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Posts Tagged ‘Heirloom Roses’

Monday, 28 March 2016

I awoke early (for me) and could not go back to sleep till I had called the neurologist’s office in Aberdeen.  His office person put him on the phone within thirty seconds; my timing had been perfect, and he had wonderful news: The MRI and ultrasound showed no tumor, no strokes, nothing at all bad in the old brain, and my carotid arteries are in perfect tune.  My happiness was not even slightly tempered by my chronic “dizziness” (lightheadedness, not the spinning of vertigo)  being still a mystery.  I still have the occasional very weird feeling of my right side head and right side foot BOTH feeling whirly inside at the same time.  I thought I’d mention that in case a reader says “Oh, I have that, too, and it’s _____”.

Next week brings another scary medical test (I fear not the test itself but the potential for bad results) but for now, I am free this week to get lots of work done without having to make another trip to the wise and highly rated doc two hours away in Aberdeen.

My plan today had been to weed the Ilwaco boatyard garden.  Perhaps my burst of happy energy changed my mind and sent us to the beach approach garden instead.  My conscious thought was that it is better to do beach approach day, boatyard day, then back to beach approach because the approach garden is SO tedious that it’s better to not do it two days in a row.

At the post office, we got a great big box from Heirloom Old Garden Roses, too big to haul around all day so we went back home to unpack it.

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Allan’s photo: boxes inside boxes


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Allan’s photo: Jude the Obscure, Westmoreland, Mme Alfred Carriere

Inside were three excellent roses, including Jude the Obscure which I’ve long admired at Klipsan Beach Cottages…but not Mary Rose, the one I had especially meant to order for Kitty Mary’s grave.  I think I got distracted by climbers and forgot to tick the correct box.  Good thing I know nothing is wrong in my brain or I would wonder.  I called them up and ordered Mary Rose to come all on her own.  Heirloom Roses used to sell the tiniest of roses, all of which grew and did well for me. Over the years, something has changed and now they offer gallon size, as you can see.  They sell ONLY own root roses, about which they say:

Heirloom Roses does no budding or grafting at our nursery.  Unlike the majority of rose growers in the US. we sell only own-root, virus-free roses. Our roses are first-year cuttings that are grown from a leaf cutting taken from a “mother” or “stock” plant. Own-root roses may be smaller when purchased, but quickly catch up to grafted roses (which are usually sold as two-year-old plants).

  • Own-root roses are hardier than grafted roses because their crown has not been weakened.  The bud union of a grafted rose is vulnerable to cold and can be easily damaged during a hard winter.
  • Own-root roses come back true to variety if frozen to the ground, because they have their own root system. Winter kill is less likely.
  • Own-root roses are shaplier because they send up shoots from their own roots. This creates a fuller plant over time, which adds to increased vigor, bloom, and life expectancy.
  • Own-root roses have no rootstock suckers, meaning more energy is sent to the main plant.

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

I look forward to having Jude the Obscure in my own garden and, by next week, Mary Rose. I was, in fact, with Mary Caldwell of Klipsan Beach the day she bought her Jude the Obscure in person at Heirloom Roses.

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Onyx watching the unpacking of roses


onyxacanthus

Onyx’s eyes are similar in hue to Acanthus Hollard’s Gold.

Long Beach

We picked up one of my grandma’s scrapbooks which had been on loan to our friend Wendy at Beach Dog.

gunneras

Beach Dog’s impressive pair of gunneras.

Then, to work, first with some deadheading at City Hall….

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city hall north side


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Just west of city hall: Starvation Alley organic cranberry juice tasting room

…and then  out to the Bolstad beach approach garden to weed one more of the thirteen sections..

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the long narrow Bolstad garden


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before: 12:15 PM


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before (Allan’s photo)


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before (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo


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Someone had left these, perhaps in excitement at approaching the beach. (Allan’s photo)


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almost done, with a big mess to clean up (Allan’s photo)


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a difficult and thorny job (Allan’s photo)


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cleaning up (Allan’s photo)


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after, 5:45 PM, weeds out, roses beaten back from the edges


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sweeping up

Today the job still took ages, 5.5 hours (11 total) and yet felt less daunting, perhaps because of the good news I had had in the morning.

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after

After dumping the debris at city works, we planted three plants at Fifth Street Park, and a start of a white geranium macrorrhizum at the mortuary garden.

