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Posts Tagged ‘Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’’

Saturday, 18 April 2015

After my concern that someone mean would look over the fence and sneer at my weeds, I opened the curtains this morning to see a stranger gazing over the low front fence into the garden with a most appreciative expression. I ducked so she would not be embarrassed.

I wish I could start with a burst of energy on days off.  Instead, I tend to fritter and put off the beginning of the gardening day.

Smokey encouraged me to get started.

Smokey encouraged me to get started.

I got a surprising amount done considering that I did not begin till noon, including transplanting four roses into the back (fenced) garden, as I am tired of deer eating them.  (But now what will they eat when they jump the low front garden fence?)  The rose transplanting should have been done in March or earlier.  I got several Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ planted along the fence, to fill in between the ones already there, because I like them so much.

before filling in

before filling in

 After that, I tackled the weedy corner of the front bed, below.

before, looking west

before, looking west

I soon realized that I wanted to remove ALL the variegated carex along the front border.  The more I examined it, the more concerned I got by how far it has run into the center of the garden.  This required much swinging of the pick.  When Allan returned from his motorcycle excursion, he helped me with one large and stubborn clump; the pick simply bounced off unless swung with extreme force.

My energy got flowing full force at around 4:30 PM.  We had dinner plans so I couldn’t take advantage of that and work till dusk.

5:50 PM

5:50 PM

When we began this garden in fall of 2010, I thought it was such a good idea to use the carex as an edger along the front.  Having to trim its tatty blades back hard in early spring this year made me go off of it, and its running habit was the death knell.

after

after, with gallon sized Sky Pencils planted along the fence.

The weather looks pleasant in the photos.  It was not.  All day a strong, cold, irksome wind buffeted the garden.

At six, we met Kathleen for dinner at Long Beach Thai.  The first thing I asked her when we all sat down is if, during the months of long daylight, could she possibly manage to wait till 7 to eat?  (She is on a much more morning-person schedule than we are.  At home, we dine at nine or ten o’ clock.)  She agreed, so I won’t be having to stop gardening this soon again.

The food was delicious, spicy and with all of the flavours that Thai food is supposed to have.

fresh rolls

fresh rolls

larb gai

larb gai

Allan's cashew curry stir fry

Allan’s tofu cashew stir fry

We lingered until sunset.  Because of wildfires in Siberia, the sun here is setting in a huge red ball.

DSC00005

After dinner, I sat down at home and read Straw Bale Gardens; the pressure was on as it was two days overdue.  The author’s gently droll sense of humour made it entertaining as well as informative.

straw

Example:

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I won’t have time to try out his methods this year.  Maybe someday, in retirement.

As for now, I planned to take two more days off to plant and weed.

Sunday, 19 April 2015

Smokey and Mary waiting for me to get started

Smokey and Mary waiting for me to get started

After the usual difficulty in getting started, I went back to weeding and planting Sky Pencils in the front garden.  I found one more deer-nibbled rose to move to the back garden.

Allan helped me by getting out two difficult clumps of carex.

Allan's photo: before

Allan’s photos: before

and after

and after

carex pile just from that one spot

carex pile just from that one spot

By pre-arrangement, Debbie and Dave came by to pick up a pile of the Carex, some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, a few sanguisorbas and a few other divisions for the fall plant sale.

Debbie will divide and pot them all up.

Debbie will divide and pot them all up.

After the carex removal and a construction type chat with Dave (who is an expert builder and in fact built the house in which he and Debbie live), Allan went down to the port to see his pal Chris sailing his trimaran.

boat

Chris pulling up the main sail as his friend holds the pontoon

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lot’s of hand paddling after Allan pushed them off the dock

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boat

it looks like they’re up on the hydrofoils in this long shot as the Ginger returns to port

While I complained all day (mostly quietly in my mind) about the horrible cold maddening wind, Chris drove by after his outing and said it had been wonderful and he had “never before gone so fast”.

Meanwhile, Allan had nobly gone to work for a little while and strimmed behind the fence at the boatyard.  We hope this keeps the boatyard crew from even thinking about breaking out the Round Up.

Allan's photos: before

Allan’s photos: before

after.

after.

Last year I found time to actually dig out a strip of grass along the fence.  This year, time for that has eluded me.

Allan had to move assorted gear in order to do a good job.

before

before

after

after

and a boat

and a boat

My big project of the day was to weed all the “stink mint” out of the north east corner of the garden and plant some more Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ along the fence.  Here is before photo from last week:

DSC00425

I found a darling little plant that had been completely hidden by a cluster of suckers from the big tree.  I’m pretty sure that I got it at Joy Creek Nusrsery.

