Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘heaths and heathers’

 Saturday, 16 July 2016

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties present:

aberdeen

garden eight: “Painting with Plants”

DSC04812

The last garden we toured was just a block from the two gardening neighbours.  It is always so nice (although not always possible, of course) when tour gardens are close together.

DSC03431

Walking one block over; I wondered if this might be the next garden.


looking down the side street

looking down the side street

DSC03430

I could see from the clock on the porch that we were going to be done with tour on time (4 PM).

I could see from the clock on the porch that we were going to be done with tour on time (4 PM).  You can see to the left where the garden changes from lawn to bark.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

DSC04729

Yes, this was indeed the tour garden.

Yes, this was indeed the tour garden.


DSC03390

I like what I see from the outside.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

DSC03391

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

DSC03392

DSC03394

The lots to one side of the house are "painted with plants".

The lots to one side of the house are “painted with plants”.


DSC03397

Who needs a sunny day when you have colour like this? (I love gold foliage.)


looking back at the house

looking back at the house


DSC03399

sweeps of vibrant color from foliage


a little sit spot

a little sit spot


Three extra city lots to garden on!

Three extra city lots to garden on!


You can see how the bark will fade to brown as it ages.

You can see how the bark will fade to brown as it ages.


an outdoor pavilion

a fireplace pavilion

DSC03406

Note the window frames for the back wall of the pavilion.

Note the window frames for the back wall of the pavilion.

DSC03409

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


garden shed at the far side of the property

garden shed at the far side of the property

DSC03404

I was smitten with the heathers in this landscape.  Or are the ones that drew my ardent admiration heaths rather than heathers?  I read up on it and am still confused.  I must completely rethink my opinion about heathers.  All this time, I have been bored by the flattish winter blooming ones of dull white and off pink.  These spiky airy lovely plants are a different look entirely.

Heath or heather, that white flowering plant is all spiky and I like spikes.

Heath or heather, that white flowering plant is all spiky and I like spikes.


outside a "reading room"

outside the “reading room”


Inside, a peaceful retreat (Allan's photo)

Inside, a peaceful retreat (Allan’s photo)

DSC03411

DSC03415

DSC03412

DSC03413

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

DSC03414

DSC03416

From comments I overheard from tour guests, the plantings in this garden have dramatically expanded since the last time it was on the tour.  I would love to see it in five more years with even more plants added.  I envy the amount of space left to plant in.  No walking around with a plant you shouldn’t have bought because there is no more room!

Below the reading room, an orchard (Allan's photo)

Below the reading room, an orchard (Allan’s photo)

DSC03417

At the edge of the upper garden, the tops of trees below show the dramatic drop off where 95 tons of boulders and many loads of soil created a flat terrace.

tree tops from the garden area below

tree tops from the garden area below


the patio created by the boulder wall

the patio created by the boulder wall


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

DSC03421

the lawn below the house

the lawn below the house

It was difficult to get a photo of this effect, but I overheard that the boardwalk that goes all around this big rectangular area is meant to be a photo frame.

Allan on the lower boardwalk

Allan on the lower boardwalk


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


I have always like heathers (and heaths) planted on a slope. This one will look stunning.

I have always like heathers (and heaths) when they are planted on a slope. This one will look increasingly stunning.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


avoiding the railing-less stairs

avoiding the railing-less stairs


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Most of the garden was easily accessible with paved walkways.

Most of the garden was easily accessible with paved walkways.

DSC03428

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan went down to the lowest part of the garden and took some photos for me to peruse:

DSC04762

gold and purple….heath or heather…I want it!

DSC04763

DSC04750

DSC04751

DSC04756

boulder wall and the lower part of the orchard

boulder wall and the lower part of the orchard

DSC04760

the lowest level of the garden

the lowest level of the garden

Before our departure, we filled out a little survey that had been handed out asking what we thought of the tour, and deposited it in a box on the patio.  I wrote in the comments that eight out of eight gardens had been excellent.  I can’t remember ever being on a garden tour (and I have been on many) where I so much liked every single garden on offer.  Each was different, interesting, with plant diversity, perfect grooming, innovative ideas, and sustainable gardening practices.  Not one felt ostentatious or like the design and work had just been hired out.

Several of the members of the Master Gardener group that puts on this tour had assured me that it is their standard to have a tour this good every year.  I know it is going to be a top priority for me to attend it next year.  If only I could go back in time, I would love to have attended last year’s.

Tonight: a bonus post of our evening in Aberdeen.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Touring on Study Weekend, hosted by Willamette Valley Hardy Plant Group

The garden we almost skipped due to time factors ended up being the one I most wished was my own.  It was only eight years old in 2008, on 2.5 acres, with “a perennial garden, heath and heather beds, lavender grid, formal vegetable garden and orchard, antique apple orchard, meadow, and creek garden”.

First we walked up the drive because we saw a blessed sight: a sanican!  (Thank you, Bryan and Cassandra Barrett or the Willamette Valley Hardy Plant Group!)  Just past there was this old barn with chickens.

From there we could see a wide rustic path to the unpretentious house…and the beautiful veg patch.

vegetable garden

Over the informally arranged and clearly productive veg garden we glimpsed glorious flowers.

an enticing glimpse

A gravel scree lay between us and the house and garden beds into which we were eager to wade.

scree garden

 For a little while I’ll just let the plants around the house do the talking.

We could see through the lattice a glimpse of the orchard and field beyond:

…and stepping through an opening between the garden areas we looked back at the beds we had just toured.  Then we saw the sloping field.  I am not a big fan of heather in gardens and have never seen it used with complete RIGHTness anywhere other than the natural hills of Scotland and the Bronte Moors until I saw this:

The heaths and heather slope segued into the “lavender grid” and then a wild meadow; of course, we had to wander down and walk through it.  I doubt either of us made many comments because we were in awe.

The mown meadow path led us back up to more gardens around the house.

I’d love to have a sculpture like the one below with a passage from a gardening book on the pages.

Rustic steps led back up into the house gardens.

We looked back at the gardens between us and the meadows, bright with colour even on a grey day.

As we explored the front garden we saw the house we saw the house looked much more old fashioned and bungalow style than it did in the back.

Around the side of the house we glimpsed the old barn where we’d begun.

Every bit of garden around the house was a perfect picture.

We crossed the road (a collection of conifers with various colours of needles protected the house from the road) to the newer garden that the Barrets were developing along the creek.

We meandered back to the deck behind the house.  I loved the fact that the deck needed repair.  Clearly the money was going to the best place:  Into the garden.

The final touch of perfection: The most attractive rain barrel I had ever seen, imported from England:

Tour time was over and back we went to Sheila’s home and garden which deserves an entry of its own.

Read Full Post »