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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco boatyard garden’

Wednesday, 7 November 2018

I awoke at 7:30 fretting over Stacey Abrams in Georgia, and no more sleep could be found.  For me, this means I’d had very little precious sleep.

I gave up on the sleep quest and read the news from 8:30 to 9:00 (mildly comforting, hints of a run off vote maybe being possible for Georgia) and then got started on our day.

We had time to get the mulch bucket brigade set up and, with a little bit of garage clean up, added four more buckets with handles to our array.  As we were filling them, Bill came over (as planned) to talk about my bathtub replacement project.  (He is an artistic craftsman so however he wants to tile the area is fine with me; I suggested something leafy like a woodsy grotto, perhaps.  I have woodsy grottos on the brain after Halloween.)

Allan kept filling buckets and by the time Bill left, all were ready to go.

Soil Energy bucket brigade (Allan’s photos)

buckets of mulchy goodness

We applied load one to the port curbside gardens.  I planted some of the donated sea thrift from The Basket Case.

Allan’s photo

It pleases me to report that we got architect David Jensen’s curbside garden well mulched along with the entire east end garden.

east end before…

and after (Allan’s photos)

At home again, while Allan reloaded all the buckets, I wheeled 3×16 gallons of mulch (three trips) to the Norwood garden, two doors down.

16 gallons in the just my size red wheelbarrow

steam rising off the mulch pile (Allan’s photo)

When a pile of mulch is hot inside, don’t plant directly in that mulch until it cools down.  Once upon a time, a local gardening business (now gone) put hot mulch in the curbside bed at the old Shorebank building at the port, long before I was involved with those gardens.  I saw the deeply steaming new soil and saw the gardeners planting in it and thought, this is trouble.  Indeed it was.  A few days later, all the shrubs and young trees were crispy and had to be replaced.  It is ok to apply warm mulch in established beds around shrubs (nothing delicate) on a cool day.  I have been known to water the mulch down if its heat worries me.

Norwood back border before

after

I wonder if someone helped this golden euonymus become a bird shaped topiary?

ready to go again (Allan’s photo)

The boatyard was our destination for load two.

before

after

heading back home for load three…

load three back at the boatyard

This area and others where we have twice removed Pennisetum macrourum needed lots of filling in to raise it to sidewalk level:

before

after

Our view from the south end of the boatyard garden:

We had almost enough soil left to do all of the north stretch of the boatyard garden.

application with bucket and rake

I must confess that, due to time factors, I just covered the small weeds.  Hey, this was one of the first gardening books I ever owned:

“The unmulched garden looks to me like some naked thing which for one reason or another would be better off with a few clothes on.” –Ruth Stout

Home again, we filled just the four-gallon buckets (17 in all) and finished off the boatyard garden with six of them.  The rest were destined for the fire station.  We followed the boatyard mulching with the planting of two more sea thrifts by CoHo Charters, and then we noticed the sunset and drove to the south parking lot for a quick sunset view.

The dredge was splurting out mud in its autumnal quest to keep the boating channel deep enough.

At the fire station, by street lamp, we dumped and spread the contents of our 12 remaining buckets of the day.  Tomorrow, we will begin there with more mulch.

Mulch list is getting shorter.

Mulching is exhausting work, more so for Allan who hefts the buckets into and out of the trailer because my knee won’t take the weight.  It is a blessing that darkness comes early now and makes us not work on into the late evening like we do in summer.

“Why do people who like to get up early look with disdain on those who like to lie in bed late? And why do people who like to work feel superior to those who prefer to dream?”-Ruth Stout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 15 October 2018

We had an all Ilwaco bulbing day.

J’s & Norwood’s & Mike’s garden

We started at the little blue cottage across the street.  I had noticed in a recent photo that some blue fescue looked old and tatty, so it got removed (by Allan) and new bulbs put in its place. Meanwhile, I set the bulbs out across the street at the Norwood garden and then Allan planted them while I planted at the J’s cottage.

At the J’s: azalea oddly in bloom last week, with tatty grasses

bulbs are now where fescues were

Every bulb I planted around the J’s birdbath required banging a hole through the stupid landscape fabric that is underneath this garden (not installed by the Js; it was there when they bought the place).

