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Posts Tagged ‘hillside garden’

Friday, 22 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

At an hour when we are usually sound asleep, Allan went to the third floor of the Mcmenamins Anderson School Hotel to get us coffee from the principal’s office (which is a bar in the evenings).

at the Anderson School

Alison, author of the Bonney Lassie blog, met us at the hotel in the early morning and did the driving.  This was wonderful for us, as she is used to city driving, and the satnav system on her Prius makes ours look like something prehistoric.  By sitting in the back seat, I did not see all of the scary traffic and had a much easier day (as did Allan).  You can read her excellent post about some foliage combinations that she liked (and didn’t) right here.

garden one: Coney Hillside Retreat in Woodinville

I always prefer to see gardens made by the garden owners.  One of my favourite gardening quotations is this: Nobody can design a more satisying garden for you than the one that you think out for yourself. It could take years, but in the doing of it, you should be in paradise. -Mary Keen

the path to the garden

on the right, partway up

A lot of the gardens had metal alliums of different sorts.  I want some!

the bocce ball court

Allan’s photo

a comfy place to watch the games

on the left across from the court

up the hill (Allan’s photo)

stairs going up and an outdoor fireplace

I kept to the gradually rising path rather than the stairs.

at the front terrace (Allan’s photo)

one level up, the giant checkerboard

the front terrace and wine cellar

Allan’s photo

I walked across the front of the house and looked down the stairs…

front patio

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

and entered the garden the back way, behind the greenhouse.

Allan’s photo

I joined another tour guest in liking this ladder idea; I had seen it before but, like many ideas, had forgotten it.

in the greenhouse (Allan’s photo)

The kind owner was giving away jade plants. (Allan’s photo)

wine bottle planters (Allan’s photo)

the hillside of the back garden

path to the greenhouse

the pond, showing the waterfall stairs

enormous koi

We admired the big rock slab for fish to hide under.

Allan’s photo

me and Alison by the pond

 

one of the sit spots

Allan went up the stairs by the waterfall.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

at the head of the waterfall (Allan’s photo)

 

on the hillside

stairs to the deck

With brace and cane, I can no longer do stairs without railings; I never know when my balance will just give out.  Even though I can usually find ways to view the gardens, I am grateful that Allan is available to fetch me a glass of lemonade.

Allan’s photo

another ladder shelf

I left the back garden at the end most tour guests would have entered by, and looked back to appreciate their first impression.

another foliar view as I departed

on the way back down (Allan’s photo)

a good plant tag (Allan’s photo, of a plant he admired)

the petasites in question (Allan’s photo)

I don’t think we could grow petasites because of snails.

I was so absorbed in looking at the garden that I did not hear the music wafting about.  Allan and Alison assured me it was there.

You can enjoy another walk through this peaceful garden, three years ago, in the Linda Letters blog, right here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden four: a garden recreated after the 2007 storm

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entering from the lower driveway

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Allan’s photo.  Garden owner John is above.

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Liatrus (Allan’s photo)

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common name Kansas Gayfeather (Allan’s photo)

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Stone steps lead up through the garden.

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a patio surrounded by garden

By now, we were touring at the same time as our friend Pam Fleming, the Seaside, Oregon city gardener (who had brought us some plants from Xera Plants in Portland, to my delight!).  We were stumped at the identity of the shrub in the photo below. We and the owner had some discussion with the garden’s owner and decided it is a Rhus (sumac).

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John, Pam and I

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It will have bright berries later.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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looking back at the stone path

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a bright salvia at the base of steps going to a higher level

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looking down at the brick patio

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the sunroom

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the patio and sunroom

I love that the garden owner had put out a selection of her favourite gardening books.

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I wish I had carefully photographed this entire article:

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Oh, but look! I found it online, and you can read it here.

(I usually remove garden owners’ surnames from tour posts; it’s ok if the names are in a newspaper article.)

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at the edge of the patio

Jan said her daisies looked perfect until our recent 95 degree day.

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golden foliage by the house

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the delectable sunroom

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Columbia River view from the front yard

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I spy Pam Fleming talking with garden owner John far below.

I saw some other guests, too, and pointed them out to Allan who was much closer to them.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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The deer decided to go to the Astoria Column road. (Allan’s photo)

By now, I had made my way down to the lower level.

