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Posts Tagged ‘Haystack Rock’

Tuesday, 27 October 2015

Carol and I swanned down to Cannon Beach on the only full day of her two night trip to the beach.

ilwacocannonbeach

Mostly, I photographed the gardens as we walked around.

Our walk was all around this area.

Our walk was all around this area.

I am always relieved to see that other city gardeners have areas they don’t have time to make perfect:

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the other corner of that intersection

the other corner of that intersection

blackberry sneaking through a hebe

blackberry sneaking through a hebe

(I’m not being holier than thou. You can often find a blackberry sneaking into our Port of Ilwaco garden by the restroom pavilion, and to find a weedy area in Long Beach, just check the parking lot berms.)

downtown window boxes

downtown window boxes

Every single downtown business has landscaping.

Every single downtown business has landscaping.

hardy fuchsias on a side street

hardy fuchsias on a side street

more hardy fuchsias

more hardy fuchsias

(Note to self: While my own garden abounds with hardy fuchsias, I could certainly use more in the Long Beach parks.)

I knew a secret path up into the cottagey beachfront neighbourhood.  It is private, but the public is allowed to walk through “at their own risk”.

the semi-secret path

the semi-secret path

up the stairs; note the sitting bench by the tree.

up the stairs; note the sitting bench by the tree.

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looking back over the steps

looking back over the steps

an attractive arbour...

an attractive arbour…

...which has two benches.

…which has two benches.

fence post toppers

fence post toppers

and a fence top gull

and a fence top gull

my favourite Cannon Beach arbour

my favourite Cannon Beach arbour

my favourite Cannon Beach Cottage (The Bears)

my favourite Cannon Beach Cottage (The Bears)

annuals

annuals

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my favourite beach front garden (cleaned up for fall)

my favourite beach front garden (cleaned up for fall)

the view from that corner

the view from that corner

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to the south, Haystack Rock

to the south, Haystack Rock

my favourite beachfront hardscape

my favourite beachfront hardscape…

and its entryway

and its entryway

the wisdom of Cannon Beach (no fireworks!)

the wisdom of Cannon Beach (no fireworks!)

another beachfront corner

another beachfront corner

in the distance, the Tillamook Lighthouse

in the distance, the Tillamook Lighthouse

telephoto of "Terrible Tillie"

telephoto of “Terrible Tilly”

historic photo

historic photo

This house was once on the cottage tour, and had a reading chair in each dormer.

This house was once on the cottage tour, and had a reading chair in each dormer.

You could buy that twin dormered ocean view home for $1,200,000.00 .  Well, someone could.

The Ocean road becomes non-vehicular.

In the next block, the Ocean road becomes non-vehicular.

stairs to the beach

stairs to the beach

We turned away and walked back to town down the main street.  I think it would have been more pleasant to walk along the beach.  We were, however, hungry for lunch at Bill’s Tavern.  I was mighty tired and dizzy when we got there.  Carol and I agreed it is hard getting old(er).

borrowed from Bill's website

borrowed from Bill’s website

inside (with Halloween decor)

inside (with Halloween decor)

excellent reasonably priced food

excellent reasonably priced food

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albacore tuna sandwich with a touch of curry, backed with cod and chips

a revitalizing albacore tuna sandwich with a touch of curry, backed with cod and chips

an opportunist at an outdoor table

an opportunist at an outdoor table

a human (not an employee) feeling compelled to ruin the bird's meal

a human (not an employee) feeling compelled to ruin the bird’s meal; why?

more good landscaping across the street

more good landscaping across the street

I wasn’t especially dizzy any more.  (Lest you worry, I’ve been lightheaded on occasion since 2008 so it is probably not life threatening yet.)

leaving Bill's with photo taking energy restored

leaving Bill’s with photo taking energy restored

I have been to Cannon Beach with friends who want to browse into every shop.  Thank goodness Carol is not like that and is content just to stroll along and look at gardens and window displays.

