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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco boatyard garden’

Wednesday, 5 December 2018

With some colder weather in store, Allan had tried adding some plastic to the sides of the greenhouse lean to:

Allan’s photo

We found out this morning that it was so flappy and noisy in the wind that I worried it would keep our neighbours to the east awake.  Adding weights to the bottom did not help, so down it came.  The lean-to is useful enough without doors as it should keep frost off of tender plants.  Allan may add something stronger, but removable, for the coldest nights, once it gets figured out…

I began a project of cutting back honeysuckle and hops, all tangled with a lot of dead in it, on the arbors to the east of the compost bins.

before

I was quite enjoying the task when I happened to look at my pineapple sage and realized that the cold had surely damaged plants in the less sheltered Long Beach gardens.

pineapple sage

and Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’

So halfway into the afternoon, we had to switch gears and go to work.

We pulled the last of the Ilwaco cosmos…

….at the boatyard garden…

….and the Ilwaco pavilion garden.

We checked on the window boxes and barrels at the Depot Restaurant in Seaview and found that the annuals were still not ready to pull, even though I wish they were.

Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ still has some yellow daisies….

and the window boxes still have some flowers.

In Long Beach, we cut down chrysanthemums and Salvia leucantha in several planters.  The city crew has had to dig in one of them, probably for electrical Christmas lights reasons.

Oh, dear.

I visited NIVA green for a bit of Christmas shopping.

beautiful new velvet bags, too soft for my lifestyle

There is one photo I cannot show because a Christmas present is front and center.

I was able to tell Heather in person that I was going to remove myself as co-administrator of the NIVA green Facebook page, because her assistant, Wes, is now doing such a great job with it.  It is much better for someone who is on the spot to do it, and my grandmother told me many times that too many cooks spoil the broth.  I have another place to share my photos: the “favourite shops” album on my own Our Long Beach Peninsula page.  For all its flaws, Facebook is a strong connector in our beach communities.

We finished Long Beach by clipping back some frost-limp perennials in Fifth Street Park, where the very last cosmos got pulled.  Allan had covered the gunnera with leaves during an errand run the day before.

Our last work stop was brief.  I finally cut the Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen that was STILL blooming in front of the Shelburne.  I no longer wanted to wonder every day if it looked good or was frost blackened.

This one lonely stem had emerged unplanned.

the fig tree

pineapple sage looking better than mine

We rewarded ourselves for our staycation work day with dinner at the pub.

Our drinks:

I had never heard of a Salty Dog drink.  Delicious because I love salt and I love grapefruit juice.  Amazingly, Allan had never before had a hot buttered rum.

view from our favourite table

chopped salad with chicken and a pub burger

and our favourite desserts

My BOOK had arrived at the post office today, per an email notice, but it was closed so I would have to wait till tomorrow.  I read a short book instead, which turned out to be a moderately well written and quite interesting experience of the Hillary Clinton campaign, 2016.

As with Hillary’s memoir, What Happened, I felt by the end that Hillary would be a good and kind person to know (and a much finer president than what we have now).

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 20 November 2018

Port of Ilwaco

We had to rise “early” to be to the port by ten so that Allan could help with the crab pot tree.

While he and others got started, I did some planting in the boatyard garden of plants I had dug in a path widening project yesterday: Egyptian walking onions, sanguisorba, some Persicaria ‘Firetail’ and some phlomis.

still interesting

cosmos, pink yarrow, California poppies (and santolina)

rosemary and ceanothus both sporting some blue flowers

lavender

California poppies

penstemons

cosmos

A the end of the boatyard, the CoHo King came in for its off season paint job.

CoHo Charters Captain Butch Smith in yellow

me and Butch making sure all goes well

Just past the boatyard stands the crab pot tree, where more floats were added and lights secured with zip ties.

A float for Kevin Soule, who died in a crabbing accident on Willapa Bay this past year.

the volunteers, organized by Our Jenna (Queen La De Da)

The star had been left in a storage unit in north Long Beach.  While it was fetched, I took a walk along the marina with Della and her corgis.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Howerton Avenue (telephoto)

Both Jim and Della are in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, so I got her to tell me about some of what they do, including safety instruction and even escorting boats upriver.

Salt Pub is being remodeled to include the lower floor.

a new bar top being stained in beautifully warm weather

Laila of Salt meets a corgi

high tide

the condor

Back at the crab pot tree, the star had arrived.

Allan and Jim on the tree

Jim at the top

Della hands up some ties.

They all said it was easier to climb up than to get down.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Coast Guard floats

Allan’s photo

Jim installing the star (Allan’s photo)

As a finishing touch, CoHo Butch brought some fishermen’s boots for the crab pot snowman.