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a woodsier garden below

The Astoria regatta parade had finished, resulting in a steady stream of traffic up the hill.  I figured out an alternate route to get back to the flatland for the last two gardens.

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looking back at the tour house after successfully crossing the road

Next: a delightful small semi-public garden

 

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Saturday 12 August 2017

Because we are fortunate to know Jessica, the gardener for the excellent third garden on the Astoria garden tour, we were given permission to look at her garden project across the street.  The owners had said it could be on the tour were it not for the difficult accessibility of steep front stairs.  Jessica said it is an interesting challenge to mulch the front slope.

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Allan’s photo from across the street

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the curbside meadow

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looking across at the garden we just toured

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Allan’s photo

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You can get one of these signs for $25 from The Xerces Society.

I could not face coming back down the steep stairs which are the only access to the garden.  I asked Allan to go up and take photos to give me an armchair tour of the garden.

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Allan’s photos:

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More bonus photos of gardens nearby, all by Allan:

 

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Daliahs line a driveway nearby.

You may recall that the official tour garden we had just seen was called the “Bye bye deer” garden, having been fenced to keep them out.

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at the next intersection uphill

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The low stone wall was no barrier.

The parking strip garden that the deer passed by:

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a bench nearby:

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a bench nearby, with dandelions

Here are some words of wisdom about a dandelion garden’s benefit to pollinators.

Next: back to the official Astoria garden tour!

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Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden two: a hillside garden

I try to remove the owner’s surname and address from the program, which leads to some awkward deletions at times.  I want you to see, though, how thoroughly the program covers the garden features.  Also, take note of how the garden designers and workers are given credit throughout the program.  This is unusual and much appreciated.

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Allan’s photo

 

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Note the rubber ducks.  The box is the Little Free Library, making it clear people are welcome to walk into the garden. There is even a drinking fountain on the left by the chairs, and it works.

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Allan’s photo

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The  public drinking fountain is this side of the free library on the left.

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Little Free Library

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Allan’s photo

Allan found a garden map and plant list on the lower patio.  I completely missed it.

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Looking up; the beloved banana is to the right.

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rocks along the sidewalk

I carefully plotted out a knee brace and cane and sore foot accessible path.  I figured I could go up the gravel path and come to a resting point on a terrace halfway up, where I could see a woman standing, and then walk back down the sidewalk on the north side of the garden.

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getting closer

When I got up next to the middle terrace, I ran into a problem that could be so easily solved. I knew I could not do the railingless stone steps.

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railingless stone steps going in two directions (Allan’s photo)

To my right was a jumble of rocks between me and the lawn.  I couldn’t go back down the slippy gravel, couldn’t go up the steps, and couldn’t step over the low pile of rocks to the lawn.  I was stuck. My only solution was the impolite move of stepping into the garden and then getting a hand from the woman on the lawn to get me over the rocks.  That makes them sound mountainous.  They were low, but with no way through for a disabled person.  Just moving one rock to make a clear passage to the middle terrace would be better for old folks.  There’s nothing like navigating a garden with a cane to make one think of easy fixes like that.

 

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safely over the rocks and standing on the terrace

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Columbia River view looking northeast from the middle terrace

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Allan telephotoed the view.  You can see Tongue Point.

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looking up

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and down

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Someone asked for an ID on the Liatris (Kansas Gayfeather)

I walked over to the north sidewalk and was easily able to access the upper lawn terrace and look down from the top of the stone steps.

 

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looking down

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Allan’s photo, looking up. The third step up is where to turn right and take more steps down to the grass of the middle terrace.

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Deer have browsed as high as they can reach.

The patio behind the arborvitae is this garden’s garden retreat.  Garden writer and designer Lucy Hardiman would call the welcoming hillside garden a “garden advance”.

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the patio (Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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looking down to the middle terrace (Allan’s photo)

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the view from on high

Another garden guest was able to make her way up the north sidewalk to the upper garden.

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attaining the middle terrace (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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deer proofing (Allan’s photo)

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looking from the north sidewalk to the lower patio

I appreciate the generosity of this grand gift to the street.

Next: a garden by Jessica which was my favourite of the tour.

