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Posts Tagged ‘Huson garden’

Wednesday, 5 February 2014

Allan and I got up at eight AM, a truly shocking hour for us, in order to be at the Long Beach Depot by 9 AM to join a Hospitality Training event.  We started with the famous video about work ethics and practices and, most importantly for our beach towns, how to make tourists happy,  by the Pike Place Market Fish Co.   I found a neat video of them throwing fish around (preceded by an exciting sequence of approaching Seattle on the ferry).  I don’t get to the city much; when I lived there, the market was my favourite place to be.

fam

Sue from Our Place at the Beach hotel led the FISH portion of the day.

The Fish Work/Play book

The Fish Work/Play book

We all got a bit of swag: brochures and toy fish.   Friends of mine who are in the corporate world all said “Oh, yeah, the Fish video, seen it repeatedly!”.  We never had and we found it quite fun.  One of the questions in the workbook was “If your company had a theme song, what would it be?”  I can tell you right now it would be this one.

The local Subway shop contributed lunch for the event and Sweet Celebrations bakery provided the dessert.

lunch

lunch

Outside the Long Beach Depot building (formerly a station for the Clamshell Railroad) the Long Beach trolley awaited us.  The plan for the day including a “familiarization tour” of the Long Beach Peninsula so that we would know what to recommend to our happy tourists.  Even though I’d already been to all these places, all are worth another visit and I thought it would nice for Allan to be a non driver for a change.

trolley

all aboard!

all aboard!

Ragan Myers, LB tourism and events coordinator, spoke during the trolley tour.

Ragan Myers, LB tourism and events coordinator, spoke during the trolley tour.

We headed straight up the Peninsula to Ocean Park, and then jogged over on Bay Avenue to Sandridge Road, passing one of our jobs, The Wiegardt Gallery.

I could see from the trolley that the garden needs work.

I could see from the trolley that the garden needs work!  It will be next on our agenda.

I knew we were going to Oysterville first.  This had been one of my incentives for going as I knew I’d get a look at winter in the Huson garden there.  I wasn’t sure we were going to stop so I took some photos from the trolley windows as we passed by.

Huson garden, Oysterville

Huson garden, Oysterville

huson

huson

from the trolley

from the trolley

Joy!  We stopped at the famous Oysterville Church, one lot north of the garden.

tourgoers going into the Oysterville Church

tourgoers going into the Oysterville Church

While the others went into the church, I strolled down to the garden.  Another tour-goer, Jayne Bailey from Bailey’s Café in Nahcotta had already done the same.

Huson garden

Huson garden

This garden holds a great fascination for me because the owners’ garden in Ruston is one of my favourites of all the Hardy Plant Study Weekend tours.

peering over the fence

peering over the fence

husongarden

more gawking over the fence

more gawking over the fence

boxwoods

urn

narcissi

driveway on south side of house

driveway on south side of house

I then walked into the churchyard to get a look at the garden from the north side.

Allan took this photo from the church of me on a garden spying mission.

Allan took this photo from the church of me on a garden spying mission.

looking south from the church lawn

looking south from the church lawn

Hamamelis in bloom, probably 'Diane'

Hamamelis in bloom, probably ‘Diane’

At the back of the church, looking into the Huson garden, clipped sword ferns

At the back of the church, looking into the Huson garden, clipped sword ferns

Allan's photo from the church window (looking south)

Allan’s photo from the church window (looking south)

Allan's photo...he was on a garden spy mission of his own.

Allan’s photo…he was on a garden spy mission of his own.

Allan's photo from inside the church, looking south

Allan’s photo from inside the church, looking south

Huson and his partner have also done some gardening around the church itself.

snowdrops behind the Oysterville Church

snowdrops behind the Oysterville Church

from in front of the church, looking east

from in front of the church, looking east

Many of the Oysterville houses are fenced with iconic white pickets, often coated with lichen.  According to a plaque on one fence, the rose that grows throughout town is ‘Dorothy Perkins’.  I wonder if it gets milder like the ones in Long Beach’s Fifth Street Park?  The cultivar known as ‘Super Dorothy’ is much better…

Meanwhile, Allan was inside the church with the rest of the tour group.