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one of many courtyards

one of many courtyards

hardy fuchsia

hardy fuchsia

hardy fuchsia

hardy fuchsia

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a touch of autumn

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wineshop with grape vine

wineshop with grape vine

At the end of the street of shops, Carol and I found a place to sit and relax for awhile.

overlooking the estuary

overlooking the estuary

Ecola Creek Estuary

Ecola Creek Estuary

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No vehicles on the beach at Cannon Beach....so much more beautiful than ours.

No vehicles on the beach at Cannon Beach….so much more beautiful than ours.

young gull disappointed that we had no snacks to offer

young gull disappointed that we had no snacks to offer

We decided we needed some espresso for the road so sought out one of the world’s most pleasant coffee houses in a little courtyard off the main street.

Carol approached the lovely Bella Espresso.

Carol approached the lovely Bella Espresso.

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outdoor seating nook

Carol pointed out the existence of journals!

Carol pointed out the existence of journals!

I got all excited…but the journals were not like the Sylvia Beach room journals and were mostly drawings rather than words.

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the best entry I could find

viewed from our window seat: euonymous climbing high

viewed from our window seat: euonymous climbing high

 a lovely ambience in Bella Espresso

a lovely ambience in Bella Espresso

We relaxed with our pleasant interior and outdoor courtyard view for a long while before walking back to Carol’s car and our drive back to Ilwaco.

one last Cannon Beach garden photo

one last Cannon Beach garden photo

Carol dropped me off and returned to the Sou’wester for a quiet evening of reading in the Zelmar Cruiser vintage trailer.

Next: While we went to Cannon Beach, Allan went boating on Oregon’s John Day River.

 

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Saturday, 12 September 2015

Cannon Beach Cottage Tour

a benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum

Oznick-Muncy Cottage

from the program:  This modernized traditional craftsman style dream home was built in 2007 and is a great example of how the past meets the present.  The owners used a contemporary approach to their living quarters by featuring original art by Cannon Beach’s own Bill Steidel and Portland’s Richard Thompson.  Be sure to check out the beautiful man-made fireplace which is constructed from original Oregon river rock.

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Allan’s photo; as you can see, we were allowed to take photos here.

The table settings had belonged to the owner's great grandmother.

The table settings had belonged to the owner’s great grandmother.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

from the local shop Sesame and Lilies

from the local shop Sesame and Lilies

 

sleep

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Quinn’s Cottage (a vacation rental)

From the program: This classic maritime architectural style cottage was built in 1930 and the current homeowners purchased the home in 2004.  This home is a traditional Cannon Beach cottage with exposed shingle siding and parlor windows.  The cottage is thought to have started as a single-walled fishing shack in the early 30s and slowly got added onto over the years, with the most recent addition of the second floor from about the 1970s.

Quinn's Cottage

Quinn’s Cottage

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Quinn Cottage living room

Quinn Cottage living room

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borrowed from the vacation rental website, as I failed to photograph this cute desk.

borrowed from the vacation rental website, as I failed to photograph this cute desk by the front door.

kitchen

kitchen

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The upstairs was not available to view because of the narrow stairs. The volunteer host's daughter guarded the way.

The upstairs was not available to view because of the narrow stairs. The volunteer host’s daughter guarded the way.

You can view photos of the upstairs on the vacation rental website.

Sea Salt

from the program: This beautifully tranquil home as built in 1986 and formerly sat across the street from an earlier version of the Surfsand Resort, which was located on Spruce Street.  It is rumored that Sea Salt was one of Surfsand Resort’s units and was later relocated and remodeled in 2006 to its current location.

Sea Salt is a vacation rental, so you can see more photos here.

Sea Salt

Sea Salt

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: The house looks modern on the outside but has cottage charm inside.

Allan’s photo: The house looks modern on the outside but has cottage charm inside.

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downstairs bedroom

A peek out the bedroom window revealed this chimney!

A peek out the bedroom window revealed this chimney!

and a Buddha in the back garden.

and a Buddha in the back garden.

upstairs bedroom: Allan's photo

upstairs bedroom: Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, upstairs deck

Allan's photo from the upstairs deck

Allan’s photo from the upstairs deck

Sea Salt side yard

Sea Salt side yard

The view down the street toward the beach, two blocks away.