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Saturday, 16 July 2016

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties present:

aberdeen

garden five:  “The Art of Taming a Hillside”

We got a taste of how much the hillside needed to be tamed as we approached this garden up a very steep narrow road, met at the top by other vehicles that had not been able to find parking and wanted to come down.  There was just one panicky scream from the passenger seat as we backed down the long narrow slope and found a parking spot two blocks away (and a slightly less steep incline to walk up).

the view as we walked along the street to the garden

the view as we walked along the one lane street to the garden.  The water is the Chehalis River.


narrow street, narrow sidewalk (Allan's photo)

narrow street, narrow sidewalk (Allan’s photo)


The slope we had to back down is steeper than it looks in this photo of Allan's.

The slope we had to back down is steeper than it looks in this photo of Allan’s.

Because I have recently decided not to use surnames in describing most gardens (for privacy reasons), this particular program description looks a bit funny after retouching:

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It was not until I began writing this post that I saw the mobility issues warning in the garden description.  I find it so difficult to focus on garden descriptions the day of a tour that I completely missed it.  My reading comprehension suffers because of eagerness to get into the garden.  (That’s why I think it is helpful to have a Facebook page or a newspaper article with descriptions and warnings…even maybe locations of nearest restrooms!…to peruse in advance of a tour, to help with planning one’s day.)

To anyone just joining this blog: I have a collapsed knee (which will be dealt with this winter) and some dizziness and balance issues AND acrophobia.  I will work through all of these to see a worthwhile garden and a warning, even if seen, would not have stopped me from trying.

Here I blithely go, not having noticed the big "mobility issues" warning.

Here I blithely go, not having noticed the big “mobility issues” warning.


arriving at last!

arriving at last!

my journey through the amazing hillside garden

Entering the garden, past the check in table: I look to my right. That doesn't really look like the path.

Entering the garden, past the check in table: I look to my right. That doesn’t really look like a path, more like I’d be walking in a garden bed.  It was a little more vertical than it looks in the photo.


to my left: a high quality shade bed

to my left:  shade bed with good plants


straight ahead

straight ahead


a bit further, to my right: The ivy is on a vertical hill.

a bit further, to my right: The ivy is on a vertical hill.


to my right, below: the spring run-off

to my right, below: the spring run-off


I dither for awhile about whether or not to go straight ahead. Allan goes onward; I decide to try another way.

I dither for awhile about whether or not to go straight ahead. Allan goes onward; I decide to try another way.


feeling doubtful

feeling doubtful, about to turn back

I needed to find a way UP that I was pretty sure I could also use to get back DOWN.

Okay...I am going this way after all. Hope it is a real path!

Okay…I am going this way after all. Hope it is a real path!


All righty, I got this far! Looking down on the greenhouse and the entry to the garden.

All righty, I got this far! Looking down on the greenhouse and the entry to the garden.


good plantings to keep me going

good plantings to keep me going


Now I am on a path that I know is legit.

Now I am on a path that I know is legit.


looking back after making it somewhat further.

looking back after making it somewhat further.


This is midlevel in the garden.

This is midlevel in the garden.


The terrace or plateau has room for several sit spots.

The terrace or plateau has room for several sit spots.


a large level terrace with paths and a patio

large level terrace with paths and a patio


well planted, intricate plant diversity

well planted, intricate plant diversity

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along the fence. I heard chickens that are in the neighbour's yard.

along the fence. I heard chickens that are in the neighbouring yard.


at the end of the fence walkway

at the end of the fence walkway


looking back

looking back


skilled and intricate construction at the base of the hill. Note the door to the right into the compost bin enclosure.

skilled and intricate construction at the base of the next hillside. Note the door to the right into the compost bin enclosure.  Behind the grate: water run-off from the spring.


water, same stream that appeared way below at the entrance to the garden.

water, same stream that appeared way below at the entrance to the garden.

I was astounded to see the brilliant way that the gardeners had solved the problem of an almost vertical hillside.  If only I had thought of this for the vertical clay hill that sat next to the front patio of my old garden—a planting problem that daunted me for 14 years.

My jaw dropped.

My jaw dropped. What a brilliant solution!


a collection of cool ferns and more

a collection of cool ferns and more

Steve, the garden owner, stood nearby as I paced back and forth, marveling.  “HOW?”  I asked him.  He told me he had driven rebar 8 feet (I think) into the hardpan to support this structure.

I just can't get enough of this.

I just can’t get enough of this.


He must lay a ladder against it to climb up and maintain it so well??

He must lay a ladder against it to climb up and maintain it so well??

I decides I had better figure out how in the world I was going to get back down to the street.  Maybe I could find a better way than the bark slope.  It was worrying me.