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Fifth Street: One variegated symphytum, welcome to run all around this corner (Allan’s photo)


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lavenders into planters


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Lavender ‘Madrid Blue’ which I pray does not get stolen (with Viola ‘Etain’, Allan’s photo

The air had become chilly, changing my mind about planting some seeds at the Ilwaco Community Building.

The Depot Restaurant

was an appealing place to warm up with a good meal.

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Tulip ‘Gavota’ looks good against brick and against red paint.


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Depot garden (Allan’s photo)


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Depot garden (Allan’s photo)


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in the Depot, at the end of the bar


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Depot Restaurant wilted spinach salads

 

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halibut on sausage gumbo with basmati rice


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sunsetting at the end of the Seaview approach road, past the Sou’wester (left)


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Allan deadheaded a window box on his way out.

Ilwaco

We paused in the big port parking lot to admire the southeastern sky over the port buildings.

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Allan’s photo


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Allan’s photo


  A guest photo:  

Our friend Michelle drove across the four mile long Astoria-Megler Bridge today and posted this photo of how the clouds were so low that vehicles were above the clouds on the Columbia River.  Re the bridge, she writes: “I’ve grown used to it. 8 years ago, I held my breath all the way over.”

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photo by Michelle Zinkevicz

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1995 (age 70):

March 28:  Planted all begonias in pots and in trays etc.  I have to figure out a new way to label bulbs in color etc.  The ones I marked last fall are all mixed up.  Next job will be to check over dahlia bulbs to see which ones made it through the winter.

1998 (age 73):

March 28:  2:00-5:00  It was cold today so I stayed in until 2:00.  Then the sun came out.  I went out planning to weed in front but worked in strawberries instead.  Last week I decided it will be easier just to dig the berry plants because most need to be divided so I dug plants out of one row.  I can’t decide if I should leave area empty until Ron comes to till or whether to replant berry rows as soon as I can.

 

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I procrastinated all morning, but there were reasons: catching up on the blog, and bad (ish) weather. Maybe I was sick of planting plants, but I had many to plant here and needed to get started. Finally I got myself outside with the memory that I had very much been looking forward to another go-round of pulling Impatiens (jewelweed, touch me not) out of the front border.

2:38 PM, front garden

2:38 PM, front garden

after editing

after editing

I need to learn to mark the spot where I take my before photo to make the results more clear!

I was amazed at how big this cardoon has gotten since last time I noticed:

humungous

humungous

Another task that I had been longing to do in the back garden was to use the hedge shears to lop back the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’. It gets so lush that it flops open. Last year for the garden tour I had to use all sorts of short bits of rebar to hold it up and make it halfway decent looking. By chopping it at this time of year, the plant stays more compact and still flowers, but with smaller, not so heavy flowers so it does not fall open. I recently did the same to all the ‘Autumn Joy’ in the Long Beach planters.

before

before

Unfortunately, when I tried to use the hedge shears my right arm protested mightily. It has been plaguing me for two days….”planter’s arm”, apparently. Allan stepped in and did the job.

after (but not picked up yet)

after (but not picked up yet)

The creeping sorrel in the raspberry patch had suddenly leaped to almost as tall as the berry canes.

Yikes!  When did that happen?

Yikes! When did that happen?

After running some errands of his own, Allan stepped in here also and did a wonderful job.

Thank you, Allan!

Thank you, Allan!

By then, I was heavily into planting annuals and perennials. I told myself I would get at least thirty plants planted before I let myself get back to the enjoyable task of weeding, and I am sure I surpassed that number. While planting on the west side of the house, I kept catching myself thinking “Nora and Devery will like these.” (Devery was Nora’s wonderful caregiver.) Then I would remember with a huge pang that Nora was gone. I had made sure over the last two years that the west side garden that she can, I mean could, see from her front window was vibrant with bright colour.

Tomorrow planting hell will surely conclude, because all I have left to plant are these:

holding area on east side of house

holding area on east side of house

(Not as bad as it looks, because some of those are in permanent pots. Probably about ten plants there that need planting.)

And this line up on the path to Allan’s shop:

mostly cosmos and painted sage, and some of the cosmos will go to Ann's on Tuesday.

mostly cosmos and painted sage, and some of the cosmos will go to Ann’s on Tuesday.