The view down the street toward the beach, two blocks away.

interlude

We had a walk to a few blocks to the next cottage and we photographed cottages, gardens, and beach.

a cute little cottage

a cute little cottage

with a corner table

with a corner table

We walked down the highway for a block and admired the gallery building across the street.

We walked down the highway for a block and admired the gallery building across the street.

cottage just uphill from the gallery

cottage just uphill from the gallery

Allan pointed out that we could walk west for a couple of blocks and take the beach road to the next cottage, so we did.

What I liked about this fancy big house was the copper roof.

What I liked about this fancy big house was the copper roof.  This two bedroom, two bath home two blocks from the beach with hardly any yard is for sale for $635,000.

my kind of cottage

my kind of cottage

I took so many photos of that white picket fence cottage exterior that I felt I might be bothering the folks inside.  They must be used to it.  I knew they were home by all the shoes on the front porch.

picket2

note the windowboxes!

note the windowboxes!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; I was using my cane and was mighty glad to have it.

I like the porch and dormers.

I like the porch and dormers.

house with honeysuckle arbor

house with honeysuckle arbor

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

just my size, with garden space: would probably sell for $300 thousand or so here.

just my size, with garden space: would sell for $325 to 400 thousand or so here.

a back yard of the beachfront row of houses

a back yard of the beachfront row of houses

I asked "May I photograph your horse?"

I asked “May I photograph your horse?”

"Yes, you may." (Allan's photo)

“Yes, you may.” (Allan’s photo)

horse

intersection of beachfront road and dune path

intersection of beachfront road and dune path

looking north

looking north

Allan had a look at the rock.

Allan had a look at the rock.

Allan's photo: the iconic Cannon Beach symbol, Haystack Rock

Allan’s photo: the iconic Cannon Beach symbol, Haystack Rock

Allan's photo: grass planted to stabilize dunes does not look to us like native beach grass.

Allan’s photo: grass planted to stabilize dunes does not look to us like native beach grass.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Next:  We turn the corner at the end of that block and arrive at the next cottage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 13 September, 2014

Cannon Beach Cottage Tour

a benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center

We had a long walk to the next cottage.  As always in Cannon Beach, charming sights abounded.

a wee cottage with a garden full of potential

a wee cottage with a garden full of potential

The walking route took us along the narrow shouldered lane uphill on Hemlock Street.  Now me, hobbling with my cane and with cars going by and a drop off on one side, was probably the only one in the world acrophobic and car phobic enough to be scared.

map

I really was quite toe curlingly anxious.

I really was quite toe curlingly anxious.

However, I survived the walk both ways.  Allan was with me on the way back and told me quite comfortingly that if I fell down the slope it would be into brambles and not all the way down. It was quite, quite a long and uphill and downdale walk and I was glad I had brought my cane.

the first view of Haystack Rock

the first view of Haystack Rock

and a clearer view as the walk progressed

and a clearer view as the walk progressed

Allan says "I stayed above the highway on a 'shortcut' with this double decked house facing Haystack rock...

Allan says “I stayed above the highway on a ‘shortcut’ with this double decked house facing Haystack rock…”

"and a flowering hedge below" (looks like Escallonia to me)

“and a flowering hedge below” (looks like Escallonia to me)

"and standing stones south of the main rock" (The Needles)

“and standing stones south of the main rock” (The Needles)

"and a house of river rock (& a few plants)"

“and a house of river rock (& a few plants)”

I was walking alone as Allan left the previous house after me, and as I finally neared the destination, older folks leaving the property said to me, “It’s worth it!”  I realized that with my cane, I am now bonded to the older folks.  I guess I am one of them!  They were so right, the destination was well worth the long, hilly walk in both directions.