Looking through an arbour to a bridge that goes to the house.

Looking through an arbour to a bridge that goes to the house.


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by the bridge to the house


I scuttle across quickly.

I scuttle across quickly.


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view from the side porch of the house


Here are the stairs Allan came up. Hmmm.

Here are the stairs Allan came up. Hmmm. No……..

I decided I would go back down the bark-y slope…eventually.  Meanwhile, I went back to the amazing hillside planters.

On the way back: The lattice is decorated with china pieces.

On the way back: The lattice is decorated with teacup and saucer creations that I like so much.


Admiring the hill planting some more. Look: I saw people WAAAAY up top and was not sure how they got there.

Admiring the hill planting some more. Look: I saw people WAAAAY up top and was not sure how they got there.  WAY up over the stone wall is another path.


I see Impatiens omeiana and other cool plants to delight a collector.

I see Impatiens omeiana and other cool plants to delight a collector.


boxes spilling over with goodness

boxes spilling over with planty goodness

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I admired every detail, also postponing the inevitable trip back down the lower barky slope.  But then…Allan appeared and told me there was an alley up above!  Similar to the previous garden, I had a way out other than going back down.

looking up from the base of the planted boxes. Allan is up there, checking it out.

looking up from the base of the planted boxes. Allan is up there, checking it out.  There is a gate to the alley.

I found out that the upper deck ALSO had a gate to the alley.  The owner had told Allan that’s how they bring in their groceries.  Thinking about it, it would be a long grocery carry from the bottom, over the lower bridges and up the stairs.

last look at the central plateau

last look at the central plateau

I think I would have explored the many beds of the central plateau better if I had known I had an easy way out.  Now I would like to go back and peruse the plants more thoroughly.

looking at the garden stairs that might take me to the alley gate

looking at the garden stairs that might take me to the alley gate


probably not (Allan's photo)

probably not (Allan’s photo)

I crossed the bridge to the house again, climbed some enclosed stairs with a nice railing, and emerged onto the back deck.

I found my way to the top level to exit into the alleyway.

I found my way to the top level to exit into the alleyway.


one of those clacking crow fountains that I love.

one of those clacking crow fountains that I love.


not sure what, fire or water?

not sure what, fire or water?

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alongside the deck

alongside the deck


from the back gate, an easy way out

from the back gate, an easy way out

From the alley, I found the exterior gate that led to that mysterious path WAY above the wooden planters.

steps down to the center terrace

steps down to the center terrace


The path along the uppermost level. I would have been clutching that railing.

The path along the uppermost level. I would have been clutching that railing. Or maybe fainting.

The stream from the spring went underneath the alley. (I’ve since learned this is a one way city street, not an alley.)

across the alley: water from the spring

across the alley: water from the spring


Thus begins the water course that is diverted down through the levels of the garden.

Thus begins the water course that is diverted down through the levels of the garden.  I wonder if it flows dramatically in the winter or on rainy days?

Usually, I blend Allan’s and my photos together to describe a garden, even though we often walk through at a different pace and direction.  This particular garden was so complex and interesting and challenging to describe that I am going to let Allan’s photos tell their own story about his experience of the hillside.

Allan’s exploration of the astonishing hillside garden

entering from the street

entering from the street


next to the greenhouse

next to the greenhouse


We have a birdhouse just like that from Ilwaco Saturday Market!

We have a birdhouse just like that from Ilwaco Saturday Market!

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I am walking away; Allan goes on up the path and stairs.

I am walking away to try a different climb; Allan goes on up the path and stairs.


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the way up


looking back

looking back

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another explorer

another explorer


Many ladders must be necessary for this garden.

Many ladders and scaffolding might be necessary for this garden (and, owner Steve said, painting the house).


looking down

looking down


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Top of photo: You can see the very tiptop walkway with the railing along the fence.

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beds next to the deck


the upper deck

the upper deck

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window low down by the deck

window low down by the deck


in a workshop window next to the deck: meticulous

in a workshop window next to the deck: meticulous

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looking down into the garden. I’m at the base of the wooden planters on the steep slope.


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from the deck

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a way up to the topmost level

a way up to the topmost level


agile not acrophobic people on the uppermost path

non acrophobic people on the uppermost path

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(Allan is like a mountain goat with a good head for heights.)

(Allan is like a mountain goat with a good head for heights.)