At the Norwoods, Allan’s befores and afters of the north side (he weeded, too, mostly pesky creeping sorrel):

before

after (I see the area where a big pieris came out needs some small shade plants added …when the weather gets damp again).

before

after

We will mulch the south side bed when we start our mulching rounds.  It is narrow and was planted by the previous owners of the house.

south side

Next we planted white and pink and blue spring flower bulbs (narcissus, tulips, crocus, iris Dutch and reticulata and assorted whatnots) at Mike’s.  His garden was looking quite fine with pink hesperantha but not one photo was taken.

Port of Ilwaco

Planting at the boatyard and the port came next.  The hot weather was more manageable down by the water.  Today, there was no wind, so our bulb bags did not blow away.  That was a treat.

boatyard garden

ceanothus and lavender

I am pleased with the tapestry of flowers.

Even the BadAster is pleasing here.

rue, euphorbia, cosmos, santolina

hot sunshine, a bit too hot for my preference

looking south from the gate

We headed down to the curbside gardens along the port with an assortment of narcissi and some species tulips that I hope are small enough to not entice deer.  I wish I could plant lots of crocus and Iris reticulata there.  It was heartbreaking a few years back when crows or seagulls pulled out almost all of those little bulbs as soon as their early green sprouts started to show.

on the way to the port…hot

Allan’s photo (obviously)

Ilwaco pavilion garden  (Allan’s photo)

Ilwaco pavilion garden

By five thirty, we had made it all the way down to the west end, putting some new bulbs in almost every bed.

west end (Allan’s photo)

shockingly hot at 5:30!

At home, the evening was pleasant, warm, windless, even after dark.  I would love to have sat around the campfire but instead I had to sort the next batches of bulbs for several more hours, with the front and back garage doors open with the van parked in the driveway to give me some privacy from the street.

work board with port and boatyard erased and more sorting done

 

 

 

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Friday, 28 September 2018

 

the temperature when we left for work

Last year I swore I would not work if the temperature was over 75.  But needs must…

Shelburne Hotel

We watered the Shelburne garden just in case the predicted rain did not come.  The hotel was hosting a big weekend of food and music with a band called The Super Saturated Sugar Strings.  One of the band members, a chef, was going to prepare the Friday dinner in the Shelburne Restaurant.  I like the name of the band and it all sounded very interesting but I had no energy to attend, just to get the garden ready for guests.

The Sugar Strings event sounds fascinating as I read about it now.  I have regret at not making the effort to dig deep for a bit of extra evening energy.

“5-course dinner and Parlor in the Round music featuring members of SSSS

Sugar Strings frontman Carlyle Watt will be crafting a multi-course dinner at the historic Shelburne Hotel in Seaview, WA. Carlyle studied at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in California’s Napa Valley, and he is currently the head baker and executive chef at Alaska’s award winning bakery, Fire Island Rustic Bakeshop. In 2017, he was nominated as an outstanding baker by the James Beard Foundation. Carlyle’s ability to merge baking, pastry, and culinary techniques creates a unique and memorable dining experience. When the Sugar Strings go on tour, Carlyle brings his passion for food along, hosting pop-up dinners, guest-chef appearances, and generally keeping the band well-fed to sustain their high energy shows. 

Collaborating with Carlyle in the front of the house will be The Sugar String’s bassist, Kevin Worrell, presenting his hit Alaskan singer-songwriter showcase, Parlor In The Round. This dinner theater will feature local favorites Pretty Gritty and the Strings’ own Kat Moore, taking turns with songs and stories inspired by the evening’s bill of fare. As host, Kevin will select written submissions from the audience as prompts for musical improv games, and as fodder for his quick-witted banter.”

I don’t think I could have dug deep enough for improv energy, though.  As long as no audience participation was required, I would have been ok.

A different event was taking place in the pub tonight (the hotel has a pub and a dining room).  We think that is the event for which Todd was bringing flowers.

Allan’s photos

As Todd hurried off to another obligation, Allan and I had time, for once, to do a thorough job of weeding, deadheading, and tidying the paths without rushing off to another obligation of our own.

in the Shelburne back garden

front garden, 82 degrees F.

