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Posts Tagged ‘hydrangeas’

Saturday, 18 July 2015

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for the Water Music Festival and music programs in local schools

ticket tour map

ticket tour map

Garden 3: Mimosa Garden (Holtermann Garden

Waving tropical fish flags greet you as you begin your tour of an art-filled patio garden with colorful pots, choice and well-grown plants, and a wall pocket of textured succulents. Stroll through the full-sun gardens wrapping around the this dune-facing home, which well meets all the challenges of the wind, fog and salt air.  Enjoy the many spots to sit, a working potting bench, and a small kitchen garden.

This aerial photo taken by local photographer Bob Duke with the aid of his drone show how close the garden is to the dunes:

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Bob Duke, showing the triangular shaped lot

garden tour day

garden tour day

on a pre-tour visit June 1st

on a pre-tour visit June 1st (when we just looked at the garden from here, as we were making a spontaneous drive-by)

fish

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Bob Duke

entrygarden

south side of house

Mimosas and lemony ice water were on offer at the welcome table.

Mimosas and lemony ice water were on offer at the welcome table.

treats (Allan's photo)

treats (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Gardener Pat's t shirt (Allan's photo)

Gardener Pat’s t shirt (Allan’s photo)

west side, photo by Kathleen Shaw

west side, photo by Kathleen Shaw

cheerful entry garden

cheerful entry garden

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

The garden had looked just as perfect when Nancy and I visited on July 3rd to get some “sneak peek” photo for the tour’s Facebook page as it did on tour day.  I noticed how well-grown the plants are.  Just two days before the tour, Pat’s husband sent us this photo captioned “Working through the pain to get ready for the garden tour.”  Pat had hurt her leg and was continuing the preparation on crutches.  Because the garden already looked so fine, it was not the disaster it would have been for someone like me whose garden is not perfected till about one day before a tour.

photo by John Holtermann

photo by John Holtermann

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

pre-tour visit, July 3rd

tour day

tour day

colour

lookback

front door

front door

pre-tour visit, July 3rd, digiplexis

pre-tour visit, July 3rd, digiplexis

digiplexis

Digiplexis ‘Illumination Flame’

pre-tour visit, July 3rd:  This little heart bench belonged to Pat's mother.

pre-tour visit, July 3rd: This little heart bench belonged to Pat’s mother.

tour day

tour day

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

stepping stones to patio on west side of house

stepping stones to patio on west side of house

patio4

pre-tour visit, July 3rd, Scophularia vareigata (variegated figwort)

pre-tour visit, July 3rd, Scophularia vareigata (variegated figwort)

west side patio

west side patio

patio2

lower windows tip out

lower windows tip out

Our Kathleen toured the garden in the late afternoon and found Barbara Bate playing piano on the west patio.

bate

Barbara Bate

north wall of patio

north wall of patio

On a pre-tour visit on June 1st

On a pre-tour visit on June 1st

succulent pocket garden on pre-tour visit, July 3rd

succulent pocket garden on pre-tour visit, July 3rd (lower right corner: Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’

July 3rd

July 3rd

and on tour day

and on tour day

pots

chair

hydrangea at gate to next area

hydrangea by the entry to the next area of the garden

window reflection with more plants inside

window reflection with more plants inside

looking back on the west side patio

looking back on the west side patio

to our left as we step through into the next area

to our left as we step through into the next area

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

The little watering can is a clever reference to the flowing shape of Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola'.

The little watering can is a clever reference to the flowing shape of Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’.

Or is it 'All Gold'?

Or is it ‘All Gold’?

gold3

Allan’s photo

When we were there in the morning, Barbara Bate was playing in the north side garden.  For her second set, she moved into the sun where Kathleen found her later on.

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo “They were talking Beethoven while Barbara Bate was playing him some samples by memory.”

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

Barbara Bate

As in all the gardens, I wished for more time to sit and enjoy the music.  I have a soft spot for Barbara, who played at my mother’s memorial at Golden Sands and who knew her favourite song, Because (you come to me with naught save love, and hold my hand, and lift mine eyes above…).

Gunnera in the triangle corner of the garden

Gunnera in the triangle corner of the garden

Every now and then, I run across a garden blogger who lists all sorts of garden descriptive phrases we are not supposed to use anymore because they’ve become passé (“architectural foliage” is one, and “garden rooms” is another).  Well, too bad, because here is a great example of architectural foliage in a garden room.  Each section of this garden is enclosed by a fence, a dense planting, or the wall of the house or a shed and it is like a series of outdoor rooms.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Barbara and the reflected garden

Barbara and the reflected garden

back

garden room with chairs and a carpet

curve

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

daisies

Here’s that aerial photo again; you can pick out the white daisies and the gunnera in the corner.

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Bob Duke

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

yellow

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

garden room with chairs and tub

garden room with chairs and tub

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

on the north fence

on the north fence

window2

flag

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

gate to the kitchen garden

gate to the kitchen garden

kitchen garden

kitchen garden

pre-tour visit, July 3

pre-tour visit, July 3

garden shed

garden shed

hosta detail

hosta detail

diascias

diascias

looking back

looking back

east wall of house

east wall of house

another sit spot

another sit spot

Another aerial photo shows the garden shed and another enclosed nook near the front driveway.

drone photo by Bob Duke

drone photo by Bob Duke

pots2

chairs

photo by Kathleen Shaw in the afternoon

photo by Kathleen Shaw in the afternoon

hydrangea2

The weather was so scorching hot that some plants were wilting, so garden owner John began to water.