Then there are some tomatoes in the greenhouse, and I could have done them during the blustery morning inside the greenhouse, had I remembered them!

tomatoes

tomatoes

Oh, drat, and these also, which I almost forgot were waiting next to the greenhouse.

more cosmos.  I like them.

more cosmos. I like them.

So tomorrow will be the planting of the six packs of cosmos all over this garden.

The relatively small amount of cosmos that will be left for Ann, along with two Penstemon ‘Burgundy Brew’ for two wine connoisseur clients, two Rosemary for Chef Michael at the Depot, and …oh….I should get some blue and white painted sage for the mayor’s garden….Those plants that are left are not enough to constitute a hellish amount of planting. So I am fervently hoping that by eight PM tomorrow I can declare annuals planting hell over for 2013.

My right arm will be grateful.

At almost dusk, I took a walk around the garden to photograph plants that had caught my eye during an afternoon of planting. (Like most gardeners do, I walk round and round with a perennial pot in hand trying to figure out where it could go.)

Clematis on east fence...most blooming on my neighbours' side!

Clematis on east fence…most blooming on my neighbours’ side!

another east fence clematis

another east fence clematis

Siberian Iris

Siberian Iris

Smokey toured with me.

Smokey toured with me.

shade bed

shade bed

I so look forward to a satisfying weeding of that shade bed. It was too windy to weed this close to the bogsy wood today, especially since the alder right over the shade bed has died! It is a great snag for birds but I fear a big branch breaking off in wind so I stay out from under on days like today, with gusts of 26 mph!

ominous

ominous

I wonder why this one alder died. I did not pile soil deeply around its base or anything bad… I skittered back to safety away from the tree.

west border

west border (Hi, Mary’s red boat shed!)

a new rose by the west gate

a new rose by the west gate

another new rose

another new rose (and…horsetail)

The new roses are from Heirloom roses, and I am going to sort out their names later this year!

I do NOT remember planting these iris.  I think they are too big to be from the ones Kathleen Sayce gave to me and Ann....

I do NOT remember planting these iris. I think they are too big to be from the ones Kathleen Sayce gave to me and Ann….

view down west path to the bogsy wood edge

view down west path to the bogsy wood edge

In the front garden, some truly accidental colour matching pleased my eye.

Imagine this astrantia...

Imagine this astrantia…

when this clematis that is behind it gets big enough to show above the astrantia.

when this clematis that is behind it gets big enough to show above the astrantia.

And the Allium bulgaricum also matches!

And the Allium bulgaricum also matches!

In closing, Allan’s excellent garden in the dusk…

perfectly weeded

perfectly weeded

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In May or June, I took a road trip with Mary from Klipsan Beach Cottages.

Joy Creek Nursery, Scappoose

We stopped at Joy Creek Nursery, of course…

Joy Creek 2001

Joy Creek 2001

Joy Creek border

Joy Creek border

Lake Oswego (and a sad story)

Mary and I stayed at Sharon’s new townhome on the edge of Lake Oswego near Portland. In her divorce case, her  soon to be ex claimed the arbour Robert had built for her, on commission, purchased with her money. It was attached to the house porch railing with two screws, which made it part of the household.  She had to buy it from him for the same price that she had originally paid to Robert, so she bought it twice!   (I had remembered Robert having to build her a second one, but no, she just repurchased the original.)  She was still sad about losing the wonderful garden we had made at her former home on the bay.  Her new rented home had little space for gardening. I had testified at the trial that all the plants had been purchased with Sharon’s money, so she was allowed to take some, most of which took refuge in my garden and the gardens at China Beach Retreat and Klipsan Beach Cottages.  The ex had then sprayed the garden area (still with many plants and bulbs) with Casaron and then covered the area with landscape fabric and river rock.  Goodbye to all the lilies, tulips, alliums and narcissi.

Sharon's double price arbour

Sharon’s double price arbour

Lucy Hardiman’s garden in Portland

Sharon wanted to show me the Hawthorne neighbourhood in Portland so the three of us went there for an afternoon.   I remembered that Lucy Hardiman (from whom Sharon and I had taken three workshops over the past couple of years) lived near there, and we found her address through the phone book.   Such garden celebrity stalkers we were!  Sharon, Mary and I were nosing around Lucy’s well known sidewalk garden (she calls it a “garden approach” rather than “a garden retreat”) when she saw us from her upstairs window and invited us in.