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intricate levels.  This is the topmost, and you can see one of the wooden planter boxes.


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the topmost path


looking down from the highest point

looking down from the highest point


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at the end of the upper path


the hillside boxes

the hillside boxes


the back deck again

the back deck again, just before we exited

This was one of the most fascinating gardens I have ever seen, with good plant diversity, artistry, and impressive engineering skills.  I have been thinking about it a lot since tour day and am so glad I managed to see it (and also that Allan filled in with photos of the areas I did not attain).  Every stone, paver, plant, and cubic foot of mulch had to be brought in up or down stairs.

Having now visited five out of eight, I continued to marvel at how perfectly groomed they all were for tour day: No weedy bits around the edges, every plant deadheaded and dead-leafed (any unsightly leaf removed).  This is what I hope for from a garden tour.

Next: One of my favourite finds on a garden tour: gardening neighbours.

 

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Friday, 24 June 2016

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend in Salem, Oregon

By the ninth garden of the day, I was getting a little punchy (as you might be if you are keeping up with two posts a day).  At first, I couldn’t figure out which garden it was on the short dead end street.

a handsome garden by where we parked

a handsome garden by where we parked

Was it this one? No.

Was it this one? No.

Was it this one? No.

Was it this one? No.

This one had mosaics, but no.

This one had mosaics, but no.

Allan reminded me that the description included distinctive gargoyle pillars.

garden 9: mosaic garden

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found it!

found it!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

so punchy I did not wait for Allan to get out of the picture!

so punchy I did not wait for Allan to get out of the picture!

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Origanum rotundifolium, a favourite of mine that I do not have this year.

Origanum rotundifolium, a favourite of mine that I do not have this year.

front garden

front garden

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having entered the back garden

having entered the back garden

in the back garden

in the back garden

meerkats

meerkats

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Even though there were steps with railings, neither Allan nor I were up to getting down to the lower level.

quite a drop off

quite a drop off

The pebble mosaic path on the edge of the steep drop off made me faint to look at. These are brave gardeners!

The pebble mosaic path on the edge of the steep drop off made me faint to look at. These are brave gardeners!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo. He said the composter was way down below. So the people must go up and down a lot!

Allan’s photo. He said the composter was way down below. So the people must go up and down a lot!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a pond with a delightfully deep section

a pond with a delightfully deep section

stairway at back of house (Allan's photo)

stairway at back of house (Allan’s photo)

returning on the other side of the house

returning on the other side of the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back from the front garden

looking back from the front garden

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Grand Hotel and Old Mill

We had just managed to finish viewing the 9 gardens by 4 PM, with time to check into the Grand Hotel, Salem, and have some dinner before 6.  The left hand turn from a busy one way street into the tiny hotel check in area was harrowing, especially when we were asked to back out into the traffic because a wedding party was checking out.  Fortunately, when Allan refused to do that dangerous move, they let us go down into the free parking garage from whence we could take an elevator up to the hotel lobby.  Whew.  The sudden onset of citification was almost too much.

The Grand Hotel

The Grand Hotel from online (picture traffic roaring by)

Grand Hotel (Allan's photo)

Grand Hotel (Allan’s photo)

After dinner at the hotel restaurant, we decided to walk the half mile to the evening events.  I couldn’t take another moment in city traffic.

hanging basket along our walk (Allan's photo)

hanging basket along our walk (Allan’s photo)

Baskets had black eyed susan vines, interesting.

Baskets had black eyed susan vines, interesting.

some pruned ivy (Allan's photo)

some pruned ivy (Allan’s photo)

We walked across the Willamette University Campus, and then across a railroad track, avoiding a high-in-the-air and very long pedestrian overpass.

on campus (Allan's photo)

on campus (Allan’s photo)

This caught my eye. Later we learned it was likely a small botanical garden on campus, so I wish we had walked in.

This caught my eye. Later we learned it was likely the Martha Springer Botanical Garden on campus, so I wish we had walked in.  It was across a deep channel of water at this point.

The Old Mill

The Old Mill

The two lectures were at the Old Mill at the Willamette Heritage Center.  Usually, a Hardy Plant Study Weekend has two lectures Friday evening, three on Saturday morning, one on Saturday evening, and three more on Sunday morning.  This particular weekend was not going to be very studious as it only that the two lectures.  While I found that odd, I relished the thought of not having to be in a lecture hall by 8 AM.  The morning lectures were replaced by more gardens to tour than usual.  Another unusual factor was the plant sales:  Instead of having them at the event venue, they would be at two different nurseries during the weekend.  That was fine with me.

