tetrapanax would get this big.

wish my Tetrapanax would get this big.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We walk between the greenhouse and the garage and to our right is this stone stairway.  I’d already figured out I could go up the stairs and then back around by a sloping lawn.  I was glad I’d brought my walking stick.  (I’ve learned that’s the euphemism often used for cane.)

between

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

flowing, Piet Oudolf-y kind of garden beds.

flowing, Piet Oudolf-y kind of garden beds.

We look up the stairs and there at the top is Todd.  He bounds down like a tall gazelle.

todd

Not only does this show Todd, but also how the greenhouse, stone walls and stairs, and garage relate to each other.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

dog2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bench

I covet this.

I covet this.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I couldn’t take photos going up the stairs because of my various height neuroses.

I made it up!

I made it up! to the midway level

Other determined tour guests who had climbed despite some difficulty.

Other determined tour guests who had climbed despite some difficulty.

at the top

at the top

top2

looking way back down at Todd and Allan

looking way back down at Todd and Allan

grasses2

art2

Allan halfway up

Allan halfway up

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

lawn

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

above the garage

above the garage

eucalyptus

eucalyptus

spraypainted Allium schubertii tumbleweeds

spraypainted Allium schubertii tumbleweeds

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking down on the driveway from the upper lawn

looking down on the driveway from the upper lawn

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

garage

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

drive3

I find a path clearly defined enough to lead me out to the street without having to go down a short stone staircase.

I find a path clearly defined enough to lead me out to the street without having to go down a short stone staircase.

To my right: the short stairway to the driveway

To my right: the short stairway to the driveway

from the little path

from the little path

Yay, my path comes out at the street!

Yay, my path comes out at the street!

I do spend a fair amount of time in hilly gardens trying to find ways to avoid vertiginous and knee-bothering stairs and slopes.

I walk back up the driveway to the deck of the house.

There he is again!

On the way: There he is again!

pots5

around to the porch

around to the porch

I have an attack of acrophobia when I see car going by on Highway 30 below, and have to edge back off the porch…

with just one photo of these enticing chairs.

with just one photo of these enticing chairs.

Allan's photo

I asked Allan to take porch photos.

the mossy table: Allan's photo

the mossy table: Allan’s photo

DSC01913

Allan’s photo of a staghorn fern

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I asked Allan to take some porch photos.

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, looking down from the porch

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

on the deck

on the deck

pot6

on the table

on the table

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

so adorable

so adorable

as we depart

as we depart

pears

a last look

a last look

postscript

Todd had already left to go to the Wakefield-Grossnickle garden on Old Germantown Road.  That is my favourite garden of any I’ve ever seen.  We were skipping it today for three reasons:  I really wanted to go to Xera nursery in Portland, and would have no other time to do so.  I’d seen that garden just last July, and I also knew it would be hard on my knee to navigate its steep entry drive and its slopes.  But mainly, the curvy stretch of Old Germantown Road between Highway 30 and the garden scared the bejeezus out of me.  After a trip down that road in 2007, I swore I would never ride down it again, and that I would only visit the garden on the less precipitous, curvy road from Highway 26!

never again!!

At the Hyland-Beckman garden, we had met a gardening friend from Seattle, who had already been to the Germantown garden and said she had “white knuckled” her way down.  I was relieved I wasn’t the only one scared by that road.

However, I feel bad to not have visited that most amazing garden, my favourite of any I’ve ever seen, so here are blog posts from our previous visits.

2007, a Hardy Plant Society garden open

2011: Hardy Plant Society study weekend

2014: Garden Bloggers Fling

Later, Todd said that he loved it.  I knew he would, and I’d been eager for him to see it.  I could so happily live in that garden, if I had someone to deliver groceries so I never had to leave.  Those who live in the hills around Portland are made of sterner stuff than I.  (That is not difficult.)

We also missed another tour garden that was right across Old Germantown Road from My Favourite Garden Ever.

Our next stop, Xera Plants, wonderfully made up for the poignancy I was feeling, and that will be in our next post, a bonus post this evening.  It will also include some lecture notes so that part may be of interest only to those who wish they had been at the study weekend.