Japanese anemones

one of two matching planters at the front entry

Not only did we have time for a nice garden tidy (except for big projects like battling the aegepodium or houttuynia), we took time for a tasty pub lunch of two new menu items.  Because we rarely take a break for lunch during a work day, our lunch is usually some sort of home made sandwich scarfed down while we work.  This was a special reward for working in hot weather.

Allan’s photo

crab cakes with apple and fennel cabbage slaw and roasted red pepper aioli

beer battered fish and chips

and that oh so good blackberry cream cheese tart

looking north into the front garden as we depart

We thought because of the heat that it would be a good night for a campfire dinner.  Allan bought some hot dog buns at the grocery store across the street while I did a tiny bit more gardening.

Ilwaco

As soon as we approached Ilwaco, we decided the campfire idea was not a go.  Between Seaview and Ilwaco, we drove into a cool and breezy fog, so welcome after two days of heat.

I worked for awhile on the boatyard garden while Allan watered the Ilwaco planters, we fervently hope for the last time in 2018.  The Long Beach parks manager spoke this week of winterizing the LB planters because of rain being predicted, and yet the forecast only calls for slight chance of minimal rain.  I would love a good rain at last once a week now.  We are so tired of watering.

fog at the end of the boatyard

Allan’s photo

Cosmos in the boatyard that looks like ‘Happy Ring’ (which I did not plant this year).

I like Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ very much, just have not seen it for sale anywhere lately.

solidago, sweet peas, lavender, Allium christophii seedhead

tall pink aster, possibly ‘Harrington’s Pink’

looking north

I walked home via the post office and the fire station to weed and deadhead those two small volunteer gardens.

Ilwaco Fire Department

This time, the day had been well planned enough that Allan was not out watering in the dusk.

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 26 September 2018

On Monday night, at midnight, after our excellent day out gardening touring, Skooter came roaring in the cat door with someone hot on his tail.  This time Allan got a look at the culprit, probably the same one who has chased Skooter in the dark before: it was the orange cat from across the street.  He was sitting on the gate looking back.

Skooter had a trace of blood on one paw.  We cleaned it and had been watching him.  After a Tuesday of slight limping and no improvement, I made an appointment for him at Oceanside Animal Clinic for this afternoon.  He and Frosty had to stay in for the first part of the day.  I was filled with dread at the thought of keeping Skooter indoors for a week of recuperation.  Much yowling, dirty looks and spraying in the house would surely ensue.

We would have time to water the Long Beach planters before the appointment.  We also did the September Planter Reference Post.  I will add it as a bonus post tonight because it is dull for most anyone but me.  The light was difficult today with sun and shadow.  It will be the only time for the rest of the month that we will be checking each planter, though, so the reference post must be done.

Long Beach

The city crew was fixing a flagpole in Veterans Field.

I do try to get photos of the crew at work because its workers are so beloved that they have their own fan group on Facebook.

Just a few photos taken while watering:

Othonna, wish I knew which one.

new batch of Cerinthe major purpurascens

Salvia leucantha (Allan’s photo)

The carousel horses have gone into winter storage. (Allan’s photo)

Allan took a photo as a reminder that back in about the year 1998-ish, the planters were installed and each one was taken on by a volunteer.  I did four, and that is what led to my being employed by Long Beach and eventually, when the volunteers mostly fizzled out, caring for all the planters, first with Robert and now with Allan.

handsomely refurbished building for rent

WHY must people tie their dogs in the gardens?

I did find the dog’s person and she did move the dog.  I went into the shop that the dog was watching so intently and asked loud enough for all to hear (with every effort to sound friendly) whose dog it was.

My camera continues to have a mind of its own, taking random photos at unpredictable intervals.  It caught this one of my bucket of compost clippings.

I found a rock.

I haven’t posted the Fish Alley mural this year.

Hanging baskets are still good at the police station.

interval

We got home at 1:15 to wrangle Skooter and found two vocally unhappy cats in the house.  As soon as Skooter was in his travel box (yowling), Frosty was so grateful to go out into the sunny day.

We were so relieved that Skooter did not have an abcess on his foot, just a puffy spot where a tiny piece of the neighbor cat’s claw had broken off!  The vet said she, too, has a cat who came to her as an outdoor cat and will not settle for being indoors.

