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Posts Tagged ‘Homewood’

Sunday, 9 August 2015

Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour

The annual edible garden tour, presented by the Long Beach Grange, is a benefit for local food banks.

edibleofficial

Homewood

“A young food forest on about ½ acre, with some big changes underway this season”

Homewood lives up to its name with such a feeling of hominess.  The house was designed to have windows on two sides of every room and has an entire wall of books, something I always like to see.  Lisa, the owner of this garden, is the organizer of the Edible Tour.  She and her late spouse designed and built the house together.  She is a fiber artist as well as a food forest gardener, and her creations can be found at the Bay Avenue Gallery.  While some of her creations are elegant fashion accessories like her beaded purses, you can see that others are inspired by her kitchen garden.

photos courtesy Bay Avenue Gallery

photos courtesy Bay Avenue Gallery

So what is a food forest?  “A food forest is a gardening technique or land management system, which mimics a woodland ecosystem by substituting edible trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals. Fruit and nut trees make up the upper level, while berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals make up the lower levels.”

Lisa’s garden lives up to the description, with food at all levels of the garden.

arriving at the garden

arriving at the garden

entry, with climbing roses

entry, with climbing roses

Teresa and I enter the garden (Allan's photo)

Teresa and I enter the garden (Allan’s photo)

I love the blue trim on the house.

I love the blue trim on the house.  The white cages hold blueberries.

house

Lisa told us that she had at last successfully managed to make a deer-proof fence all around the perimeter of the property.  The smaller cages are to protect fruit from the birds; otherwise, there would be none left for Lisa of the special delicacies like blueberries.

looking south over the rain gauge: The summer has been exceptionally dry.

looking south over the rain gauge: The summer has been exceptionally dry.

I first took the path around the south side of the garden.

past the outdoor sink

past the outdoor sink

sink

sink

handy for washing soil off produce out in the garden

handy for washing soil off produce out in the garden

apples

apples (Allan’s photo)

Asian pear, Lisa's photo

Asian pear, Lisa’s photo

chairs

hydrangea

hydrangea

path

path2

Just this last month, Lisa laid this stone path instead of having grass paths.

Just this last month, Lisa laid this stone path instead of having grass paths.

nettle, a beneficial plant, caution-taped to avoid accidental contact

nettle, a beneficial plant, caution-taped to avoid accidental contact

aronia (chokecherry)

aronia (chokecherry)

path destination, a secret sit spot

path destination, a secret sit spot

bench2

around

path back to the house

path back to the house

house

Malva (mallow) flower

Malva (mallow) flower

Lisa and Teresa

Lisa and Teresa

The sunny center of the garden on the south side of the house is given to kitchen garden rows.

center

Lisa made numbered edging for the garden beds and told us that she is planning to do so for other beds, with tree names set into the concrete.

concrete mosaic row numbers

concrete mosaic row numbers

center

sun

beans

beans

beans

beans

I am sure that earlier in the year there were edible peas, as well.  By the almost mid-August date of this tour, the early season crops are done, especially in this hot dry year when the season for most flowers and fruits is earlier than usual.

sunflowers, turned away

sunflowers, turned away

sunflowers

sun

sun

cucumber tower, Lisa's photo

cucumber tower, Lisa’s photo

Bay Avenue Gallery art

Bay Avenue Gallery art (Allan’s photo)

cat from Bay Avenue Gallery

cat from Bay Avenue Gallery

IMG_9219

compost

east end of deck

east end of deck

refreshing herbal tea

refreshing herbal tea

edibles on display

edibles on display

cuke

Allan, Lisa, and Teresa look at the garden plan and plant lists.