 

 

 

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Friday, 26 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

study

Lost Lagoon Farm, Sauvie Island

From the program: Jane Hartline and Mark Greenfield, Lost Lagoon Farm.  See what happened when two seasoned gardeners unleashed their energy and passion for gardening, wildlife and native plants on 3 acres on Sauvie Island.  A decade ago, we researched what plants were truly native to our land ecosystems, ripped out agricultural weeds around our 1/4 acre pond and planted more than 2,500 native trees, shrubs, wildflowers and ferns to provide habitat for songbirds, amphibians and other wildlife.  The self-guided tour of our habitat restoration project is the main event, but the gardens around our house are charming, with lots of interesting (non-native) plants and garden art, a rain garden, an awesome vegetable garden with a work space that will make you envious, and several cozy, verdant nooks for relaxing.

on the way into the garden

on the way into the garden

It was too hot for wearing wool coats.

It was too hot for wearing wool coats.

Because of the heat and extreme contrast from sun to shade, I’ve decided not to try to fix the contrast on the photos.  Walk with us; this is the experience that we had, back and forth from deep shade to blinding sunshine.

start here

Start Here: the walk toward the house

a woodsy approach

a woodsy approach

One of several shady sit spots.

One of several shady sit spots.

arrow2

The path becomes more formal.

The path becomes more formal.

We could go this way...but...

We could go this way…but…

We turn toward the barn.

We turn toward the barn.

another sit spot

another sit spot

I like the mulch of fallen cones.

I like the mulch of fallen cones.

the barn

the barn (Looking through, you can see the resting flock of sheep.)

Inside the barn, with a few of the chicken coop

Inside the barn, with a view of the chicken coop

chicken coop view

chicken coop view

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

back to the shady path...well planted along the sides.

back to the shady path…well planted along the sides.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We are seeking the house.

We are seeking the house.

light at the end...

light at the end…

a bright circle

a bright circle

We turn right to inspect the kitchen garden.

delicious compost!

delicious compost!

tour goers and veg

tour goers and veg

IMG_9592

 

veg

 

purple martin houses

purple martin houses on a tall pole

martin

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

purple martin pictures: Allan's photo

purple martin pictures: Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The weather was so hot that a jug of water by the veg garden workshed was hot like from a recently boiled teakettle.

Perhaps I exaggerate slightly.

Perhaps I exaggerate slightly.

tools in the kitchen garden shed

tools in the kitchen garden shed

work area

work area

artfully screened wall

artfully screened

screen2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking across the lawn to the house

looking across the lawn to the house

lawn surrounded by garden

lawn surrounded by garden

a familiar shed

a familiar shed

We toured this garden on the Garden Conservancy tour in 2009.

photos from 2009

photos from 2009

Redwing blackbirds were all over this.

Redwing blackbirds were all over this feeder by the kitchen garden fence.

Small birds flew all around the house patio, where many feeders served them.  They flew up onto the roof when we approached.

birds2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo (hats)

the patio

the patio

The birds decided it was safe to come down.

The birds decided it was safe to come down.

They kept a close eye on us.

They kept a close eye on us.

Ah...icy cold water

Ah…icy cold water

patio corner

patio corner

 

lemon tree

lemon tree

looking back toward the veg garden

looking back toward the veg garden

Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

A path leads around the house.

A path leads around the house.

shrubs

 

patio3

another example of a house with lovely, big garden embracing windows

another example of a house with lovely, big garden embracing windows

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in a side yard: native plants for sale...

in a side yard: native plants for sale…

douglas

Darmera peltata (umbrella plant) is one that I do like to have in my garden.

Darmera peltata (umbrella plant) is one that I do like to have in my garden.

fringe

tour guests

tour guests

We’ll now leave the house gardens and walk the self-guided tour of Lost Lagoon.  As we followed the path, we made every effort to take photos that will share the experience and information with you.  We were both impressed with the high quality of the information signs.

sign2

lost

raccoon

 

Allan's photo

 (Allan’s photo)

Raccoon Camp

Raccoon Camp

snags

snags2

snags

path to Lost Lagoon

path to Lost Lagoon

path3

cottonwoods

oak

brush

warbler

Warbler Tree Bench

Warbler Tree Bench

oregon

pollinator

turtle

turtle highway

turtle highway from the farmland irrigation ditch…

to the Lost Lagoon.

to the Lost Lagoon.

lost2

Lost Lagoon

Lost Lagoon

nettles

wildlife

wildlife corridor

wildlife corridor

martins

martins2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We continue around the lagoon.

We continue around the lagoon.

chains

 

winter

 

view to the bridge from behind the pond

view to the bridge from behind the pond

As we continued our walk, we could see the Sauvie Island bridge. (This is slightly telephoto)

from the backside of the lagoon path: Sauvie Island bridge. (This is slightly telephoto)

currant

swaths

 

Allan's photo

viewing bench

viewing bench

cafe2

an idyllic life

an idyllic life

messy

prairie

The path goes under a weeping willow.