John chats with Allan while watering in the nook off the driveway.

John chats with Allan while watering in the nook off the driveway.

by the driveway

by the driveway

Waterlogue

Waterlogue

The Mimosa Garden was a close contender for my favourite 2015 tour garden because of the garden rooms, the whimsical decorations, and the selection of interesting and well grown plants.  To be a contender, a garden must have art that tells me something about the owner, must have more garden than lawn, and must not be a barkscape; the plants must touch and intermingle.

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Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

Barrager garden

Just up the street from Barbara Ashmun’s garden, her nearby neighbour Doug Barrager’s garden was also on tour.  I do love when tour gardens are walking distance from each other.

DSC05230

from the street

from the street

sideslope

lilies

lilies

lily and dogwood

lily and dogwood

rose borders

side garden rose borders

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

into the shade

into the shade

shadegarden

more shade beds: Allan's photo

more shade beds: Allan’s photo

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

I want this hydrangea.

I want this lace cap hydrangea.

I like the precisely cut flowers.

I like the precisely cut flowers.  Allan overheard some tour guests saying this is an unusual cultivar.

Jeanne and I marveled at the perfection of the hostas.

Jeanne and I marveled at the perfection of the hostas.

hostas2

more perfect hostas

work area around the side of the house

work area around the other side of the house

the sunny side of the house

the sunny side of the house

variegated dogwood at the corner

variegated dogwood at the corner

roses along the front street

roses along the front street

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another starry dahlia

another starry dahlia

bonus garden

We enjoyed the view over the picket fence of a garden across the street.

DSC05331

another gardening neighbour

Next: We return to Floramagoria, one of our favourite Portland gardens.

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Friday, 26 December 2014

When our friend Lisa of the Hydrangea House (and previously from Crank’s Roost, a longtime job of ours back when she owned that little Seaview cottage) invited us to her Boxing Day open house, I went back and forth a dizzying number of times. On Christmas Day, I made what I thought was a final decision to let social anxiety rule and not go.  And then, on Boxing Day itself, I changed my mind again and Lisa was kind enough to not let the backing and forthing bother her.

She assured me that the open house hosted by her and her spouse Buzz could be blog fodder, so here we go.

The house has now been named, in Japanese letters, after our dear friend Bill Clearman.

The house has now been named, in Japanese letters, after our dear friend Bill Clearman.

The house is of special interest to me not only because we used to prune the hydrangeas but because Bill Clearman, working with a Japanese architect, was the builder.

corner of garage, approaching the walkway

corner of garage, approaching the walkway

One of the house’s significant features is the blue tile roof on the garage, the walkway, and the house itself.  Here are daylight photos from an earlier visit.

The approach to the house that we walked tonight after dark.

The approach to the house that we walked tonight after dark.

house

a small part of the field of 275 blue hydrangeas

walkway to guest house

walkway to guest house

Bill painstakingly fit together the posts and beams using Japanese tools.

Bill painstakingly fit together the posts and beams using Japanese tools.

The left side of the walkway is planted with noxious and firmly entrenched English Ivy.  It would be hell to remove, but I’d replace it with a collection of hellebores and, say, epimidiums.

to the front door

to the front door

to the right of the steps, the sand garden had Maddy's footprints and a rubber dog toy.

to the right of the steps, the sand garden had Maddy’s footprints and a rubber dog toy. (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo with Maddy's "kong" chew toy.

Allan’s photo with Maddy’s “kong” chew toy.

a waterlogue of the sand garden from a gardening day of the past

a waterlogue of the sand garden from a gardening day of the past

by the front door (Allan's photo, for Garden Tour Nancy)

by the front door (Allan’s photo, for Garden Tour Nancy)

the massive fireplace in the living room

Inside:  the massive fireplace in the living room

and the obligatory Waterlogue

and the obligatory Waterlogue

detail

detail

There is an art theme shared by the two parties we attended this season, as there is also a photo or painting of a water tower in Debbie’s house, and I meant to ask her the significance but I forgot.

A new wooden floor was recently laid by Bill, replacing (I think) carpeting from the previous homeowners.

A new mahogany floor was recently laid by Bill, replacing carpeting from the previous homeowners.

lr

To the right, I parked myself in the cozy seating spot for much of the party….

after taking a plate of snacks from the first wave of food in the dining room.

after taking a plate of snacks from the first wave of food in the dining room.

the tree, which was purchased from the Ilwaco High School Music Boosters annual Christmas tree sale

the tree, which was purchased from the Ilwaco High School Music Boosters annual Christmas tree sale

My good friend Maddy, living in hope of someone dropping good food.

My good friend Maddy, living in hope of someone dropping good food.

I made an excursion onto the east side deck to have a look at the hydrangeas.

the hydrangeas with old papery flowers hanging on

the hydrangeas with old papery flowers hanging on

The vast hydrangea field extends all along the front of the guest house.

The vast hydrangea field extends all along the front of the guest house.  I was pleased to see that pavers have now been set into the river rock for better access.  I used to find that so hard to walk on.

from the deck, Allan's photo; in the daytime, you would be able to view Willapa Bay's changing tides.

from the deck, Allan’s photo; in the daytime, you would be able to view Willapa Bay’s changing tides.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan checked on the fairy door.