IMG_9133

While perfection was not achieved, the results were certainly an improvement, and I had gotten all of my Sky Pencils planted.

at stopping time

at stopping time

I was happy to stop at 6:30, as we had plans for another dinner out.  We treated Todd to dinner at the Depot in thanks for all the great plants he has sent us and in celebration of having a true CPN (Certified Plant Nut) back on the peninsula.  When he arrived, my 60th birthday celebration that seems to never end continued with two cool plants, a pardacanda (candy lily) and a Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot).

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, surely the last of the endless birthday

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I forgot to photograph the three scrumptious scallops that we had for a starter; they were so beautiful, and so good, that I dived right in.

Here they are, courtesy The Depot website

Here they are, courtesy The Depot website

the special:  Rockfish, with parsley pesto, on beans, with clams.

the special: Rockfish, with parsley pesto, on beans, with clams.

Allan's rockfish with a mushroom sauce

Allan’s rockfish with a mushroom sauce

At my request, we got to hear the story of how Todd became the curator of the display garden at Plant Delights, and reminiscences of learning to love plants as a child while exploring the woods and bayside of the Peninsula. He told us that his first memory was of admiring a container of pansies at his parents’ house and thinking “Those are cool!”, and said that someone told us we often follow a path in life inspired by our first memory.  I think my first memory is listening to my Grandma’s cuckoo clock.  Hmmm.

We lingered till after closing time, while the staff put the chairs put up on the other tables.  Chef Michael kept telling us we did not have to leave yet.  When we did, the restaurant looked like the final scene in My Dinner with Andre, the film in which two friends talk and the end shows them suddenly realizing that the restaurant is closed and the floor is being swept.  (This seems to be a common occurence when we go out to dinner with friends.)

Chef Michael Lalewicz

Chef Michael Lalewicz

my-dinner-with-andre-1

Just before bedtime, I finished a book that I would give ten stars instead of five on Goodreads, if I could.  I recommend it highly and I hope to find time to write about it a little bit more, some rainy day.

I am smitten with author Dee Williams and wish that we were friends.

I am smitten with author Dee Williams and wish that we were friends.

I intend to take one more day off and get as many of my “ladies in waiting” (plants in waiting) into the ground as possible.

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Thursday, 16 April 2015

I overslept, on a day when we had much to do.

Allan's photo of a wild cucumber vine climbing through our dogwood outside the kitchen window

Allan’s photo of a wild cucumber vine climbing through our dogwood outside the kitchen window

my photo of an epimidium that Todd gave me yesterday

my photo of an epimidium that Todd gave me yesterday

On the way out of town, I looked in passing at the community building garden, which I had recklessly agreed yesterday that we would take on.  Oh my gosh, it was weedy.  I felt a great sense of doom as I would rather spend the time on my own garden.  I brooded about it for some time, and after awhile Allan said that it was his idea that he might go weed it himself sometime soon when I am weeding my own garden.  That would be wonderfully noble.  (He can have ALL the wages!)  Unlike me, he does not have an aversion to heather planted on level ground…or the dry scritchy scratchiness of weeding horsetail and bindweed around heather planted on level ground…If heather was nicely transplantable, which it is NOT, I would move it to the part of the garden that slopes and then it would look like wonderful Scottish moors in miniature.

The Depot Restaurant

At our first job, which was supposed to be just deadheading, I suddenly could not resist a project.

Allan deadheaded the narcissi and tulips.  All day long the sun was too bright for good photos.

Allan deadheaded the narcissi and tulips. All day long the sun was too bright for good photos.

I did not take a before photo of digging loads of schizostylis out of an area where I want to plant annuals.  I love schizostylis but sometimes it is a good plant gone bad.  Dan Hinkley said that it tends to be more of a runner when it is seeking water, because in its native South Africa, it grows on damp riverbanks.  (Three days later, we dined at the Depot and I learned that the restaurant is going to be painted soon.  I won’t be planting cosmos in this garden bed till AFTER that happens, and must remember to put stake tripods over the alliums and nicotiana.)

during the project with three buckets of plants removed

during the project with three buckets of plants removed (and my shadow)

after, with three Nicotiana langsdorfii added

after, with three Nicotiana langsdorfii added

ajuga and variegated saxifrage growing under the parking lot barrier

ajuga and variegated saxifrage growing under the parking lot barrier

buds of Tulip 'Green Wave', one of my favourites, a parrot tulip which is the latest of all.

buds of Tulip ‘Green Wave’, one of my favourites, a parrot tulip which is the latest of all.