I learned that Evertuff boots are the favourite brand.

I was then very proud of us for going to the pharmacy and getting flu jabs, which we have never done before.  I had a terrible fear of side effects interfering with work so had waited till the good weather was done.  As I write this three days later, neither of us had any side effects at all.

home

The crab pot time had given me only about an hour to do some weeding.

Skooter helped.

I moved this last bit of firewood under cover behind the garage.

That was the end of last winter’s windfalls.

A horrid sight by the wood pile: the golden foliage threaded through the eucalyptus is bindweed that has crept in from the gear shed yard.

ominous

Allan added a third birdhouse to where I had noticed a lack with only two.

I went with Allan while he grocery shopped at Sid’s supermarket, right across the street from the Shelburne Hotel, and in the hotel garden I planted a goodly start of Thalictrum ‘Elin’ from our last day at Klipsan Beach Cottages, and some Egyptian walking onions, and put some decorative branches in containers:

We watered the Depot Restaurant window boxes and went home again, where Allan managed some more work on his greenhouse lean-to project before night fell.

Much later in the evening as we watched some telly, we heard the rain finally begin.

 

 

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Tuesday, 13 November 2018

Port of Ilwaco

We got up early (for us) to help with decorating the Crab Pot Tree at the port, with gratitude that the weather forecast of a quarter inch of rain and 20+ mph wind was completely wrong. Mostly, as I told Jenna when we showed up at 10:15, my “volunteering” meant that I had volunteered Allan to help while I worked on the nearby boatyard garden.  I can’t do heights, and there were other folks to hand things up to the people who can do heights.

Last week, a couple of volunteers had put the strings of lights on.  Allan and I were at home that day because we had arranged the delivery of mulch before I remembered it was a Tree Morning.

the tree today when we arrived

Here comes a decorated crab pot from the boatyard.

Crab Pot volunteers

Allan heard one of the volunteers say, “Our corgis thought they were going for a walk!”

Allan’s photo

hanging floats on the tree

This year, some floats are marked with the names of the crabbing fleet.

Two floats represent the Coast Guard…

U.S.Coast Guard Station Cape Disappointment crab float signed by the station personnel and Auxiliary Flotilla 6-2 members.

And one float, to be installed later, will honor the names of two local fishermen who died while crabbing, Luke Jensen and Kevin Soule.

Jenna and a volunteer installing lights to mark the observation field

This year, to avoid folks walking in traffic and being all crammed in around the base of the tree, the watchers and carolers will be across the street in a large parking lot.

When I met Allan, he was an 18 year old who enjoyed climbing the scaffolding of bridges for fun (as I recall).

Allan’s photos:

U.S. Coast Guard National Motor Lifeboat School crab float signed by the staff and students.

Jessie’s Fish Company in the background

For the next two Tuesdays, volunteers will gather at 10 AM to complete the decorating.

Meanwhile, between walking back and forth to take these photos for Discover Ilwaco, I did the fall clean up for the south section of the boatyard garden.

I love our lightweight and efficient new shearing tool, the one recommended to us by Pam Fleming.

Stihl Shrub Cutter

It is ideal for trimming lavender, armeria, santolinas, and also worked well trimming the ceanothus so it is even with the edge of the sidewalk.  By late afternoon, I was calling it “the toy” because it is so much fun to use.  The question is, if you pay $150 for a tool and spare battery, and it cuts your shearing time in half, who profits financially?

Stihl will profit again because we both like the tool so much that we must get a second one before spring clean up.

I am sorry to tell our California reader(s) that Stihl says “We apologize, but we can no longer sell or ship to CA as a result of PROP 65“.  I cannot figure out why, unless it is that the battery is considered toxic.  It seems like an environmentally friendly and delightfully quiet little tool to me.

Here is my ultra-cool fasciated Euphorbia characias wulfenii.

I am leaving perhaps a dozen cosmos in the boatyard garden till the frost takes them down.

south end of boatyard garden, done

Allan joined me to finish the north stretch of the garden.

Allan’s photo

I am not a believer in flattening a garden in autumn.  I leave a considerable amount of it standing for winter interest and for the birds to get seeds.

We removed the “please leave the flowers” signs and must remember to reinstall them when the narcissi buds appear.

Allan used The Toy on one of the Ilwaco planters and a street tree garden, to flatten the golden oregano.  The first hard frost will blacken it, so this is pre-emptive and will also help small bulbs like crocuses show up.

before

after (Allan’s photos)

Sad erysimum may be pulled next spring or sooner.