Allan checked on the fairy door.

Patti J was there and sat with us.

our Patti

our Patti

Maddy settled down with us for awhile.

Maddy settled down with us for awhile.

my sit spot haven

my sit spot haven

the view from my seat

the view from my seat

and another view from my sit spot

and another view from my sit spot

I looked up and marveled at Bill's work on the high ceiling.  (Note the high windows that bring in much daylight)

I looked up and marveled at Bill’s work on the high ceiling. (Note the high windows that bring in much daylight)

up

If I am not mistaken the beams are all fitted together with the use of Japanese woodworking tools and with no nails or screws.

up2

The main course of food appeared, with brioches made by Pink Poppy Bakery.

mains

note the blue calico plates; I love them (and have a few myself)

Desserts included Pink Poppy cookies and some of the Pink Poppy pecan pie that I had read of and was pleased to get to sample.

desserts, with Ray from Astoria in a festive tie

desserts, with Ray from Astoria in a festive tie

one of the desserts

another of the desserts

One of Buzz’s sons kept the fire going; the fireplace is large enough to take a big log.  From where I sat, I admired the built in storage for firewood.

fire

 

detail

Buzz was a consummate host, circulating and making sure everyone was well supplied with food and drink.

buzz

Painted in Waterlogue

Having read Buzz’s book, Father’s Day, I was especially pleased to meet his son Zach.  Zach asked me what day Allan and I had been married.  I told him the date ten years ago and he immediately told me what day of the week that date had fallen on.  I had read of this, but hearing it in person boggles the mind.

Zach in red

Zach in red

Sometimes I am nostalgic about gardening here. When I looked out the window in the dark and saw the stems of the hydrangeas they called to me but not loudly enough to really want to prune them again.  It’s a job for younger gardeners with good knees.

stems, through the window, telephoto from where I sat

stems, through the window, telephoto from where I sat

Later in the party, Allan had a long schmooze with Buzz on the topic of motorcycling.

Allan and Buzz discussing a fascinating subject

Allan and Buzz discussing a fascinating subject

I met Cynthia from Astoria and I was surprised, as always, to learn that she reads this blog.  While suffering at times from the usual social anxiety, I practiced asking questions.  It’s an easy solution at times, as I am interested in the answers.  The sometimes impossible part is making the approach or sitting down in a group, especially a group of elegant looking people while feeling like a peasant (and like someone with a very, very small life).  I wandered around a bit taking photos of objects, which behavior might have looked a little weird, and then Waterlogued some in order to look serenely occupied.

amaryllis

I well remember typing on an LC Smith typewriter like that.

I well remember typing on an LC Smith typewriter like that.

Painted in Waterlogue

vase

 

Painted in Waterlogue

lamps

As we departed, the evergreen smell from the small grove of redwoods by driveway filled the air with the essence of winter.  I was glad we had rousted ourselves out of the lazy comforts of home.  Thanks, Lisa and Buzz.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 2 September 2014 (part one)

Steve and John’s most amazing bayside garden deserves its own separate post, so I’m dividing today into two parts.

After dining with them last Thursday night at the Cove, we were invited for a garden tour and lunch at Steve and John’s bayside home, where all is soothing and uncluttered.

We took some tomatoes and a bouquet of flowers and foliage from our garden; the bouquet went into the most perfect vase of wood (with a water holding insert).

in their kitchen

in their kitchen

Plant lovers that our hosts are, we spent quite some time discussing the various plants (including one I had to look up later, Clematis heracleifolia ‘New Love’ to the right, and Rubus lineatus, a few types of boxleaf honeysuckle, Hypericum (maybe ‘Albury Purple’), sanguisorbas, etc etc. Just the sort of conversation I love to have, although of course my mind went blank on some plant names till later.

the bay view (east) from the house

the bay view (east) from the house

and the north view with the newly planted green roof (which we will examine closely later).

and the north view to the flower and kitchen garden with the newly planted green roof (which we will examine closely later).

The window reflection above shows the bay and a good architectural feature: the opening into the lower level of the house has cross pieces like a window frame; Steve and/or John’s idea to enhance local architect Eric Fagerland’s design.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

north

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I wish I had taken a photo of the luncheon table, a few steps down from the kitchen. Sometimes it seems intrusive to take photos showing the inside of friends’ houses, so I tend to avoid it even at moments when it would be appropriate.

Allan did take this photo in the kitchen.

Allan did take this photo in the kitchen.

I hope I am counting and not pointing. (On an earlier visit, I did point at the drawer and cupboard handles, whose shape is the shape of a wave, so perfect for a home by the water.) The book is Eden on Their Minds, which I took to show them.

I did (of course) photograph Chef Steve’s delicious food.

the salad, picked from the kitchen garden

the salad, with greens picked from the kitchen garden

mushrooms in sauce on polenta

mushrooms in sauce on polenta cakes

so delicious

so delicious

After lingering over coffee, we went out to tour the garden. To Allan’s and my surprise, a very light mist had begun to descend. Before we went to see the new green roof on the pumphouse, John showed us the diagram he had made on his computer.

I wish I could remember how many inches each layer represents.

I wish I could remember how many inches each layer represents. It is a very exact diagram.

The view from John's computer desk would prevent me from getting much done.

The view from John’s computer desk would prevent me from getting much done; I would just gaze.

Then outside and to the north of the house...

Then outside and to the north of the house…

...to the patch of dahlias by the kitchen garden.