Below, we walked around the side of the house…

entering the garden

entering the garden

and the garden is revealed.

Lucy's back garden

Lucy’s back garden

looking to the house from the arbour

looking to the house from the arbour

Lucy had a VERY sweet dog.   You may be disappointed if you click to enlarge the photo;  unfortunately, my scans appear to be small.

containers in Lucy's garden

containers in Lucy’s garden

Lucy had begun to make mosaic pieces.

Lucy had begun to make mosaic pieces.

mosaic table

mosaic table

I was very taken with the shrub (below) but even though I have bought a couple since then, I have never managed to grow it successfully.  When I returned to tour Lucy’s garden some years later, the shrub was gone so it may be rather tender.

Cestrum

Cestrum

bronze fennel....now called by some a noxious weed

bronze fennel….now called by some a noxious weed because it reseeds so freely

The tiny paths in the back of her garden made me feel better about the little tiny path running up the north side of mine.

tiny secret path

tiny secret path

pots

pots on Lucy’s deck

We lingered by the beautiful sidewalk garden atop a stone wall.   Ludy often tells in lectures how she and Fred saved for years to have the wall done.

atop the wall

atop the wall

atop the wall: Origanum rotundifolium (ornamental oregano)

atop the wall: Origanum rotundifolium (ornamental oregano)

In one of her garden show slide presentations, I had first seen, growing on this wall, Salvia viridis (painted sage) and Cerinthe purpurascens, still two of my three favourite annuals.  (Number three?  Cosmos, of course!)

The centerpiece of the wall is the famous heart that reaches out to passersby.  It is overgrown with a plant in this photo:

Lucy's wall

Lucy’s wall

Another favourite Lucy story of mine is how she would sit above the wall in a hidden area behind some shrubs and listen to people’s comments about the garden.

Heirloom Roses in St. Paul

On the second day of our road trip we went to Heirloom Roses, in St Paul, Oregon, where the front arbour was more thickly covered than on my previous visits.

shop entrance

shop entrance, with cat

Below:  I think the pillar rose is Eden, which Mary of KBC fell for hard but which never grew well for us at the beach.  The flowers are so full that in our damp air, they browned off before opening fully.

Eden

Eden? and a clematis

at Heirloom Roses

at Heirloom Roses

somebody's roses!

roses

roses trained and free

roses trained and free

Ferguson’s Fragrant Nursery

We also went to the wonderful Ferguson’s Fragrant Nursery nearby.

at Ferguson's

at Ferguson’s

2001 was the year that Cathy Peterson, who wrote a weekly gardening column for the Daily Astorian, asked me if I would organize a garden tour for her and some friends, and I did.  Such fun it was!   My garden was on it, and Sheila helped me get it weeded and cleaned up in time.  I also featured Seagarden,  Patti’s garden, The Shelburne, Jo’s Long Beach garden, and Klipsan Beach Cottages.  I have no photos to show that it ever happened, but I do recall that we all had dinner on the deck at the Depot restaurant afterwards, and Cathy bought my dinner as a thank you.   I believe she wrote something about it, and it would be so wonderful if I could find it.  Why is my file cabinet of gardening articles no longer in alphabetical order?  Next winter’s project!

A few years later, Cathy retired from writing for the Astorian.  Someone else took over “In the Garden” and wrote two excellent columns, and then the Astorian dropped the column altogether.  I still miss it.  A lot.

 

A digression:  The Depot restaurant had been bought the year before by two young locals and had turned into a very good restaurant.  Before, during the year 1993 when we lived at the Sou’wester, it had been a noisy tavern with much drunken whooping every night at closing time.  Then it had sat vacant for several years.   We were so happy to see it revived.   It became the restaurant we know today (our favourite!) after Michael Lalewicz and Nancy Gorshe bought it a few years later.   Below, the Depot in 2000:

The Depot, the previous year (2000)

The Depot well before it had its north side gardens.

The Depot well before it had its north side gardens.

Below, in 2000:  The new garden being created by the new owners, Nat and Domique, and by Dirk Sweringen of the nearby English nursery. I ended up pruning these ornamental grasses every spring. They make a great rustling privacy screen for the outdoor deck.