West-Bouvy Cabin

from the programme:  Originally built in 1913 for Oregon governor Oswald West, this is one of the most historic homes on the tour.  The property sits on a basaltic precipice with a breathtaking view of the ocean.  The rectangular, one story Adirondack style log cabin is 40 by 48 feet and sits 80 feet above sea level.  The Wests sold their retreat in 1926, where it was sold to a Dr Harry Bouvy and his wife Gladys in 1936 and later passed down to their descendants.  In late May of 1991, the homeowners had made plans with the Oregon State Preservation Office to nominate the home on the National Register of Historic Places.  It wasn’t until May 30, 1991, a 16-year old arsonist set the home ablaze and 55 years of family history had gone up in smoke.  Following the fire, the home was reconstructed in its exact location.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

seesaw on north lawn

seesaw on north lawn

As you can see, the home has a second story; I’m not sure if that was added later.

view from north lawn

view from north lawn

I stood in the queue on the west side porch having a delightful chat with the docent.  He said interior photos were just fine, and so did the owner, who was inside.  We were even allowed to wear our shoes in the house despite the very fine wood floors.  The docent told me that the house had been recreated by sifting through the ashes to find the original footprint, and also had been recreated from photographs.  (I did not think to ask if the second story was original or added later.)

The name of the young arsonist is a mystery; because of his age, the records were sealed.  I can only wonder why? why? why?  I found this good article about the rebuilding (although when I look at it, the colours are very odd and hard to read).  Here is another, and easier to read, article.

Allan's photo of me chatting with the docent.

Allan’s photo of me chatting with the docent.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

dining

massive stone fireplace

massive stone fireplace

fireplace

many spots for reading

many spots for reading

logs

 

nooks

south window view with an old original building

south window view with an old original building

telescope

china cabinet

china cabinet

kichen

kitchen

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

kitchen

The red counters remind me of my grandma's kitchen

The red counters remind me of my grandma’s kitchen

log cabin knife rack

log cabin knife rack

pantry

old fashioned pantry

log construction

log construction

back to the living room

back to the living room

Allan went upstairs

Allan went upstairs

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

reading nook, Allan's photo

reading nook, Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan's photo of historic photos

Allan’s photo of historic photos

the upstairs view

the upstairs view (Allan’s photo)

upstairs view (Allan's photo)

upstairs view (Allan’s photo)

snoozy spots

snoozy spots (Allan’s photo)

woodwork detail, Allan's photo

woodwork detail, Allan’s photo

on the expansive west veranda

on the expansive west veranda

view to Haystack Rock

view to Haystack Rock

The Needles

The Needles

sw

SW corner of the veranda

SW corner of the veranda

the original woodshed

the original woodshed

a green roof

a green roof; the bank would have been spangled with white ox-eye daisy earlier in the year.

spent daisy heads

spent daisy heads

south side of house

south side of house

path to beach, Allan's photo

path to beach, Allan’s photo

cabin from below (Allan's photo)

cabin from below (Allan’s photo)

behind the house, the old well house

behind the house, the old well house

inside the well house...

inside the well house…

...the old well.

…the old well.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

back porch

back porch

tiny back garden

tiny back garden

north side

north side

As we made the long walk back to the next cottage, I told older folks who were walking toward me and looking rather hot and tired in the 84 degree weather, “It’s worth it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Every year…or two….I just might take a trip with my friends Carol or Mary that is actually not about gardening.  I include such trips here because this blog is for me to read and relive someday if I am lucky enough to reach old age.  I’ve been to the Sylvia Beach Hotel with both of my best book-loving old friends, but in spring of 2010 Carol (whom I’ve known for 27 years and who visits me from Seattle) and I wanted to go somewhere that required less driving time.  Thus we rented a room at the Sea Sprite in Cannon Beach.  While I’ve visited Cannon Beach often (especially for the cottage tour), I’d never stayed overnight there.