…to the patch of dahlias by the kitchen garden.

dahlia

dahlia

the renowned dahlia 'Bishop of Llandalf'

the renowned dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandalf’

dahlia with a glimpse of Willapa Bay

dahlia with a glimpse of Willapa Bay

an extra that the catalog added to the order

an extra that the catalog added to the order

a dahlia guest

a dahlia guest

The dahlias came from Old House Dahlias (Mark Harvey) in Portland (purchased at the Portland Home and Garden Show).

We turned to a close examination of the newly planted green roof of the pumphouse with its collection of succulents generously sent by Garden Tour Nancy’s friend Mary from Pasadena. Mary had been here for Music in the Gardens and clearly appreciated Steve and John’s garden.

roof

green roof

roof2

John gives a sense of scale.

John gives a sense of scale.

succulent forest at eye level

succulent forest at eye level

Pink salvia by the pumphouse

Pink salvia by the pumphouse with Cuban oregano

Now began our walk through all the borders.

a hydrangea flower on one long sideways stem

a hydrangea flower on one long sideways stem

Hydrangea fading into subtle autumn hues.

Hydrangea fading into subtle autumn hues.

It had been bright blue like this...

It had been bright blue like this…

The subtler colours have their own beauty.

The subtler colours have their own beauty.

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'lemon twist' (Lemon Twist Hinoki Cypress)

Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Lemon Twist’ (Lemon Twist Hinoki Cypress)

Salvia guaranitica 'Winnifred Gilman'

Salvia guarantica

This plant was from Seaside gardener Pam Fleming.

This plant was from Seaside gardener Pam Fleming.

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Little Goldstar' backed with Salvia guaranitica

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii ‘Little Goldstar’ backed with Salvia guaranitica

red fountain grass backed with Salvia 'Black and Blue'

red fountain grass backed with Salvia ‘Black and Blue’ (backed with Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed)

red fountain grass, a dahlia, and a dwarf conifer that looks like a fern

red fountain grass, a dahlia, and a dwarf conifer that looks like a fern

Senecio greyii with leaves edged in silver

Senecio greyii with leaves edged in silver

dahlia

dahlia

Asclepias by the pond

Asclepias by the pond

Caryopteris 'Blue Balloon'

Caryopteris ‘Blue Balloon’

Genista:  I like the airy appearance without the flowers.

Genista: I like the airy appearance without the flowers.

a bright pink hebe

a bright pink hebe

pond garden

pond garden; the pink phlox is ‘Sherbet’

Coronilla valentina variegata

Coronilla valentina variegata (with the pale foliage, had bright yellow flowers, common name scorpion vetch!)

the pond garden from the other side (with rain making splashes in the water)

the pond garden from the other side (with rain making splashes in the water)

The spruce (left) will get outsized and will be removed soon.

The spruce (left) will get outsized and will be removed soon.

pond3

On the other side of the entry drive, we took a close look at Hydrangea ‘Plum Passion’.

Hydrangea 'Plum Passion'

Hydrangea ‘Plum Passion’

delicately fluffy lacecap flowers

delicately fluffy lacecap flowers

Pittosporum

Pittosporum, love the black stems

The bench may get an arbour soon.

The bench may get an arbour soon.

As the rain became a bit harder, we strolled on up the driveway.

As the rain became a bit harder, we strolled on up the driveway.

On the left of the driveway is a new bed, created with painstaking effort to get the native meianthemum (false lily of the valley) out, at least for awhile. The exposed root reminds me of the stone crevice garden at the John Kuzma garden in Portland.

new bed

new bed with new species rhododendrons

looking east toward the house

looking east toward the house

young species rhodo with old snag

young species rhodo with old snag

We all wondered at this red rhododendron blooming now.

We all wondered at this red rhododendron blooming now.

seems odd!

seems odd!

an impressively large fungus at the base of some salal

an impressively large fungus at the base of some salal

fungus

with Steve's hand for comparison

with Steve’s hand for comparison

an offshoot of the fungus

an offshoot of the fungus

on up the drive to the house

on up the drive to the house

Hebe 'Quicksilver' to the north of the driveway

Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ to the north of the driveway

Steve and John’s ladies in waiting section is admirably small. They had just been to Whitney Gardens and Nursery and returned with a few treasures (limited by plant hauling in a Prius).

Pinus densiflora 'Golden Ghost', stunning

Pinus densiflora ‘Golden Ghost’, stunning

Just look at that foliage.

Just gaze upon that foliage.

and look some more

and look some more

Rhododendron 'Cherries and Merlot'

Rhododendron ‘Cherries and Merlot’

along the front of the house

along the front of the house

the drainage swale between the wings of the house

the drainage swale between the wings of the house; water from the roofs drips into here with a pleasant sound.

With the rain coming down in earnest now, we prepared to leave, although we were not sure if we were going to be able to work or not.

Rain or not, we had to examine the upper garden more thoroughly.