The path goes under a weeping willow.

wood

Looking back through the willow: magical

Looking back through the willow: magical

willow3

lagoon

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

tour guests view the lagoon

tour guests view the lagoon

azolla

(Sorry all blurry, and the beaver lodge was too shady to photograph.)

(Sorry all blurry, and the beaver lodge was in shade too deep to photograph.)

dock

a bit about frogs

a bit about frogs

Having circled the lagoon, we return to the house.

Having circled the lagoon, we return to the house.

arbour at front of house

arbour at front of house

"Variegated climbing hygrandea!" said another tour guest.

“Variegated climbing hygrandea!” said another tour guest.

front door

front door

more of those enviable windows

more of those enviable windows

I think this is just a regular garage door, but painted...which I would like at our house.

I think this is just a regular garage door, but painted…which I would like at our house.

another bird feeder (Allan's photo) in an area with fewer tour guests

another bird feeder (Allan’s photo) in a front garden area with fewer tour guests

Joe Clifton was selling artwork near the Raccoon Camp

Joe Clifton was selling artwork near the Raccoon Camp

Joe Clifton

Joe Clifton: Allan bought a screwdriver flower sculpture, which would have been my pick, too.

Allan's photo

 Allan’s photo

birds on the Raccoon Camp fence

birds on the Raccoon Camp fence

As we drove out of the parking lot, we saw Todd driving in, and had a conversation through our vehicle windows.  He’d gotten a late start due to having to do watering back on the Peninsula, and was running one garden behind us.  Because Allan and I were not going to go to all five tour gardens, we had time to make a side trip to Cistus Nursery.  That will be a comparatively short bonus post tonight, since I hope, for my own sake, to get caught up to the present day before the end of summer.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 26 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend, Portland 2015

study

We were up and in the hotel restaurant by 8:30 AM, ever so early for two night owls.  I had a look at Facebook on my phone and almost burst into tears of joy.  I could hardly speak to tell Allan what I saw without flapping my hands to hold back the tears.

marriage

What a day: To begin with something so wonderful that in my 20s through 40s I never thought I would see in my lifetime, followed by garden touring, and visits to both Xera and Cistus nurseries, and closing with a lecture by Dan Hinkley.

We took our non freeway route out of Portland, heading back west down the same quiet industrial streets we had entered by last night.  Other than waiting for a long train to pass, we made good time and got to our destination only half an hour after the first garden opened.

the back roads of Portland

the back roads of Portland

our destination: Sauvie Island

our destination: Sauvie Island

Here we are just coming off the bridge onto Sauvie Island.

Here we are just coming off the bridge onto Sauvie Island.

Much of the island is farmland, both agricultural and horticultural.

Much of the island is farmland, both agricultural and horticultural.

DSC04440

farm

houseboats on the river channel

houseboats on the river channel

gravel barge on the river channel, heading to Portland

gravel barge on the river channel, heading to Portland

We arrived at our first garden, one that we had visited on the Garden Conservancy tour in 2009.

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend: Soule-Horn garden

from the program:  This is the home of George Soule and Joy Creek Nursery co-owner Maurice Horn, who will explore the evolution of this large rural island garden during his lecture on Saturday.  This country garden is located in what was once an oak savannah.  It has many borrowed views of distant mountains, oaks, hills, and a seasonal lake.  A formal knot garden near the house transitions to less formal garden rooms, terraces, and perennials borders, which transition to mown paths through open fields.  The original design was by Wallace Huntington.  Subsequent design and plant selections have been done by Sean Hogan and Maurice Horn.

The temperature was in the mid 90s, and the light glaring for photography.

By the field in which we parked, a neighboring farmer rents a space for beehives.

all abuzz

all abuzz

up the long driveway flanked with lavender

up the long driveway flanked with lavender

The driveway divides.

The driveway divides.

below the house

below the house (Allan’s photo)

to the right, a tropical island

a tropical island

Their tetrapanax was running vigorously.  I wish mine would (I think).

Their tetrapanax was running vigorously. I wish mine would (I think).

 the lower side of the house: a collection of plants

the lower side of the house: a collection of plants

approaching the house

along the left-hand branch of the driveway

to the left, over the lavender hedge

to the left, over the lavender hedge

(Allan's photo)

Allan’s photo

lav4

We took the lower path to a stairway farther on.

terraced garden below the house

terraced garden below the house

the sloping garden

the sloping garden

detail

detail

Maurice and George had kindly arranged to have flocks of butterflies throughout the garden.