Depot ornamental grasses, 2000

Depot ornamental grasses, 2000

 

 

 

 

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In June, 1999, Sharon and I and Mary from Klipsan Beach Cottages went to see the amazing rose gardens at Heirloom Old Garden Roses in St. Paul, Oregon, and also to Joy Creek Nursery in Scappoose. We were on a buying trip for Sharon’s garden and Klipsan Beach Cottages.

Heirloom Roses in 1999

I had been to Heirloom once before with Mike Kitzman on a buying trip for the Fifth Street Park in Long Beach, but it had been before the roses were in bloom.  This time, I got to see the rose garden at its peak.

Heirloom Roses

Heirloom Roses

arbour near the shop

arbour near the shop

banks of roses

banks of roses

Fourth of July' rose at Heirloom Roses.

Fourth of July’ rose at Heirloom Roses.

To this day, roses ‘Polka’ and ‘Jude the Obscure’ from Heirloom Roses are showpieces of the Klipsan Beach Cottages gardens.

Joy Creek Nursery

My visit with Sharon and Mary was my first of many yearly visits to Joy Creek.

Robert and I worked in the spring and summer for a millionaire named George Fiske-Hammond III, whose meticulously designed small garden in Seaview I wish I had photographed. The second time I went to Joy Creek Nursery, shown here, was on a buying trip with him, during which he generously lavished me with plants and a good lunch.

Joy Creek 1999

Joy Creek 1999

Joy Creek 1999

Joy Creek 1999

The George job would all come to grief later in the year when George, who was in Al Anon, had a deep rift with Robert over an incident where he felt Robert was argumentative. When he wanted me to keep working for him and not allow Robert to be there, I resigned.  He encountered me at the grocery store and lamented “You were a huge disappointment to me.”  If I had NOT resigned, my home life would have become even more difficult.

Seaside

On the way to buy plants at Raintree Nursery in Seaside, Oregon (now Seven D’s), we would take a detour to admire the streetside plantings there.  That is a detour that Allan and I take years later.

Seaside, Oregon

Seaside, Oregon

Cannon Beach

Here is where my memory fails, because in  my photo albums I have TWO sets of photos for Haystack Rock summer education program workshops with Ann Lovejoy and Lucy Hardiman.  Did I really attend these two years in a row with my friend Sharon?  I do know that 1998 was the garden tour one, which I have already written about.  But apparently in ’99 there was another one, the garden design focused one (so what was the ’98 one?)   The second day of the ’99 workshop, Lucy Hardiman’s spouse gave a workshop on building copper garden structures, and I have photos to prove it.

Fred Hardiman

Fred Hardiman

Fred's copper spiral

Fred’s copper spiral

copper pipe arbour

copper pipe arbour

Below, Fred cutting the copper with a special cutter, which I simply could not get the hang of, thus I was hampered in trying to make things like this.

cutter

cutter

Fred cutting the copper with a special cutter, which I simply could not get the hang of, thus I was hampered in trying to make things like this.

making a trellis

making a trellis

If I could only operate the pipe cutter thing, I could make things like this!

On lunch breaks, Sharon and I took walks through Cannon Beach and admired the gardens. I think 80% of each commercial property’s surrounds have to be landscaped by law there. Or something like that.  The effects are marvelous.

 Cannon Beach garden

And we walked through the Presidential blocks of Cannon Beach where I photographed my favourite little house. It’s almost always the tiny ones that catch my eye.

a favourite sight in Cannon Beach

a favourite sight in Cannon Beach

Even thought I have claimed that during the ’98 workshop, Sharon saved for me this Bubble and Flow sketch by Ann Lovejoy and gave it to me later as a gift, maybe that happened in 1999!  If I ever go through all my years of seminar and workshop notes, I might find out.

bubble and flow

bubble and flow

Joy Creek again

In fall of 1999, I took a design workshop with Sharon at Joy Creek Nursery;  Anne Lovejoy and Lucy Hardiman supervised the redesign of one of the display garden borders.  Below, some class members and the Joy Creek work crew (who RAN with wheelbarrows full of gravel and soil!) rework the border.

border redesign

border redesign

the new border being planted

the new border being planted

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

Joy Creek sculpture

Joy Creek sculpture

mesh and metal sculpture

mesh and metal sculpture

sculpture

sculpture

sculpture

sculpture

Had a digital camera been at hand in 1999, I am sure I would have more photos, including pictures of Lucy and Ann teaching.  I was kind of shy of taking photos of them….would not be so today!

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