Rain or not, we had to examine the upper garden more thoroughly.

the form of the almost human tree

the form of the almost human, huggable tree

Steve says “The huggable tree is:

Xanthocyparis Nootkatensis ‘Green Arrow’ (Green Arrow Weeping Cedar)

The foreground shrub in the same shot (to the left) is:

Ulmus x Hollandica ‘Jacqueline Hillier’ (Dwarf Elm ‘Jacqueline Hillier’)”

the clearing of the white hydrangea

the clearing of the white hydrangea

a kiwi among rhodos seeks hosts on which to climb

a kiwi among rhodos seeks hosts on which to climb

a bank of heather dating back to the old garden (pre Steve and John)

a bank of heather dating back to the old garden (pre Steve and John)

I was still taking photos after we got in our van to drive away.

looking north from the parking area

looking north from the parking area

and northeast back to the house

and northeast back to the house

This spectacular garden will be on a Water Music Festival rhododendron garden tour next spring; I will let you know as soon as the date is set.

For our previous visits to the garden, see:

our first visit, Sept. 26 last year

a springtime visit, April 23

a June visit, June 21

the garden on tour day, July 20

I want to live a long life to see young parts of this garden mature over the years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 19 July 2014

Music in the Gardens Tour, Long Beach Peninsula

a benefit for the Water Music Festival

Barclay Garden

photo 4

The Barclay garden and its neighbour (also on the tour) were the site of Clarke Nursery during my first decade on the Peninsula and many the shopping trip I made here.

I don’t think I did the two gardens justice on tour day because I was having problems hobbling around, problems that distracted me from photo taking.

Allan got this photo of the meadow where once upon a time potted plants for sale were displayed.

looking west: Allan got this photo of the meadow where once upon a time potted plants for sale were displayed.

looking east toward the Barclay house

the north side of the house (Allan’s photo)

barclay

the front garden

the front garden looking north

front

in the front garden (Allan's photo)

in the front garden (Allan’s photo)

seating to catch the afternoon and evening sun, west side of house

seating to catch the afternoon and evening sun, west side of house (Allan’s photo)

looking southwest-ish

looking southwest-ish

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)

The garden was established years ago so its shrubs and trees are mature.

The garden was established years ago so its shrubs and trees are mature.

path in front (west side) garden (Allan's photo)

path in front (west side) garden (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I know that Allan took all these path photos out of interest sparked by the memory of how years ago, probably 2005, when Mr. Barclay had recently bought the property, we brought the garden back from much weediness and uncovered all of these little paths in the west side garden beds.

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)

To the north of the house is Mr. Barclay’s kitchen garden.  He has laid chicken wire on the grass and says it keeps the deer from entering the garden.

 

the kitchen garden

the kitchen garden

coming around the north side of the house

coming around the north side of the house

garden tour guests on the deck

garden tour guests on the deck

Mr. Barclay in yellow shirt talked with Garden Tour Nancy in a white top.

 

deck on east side of house (Allan's photo)

deck on east side of house (Allan’s photo)

treats and wine on the deck (Allan's photo)

Refreshments were served on the deck (Allan’s photo)

The lawn below the deck sweeps across the bayfront in a smooth transition to the garden to the south, which was also on the tour.

The lawn below the deck sweeps across the bayfront in a smooth transition to the garden to the south, which was also on the tour.

Tom Trudell was the musician at this garden.

Tom Trudell was the musician at this garden.

He hammed it up when I asked him to strike a performance pose.

He hammed it up when I jokingly asked him to strike a performance pose.

Tom Trudell, who teaches and plays jazz piano

Tom Trudell, who teaches and plays jazz.

deck3

The deck stretches halfway along the east side of the house.

hydrangeas

a photo from a pre-tour visit in early June

a photo from a pre-tour visit in early June

at the southeast corner of the house

at the southeast corner of the house

the garden on the south side of the house

the garden on the south side of the house

I startled a snake sunning itself, or else it startled me.  You can decide by the camera being a little blurry.

I startled a snake sunning itself, or else it startled me. Or both.  You can decide by the camera being a little blurry.  (I like garter snakes.)

southpath2

garden beds south of house

garden beds south of house

looking east on our pre-tour visit in early June

looking east on our pre-tour visit in early June

The hydrangeas caused a sensation among the tour guests.

The hydrangeas caused a sensation among the tour guests.

coming round to the west side of the house

coming round to the west side of the house

more floriferous hydrangeas

more floriferous hydrangeas

Next, we will go next door to my favourite bayside garden, that of Steve and John.  From the Barclay garden, we can walk through to their kitchen garden.

a peek from the Barclay garden to Steve and John's garden just next door to the south.

a peek from the Barclay garden to Steve and John’s garden just next door to the south.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 21 April 2014

We returned to Stephen and John’s glorious garden, which I had last seen with Garden Tour Nancy in September, this time to see the rhododendrons in bloom.  Allan and I were first to arrive at 4:30, soon joined by Garden Tour Nancy and Phil and a bit later by Pam and Kathy from Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart.  Stephen and John are regular shoppers at that excellent little nursery.

As we waited for Pam and Kathy to arrive (who had the longest drive by far and were delivering a Japanese maple), we admired the assorted views from the living room.  I am always a little hesitant to take lots of photos inside a home which is not officially on a home tour, but here are some hints (with permission):

the view, east over Willapa Bay

the view, east over Willapa Bay

two of a large collection of garden books

one of a large collection of garden books

Oh, and look, a book by local writer and daily blogger Sydney Stevens.

more gardening books

more gardening books

window view looking north

window view looking north

and east again

and east again

The garden will be one of seven or eight on the Peninsula Garden Tour, Music in the Gardens, on July 19th.  The musician will probably be sitting on the patio shown above.

This is their favourite bird sculpture...