And best of all, parrot tulip 'Green Wave', a very late bloomer

Last year:  parrot tulip ‘Green Wave’, a very late bloomer

The Basket Case Greenhouse

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Fred had made a trip inland to bring back some shrubs, especially Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’, a great vertical green almost deer-proof accent plant that is hard to find for sale around here.

It was difficult to take photos for the Facebook page because of bright sunlight.  He’d brought back some very cool plants, including ‘Pink Lemonade’ blueberry, Lonicera fragrantissima, ‘Orange Rocket’ barberry, Sarcococca, and more.  And a ‘Shasta’ doublefile viburnum.  The one in the yard just north of the Basket Case looked like this today:

double file virburnum, so called because the flowers march down the branches in pairs.

double file virburnum, so called because the flowers march down the branches in pairs.

me and Fred admiring the Orange Rocket barberries.

me and Fred admiring the Orange Rocket barberries.

Trying to decide if I will take ALL the Sky Pencils!

Trying to decide if I will take ALL the Sky Pencils!

Just as I was perusing the availability list for the next order, and Allan was loading the van with all but five of the Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’, who should show up but Todd.  While we were on our way north, he was on his way south.  Of course, the availability list was of interest to him, as it would be to any CPN (Certified Plant Nut).

Allan's photo:  the discussion of many plants.

Allan’s photo: the discussion of many plants.

Todd had a t shirt based on Farmville, although Allan only realized that later!

Todd had a t shirt based on Farmville, although Allan only realized that later.

Pondering this as I write, I just realized this is a Plant Delights catalog cover, where up until recently Todd worked as display garden curator.   I am a bit slow on the uptake sometimes.

more plant discussion with Fred joining in

more plant discussion with Fred joining in

A great deal of time seemed to pass (the availability list is long) before we all went off to get back to work.

Golden Sands Assisted Living

Allan and I managed to make a very short stop at the Golden Sands garden where I planted four dahlias and pulled a very few weeds.

Allan's photo: camassia and Tulip 'Florette' at Golden Sands

Allan’s photo: camassia and Tulip ‘Florette’ at Golden Sands

Camassia (Allan's photo)

Camassia (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo of Tulip 'Florette'

Allan’s photo of multi-flowering Tulip ‘Florette’

chives in flower (Allan's photo)

chives in flower (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Klipsan Beach Cottages

At KBC, I offered Mary a couple of Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’.  She liked the idea so much that Allan ended up clearing space and planting four of them.  I knew Mary would like them because she is fond of a formal look.  What got removed was mostly elephant garlic and Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.  I told Mary and Denny that I felt silly because last year I made a fuss when Denny pulled a lot of the elephant garlic (when it was in bloom and adding interest!) and now there is just as much if not more than last year.

Allan making space for the first two Ilexes.

Allan making space for the first two Ilexes.

after

after

Meanwhile, I used the pick to get out a large area where the Bad Aster had taken hold.

Meanwhile, I used the pick to get out a large area where the Bad Aster had taken hold.

before: two more Ilexes would go here.

before: two more Ilexes would go here.

before:  Allan's photo

before: Allan’s photo

after

after (behind to the right of frog)

before:  Allan's photo

before: Allan’s photo

after:  Allan's photo

after: Allan’s photo

Next week we will have time to thin plants out behind the Ilex so it shows better.  Meanwhile, Denny and his helper Lewis had been installing new lattice under the house deck.  I like it much better than the previous criss cross diagonal pattern.

new lattice

elegant new lattice

This fringed tulip has returned for several years.

This fringed tulip has returned for several years.

Tulip 'Green Wave'  (Allan says he finds parrot tulips confusing as he cannot tell if they are starting or finishing their bloom.)

Tulip ‘Green Wave’ (Allan says he finds parrot tulips confusing as he cannot tell if they are starting or finishing their bloom.)

Tulip 'Florette'

Tulip ‘Florette’

Bella (Allan's photo)

my good friend Bella (Allan’s photo)

Bella got smooches.

Bella got smooches from me.  (Allan’s photo)

ready for smooching

ready for smooching

How I love this dog!

How I love this dog!