The Old Mill Building

The Old Mill Building

a glass elevator

a glass elevator

seating, and a clever touch of two screens showing the identical slide show

seating, and a clever touch of two screens showing the identical slide show

Dave Eckerdt, he who had had my favourite garden (Deerly Missed), gave the intro talk with clever references to gardening events similar in name to Olympic events.  Normally, this weekend would have taken place in Eugene, Oregon, had not the Olympic trials been there this very week.  I was glad that Salem had gotten the event instead as it would open a new world of gardens to us.

Dave and one of a number of funny Olympics/gardening puns.

Dave and one of a number of funny Olympics/gardening puns.

Professor Ryan Contreras spoke about ornamental plant breeding.

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Hs talk was mostly about cotoneasters.

Hs talk was mostly about cotoneasters.

He made the subject interesting.

He made the subject interesting.

Then Marietta O’Byrne gave us a gorgeous slide show about her Northwest Garden Nursery garden in Eugene (now mostly a private garden).  I have wanted to see that garden for years.  Even though it would be open on Monday, we needed to get back home and back to watering city planters on that day.  I was deeply tempted to change my plans after viewing and hearing her talk.  And, in the door prizes, Allan had won a golden hellebore from her collection.

Allan's prize. I got nothin'.

Allan’s prize. I got nothin’.

We walked back to the hotel without any problem other than tiredness. I think we were the only people who walked to the event (due to my traffic phobia only). Saturday, we would have 7 more gardens to tour, including an evening soirée at Dancing Oaks Nursery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 19 July 2015

On the evening of the Music in the Gardens tour day, I had found a handwritten note under my door.  After some deciphering and pondering, I realized that it was from the owner of the Bohnke garden, which I had written about with well-deserved effusiveness a couple of years ago when it had been on the official Astoria garden tour.  Because the Astoria garden tour had been canceled this year, and their garden had been one of the proposed gardens, Bob and Helen Bohnke had decided to go ahead and have a garden open anyway.  I Googled to see if I could find any information to confirm this.  (Bob had left me his phone number, but I hate making phone calls!)  I found this letter to the editor in last week’s online issue of the Daily Astorian.

bobOh my gosh!  Now I was really determined to go.  I made a screen shot of the letter and put in on my Facebook page in hopes that others would see it and attend.  In the morning, I got a text from Rainyside Debbie Teashon saying that she was going.  I’d texted Todd about it, but he did not get the message till evening.  So off Allan and I went at Sunday midmorning over the Astoria Megler Bridge.

the view from the bridge

the view looking west from the bridge

We parked on the hilly street in Astoria, and someone walking by said, “Are you here for the tour?  It doesn’t start till noon, but he let me walk through.”  It was 11:30, so we just started nosing around the edges.

a charming garden three doors uphill

a charming garden three doors uphill

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The Bohnke Garden

bohnke

from the sidewalk

from the sidewalk: the colours make me happy

atop the retaining wall

atop the retaining wall

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Salvia ‘Hot Lips’, Allan’s photo

I went up the lawn below the house, which belongs to a church but which the Bohnkes maintain.

I went up the lawn below the house, which belongs to a church but which the Bohnkes maintain.

From the back porch, a kitty came to the lawn to greet me.

From the back porch, a kitty came to the lawn to greet me.

kitty2

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

(Bob later told us that chair had given way when he sat down with his morning coffee!)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

ever so friendly

ever so friendly

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

From the lawn, I could see a memorial spot positioned at the edge of the garden.

memory

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

returning to the front sidewalk

returning to the front sidewalk

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking up at the front garden with Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

looking up at the front garden with Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

front corner; bucket had crocosmia corms to give away to anyone who might want some.

front corner; bucket had crocosmia corms to give away to anyone who might want some.

There was so much to see that I did not feel at all impatient while waiting.

Here came Debbie, setting up her camera!

Here came Debbie, setting up her tripod!

big camera, little camera

big camera, little camera

Noon: Here comes Bob!

Noon: Here comes Bob!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

hydrangeas

hydrangeas at the foot of the front steps

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Here comes another garden host.