Meanwhile, Allan was inside the church with the rest of the tour group.

inside the church

inside the church

Allan's photo of the trolley

Allan’s photo of the trolley

the path to the bay from where we parked the trolley

the path to the bay from where the trolley parked

We then drove the north loop of town that passes Oysterville Sea Farms, right on the bay.  The business owner was out of town so we didn’t get a tour of the building.

next:  Cranberry Research Station and The World Kite Museum

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Thursday, 7 November, 2013

I had been so sure we would have the day off that I was shocked when sunshine awoke me.  The sky to the south, more white than grey, perhaps boded that some work time could be found before the predicted storm.  We decided to try.  I have a few plants left to put in the ground for clients, and it is better to do so before the soil gets colder.

I went to the patio to grab a chunk of a Libertia that we divided from the Golden Sands garden.

The cosmos in the garden boat, while sideways, still have a few blossoms.

The cosmos in the garden boat, while sideways, still have a few blossoms.

One pink dahlia is going strong.

One pink dahlia is going strong.

the blue river of Geranium 'Rozanne' would look better if I had tidied it up...

the blue river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (still blooming!) would look better if I had tidied it up…

I should do something about the squash (one real, one fake).

I should do something about the squash (one real, one fake).

I WILL pick those squash tomorrow.  One has sunk into itself like a popped balloon but I think two are left.

one tall sweet pea vine to the very top of the deer fence

one tall sweet pea vine to the very top of the deer fence

We then made the forty five minute drive to the Wiegardt Gallery to plant three Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ and a clump of Libertia and, we hoped, do some fall clean up.  We also hoped to plant a Hellebore and a Libertia at Klipsan Beach Cottages.

Wiegardt Gallery west side now with five Ilex 'Sky Pencil'

Wiegardt Gallery west side, now with five Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’

and one little Sky Pencil to add some verticality (eventually) on the south side.

and one little Sky Pencil to add some verticality (eventually) on the south side.

It is just past the end of the hose!

We chopped down some Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ (unusually short, in a northern bed that does not get much water).  While I might have continued to enjoy the blackened foliage against the pale variegated Miscanthus, I think it is one of those tableaus that passersby would see as something undone that should have been done.

before and after

before and after, with Miscanthus variegatatus and Siberian iris and Libertia

The weather having turned  dire, we popped into the gallery for a moment to get out of the wind, hoping it would die down so we could go on to the KBC garden.  Earlier in the month, Eric had picked from my wheelbarrow some tattered cosmos blossoms to paint.  Today I picked him a bouquet of the last of windblown flowers.

the last of the cosmos, from some plants we had pulled up

the last of the cosmos, from some plants we had pulled up

warm inside

warm inside

I love the painting at the center, left, with red flowers:  Knautia macedonica

I love the painting at the center, left, with red flowers: Knautia macedonica

Gallery manager Christl says she asked me for the proper spelling of Knautia!

wiegardt

rose painting by Eric Wiegardt

rose painting by Eric Wiegardt

Afte chatting (and consuming some Finnish mint chocolate candy offered by Christl) we went back out into the now pelting rain.  Allan came up with the bright idea that we should try again to go to the Oysterville Store to ask the owner if he wants to be “cash mobbed” in March.  Last time we went, we happened upon his lunch break and missed seeing the inside of the store.

rain....daunting us from working

rain….daunting us from working

wind in the Wiegardt garden

wind in the Wiegardt garden

Oysterville Store it would be.  The wind chased us over to Nahcotta, just east on the bay….

Nahcotta oyster shell mountain

Nahcotta oyster shell mountain

…and on up to Oysterville, where we parked right in the middle of quiet Territory Road for some stormy day photos.

Territory Road, looking north

Territory Road, looking north

Territory

reflection

trees

the iconic Oysterville picket fence

the iconic Oysterville picket fence

bay view bench

bay view bench

I snooped with my eyes over the fence of the Huson garden, a garden created by the owners of another favourite garden of mine, a garden in Ruston that I still think of often.

Oysterville garden

Oysterville garden

along the road

along the road

It is magnificent.

It is magnificent.

Across the street, a couple of hardy fuchsias still bloomed, one overhanging one of the pumpkins that Huson has placed throughout the village.

fuchsia

fuchsia2

Because the dashboard clock told us the store would not be open for another few minutes,  we took a detour past Oysterville Sea Farm.

oyster beds

oyster beds and gulls

pilings

Oysterville Sea Farms

Oysterville Sea Farms

oyster shell road

oyster shell road

across from the Oysterville Store

across from the Oysterville Store

a photo of the store/post office taken last February

a photo of the store/post office taken last February

We usually see Oysterville only on a rainy day off!