The light and shade always makes it hard to get a photo that shows the vasty sweep of narcissi by the A Frame.

The light and shade always makes it hard to get a photo that shows the vasty sweep of narcissi by the A Frame.

west end of the pond garden

west end of the pond garden

the weekly view in the east gate

the weekly view in the east gate

This is the new changing view that I am going to try to photograph each week.

This is the new changing view that I am going to try to photograph each week.

I felt compelled, after KBC, to go back to the Basket Case and get the five Sky Pencils that I had left behind.  What if I run out when I start to decide where I want to add more of them to my garden?  Then we went on to the last job of the day, arriving at just before 5 PM.

Andersen’s RV Park

Allan did a weeding session on the garden shed garden while I walked all around and deadheaded narcissi and did some weeding in other areas.

weeding the garden shed garden

weeding the garden shed garden

before (Allan's photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan's photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

Cistus against the garden shed (Allan's photo)

Cistus against the garden shed (Allan’s photo)

Cistus (Allan's photo)

Cistus (Allan’s photo)

The RV Park itself was full.

The RV Park itself was full.  Those are the Payson Hall clubhouse planters to the right.

Allium schubertii coming on in the Payson Hall planters

Allium schubertii coming on in the Payson Hall planters

The picket fence garden:  The sweet peas have sprouted and are maybe 1/4 inch tall!

The picket fence garden: The sweet peas have sprouted and are maybe 1/4 inch tall!

The Cove Restaurant

By seven, we were at The Cove for our Thursday tradition.

map of the adjoining golf course (Allan's photo)

map of the adjoining golf course (Allan’s photo)

tulip in the entry garden (Allan's photo)

tulip in the entry garden (Allan’s photo)

Owner Sondra has been too busy to get these plants out of their pots and into the barrel.

Owner Sondra has been too busy to get these plants out of their pots and into the barrel.

 The tables were full so we sat at the bar and we were able to see Chef Jason Lancaster working hard in the kitchen.

strawberry salad (Allan's photo)

strawberry salad (Allan’s photo)

Wendy and Sondra

Wendy serves up dinner.  Her sister, restaurater Sondra, is in the background.

delicious vegetable stir fry bowl with udon noodles

delicious vegetable stir fry bowl with udon noodles

ahi tuna

ahi tuna

home

We got home just after dusk and as I got out of the van I exclaimed that my Davidia involucrata ‘Sonoma’ is blooming!

a flash photo!  I was very excited!

a flash photo! I was very excited!

I should creep into my old garden to see if the one I planted there fifteen years ago (NOT ‘Sonoma’ so might take ten years to bloom) has flowered.  It never did while I lived there.

Tomorrow, we have to check on the Ilwaco planters for little weeds, get the Anchorage Cottages garden attended to and then make Long Beach as perfect as possible for Saturday’s Clam Festival.

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Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Our north end day was slightly delayed by a stop at 42nd Street Café to find out what needed to be done for an emergency must-be-done-by-the-weekend weeding call I had gotten from the owner.  I have a thing for restaurants, so we will take on the project….tomorrow.

I like to get as many north end jobs done as possible on Wednesdays, and lately I like to go to Klipsan Beach Cottages first.  Owner Mary was getting sad when we would show up at the end of the day, while she and Denny were having dinner and wrapping up their own day, and there would be no time to visit.

I saw a striking sight from the road as we drove up and I walked out to photograph it.  I’m not sure whether to use it on their Facebook page or not.  It does sort of imply that it rains a lot here.

reflective pool

reflective pool

inside the fenced garden

inside the fenced garden

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower' taller than the greenhouse!

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ taller than the greenhouse!

Mary and I wish we knew the name of the rose that she got as a gift.

Mary and I wish we knew the name of the rose that she got as a gift.

the cottages from just outside the fenced garden (looking west)

two of the eight cottages from just outside the fenced garden (looking west)

Next, we deadheaded Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ at the little Oman Builders Supply garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden

At the Wiegardt Gallery, we planted the three Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ that last week just got a scenic tour of the Peninsula and went back home because weather was still too hot and dry.  It had definitely turned wet enough now.

Wiegardt Gallery, west wall, before

Wiegardt Gallery, west wall, before

after, with three Ilex added

after, with three Ilex added

They will make a difference, especially when I get two more.  I just do not understand why they are so hard to come by, when they are such good doers and deer resistant.  This garden used to have two Escallonias, but Eric thought they were too big, so I hope the Ilex will give some tall structure without being annoying.