Skooters paw before the other guy’s claw piece was removed.

Skooter was happy to be let out back at home onto the soft green grass.

Allan’s photo

He pretty much slept for 30 hours because of a couple of shots that he was given, waking only to hiss at me when I cleaned his paw.

Port of Ilwaco

We returned to work by finishing the tiny garden of roots at the Port of Ilwaco.

success, with two lavenders, some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, a curry plant and some poppy seeds.

To tie in with the CoHo charters lavascape to the west, I want to get a good heather to go in here.  NOT a boring white winter blooming heather, but one of the showy spiky ones that blooms in summer.

Here is a before photo. I think the curb might have been a slight casualty. The escallonia blocked traffic sightline from parking lot driveways.

The tall ship Hawaiian Chieftain was in port.  We took a short work break to have a look.

The Salmonater belongs to our neighbour, Jeff Norwood.

After that brief break, we attacked some of the Pennisetum macrourum in the boatyard garden. For years, this pushy grass stayed in a well-behaved clump at the south end.  And then it started to run, and run, and run.

before

half an hour later

before by Allan

A member of the Peninsula Gardeners stops to tell me that some plants I gave her are doing well.

after

There is still more to dig.  We throw it out in our wheelie bin, not in any debris pile.

still do to

This evening, we quit work early to go to a meeting at

Ilwaco Timberland Library.

Allan saw this family by where he parked.

The issue was an urgent one of sudden library closures.

a crowd entering the meeting room

Librarians setting up a feed for overflow crowd in the library itself.

Allan’s photos of the full house:

The South Bend and Randle groups

From Brian Mittge on Facebook:

The people of Randle came by LEWIS Mountain bus all the way to the corner of the state in Ilwaco and spoke loudly that they would fight to keep their library after a draft Timberland Regional Library administrative report recommended closing it and many other small libraries (including Salkum, Packwood and maybe Winlock, depending on how you read between the lines). The seven members of the Timberland Board, who hadn’t seen the draft report until quite recently, voted unanimously to keep Randle open for at least one more year.

So tonight was a good night, but if y’all care about your small local libraries, it might be wise to look into budgets and facility reports. This issue isn’t going away. Check out the draft facilities plan here:http://avca_media.s3.amazonaws.com/…/Proposed_Capital_Facil…

It’s important to note that this proposal from administration doesn’t necessarily have the support of the seven trustees, who would be the ones to vote on any library closure.

By the way, props to Brian Zylstra for calmly and thoughtfully leading a meeting that could have gone sideways, and to Edna Fund for eloquence, urgency and clarity in her remarks.

Dedication to their library!

Here are the notes I took.  I started typing them into my phone halfway through the meeting.  I wish I had started earlier. Many people spoke passionately and so eloquently.  In fact, everyone was eloquent, from librarians themselves to off-the-grid residents of Randle. Could it be because all were bonded by their love of books and years of library life? I think so!

Comments from many different library patrons:

We’ve had 17 years of war maybe that’s why we don’t have money for libraries. 

The small town libraries are used as warming centers and for people who have no internet access at home to get fishing or burning permits and other online things.

These libraries are the only Community centers in small towns. 

South bend library was closed this week with no warning because of issues with the building. 

People off the grid in Randle use the library for many services.

Poverty and lack of transport even for five miles (re proposal that the Raymond library be used to replace South Bend’s library permanently.)

After school, South Bend children walk to the library.

Widening gap between haves and have nots 

Arts and humanities programs that schools no longer offer are available at the library.

Every decision we make today affects the world we live in tomorrow. We’re diminishing our future by closing libraries.

The library is an anti depressant and anti isolation for youth and seniors. The lack of a library’s community facilities will lead to depression, suicide, and geriatric death. 

Every community had the same story about how important their library is.

Why are the three lowest income highest poverty rate communities the ones with are their libraries under threat?

Montesano and Hoquiam are on the chopping block with no notice so their residents were not here. 

Many shared stories of childhood library memories. 

We need our country to be smarter and make better decisions and help the world. 

After the meeting, the Randle people gathered by their chartered bus for the three plus hour drive back home.