You can read some history of the Oysterville store in Sydney Stevens Oysterville Daybook.

In the window of the front door, a big dog greeted us.

I wanted to stand around and pet him, but he wanted to go outside and find someone to play ball.

I wanted to stand around and pet him, but he wanted to go outside and find someone to play ball.

in the store:  books

in the store: books

a parlor off to the side

a parlor off to the side

cozy wood heat in the main room

cozy wood heat in the main room

Allan buys some Jean Nitzel greeting cards at the counter

Allan buys some Jean Nitzel greeting cards at the counter

Owner Greg Rogers told us that the candy case was original to the old store.

Old timers remember this.

Old timers remember this.

a historic scale

a historic scale

Greg also told us that the table on which the scale and candy case sit had belonged to his grandfather, Ernest Rogers.  Ernest, while working at Davies Coffee and Spice on the Seattle Waterfront in 1915 had bagged (or otherwise sorted into containers) coffee on this very table and then delivered it to Chinese restaurants.

Greg has a fondness for old signs.  The “Information” sign below is part of a park (?) sign from Hawaii, part of which was burned in a volcano eruption or lava flow.

signs

signs

seattle

The cities, above, are part of the trajectory of Greg’s life, as described in this article.

behind the counter

behind the counter

in the store

in the store

A connection from Ilwaco to Oysterville:  Kelly of Blue Crab Graphics screen prints the t shirts.

We spoke for awhile of cash mob ideas and then Allan and I re-examined the weather through the front door.

still rather dire

still rather dire

I continued to hope, as we departed, that we could get just two plants planted at Klipsan Beach Cottages.  Allan pointed out that we had done a lot of time in the van to very little time working.

I wish I had stopped to take a photo looking west as we came over the hill from Oysterville to Surfside.  The ocean waves crashed dramatically high and pampas grass in residents’ gardens bent sideways in the wind.

We tried for another photo from Bay Avenue in Ocean Park but there were too many storm watching cars parked right in the scene.  Tp pass the time in hope of a weather break, we shopped at Sweet Williams on Bay for Christmas cards; owner Katie Williams always has some with a coastal theme.

Sweet Williams on Bay

Sweet Williams on Bay

Polish Pottery

Polish Pottery

The sky had just a bit of blue as we entered and left Katie’s shop.  I knew better than to fall for it. The wind had picked up to 30 mph.  We gave up on work and headed back to Long Beach in lashings of sideways rain.

at the Bolstadt street light

at the Bolstadt street light

lb

Back in Ilwaco, we saw from our driveway a garbage can heading north to south along Lake Street and Pearl.  Although our wheelie bins are of a substantial size and weight, it looks like this one might end up at the Port.

wheelie bin on a journey

wheelie bin on a journey

Getting home from work early was a good thing today.  We had a project to do in the garage, making space for bulb sorting.  Tomorrow a large bulb delivery is due to arrive.

I got plant tags from the summer stuffed into a 5 gallon bucket.  Sorting them will make a useful winter’s day project and perhaps I will even make a database of what plants have been added to my garden.

sorting project

sorting project

I rooted for the Danger Tree to harmlessly fall….

Danger Tree!

Danger Tree!

admired the Melianthus major in the front garden…

A heavy frost could take this down.

A heavy frost could take this down.

and a hebe in geometric bloom:

very tidy

very tidy

The Fatsia is blooming in Allan’s garden.

Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web'

Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’

and some annuals are still blooming by the garage.

even a double impatiens!

even a double impatiens!

The leaves of Nora’s maple are turning by the window where she used to sit and wave to us when we came home.

We miss her.

We miss her.

After considerable reorganizing and placing of seasonal tables (including taking Allan’s sorting table from the middle of his room!), we are now ready as can be for bulb hell time.  I have fingerless gloves:

It gets chilly in the garage.

It gets chilly in the garage.

My Colorblends mug for hot cups of tea:

It's rather a strange design.

It’s rather a strange design.

I like the way the Colorblends order always comes with some Dutch newspaper inside.

paper

Usually there is a little giftie enclosed, like the mug, or some tulip coasters, but not this year.

I have paper, a clipboard, a chair, a calculator, crates to sort in, bags, a sharpie (better have more than one) and a U shaped table arrangement…and still room for the van to park.  One table is for tulips, one for narcissi, one for small bulbs and one for Alliums.

Couldn't be more ready...