We also added an Echinacea ‘Green Jewel’ to a newly cleared bed on the south side.  It looks better than any I put in the ground earlier this year and I hope it has gotten big enough to survive any slugs and snails, as they seem to love this plant.

a green jewel

a green jewel

I was at a bit of a loss regarding where to go next.  Golden Sands?  Marilyn’s?  Marilyn’s won out, as we had not gone there last week.  It still bugs me that the alders were limbed so high…

alders

 

But to get a sense of enclosure back, I am thinking the sterile Buddliea that is in the west garden might be just the right size.

Buddleai 'Blueberry Cobbler'

Buddleia ‘Blueberry Cobbler’

I really don’t want to transplant that one, so I hope I can find another one.  Asian Moon, Purple Haze, or the orange Sweet Marmalade would be good if I can just get my hands on one.

Marilyn's, looking north from by the back porch

Marilyn’s, looking north from by the back porch

Marilyn’s daughter, Nancy, has been posting some photos of the deer who live in this garden.

Nancy’s deer photos:

deer

deer

549583_10201315410279639_1070166195_n

 

We still had time to check on Golden Sands Assisted Living garden, which we also skipped last week.  I got two more patches of wild beach strawberries pulled:

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

Still need to get all the way around the back of the SE quadrant….

SW quadrant

SW quadrant

But the southwest quadrant is done!

The strawberries were as thick as the ones on the outside of the landscape timbers.

Allan moved the bench, making even more solidly sittable than it was before.

in 2011.  For a long time it has sat in front of the NW quadrant.

in 2011. For a long time the bench has sat in front of the NW quadrant.

Now the garden can be seen!  (such as it is)

Now the garden can be seen! (such as it is)

The bench is much better here.

The bench is much better here.

What a mess awaits us in the NW quadrant.  Strawberries, up in everyone’s business.

Gah!

Gah!

The soil is tight and rubbly, but once we spend another partial day and get this weeded, we can bring in a load of cow fiber and turn this into a place of beauty.  I have a stash of plants donated by Sheila and Kathleen S. that have been waiting since July (for the sprinkler system to be fixed) to be added to this garden.

Golden Sands: happy rose because of working sprinklers (and rain)

Golden Sands: happy rose because of working sprinklers (and rain)

While at Golden Sands, I got a call and a text from Nancy Allen asking if I could accompany her to a potential garden tour garden tomorrow.  She is already looking ahead to the July 2014 tour.  Can I resist a chance to look at a garden?  Never.  So on the way south, Allan and I added a check up on the Anchorage Cottages garden in order to make tomorrow easier.  (My promise to do that one off weeding job to 42nd Street Café,  and a predicted Friday storm have made the schedule tight for Thursday.)

At the Anchorage:  Allan found this many pampas plumes broken by Sunday's wind.

At the Anchorage: Allan found this many pampas plumes broken by Sunday’s wind.

Manager Beth added this lovely birdbath.

Manager Beth added this lovely birdbath.

Someone, not us, did a nice job of pruning the Escallonia iveyi so one of the Anchorage signs shows better.  When I was taking a photo of it and the cleaned up pampas grass, I noticed more pampas plumes bent over and we had to clip them before we left.

to the left, bent pampas

to the far left, bent pampas

pink pampas plumes at The Anchorage

pink pampas plumes at The Anchorage

I think all the many Pampas grasses at the Anchorage were planted by Dan Hinkley because he and Robert Jones designed the garden for Robert’s sister who used to own the place!

Ironically, our last mission of the day was to tag some large grasses, including one Pampas, and a couple of Phormiums that the port crew are going to remove from the Howerton gardens on Friday.  (If you want to go down there and hang around and try to snag the plants, maybe you could!)  In the curbside garden, these plants block the sightlines and have to go.

Allan tagging a grass by the Loading Dock Village

Allan tagging a grass by the Loading Dock Village

Two more tagged by the much missed old Port Bistro café

Two more tagged by the much missed old Port Bistro café

I want to see the last of this grass and Phormium by Pelicano Restaurant's parking lot.

I want to see the last of this grass and Phormium by Pelicano Restaurant’s parking lot.

When pulling out of several parking lots along Howerton, too-tall plants can block the sight of oncoming traffic.  These plants were not chosen or installed by me, but of course we are the ones who have to chop the darn things down once a year…and that is not enough.  We will replace them with smaller grasses.

This phormium by Powell Gallery must go...it pokes into the sidewalk area.