This is their favourite bird sculpture…

and these were mine.

and this was my favourite.

birds2

And then…Pam and Kathy arrived and we soon walked out in the soft light to tour the garden.  I took copious notes, first on my phone (with many comical results by autospell like a “blow dry” rather than loderi rhododendron) and then scribbled on notecards.  I do hope I will be able to decipher them and get the right plant names on the many photos.

some of my notes!

some of my notes!  I gave up on autospell after ridiculous results

We began west of the parking area by the house.

We began west of the parking area by the house.

Intense fragrance in the air came from a huge rhododendron to the north, the same one we had seen from the north window.  I had no idea that rhododendrons ever had that intoxicating a scent.  Stephen and John’s garden and the property just to the north of it were originally part of Clarke Nursery, and the rhododendron collection goes back many years.  It is a beautiful thing that two knowledgeable rhodo fanciers bought this property.

Rhododendron loderi 'King George'

Rhododendron loderi ‘Venus’

king george

The swoonworthy sweet fragrance made it hard to move on!

me, John, and Pam

me, John, and Pam

a very prostrate yew from The Planter Box

a very prostrate yew from The Planter Box

a Heuchera in bloom, probably 'Snow Angel'?

a Heuchera in bloom, probably ‘Snow Angel’?

bright new leaves on Pieris

bright new leaves on Pieris

frog

looking back toward the house and a striking Japanese maple

looking back toward the house and a striking Acer

and back to King George!

and back to Venus!

We then all went round the north side of the house to the bay.  Next door is the former Clarke Nursery home, and its garden will also be on the garden tour.

looking forth from Stephen and John's lawn

looking forth from Stephen and John’s lawn

As we strolled, flocks of birds swooped just above the water of the bay.

flock

flock2

Kathy, John, Pam, Phil, Nancy, Allan, John

Kathy, John, Pam, Phil, Nancy, Allan, John

Everyone focused their attention on Rhododenron 'Shamrock'...blooms on St Patrick's Day (my birthday!)

Everyone focused their attention on Rhododenron ‘Shamrock’…blooms on St Patrick’s Day (my birthday!)

Everyone focused their attention on Rhododenron 'Shamrock'...which had bloomed on St Patrick's Day (my birthday!)

Rhododenron ‘Shamrock’

our native evergreen huckleberry

our native evergreen huckleberry

the east patio

the east patio

John and Stephen have accentuated this lovely native dell.

John and Stephen have accentuated this lovely native dell.

moss and evergreen huckleberry

moss and evergreen huckleberry

Last time we visited, they wondered how to make a good walkway around the south corner of the house.  Over the winter, local landscaper Steve Clarke, whose family once owned this property, built this perfect solution.   I wish I had that sort of hardscaping skill.

the elegant new walkway, easy for wheelbarrows.

the elegant new walkway, easy for wheelbarrows….and discussion of what to plant in that corner.  Pam suggested a variegated Eucryphia.

walkway

The Eucryphia in question, I think from Back Alley.  Autospell could not handle that plant name.

The Eucryphia in question, I think from Back Alley. Autospell could not handle that plant name.

Rhododendron 'Capistrano'

Rhododendron ‘Capistrano’

mossy dell from the newwalkway

mossy dell from the new walkway

west side of the house, south of the parking area

west side of the house, south of the parking area, with a golden Lonicera

looking west down the driveway

looking west down the driveway

the west courtyard between the two wings of the house

the west courtyard between the two wings of the house

trees

courtyard

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, variegated Japanese maple leaves

Allan’s photo, variegated Japanese maple leaves

Euphorbia flowers

Euphorbia flowers

Pam did not have her camera and particularly asked for photos of certain plants which caught her eye.  This little conifer, whose name I did not write down, was one.

Pam

setting

bed

One of the old rhododendrons

One of the old rhododendrons

hosta and mahonia

hosta backed with mahonia

a massive redwood trunk

a massive redwood trunk

magestic

magestic

sword fern and redwood

sword fern and redwood

house

gold

Vaccinium nummularium (a wee evergreen huckleberry)

Vaccinium nummularium (a wee evergreen huckleberry)

down a gentle slope...red huckleberries

down a gentle slope…red huckleberries

whirly

Next to three railroad tie steps going down, a Polemonium had popped up on all its own.  I am sure it is ‘Stairway to Heaven’, which is perfect as from below those simple risers lead toward the house.

Polemonium (Jacob's Ladder) 'Stairway to Heaven'

Polemonium (Jacob’s Ladder) ‘Stairway to Heaven’

a glade, with a kiwi vine

a glade, with a kiwi vine

Pam had to pet it.

Pam had to pet it.

You can see why.

You can see why.

Pam commented that a kiwi with nothing to climb on will tend to stay smaller and not clamber all over.

Maianthemum (false lily of the valley)

Maianthemum (false lily of the valley)

When asked what we do about the rampant native groundcover, I had no solution but to live with it.  It does go dormant later in the year after going through a rather annoying yellowing off stage.

another choice rhodo

another choice rhodo…’Silver Skies’ perhaps?

Allan pointed out how meticulously the old fronds of the sword ferns were clipped.

Allan pointed out how meticulously the old fronds of the sword ferns were clipped.  No old stubs at all.

another rhodo...and I am floundering in my notes!

another rhodo…and I am floundering in my notes!  Sir Charles Lemon, perhaps? S&J know all the names!