Allan’s photo

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Tuesday, 4 September 2018

The day began stressfully with a letter from the Social Security administration saying that Allan had been dumped off Medicare.  Two hours on the phone ensued.  There had been a misunderstanding (his) re how the full amount gets paid—too complicated to explain how it happened.  The money got sent as soon as the phone calls were done and meanwhile we are waiting in hope that he is reinstated without having to reapply.  I am glad that I did not know that he was only partially ensured when he drove to Ocean Shores and back on September 1st.  (Update, ten days and many lengthy phone calls and emails later, he has still not managed to get reinstated and they will not cash the darn check.  My teeth hurt from grinding them in my sleep.  Like many women I know, I fear becoming destitute because of medical bills  I am worried about this situation on the daily.  It is the unwritten undercurrent in the next ten days of blog posts, since the blog is running ten days behind.)

A friend who works with the elderly said she sees piles of Medicare related paperwork in their homes.  She used to wonder why they did not just get it sorted out, until she became Medicare age herself and found out how complicated it is.

So I worked today in an intensely worried frame of mind, and we got started over two hours late.

Long Beach

Watering the street trees and planters…

We are deadheading as usual but leaving tatty looking plant foliage just to keep the planters full through Rod Run, in hopes that full planters will discourage sitters.

I look forward to trimming them up next week.

Why is one Geranium ‘Rozanne’ across the street red leaved and dry looking?

I went back across the street and watered it a second time.  The leaves did not look diseased on close examination.

I hope.

Hesperantha starting to bloom, a sign of fall (Allan’s photo)

New paint job on Carnival Gifts.  I like a blue building.

I found a rock from Yakima Valley Rocks.

Although the sky was as blue as the rock, the cold wind made it a challenging three hours of watering.  The east side of the street was much colder than the west side, and fortunately I did the east side first and was pleasantly surprised by the west side being less miserable.

You might recall my sadness while working on my cat memorial garden last weekend ago and my missing Smoky so much.  And my revelation that it’s because a really affectionate and bonded-with-me cat had not come along, not to replace him, but to be a comfort.  As I was close to the end of watering, an acquaintance came up to me and said she had 16 cats to rehome, from a cat collector who had recently died.  I asked if any of them were lovey dovey lap cats and she said “Mittens!”  I said “Text me after Rod Run and we will come have a look at them.”  If one of those cats is the special cat I need to help me stop grieving daily for Smoky, I might stop being a cynic about all things “woo woo” and might think something cosmic has happened.

There is also a Newfoundland dog…my favourite breed….a non drooler!  And he is used to being left home during the day.  But no.  No, I mustn’t.  I like my sleep too well to be getting up in the night or early morning to let a dog out.  Surely.  (Update ten days later—I have not been contacted about the cats. Maybe it is just as well; I would rather adopt a new cat during staycation.)

We got done at four. (Allan’s photo)

We did not have time to water the Shelburne.  I was ever so glad we had done so on Sunday after Cella’s party, or we’d have been in even worse trouble today.  (I don’t mean trouble with the Shelburne owners, just trouble with how to fit in all the watering after starting late.)

Ilwaco

I put on my sweatshirt and winter scarf to weed and water at the boatyard, while Allan watered the downtown trees and planters.

Why must I find pulled up elephant garlic every time?

I break up the cloves and replant them.  Often, the puller-upper does not even take the flower.

After an hour of weeding, I watered from behind the fence.  I was concerned because one of the ceanothus looked all brown on the back side.  I hoped it was not because someone had sprayed any weedkiller or random boat chemical.

The second ceanothus looked fine.

I trimmed the burnt looking foliage off the first one.

before

after

On further thought, no one would spray roundup that high up.  So the mystery remains.

I hope nothing bad spreads to the middle and front of the ceanothus.  I have a matched set and if one dies, the symmetry will be thrown off in a way that would be most distressing to me. (Update ten days later; they both look fine so far.)

There are two ceanothus and a cistus, and one rosemary (because one died, and I have not managed to replace it).

Stipa gigantea

Allan picked up me and the trailer of weeds and took us both home, where I watered containers while he went back out to water our volunteer gardens at the post office and fire station.  Yesterday, at Cella’s party, he pointed out to someone that I come up with these volunteer gardens and then he is the one who has to water them.  True.