This phormium by Powell Gallery must go…it pokes into the sidewalk area.

It seems a shame to have to take out the big Pampas grass at its prettiest time, but when it is gone, one will be able to see the sign for Marie Powell’s studio.

Pampas

Pampas

And I am sick of cutting it down.  It’s bad enough to deal with all the Pampas at the Anchorage!  And it also blocks the Pelicano restaurant sign.  Imagine, below, that my shadow is a driver of a car…who cannot see the Pelicano sign at all.

just a glimpse shows of the restaurant sign

just a glimpse shows of the restaurant sign

I am curious whether this fine restaurant’s business will increase when that grass has been replaced with a smaller one.

I took mercy on one centrally located Phormium.  It is so small now…perhaps it is a dwarf cultivar, or just young.

It has escaped the ax for now.

It has escaped the ax for now.

I love ornamental grasses, and even though Randy Powell asked me to do so, I have been refusing to cut the one by his door because it is at its best right now.

not for the chop yet if I can help it!

not for the chop yet if I can help it!

We stopped ever so briefly at Larry and Robert’s garden to add a bucket of river rock to their back garden.  The setting sun was just catching a tree with autumn colour.

autumn

autumn

At home, I watered the tomato and pepper plants in the greenhouse.  A cat drama entertained me in the front garden.

The neighbours' cat, hiding

The neighbours’ cat, hiding in Allan’s garden

I thought it was my Calvin at first till I realized this cat is much smaller.

encounter with Frosty

encounter with Frosty

Onyx

Onyx

further lurking in the front garden

further lurking in the front garden

Neighbour cats from all directions always seem to prefer our garden to their own.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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beehives

While the beehives near the parking area for garden six were interesting, I was more pleased to see a sanican.  A note that I made on my Facebook album of this tour:  One restroom option is NOT enough for ten gardens.  This says to me there might have been ten, rather than seven, gardens on this tour, and that perhaps we found three completely forgettable.

materials

A pile of materials (ingredients!) at the entry to garden seven managed to look artful.

From the foot of a formal stairway, Sheila and  other garden tourists admired a meadow’s vertical accents.

punctuated meadow

stairs detail

This garden was in the process of design by Maurice Horn from Joy Creek Nursery.  My companions and I felt very satisfied with the fifth and sixth gardens, but later at Joy Creek I mentioned to Maurice that we had overheard grumblings about most of the gardens not having enough cool and collectible plants.  I found it commendable for a plant purveyor to say, as he did, that this garden was about structure, not plant collecting.  I gathered he had perhaps taken a couple of complainers gently to task about this, and was glad I had phrased my remark in such a way that I sounded (correctly) like an admirer, not a critic, of garden number six.

further up the steps

and further…

Wide open spaces set off spaces crammed with plants.

I remember once attending a lecture by Ann Lovejoy back when she told a story about gardener Kevin Nicolay.  He visited one of her early gardens and made a pithy comment about how a garden is better if there is at least a bit of room to step back and admire it.

Ah…a delicious cold beverage and cookies were on offer.  The day had turned quite warm for a coastal dweller.

thank you

Past the formal stairs and patio, a casual lawn offered a view of the meadow with its verticality…

meadow view

…a verticality that was strongly featured in the formal beds just behind us.

verticality

(I now feel an urgent need to buy more Ilex ‘Sky Pencil”.)

We learned that the plan was to change the look of this area;  either move toward or away from the look (above, lower left) of individual plants inside the boxwood squares.  Oops, I can’t recall which it was to be….or perhaps the boxwood was to be done away with altogether.

scree

We moved on into an area of scree plantings and then down a wide, formal steps stairway.

stairs down to meadow

Picky though I might be, I have no objection to a garden where part of the design is brand new; I’m just frustrated when most of it is brand nw.

As in garden five, mown paths through meadows enticed the garden tourists to explore….past a billowing garden bed and off into the prairie.

returning from a grassland adventure

Above, you can see in the background the island bed photographed below:

garden bed by an outbuilding

But as usual, we had no time to sit and had to hustle on to have time for a plant buying frenzy at Joy Creek Nursery.  Only two and half weeks remained till both Laurie’s and my mother’s gardens would be on the Peninsula garden tour, and each still had spaces that could be filled with especially choice plants.  My mother’s garden in particular was all about plants.  She did not like boxwoods or any other things of foliar garden structure, so her tour day would be ALL about the colour and flowers.

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