Couldn’t be more ready…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In Seattle

In Seattle for his father’s memorial service in late February, Allan photographed this stunning Callicarpa (beauty berry) for me.  Mine are still but small, but I still remember the time when, going from one housecleaning job to another in the Laurelhurst neighbourhood of Seattle, stopping still in amazement at the sight of one in someone’s yard.  I had no idea at the time what it was or why it was blooming in winter.

Allan did not know what it was either, but he knew I would want to see it.

A Seattle beautyberry

A Seattle beautyberry

At Home

19 February

back garden crocus run, more filled out than last year.

back garden crocus run, more filled out than last year.

You can see the neighbouring gear shed (other side of fence) has their crab pots restacked so their crabbing season must be slowing down or over.

Smokey enjoys the new water feature

Smokey enjoys the new water feature

Smokey

1 March

Smokey among the Hellebores

Smokey among the Hellebores

Wherever I go in the garden, there is Smokey also.

early tulips

early tulips

on the new plant table

on the new plant table

At Work (and Around)

25 February at Discovery Heights

Upon his return, while I was obsessively working on my blog prequel, Allan did a session chopping grasses at the Discovery Heights middle garden.

before

before

after

after

tidy

tidy

 27 February: touring Oysterville

In the drizzle, we took a drive up to Oysterville to get photos for a new Discovery Coast Real Estate page.  We photographed houses and scenery, and the Huson garden, well known as a glorious new landscape at in town.  The owners have also spread narcissi through the town, and pumpkins in fall and lights at Christmas.

along the Huson fence

along the Huson fence

Huson garden hellebores

Huson garden hellebores

Huson garden, moss and pear

Huson garden, moss and pear

That night on Facebook, I was messaging with my friend Kathleen S, who does not live on the Peninsula but will soon, I hope.  She has been visiting for years and I swear she knows more about the Peninsula than I do.  She told me the last name of one of the gardeners in this Oysterville garden and I said…wait a sec…and looked up the name of a garden that I had adored as one of my favourite gardens ever in Ruston (near Tacoma).  I had toured it in 2010 with Sheila on the Hardy Plant Weekend.  I messaged Kathleen with the question:  could the Oysterville Huson be related to the Ruston Huson?  She who knows all told me it is the SAME person.  How about that?  The Ruston garden has stuck firmly in my memory since my visit there….It was truly a place of dreams.

27 February at Klipsan Beach Cottages

On the way home, we stopped to chat with the owners of the A Frame on the grounds of KBC about their five year garden plan.  In the drizzle, we did not want to actually work (although the ferns need cuting back) so all I did outdoors was take one photo of an early rhododendron.

rhodo and pond island at KBC

rhodo and pond island at KBC

1 March in Long Beach

We cleaned up Peggy’s Park, a pretty garden bed by Long Beach City Hall.

Peggy's cyclamen

Peggy’s cyclamen

Long Beach Planter at 3rd and Pacific

Long Beach Planter at 3rd and Pacific

crocuses in a Long Beach planter

crocuses in a Long Beach planter

Fifth Street Park in front of Captain Bob's Chowder

Fifth Street Park in front of Captain Bob’s Chowder

When we have time, which we sometimes do not, we like to get a delicious crab roll from Captain Bob.

3 March in Long Beach

clean up of pond garden at Bolstadt and Pacific

before

before

after

after

2 March at Jo’s garden

Allan working on a re-do

Allan working on a re-do

Jo wants the above bed all dug out except for a few roses and redone, because she fell in love with the look of our flower beds when she came to see our garden on tour last year.  We are determined to accomplish this, but time is tight.  There are still seven jobs we have not even BEEN to yet.

3 March at Andersen’s RV Park

narcissi in Payson Hall Planters

narcissi in Payson Hall Planters

and a Payson Hall frog!

and a Payson Hall frog!

Fritillaria michailovskyi in Payson Hall planter

Fritillaria michailovskyi in Payson Hall planter

The Van Engelen catalog says “Native to Turkey, it has up to five, pendant reddish-purple bells with a yellow edge on the outside and a shiny yellow interior” and adds that it blooms April/May.   Hmmm.  It’s a bit early, then.

Narcissi in Payson Hall planters

Narcissi in Payson Hall planters

Lorna of Andersen’s bought many of the great big narcissi like King Alfreds and other large cultivars.  Since I always buy mostly the little ones, it will be interesting to see how the big ones do in her west side garden….which we are about halfway through mulching with cow fiber from The Planter Box.

This center bed will be full of King Alfreds.