our room at the Sea Sprite Inn

The photo is from their website.  The fold out couch was very comfy. I would advise getting the upstairs room even though more expensive because we could hear a lot of walking and noise from upstairs. I also found that all the LED lights in the room (microwave, stove, clock…) required, for me, the strategic hanging of a bath towel to block them.  Otherwise, I felt at ease and happy in the room.  When we needed a reading lamp, the manager gave me hers from the office.  That alone impressed me with good, kind service (very different from the upcoming Hardy Plant study weekend in Portland when Sheila and I, staying in a dorm room on the Portland State U. campus, could not get a second reading lamp at all for four nights….despite repeatedly trying and despite the fact that the room had no overhead light!!).  But I digress…Another factor that would bring us back to the Sea Sprite is the view RIGHT outside of our room.

evening view from the Sea Sprite lawn

We managed to get into The Irish Table restaurant for dinner on our first evening.  (During the day it’s The Sleepy Monk coffee house.)  It takes no dinner reservations except for parties of six or more, and people line up outside at 5.15 hoping to get in.  We got there even earlier and were about sixth in line!

post dinner coffee and lemon scone dessert

Back at the Sea Sprite, the upstairs guests were enjoying the sunset.  (Another advantage to being upstairs…a better view as the lower rooms are down below the lawn a bit.)

Sea Sprite sunset

looking south….

looking north

Thanks to daylight savings time, we had time for a post-dinner sunset walk down to the famous haystack rock and back.  The tide was way out.  It had only been a few days before that the horrible Japanese tsunami had sent us up to the hill above our house because of a related tsunami warning on our Peninsula.  The Cannon Beach weekend coincided with an internet tizzy over a “Supermoon” that supposedly would cause earthquakes and tsunamis all over the world.  Fortunately I’d read the debunking of that theory and was only somewhat anxious to be on the beach.

Cannon Beach low tide reflection

sunset and low tide

Haystack Rock

Haystack Rock

pink reflected

sunset walkers (At high tide, the water would be all around those rocks.)

Haystack Rock

Cannon Beach dusk

Soon after we got back to our room, the mist rolled in and we could not see the much-heralded super moon.

daytime walk

Sunday we walked from the Sea Sprite in the Tolovana neighbourhood north to Cannon Beach downtown and back. I recalled when Carol and I had last visited the Sylvia Beach, aches and pains prevented me from walking very well on the beach.  A couple of years later, I felt several years younger and had no troubles with the walk of, surely, a few miles.  Maybe that’s the difference in taking a spring or autumn trip….But no, I’d created my whole new garden over the winter so had not exactly rested up.

Carol and the rocks

I found it interesting to see willows growing right on the dunes.

Walking back to Tolovana

The downtown Cannon Beach gardens, usually wonderful, did not inspire me to take any photos on this trip.  Springtime seemed delayed in 2010.  However, dare I say it, I thought my Long Beach gardens looked better than Cannon Beach.  I would rarely get to crow about that because Cannon Beach is famed for its landscaping.

In the Sea Sprite garden (which I had the urge to mulch!) lived bunnies….They also visited outside our room.  We were smitten with the bunny family, but when I posted the photos to Facebook my dear gardening friend Sheila was not equally moved.  Her garden is bunny-plagued so she prefers to think of them as rodents (less cute and fuzzy in the battle for garden rights).

Sea Sprite bunnies

I love to go on trips with Carol or Mary because dining out is always a priority.  On Saturday night we ate at Newman’s at 988, a restaurant in a lovely old house, said to be the “chef’s night out” place in Cannon Beach.

inside Newman’s at 988

dinner at Newman’s

I had the four course Chef’s dinner; Carol had lobster raviola.  The soup was smoked tomato.  The dessert: scones, which seemed to be the featured dessert of the week because of St. Patrick’s Day.  My review:  It was tasty, and expensive, and I like our local Depot and Pelicano better.

adult and juvenile seagulls

The begging seagulls outside our window bade us farewell the next morning.  We decided we would definitely like to stay at the Sea Sprite (upstairs!) again, although I also have a craving to find the perfect, kind of quirky, quiet lodging with a view in downtown Cannon Beach.  We are both comfortable someplace not to fancy (which is why we had decided against staying at the trés upscale Stephanie Inn).

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