Allan, Lisa, and Teresa look at the garden plan and plant lists.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking southeast from the deck

looking southeast from the deck

Lisa and her garden, showing the south wall of the greenhouse

Lisa and her garden, showing the south wall of the greenhouse

figs against the south wall of the greenhouse

figs against the south wall of the greenhouse

fig, Lisa's photo

fig, Lisa’s photo

in the window

in the window

inside the lean-to greenhouse on the south wall of the garage

inside the lean-to greenhouse on the south wall of the garage

in the green house

in the green house

stacked rock art piece, a gift from a friend

stacked rock art piece, a gift from a friend

We walked between the house and garage to see the north side of the garden.

between house and garage, looking north

between house and garage, looking north

the between garden

the between garden

ladies in waiting against the east garage wall

ladies in waiting against the east garage wall

hydrangea and buddleia

hydrangea and buddleia

fire circle

fire circle

north side of house

north side of house

shed on north side, with a little sit spot

shed on north side, with a little sit spot

east side of house: A work area is always of interest to me.

east side of house: A work area is always of interest to me.

almonds, Lisa's photo

almonds, Lisa’s photo

We returned to the deck on the south side of the house and sat with Lisa for awhile as the tour drew to a close.

deck

view from the deck

view from the deck

south view from living room

south view from living room

in2

east windows over bookshelves

east windows over bookshelves

one of Lisa's many books

one of Lisa’s many books

At five o’clock, the official end of tour time, we departed and saw Lisa taking in the tour sign.

the end of garden tour season

the end of garden tour season

That’s the end of our local garden tour season!  There will be one more tour, the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour, in mid-September.  Meanwhile, it’s back to focusing on work and my own garden.

 

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Monday we were still somewhat in garden tour mode as we were picking up and delivering some of the Edible Tour canned food to the non-vehicular abode of Lisa, tour organizer.  The tickets were purchased with either money or cans of food, all to benefit our local food banks.

First, we stopped at The English Nursery, one of the four ticket sales points.  Owner Dirk had a bag of canned food for us and en envelope of ticket money.

English Nursery in Seaview

English Nursery in Seaview

birdhouses for sale

birdhouses for sale

open

Dirk Sweringen

Dirk Sweringen

One of the specialities of the English Nursery is a great collection of hostas.

also perennials and ornamental grasses

also perennials and ornamental grasses

plants

plants

Dirk is also a photographer and is working on developing the building on the property into a gallery (and once upon a time he said a teahouse, an idea we quite like).

Dirk's photos

Dirk’s photos

When I told him how few people had attended the tour, Dirk proposed what I think it an absolutely brilliant idea.  Why not have the edible tour be on the Sunday after the Saturday Music in the Gardens tour?    It could be advertised as “Garden Tour Weekend at the Beach.”  Hotels could offer special deals, like “book our garden tour weekend package and get tour tickets” sort of thing.  The edible tour would have to start earlier than noon, eleven at least, because visitors would be touring before returning home to the cities.  I think the gardens would look better on the third weekend in July (although fewer ripe tomatoes).  What do you think?  I have since run this idea past both tour organizers and it is being…thought about.

Next we stopped at The Planter Box to drop off ours and the Karnofskis’ garden tour signs.  (The signage is very good for the edible tour, nice big wooden signs…so we can’t blame that for the lack of visitors!)  The owners of the Planter Box are very involved with the local grange which provides the signs.  We picked up more canned food bags.  Now that the tour was over, I did not have to buy any more soil for all my edible garden containers!

soil and amendments at The Planter Box

soil and amendments at The Planter Box

Teresa, Ray Millner’s daughter, was pleased to hear that his garden talk had been a big hit with tour goers.

We had to dump some debris left over from our last week’s jobs, so a stop at Peninsula Landscape Supply (where Mike makes his own mulch from yard debris)  was in order.  Look at the beautiful colour of the hemlock bark:

hemlock to the right

hemlock to the right

It is completely beyond me why I see, on garden tours, gardens mulched with red bark.  WHY?  WHY? when this natural, dark colour that looks good with our beachscapes is so readily available.  WHY?  (I am still pained by red bark that I saw on recent tour gardens, but I am too kind to rant about it on an entry about any particular garden because I don’t want to hurt the owners’ feelings.)  Our business motto is “Just say no to barkscapes” but what I really object to is RED barkscaping.

In order to pick up one more tour sign, we stopped at the Patten garden.  Andrea was home and showed us the oven where she does her Wholesome Hearth baking (available at a booth on Fridays from 4-7 PM in Long Beach at the Farmers Market).