(Allan's photo)

Allan’s photo

(Allan's photo)

Allan’s photo

staircase going up (Allan's photo)

staircase going up (Allan’s photo)

pockets of shade beside the comfortably spaced stone steps

pockets of shade beside the comfortably spaced stone steps

Hebe 'Quicksilver' spilling over

Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ spilling over

further up the steps

further up the steps

The heat had addled my brain so that I did not take a photo of the elegant stairway.  Here is a photo from 2009, when the stairway garden was just being planted.

looking down

looking down

now: mature stairway plantings in shade

now: mature stairway plantings in shade

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

how to guide a clematis up a tree (Allan's photo)

how to guide a clematis up a tree (Allan’s photo)

looking down over the hillside garden

looking down over the hillside garden

at the top of the stairs

at the top of the stairs; the house is all windows onto the garden

the knot garden

the knot garden

exuberant plants contained within the knot garden

exuberant plants contained within the knot garden

knot3

owner George, strolling with his dog

owner George, strolling with his dog

George and a tour guest (Allan's photo)

George and a tour guest (Allan’s photo)

past the knot garden

past the knot garden

some blissful shade

some blissful shade

intense contrast between sun and shade

intense contrast between sun and shade

The knot garden segues into informal gardens.

The knot garden segues into informal gardens.

Bees came from the hives, beyond the meadow, to drink from this birdbath.

Bees came from the hives, beyond the meadow, to drink from this birdbath.

We were told the ridged bottom keeps them from drowning.

We were told the ridged bottom keeps them from drowning.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

If we had entered the other way, we would have first come to patio terraces by the house.

terrace2

the same corner in 2009

the same corner in 2009

garden tour mingling

garden tour mingling

pots

on the terrace near the house

on the terrace near the house

design drawing

design drawing

map of house and garden

map of house and garden

snacks, cool water, George, and the beautiful windows (Allan's photo)

snacks, cool water, George, and the beautiful windows (Allan’s photo)

George and Maurice's adorable dog, Ricky

George and Maurice’s adorable dog, Ricky

Allan's photo. I was in love, as I am sure you can guess.

Allan’s photo. I was in love, as I am sure you can guess.

looking out over the field of green spires

view from the terrace: looking out over the field of green spires (pruned by deer)

meadow

We walked back toward the stairs we’d entered by, and passed the scree garden next to the knot garden.

scree garden

scree garden

scree2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the other side of the knot garden

the other side of the knot garden

Crocosmia spilling over

Crocosmia spilling over

looking back at the knot garden

looking back at the knot garden

Maurice had recently turned part of the slope past the scree garden into a rockery.  As the owner of Joy Creek Nursery, he has a ready supply of the coolest plants.

overview

rockery

their favourite sit spot

their favourite sit spot

red

red2

rockerytree

the view

the view

I found my way down via the lawn rather than the stairs.

path

intense sun as we go further afield

intense sun as we go further afield

downhill: a bed surrounding a small shed

downhill: a bed surrounding a small shed

behind the shed, a buddleia...

behind the shed, a buddleia…

...living up to its name, butterfly bush.

…living up to its name, butterfly bush.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

butterflu2

butterfly photos

butterfly photos

A rhodo for Steve and John

A rhodo for Steve and John

still further afield in the mown paths

still further afield in the mown paths

At the end of another path, access to Wapato State Park

At the end of another path, access to Wapato State Park, a bird watchers’ paradise

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

With no time to explore a state park as well, we turn back.

With no time to explore a state park as well, we turn back.

Many clever garden tourers carried parasols.

Many clever garden tourers carried parasols.

the lavender edges driveway from off in the fields

the lavender edges driveway from off in the fields

looking back on the fields

looking back on the fields

We must depart, although I would see so much more by walking around the house again.

We must depart, although I would see so much more by walking around the house again.

a garden by the driveway

a garden by the driveway

Bees buzzed beside us all the way down the lavender-edged driveway.

Bees buzzed beside us all the way down the lavender-edged driveway.

lav5

What I learned the next day in a lecture by Maurice Horn:

The original garden design called for a belvedere.  (I had to google that.)

The windows go from knee height to over (most) human’s heights.

The house is all windows except for a central bathroom.

The garden has Buddhist iconography because George is a Buddhist.

The bolsters of shrubs are earth, the yellow and red flowers are fire, Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ is water.

Clematis integrifolia and viorn2 resist the root nibbling the moles that eat other clematis roots.

The window views remind him of Japanese woodblock prints that were in his childhood home.

Next: a wetland restoration garden

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