Fatsia x hedera, Allan's photo

Fatsia x hedera, Allan’s photo

When the driveway was put in after Stephen and John bought the house, the builders wanted to remove the Thuja.  No indeed, the driveway curves around it.

drive

a thuja saved

To our south, while clearing the woods of salal (I applaud that!!) and alders, Stephen and John revealed a tall grove of species rhododendrons so old that even Steve Clarke could not identify them.

rhodogrove

cloud forest

cloud forest

We amble down the drive.

We amble down the drive.

Stephen and John cleared all these woods with pick and saw.

Stephen and John cleared all these woods with pick and saw.

Mango Tango

Pam pointed out that the flower of Rhododendron ‘Mango Tango’ matches the new growth on the huckleberry.

Next, in one of the open bays in the woods along the side of the drive, a bright hydrangea caught my eye.

hydrangea

gold leaves

behind it, a blue corydalis

behind it, a blue corydalis

hydrangea from a Dan Hinkley collection

a hydrangea from a Dan Hinkley collection

bronze

large serrated hydrangea leaves

large serrated hydrangea leaves

When they joined the Rhododendron Society of Portland, Stephen and John were given a rhododendron as a gift, and they chose this one:

Rhododendon 'Starbright Champagne'

Rhododendon ‘Starbright Champagne’

Rhododendron erosum

Rhododendron erosum

R. erosum

R. erosum

I recognized Disporum 'Night Heron'..doing better than mine.

I recognized Disporum ‘Night Heron’..doing better than mine.

I walked way back to look at this bright epimidium.

I walked way back to look at this bright epimidium.

Next to it, an epimidium in flower

Next to it, an epimidium in flower..looking best when you turn up the blooms to look underneath

and found a dark stream that marks the southern edge of the property...

I found a dark stream that marks the southern edge of the property…

flowing to the bay from the center of the Peninsula.

flowing to the bay from the center of the Peninsula.

Pam was interested to see the Lindera (spicebush) which had just leafed out.

Lindera benzoin?

Lindera benzoin?

As we came to the Thuja by the driveway, I thought that its bright skirt of foliage was a shrub planted underneath.

thuja

We all examined and remarked how the lower branches had layered and rooted into the ground.

We all examined and remarked how the lower branches had layered and rooted into the ground.

To our south, another bay in the woods held a Cryptomeria grove.  I kept asking what conifer each little tree was and only a bit later did I realize how little I had grasped that it was indeed a Cryptomeria grove and that they were all Cryptomerias!

Cryptomeria spiraliter falcata

Cryptomeria spiraliter falcata

another cryptomeria

another cryptomeria

but wait...is this one?  I am floundering in my notes.

Cryptomeria japonica ‘Auricariodes’

From the Xera catalog: Cryptomeria japonica ‘Auricariodes’ Zn6a (-10º to -5ºF) Cupressaceae

“Fantastic, exotic looking conifer with rope-like branches that are sparse  and twisty when young but become denser with age. To 10′ tall and forming a conical shape over time. Grows slowly in youth, picks up steam after several years. Full sun to light shade in WELL DRAINED soil, with regular summer water. Excellent specimen tree, well behaved. Always looks cool. Coldy hardy. Old selection of Japanese Cedar. Monkey Puzzle in miniature. “

I’m pretty good at going through a garden and identifying shrubs and perennials but am sadly lacking in knowledge of conifers.  A garden like this makes me want to change that.

another one...perhaps elegans

Cryptomeria elegans…or is it…’Dense Jade’?

a variegated sambucus

a variegated sambucus

I've never met a sambucus I did not love.

I’ve never met a sambucus I did not love.

On the other side of the driveway lies the big, still pond, which used to provide irrigation for Clarke Nursery.

looking north

looking north

We had to look from every angle.

We enjoyed every angle.

pond3

pond4

pond5

the view toward the neighbour's house

the view toward the neighbour’s house

pond7

reflection

bench

Those who like still water won't find that there are too many pond photos.

Those who like still water won’t find that there are too many pond photos.

Stephen and John are making a new garden bed on the north side of the pond.

new

I think that is where I saw this little rhodo.

I think that is where I saw this little rhodo.

and definitely this tree.

and definitely this tree.

photos

Pam and I were quite taken with it.

two

touring

We walked through large trees on the way back to the house.

We walked among larger trees on the way back to the house.

Eastern white pine

Eastern white pine

graceful trunks

graceful trunks; I think this was the very old, very large cotoneaster

And then…into the house where we were given martinis…

shaken by Stephen

shaken by Stephen (and note how the kitchen cabineta have wavelike handles)

and some amazingly delicious hors d’oeuvres.

martinia

After a martini, I was incapable to remember to photograph the caramelized onion and cheese on toast most delicious snacks I’ve had…or the friends having conversations about plants and books and architecture.  I do remember that earlier in the garden tour, Nancy said that a certain book, one that was fun and easy to read, was like “butter” and I loved that.

Thanks, Stephen and John, for including us in the soirée, and I hope you’ll let me know if I have any plant names wrong.  I believe your garden is going to be the best on the tour this year.

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Sunday, 17 November, 2013

The weather surprised us by being quite workable after some morning rain. While hooking up the trailer, Allan found a large Melianthus major flower thrown on the sidewalk, clearly by a finger blight suspect who just wanted to damage and not take. I had wanted to take a photo of ALL the flowers that have come out on the plant.

now missing one

now missing one

I saw an elephant garlic blossom also thrown upon the sidewalk.