 

 

 

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Thursday, 23 August 2018

Js garden

Allan mowed the little pocket lawn and I weeded at J’s across the street.

front garden with carpet of thyme (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Long Beach

We had to trim more off the top of the dang blangity non-blooming Cosmos ‘Sensation’ mix.

feeling irritated

Of course, that will delay bloom even more.  If I had more time or energy, I might tear it all out and put something else in….but the tourist season only has two weeks to go, and by mid September surely it will throw out some side flowers…?? I live in hope.

front

back—I should have cut more.

As the director of the Bellevue Botanical Border said at Hardy Plant Weekend, “When we make a mistake, it is in public for everyone to see.”  This was not exactly a mistake because this once was a reliably good plant.

Here is the frog who lives in the water box. (Allan’s photo)

Downtown, Allan went south and I went north watering planters. While watering planters on Third Street in Long Beach, I enjoyed the music of this busker and I gave him a few dollars.

The sky was blue, the sun was out, and not too hot, and we had a brisk but not too brisk wind.  Perfect for the kite festival.  The entryway to the Bolstad approach was as close as either of us got to kite festival this week.

A city crew member jokingly asked us, “Why aren’t you out flying your kite today?” When I said no energy, he knew just how I felt.  Work consumes all my energy and then I just want to be home, gathering up some new energy from my garden for the next work week.

I walked a block to the east to get a closer look at a little garden that someone has made behind the Elks lodge in a raised round bed that used to be all horsetail.

Someone is deadheading regularly here.

I wish my fiery celosia at the fire station had done this well.

Allan noticed someone was stripping flowers off the two of the lavenders in two of the planters.

I swear I just might hang signs in them like I did on the blue globe thistle in the boatyard garden (“Please don’t pick me”, on a card hung right on the plant, proved to be effective).

We finished Long Beach with a tidy of the Veterans Field gardens.

Helenium ‘Mariachi’ (pretty sure) in Vet field

Shelburne Hotel

 We had made good time in Long Beach and got to the Shelburne 45 minutes early than usual.  We managed to keep that lead, a good thing as it is now getting dark around eight.  No more ten hour days!

We watered, deadheaded, did some but not a lot of garden clean up.  Deadheading the sweet peas is the most time consuming thing now.

sweet peas and Japanese anemones

Sweet pea ‘Blue Shift’ (maybe)

looking north

looking south

Allan was able to get onto the Room Four deck to do some much needed deadheading.  We are going to move the rose down into the garden this fall and replace it with a non deadheading sort of plant.

It looked quite sad when he got there, with black spot and dead flowers.

And will replace the cosmos with some sort of non deadhead-y plants. And will put the dahlia in the garden. It’s a nice red one.

This sort of pot, on the room 11 deck, needed no care and looks just fine.

chatting with some appreciative guests

the back garden (where you can dine from the pub menu)

one of the succulent pots on the back lower decks

Ilwaco

Allan watered the street trees and planters while I watered and did some weeding at the boatyard.

What a relief it was to breathe clean, non smoky air.

view from the south end of the boatyard today….

and on Monday, when it was so smoky I could barely see a boat coming in.

an interestingly fasciated euphorbia at the boatyard

taken from behind the fence because I water from behind the fence

as I walked along pulling horsetail; looking south

I walked home via some weeding and deadheading at the Ilwaco Fire Station garden.

Now for three much anticipated days off, two at home and one garden tour day on the north Oregon coast.  It will be the last touring trip off the peninsula this year.  We are skipping the Cannon Beach cottage tour so that Allan can enjoy the Rod Run auto show here with Scott and Tony.  And…I am tired and just want to stay on the peninsula for September. So…if you count on us to show you that tour by blogging about it, you had best get yourself tickets and go.

Allan’s photo: He finished watering at the post office garden at sunset.

I wrote a blog post while Allan worked on his boating blog and then made dinner.  (For those who wonder how I garden, read, and blog, it is because Allan cooks dinner that this blog can happen on a daily basis in work season.)  Just as we sat down to eat and watch telly at ten PM, I noticed that my night blooming cereus flower had opened.  It did not seem as scented as usual.  To think we might have missed it!