Nancy Allen tells me this is a most amazing oven.

Nancy Allen tells me this is a most amazing oven.

view from the bakery, looking east to veg garden

view from the bakery, looking east to veg garden

dahlias in front of the bakery

dahlias in front of the bakery

Andrea told me that she had had about 27 tour guests (4 more than us!!) and that one group had arrived on motorcycles.  They did not come to our place which is a shame as Allan would have enjoyed that.  Because the Patten garden is in mid Peninsula, their guests were staggered all day long, so she did not have the long empty-of-new-guests stretch in the middle of the tour that we had!

Finally, we got to Lisa’s Homewood garden.  It had been a favourite of mine on the previous year’s edible tour and once again I was very taken with it.

With the lot facing south and lots of sun, she has a beautiful group of sunflowers in bloom.

sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sun

sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homewood

Homewood:  the garden shed 

compost

The house was built by Lisa and her husband and catches lots of solar heat.

lots of sun for asparagus

Asparagus thrives in the sunny south garden.

homewood

We piled up the food cans (5 cans bought a ticket to the edible tour) in the garden for a photo; there were still some more to collect from the ticket sales at Jimella’s Café but it would be closed til Thursday.  I suppose there would be none from Adelaide’s, the ticket sales place that was, for whatever reason, CLOSED on the Sunday of the tour!!  (See previous entry for how that inconvenienced would-be tour goers.)  I have ideas about that now…There could have been another store on the same block, say…Bay Avenue Gallery…that might have been asked to take over the ticket sales at the north end on that day!….or some plan other than people driving all the way up there and finding no tickets were available in Ocean Park!  I am all exclamation-pointy about this because it still really bothers me that this happened and that the northernmost garden, Lavender And, lost out on some tour goers…and maybe we all did!)

After a long visit with Lisa in her living room (procrastinating because the day was hot) and with Patty from Lavender And who dropped by for awhile, we went to work at Golden Sands.  Just as I was reaching in the back of the car for my hand tools, my hand hit upon another plastic bag…of food cans!  Argh!   Back to Homewood we went…and took another set of photos of a much more impressive stack on cans.

cans

cans

The heat was still not inspiring us to go to work (I suppose it might have been as high as 79 degrees!) but we had to…so, back to Golden Sands.  The sprinkler problem (lack thereof) continued there, so some of our time was devoted again to hand watering rather than weeding.    This time, though, I was determined to get the place looking better so we had not scheduled much other work for the day and took some extra time…

Allan weeded this horsetail and boring daylilies section

Allan weeded this horsetail and boring daylilies section

I had time for some cutting back in the NE quadrant (outside my mum's old room)

I had time for some cutting back in the NE quadrant (outside my mum’s old room)

Her dahlias are looking fine.

Her dahlias are looking fine.

some grooming accomplished on the SW quadrant

some grooming accomplished on the SW quadrant

although there is still so very much to do.

although there is still so very much to do.

I could almost visualize the pitiful Geranium ‘Rozanne’ river in the center filling out if the sprinkler system gets fixed.  It was actually showing some blue.  At over two years old, these poor plants are a good example of stress from lack of water…Hand watering once a week is not enough.

hope

We closed out the workday with watering the Ilwaco planters and weeding and watering at the boatyard.

boatyard garden, looking north about midway along it

boatyard garden, looking north about midway along it

further north

further north

love the name of this boat

love the name of this boat

And then…home for a bit of a beautiful evening in our garden.

screened south window view

screened south window view

Below:  I had painstakingly picked every dried leaf from the stems of the Eupatorium (Joe Pye weed) below, in the gloaming on the night before our edible garden tour day.

front garden

front garden

Echinacea 'Green Envy'

Echinacea ‘Green Envy’

Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant' in front garden

Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ in front garden

Dichroa febrifuga

Dichroa febrifuga

I could now declare that Garden Tour Season 2013 officially over (until the Cannon Beach Cottage & Garden Tour on September 14th) and it was about time we started to seriously apply ourselves to make enough money to get through the winter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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