When we arrived at our first job, Larry and Robert’s just five doors down (across Pearl Avenue), we saw that across the street from them, lots of hydrangea flowers were on the ground. We assume the same finger blighter hit that yard, as well, and yanked flowers off the hydrangeas by the fence. Whoever it was would have had to be tall enough to reach my Melianthus flower. I ask you, why?

evidence

evidence

color echo

color echo with the fire station in the garden scross from Larry and Robert’s

We are having an influx of new neighbours on the street, including (soon) at the house across from Larry and Robert’s, and we are happy to welcome them. We’ve already met one on our block, named Judy, three doors down!. I’m calling her “New Judy” for now (in my mind) and when speaking of Judy four doors down, I don’t call my dear friend “Old Judy”, but instead “Our Judy”, a phrasing I learned from Coronation Street and from my previous marriage to a Leedsman. Or I could call them Judy Four Doors Down and Judy Three Doors Down. I used to know so many Kathleens that we just called them all by their last names (till two of them moved away and now I just have two Kathleens in my life, one of whom we still call “Sayce” from olden days). I’ve never before known multiple Judys!

Whoever moves in across from Larry and Robert’s, if they are gardeners, will find some nice boxwood and hydrangeas. Most of the yard is incomplete and will be an interesting blank palate for someone to play with. The blueberry and other shrubs that tones so well with the police station dates back to when architect Anthony and writer Victoria Stoppiello had a wonderful, mysterious, half wild garden there. The very first thing I would do is cut down that badly pruned rhododendron that is so gangly….but it is no secret that I am not a fan of plain old rhodos, ill pruned and in the wrong place. Now, some nice species rhodos with fabulous indumentum like at a certain bay side garden are another thing altogether.

New Judy loves to garden and has a completely blank slate of lawn. I wonder if she knows about the newspaper method of garden bed creation. Perhaps she would like some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.

There is even a possibility that some people who bought a nearby house to “flip” it have fallen in love with Ilwaco and might keep it as a second home. Ilwaco can have that effect!

Meanwhile, at Larry and Robert’s, I had laid out the bulbs and we planted and weeded small weeds along the front of the garden beds.

looking from Larry and Robert's east, with Judy and Tom's in the background

looking from Larry and Robert’s east, with Judy and Tom’s in the background

a lovely photo but I left my bulb bucket by the boat!

a lovely photo but I left my bulb bucket by the boat!

Here we mostly plant Narcissi with some Alliums and minor bulbs. I dared some Tulip ‘Princess Irene’ in the boat as it is short and strong for the wind and perhaps the deer will ignore it.

Larry and Robert's old hydrangea

Larry and Robert’s old hydrangea

pineapple sage

pineapple sage

and an even bigger pineapple sage.  (blooms late, leaves smell like pineapple)

and an even bigger pineapple sage. (blooms late, leaves smell like pineapple)

Both the pineapple sages came back from last year and are thriving on the east wall with protection from southwest wind.

Then…down to the Port to finish the project we left yesterday to go to the Wizard of Oz play.

Allan weeded a green lawn of short grass out from this bed...what a job!

Allan weeded a green lawn of short grass out from this bed…what a job!

Two boys were skateboarding on the picnic table by the restrooms and then they started to sing an offkey version of Over the Rainbow, so they must have seen the play, as well.

finished what I started yesterday

finished what I started yesterday

I put two plant starts from my friend Sheila into the bed above: a hebe and Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’. We planted short narcissi in both beds, especially ‘Baby Moon’. We went on to add Baby Moon, Itzim, Peeping Tom, Baby Boomer, and Sun Disc narcissi at the Shoalwater Cove and Pelicano curbside garden, and Time Enough Books, and Queen La De Da’s. The Baby Moons should still be blooming prolifically for the annual children’s parade at the beginning of May.

Last year, we planted scads of crocuses and Iris reticulata as well. Crows and seagulls were watching and dug up and pecked at almost all of them.

colour echo with grasses and crab pots by Queen La De Da's Art Castle

faint colour echo with grasses and crab pots by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle

Signs of crabbing are everywhere now, as crabbers get poised for when the season begins.

a truckload of floats

a truckload of floats

The frames are a shout out to my favourite blogger, Mr. Tootlepedal.

I had a big idea of getting my own bulbs planted in the last hour of daylight. A drizzle arriving just as we parked at home put an end to that. Our Judy walked down with some Dave’s Killer Bread loaves (essential to the digestion) that she and Tom had picked up for us across the river, and we had a visit in the misty rain. At least I got my bulbs out on a shelf to stay nice and airy, and if it rains on Monday, I will organize them by garden area so they go in quickly when the time comes. A storm is due; I would love time in the morning to plant the Veterans Field bulbs in Long Beach before it arrives, as we certainly did not get there today.

Meanwhile, as with Saturday evening, I spend hours making bulb spreadsheets for each friend who went in on my big order. I do enjoy a nice alphabetical spreadsheet and it is a huge relief when the money comes out right, as I juggle a lot when sorting to make sure this person gets $30 of bulbs and that one exactly $100, and that one $50, and a more impoverished friend maybe just $10 worth. People with a deer problem get no tulips; those with fenced areas or protected containers can grow tulips. I charge no mark up; the profit (other than in the labor of the ones I plant) is in seeing the beauty in the spring.

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