As we watched our telly, the delicate scent of the flower emerged and floated around the room.

I am so happy that our three day weekend starts tomorrow.  This time, I will not stay on the property the whole time, because on Saturday we are going garden touring.

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Thursday, 16 August

Before work, I picked and delivered a bouquet to Queen La De Da for a bridal shower that she was hosting.  Allan photographed it for me.

Queen La De Da’s gallery and event center

At the post office, I asked him to photograph the planter; the deer are finally leaving the little rose alone.

Still before work, we visited the South Pacific County Humane Society to make a contribution in honor of our friend Larry, spouse of Diane whose garden we care for.  Allan photographed some cats.  I do long for a satisfactory lap cat.

The shelter had a large crop of kittens.

Long Beach

Sometimes toward the end of the day at this time of year, I find myself saying a little chant, especially while dragging hoses, in a high pitched monotone: “Help me helpme helpme helpme heeeelp me.” Today, it started at the beginning of watering Long Beach and that is when I knew that summer burn out had hit hard.  While I still do love my job, certain factors are wearing by now: hose-rassling, navigating around crowds, dragging heavy hoses (not in Long Beach, fortunately), and loud cars booming music with misogynist lyrics (in Long Beach, unfortunately).

While watering, I finished the August planter reference post, and that will appear tomorrow, mostly for my interest.

I noticed a chrysanthemum blooming in the planter by NIVA green and thought it was way too early and that I should have given it the Chelsea chop.

When I headed down the other side of the street, I saw that Dennis Company is already selling chrysanthemum plants—so I guess it is just right.

chrysanthemums for sale already

I still love Oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’ so much. What a doer!

Origanum ‘Hopley’s Purple’

The planter in front of Stormin’ Norman’s needs a dig out.  That darn wire plant, that I thought was a house plant when I planted it and then it took over, is trying to take over again.  We should have dug out ALL the soil instead of hoping we could control the starts from bits of root left behind in our clean out two years ago.

It is creeping everywhere.

I only had to ask one person to move off a bench for watering today.  I was glad I had already done the Funland planter before a large crowd appeared.

We watered the Sid Snyder planters. I should do a reference post for the beach approach planters.  Allan parked by Adrift distillery, owned by the Adrift Hotel, whose owners are our clients now at the Shelburne.

planters at the distillery (Allan’s photo)

World Kite Museum

We checked up on the kite museum garden because kite festival starts next Monday.

Allan’s photo

The Shelburne Hotel

We planted one more daylily from my garden, making room for it by moving a sad rodgersia to a spot where I hope it will be happier.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo: must get a bag of compost to make this daylily patch look better.

We weeded, deadheaded, and watered thoroughly, hoping it will last well till Monday.

The garden looks different now because I cut back all the Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’ to new growth halfway down. They were tired and had no no blooms to offer up high.

looking south, no more cloud of white

looking north, the tall non blooming cosmos is most irksome!

not one flower bud on most of the Cosmos ‘Sensation’

Cutting seed pods off of the many sweet peas takes a long time now.

I am happy in this garden and never sing the help me song here….not even when I see the horrors of houttuynia in this back yard shady bed, waiting a fall clean out.

horrors

I wish I had time to work on this bed more during the summer.

We remembered to clip a dead blackberry cane from the  next door yard off of the totem’s beak.

so glad this bed does not have the houttuynia

Brown Turkey fig tree has figs!

I got to pet a good rescued dog named Buster Brown.

Allan’s photo

When his person began to have dinner, Buster was all attention.

I wanted so very much to stay for dinner, too, but we had another couple of hours of our watering ritual.

Ilwaco

Allan watered the trees and planters, while I watered the boatyard garden.

The Pennisetum macrourum is coming back strong and will need another big pull out this fall.

I saw a boat name that spoke to me.  This is my dream, too:

Autumn Dream

Autumn, when we can stop watering and when the Pacific Breeze blows all the wildfire smoke away.

I walked home and saw just one of the Main Street cats.

I went out of the way to deadhead our volunteer garden at the fire station.  Allan would water it last.

ornamental corn—will it make an ear?

I am so looking forward to our three day weekend—but first (tomorrow), the Planter Reference Post.

 

 

 

 

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