This center bed will be full of King Alfreds.

lovely mulch

lovely mulch

and some new Carex testacea

and some new Carex testacea

Larry and Robert’s garden

Their little garden boat is starting to show some spring bloom.

19 February

19 February

7 March

7 March

BONUS:  Judy and Tom’s garden

Just down the street from us and across the street from Larry and Robert’s, we like to watch the season unfold in our friends’ garden.

6 March, as I leaned over the fence to admire..

6 March, as I leaned over the fence to admire..

7 March, new primrose pots

7 March, new primrose pots

and a fun new whirligig

and a fun new whirligig

7 March:  Today, we cleaned up Larry and Robert’s, the boatyard, and a Howerton Street garden.   Two clients have contacted us today regarding when we will get to their gardens.   As for the seven gardens….and one Long Beach park….and the very very very long and tedious beach approach garden….that we have not even been to yet…

I can only say that we will get there when we get there.  I am trying a new policy of not fretting and losing sleep over the schedule, as that does not make things go any faster.  (I joked to one of the clients that maybe someone will do us a favour and fire us! As usual, we need two fewer jobs than what we have.)

We even…gasp! stopped for an hour today and had a coffee break with Patt and Judy at Olde Towne Café.   Life is too short, as I have learned extra hard this winter from the experience of a friend and sister gardener who has cancer, to spend it all fretting about work.  I want to slow down, but have not yet figured out how without making at least some clients sad.  Who could possibly be patient as they wait for us and look at a weedy garden?  There seems to be no solution to this other than I just have to stop worrying about it.

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along the sidewalk of the Huson garden

Monday morning we were on the road by 9.15 heading for the South Sound tour, this time avoiding the scary freeway tunnels and going on a less harrowing route. First stop:  a garden of sheer perfection in Ruston.

The tour guide brochure says: “The map says it’s in Ruston, hard by Tacoma, but imagination says you are half a world away, in the prettiest garden in the prettiest village somewhere in the English countryside.” Yes!

Allan told me later that when he bought a home in Tacoma in 1986, he first looked at Ruston for its views of Commencement Bay, then found out about arsenic contamination in the soil and decided not to buy there. Ruston’s industrial history makes it  all the more impressive that such an oasis of beauty has been created here.

I wish that Allan  had joined us for the entire tour day and seen this garden in particular.  (He was in Seattle helping sort out his dad’s house.)

photographer

The roses and boxwood on the outskirts of the garden caused a flurry of photography by the Hardy Plant Study Weekenders.

from the sidewalk

Lavender edged the path from the lawn to the main house’s front door.  The brochure says that this garden is only ten years old…or less (because the house had been built ten years before).

lavender walk

The driveway planted with tiny buns and mounds still haunts me and makes me wish to take a jackhammer to my short asphalt driveway and do this instead.

tidy

At the end of the driveway turned walkway, roses against a green wall defined a guest house courtyard.

doorway to courtyard

guest house courtyard

The guest house porch and door was just this side of the outdoor fireplace.  We entered.   Straight ahead was the bathroom with claw foot tub and porthole window.  To our right, the bedroom.  To our left, the living room and kitchenette.

just inside the guest house door

the bedroom and its loft

How I loved the flowered wall paper and curtains.

the living room and kitchen

guest house

front of guest house

We went back outside to compare the exterior of the guest house with the interior.  We now knew that the window above belonged to the guest house living room.  As we emerged from the courtyard we again admired the planted driveway.

another view

We were so fascinated with the guest house that we walked out to the alley to see it from the other side.

side of guest house

Above: the side with the kitchenette window and the porthole over the bathtub.

from the alley

The alley afforded us another green and lovely entrance back to the garden.

On the other side of the driveway we found another little courtyard in front of the big house.  (Remember, this house is only ten years old.)

house courtyard

the main house

house courtyard

happy study weekenders! (viewed from within the lavender walk)

contemplation

roses, alliums, lavender

roses and alliums

roses red

turning the corner…

…to the other side of the house

and looking up.

driftwood in the driveway as one exits the garden

Having made our way all round the little house and the big house we had to move on, but this garden has stuck with me more than most.  It’s not something I would replicate for myself if for no other reason that boxwood gets fried by the salty winds in my new garden (although it did well in my old, sheltered garden, and there are alternatives).  But I would love to try this around someone else’s cottage.  It was indeed like entering a dream.  The whole time we were there, a chorus seemed to be singing about The Village Green Preservation Society.

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