Here comes another garden host.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Bob and friend

Bob and friend

I tink I taw a puddytat.  (Allan's photo)

I tink I taw a puddytat. (Allan’s photo)

Bob himself

Bob himself

I asked Bob about last week’s garden tour, the one about which he had written that he was disappointed with the turn out.  He told us that because of the Astoria tour getting canceled, he had just put up some signs on phone poles inviting people to come see his garden.  I love that!  I think it is a shame that the Astoria tour was canceled, and from what I have heard through the grapevine, there is no plan by the organization that used to organize it to hold one in the future, because they don’t need the money.  If true….What does needing money have to do with it?  Someone, who can get proper event insurance and who can use any profits to fundraise for a good cause, needs to step up and take on this tour, sez I!

I thanked Bob for finding my house and leaving me a note.  He had just recently been alerted to my blog post of 2013 about his garden.  I asked how in the world he had found where we live, and he said “I just went to Ilwaco and asked around.”  I love that, too.

front garden, looking north.  That is the Columbia River in the background, way down the hill.

front garden, looking north. That is the Columbia River in the background, way down the hill.

Looking out over 'Lucifer'

Looking out over ‘Lucifer’

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

birdhouses

Bob had put out his Party sign for tour day.

Bob had put out his Party sign for tour day.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a shady spot with hostas

a shady spot with hostas

north side of front porch (Allan's photo)

north side of front porch (Allan’s photo)

I was so happy that tour guests started to show up!

I was so happy that tour guests started to show up!

The side gardens of the house are as narrow as the ones in my Grandma’s house back in Seattle.  I wish I had devoted as much effort to beautifying mine.  It gives me ideas for the narrow-ish area between our house and Nora’s driveway.

at the back of the south side garden

at the back of the south side garden

butterfly

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

swallowtail butterfly (IDed by Debbie)

swallowtail butterfly (IDed by Debbie)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

back porch, Allan's photo

back porch, Allan’s photo

looking north along the narrow back porch

looking north along the narrow back porch

pots of annuals everywhere

pots of annuals everywhere

east window

east window

by the back porch

by the back porch

SE corner of back porch

SE corner of back porch

back porch

back porch

narrow garden on south side of house

narrow garden on south side of house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

birdhouse

 

retaining wall fence with flower boxes along the top

retaining wall fence with flower boxes along the top

retaining wall flowers

retaining wall flowers

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the tiny little debris pile.  I love it!

the tiny little debris pile. I love it!

looking back

looking back

I went out to the street to take a photo of the front of the house…

the front with tour guests arriving...

the front with tour guests arriving…

Then I went around to the back by going uphill, and around half a block and down the driveway to the apartments next door, thus avoiding steep steps.

the east side of the house

the east side of the house

garden on steep wall by neighbours' parking lot

garden on steep wall by neighbours’ parking lot

The neighbours in the apartment building also enjoy gardening so they share a space by the parking lot.

apartment building garden and Bohnkes intermingle

apartment building and Bohnkes gardens intermingle

looking up from the parking lot

looking up from the parking lot

lucifer4

rose draped down the steep wall

rose draped down the steep wall (with Euphorbia ‘Fen’s Ruby’)

(Fen’s Ruby is a nemesis of mine in certain gardens but here it is contained on the wall garden where it thrives.)

the wall garden

the wall garden

back porch from below

back porch from below

hosta tucked into driftwood

hosta tucked into driftwood

Allan's photo, tour guests on north side of house

Allan’s photo, tour guests on north side of house

Allan's photo: tour guests taking photos

Allan’s photo: tour guests taking photos

Allan's photo: looking down from above

Allan’s photo: looking down from above, with Helen setting up snack table

Bob and Helen had set up a table of delicious refreshments.

Bob and Helen had set up a table of delicious refreshments.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

My new friend joined us.

My new friend joined us.

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George

I recall his name as George.

This little tour was a peak garden touring experience for me.  Bob and Helen’s openness and hospitality in opening their  beautiful and colourful garden sets a good example for all gardeners, and I am so grateful that he left the note telling us about it.  I’ve sent him a friend request on Facebook; I hope he figures out that Flora Gardener is me!

Allan's photo: Bob, me, and Helen at the refreshment table

Allan’s photo: Bob, me, and Helen at the refreshment table

I told Debbie that there was another garden in Astoria that I could show her.  Being a garden tour nut like me, she readily agreed, so we headed east through Astoria to the Mill Pond village.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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