We next did our last fall clean up all along the port from east to west.

east end looking west

It was so much fun to shape the santolinas and trim the sea thrift with The Toy!  In the late winter, we will cut the santolinas much harder.  I wonder if The Toy will be able to handle that.

It did a wonderfully easy trimming of the wax myrtle, which I keep low because of traffic sight lines.

before

after…so easy and quick!

My favourite bed by the Ilwaco pavilion…

…is the only one that will need post frost clean up of a couple of cosmos that I grew from seed.

Seed success is thrilling!

At the recently mulched Time Enough Books garden, I was pleased to see lots of poppy seedlings.

dark areas are where some grass weeds came out

poppy seedlings around my new dwarf Stipa

While I moved on to beds further west, Allan cut back an elderberry, as we do each autumn to make it easier for holiday lights to be hung.

before, “someone” forgot to take an after!

Allan said the stems of the barberry will “work well in the Pencil Sharpener”, and I realized we now have a pet name for our one-branch-at-a-time chipper-shredder.

Meanwhile, crabbers were buzzing around with their crab pots all afternoon.

in the parking lot, pots from the gear shed next door to our back garden (Allan’s photo)

finishing the westernmost garden at almost sunset

It had been my dream to get the 22 Ilwaco planters and 10 street tree gardens all done today, as well.  I enjoyed the last hour of work at the port better when I let go of that dream.

At 4:30, with half an hour before dark, while Allan dumped debris, I popped across the street to pull cosmos and weeds out of the J’s front garden.  Just look who I found over there asleep in the garden.

a big stretch as he emerged from his nap

He has made himself a little nest.

We are now four days away from semi-staycation.  J’s will take half an hour more, the Norwoods will be a short job (although I plan to trim some lavender with the toy), pruning Mike’s escallonia is really all there is left to do of fall clean up there, and the planters will take just a couple of hours.  A day to quickly finish the Red Barn and then do the LAST EVER fall clean up of Klipsan Beach Cottages garden, and one more session at the Shelburne to prune some of the wisteria and a few perennials…

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 7 November 2018

I awoke at 7:30 fretting over Stacey Abrams in Georgia, and no more sleep could be found.  For me, this means I’d had very little precious sleep.

I gave up on the sleep quest and read the news from 8:30 to 9:00 (mildly comforting, hints of a run off vote maybe being possible for Georgia) and then got started on our day.

We had time to get the mulch bucket brigade set up and, with a little bit of garage clean up, added four more buckets with handles to our array.  As we were filling them, Bill came over (as planned) to talk about my bathtub replacement project.  (He is an artistic craftsman so however he wants to tile the area is fine with me; I suggested something leafy like a woodsy grotto, perhaps.  I have woodsy grottos on the brain after Halloween.)

Allan kept filling buckets and by the time Bill left, all were ready to go.

Soil Energy bucket brigade (Allan’s photos)

buckets of mulchy goodness

We applied load one to the port curbside gardens.  I planted some of the donated sea thrift from The Basket Case.

Allan’s photo

It pleases me to report that we got architect David Jensen’s curbside garden well mulched along with the entire east end garden.

east end before…

and after (Allan’s photos)

At home again, while Allan reloaded all the buckets, I wheeled 3×16 gallons of mulch (three trips) to the Norwood garden, two doors down.

16 gallons in the just my size red wheelbarrow

steam rising off the mulch pile (Allan’s photo)

When a pile of mulch is hot inside, don’t plant directly in that mulch until it cools down.  Once upon a time, a local gardening business (now gone) put hot mulch in the curbside bed at the old Shorebank building at the port, long before I was involved with those gardens.  I saw the deeply steaming new soil and saw the gardeners planting in it and thought, this is trouble.  Indeed it was.  A few days later, all the shrubs and young trees were crispy and had to be replaced.  It is ok to apply warm mulch in established beds around shrubs (nothing delicate) on a cool day.  I have been known to water the mulch down if its heat worries me.

Norwood back border before

after

I wonder if someone helped this golden euonymus become a bird shaped topiary?

ready to go again (Allan’s photo)

The boatyard was our destination for load two.

before

after

heading back home for load three…

load three back at the boatyard

This area and others where we have twice removed Pennisetum macrourum needed lots of filling in to raise it to sidewalk level:

before

after

Our view from the south end of the boatyard garden:

We had almost enough soil left to do all of the north stretch of the boatyard garden.

application with bucket and rake

I must confess that, due to time factors, I just covered the small weeds.  Hey, this was one of the first gardening books I ever owned:

“The unmulched garden looks to me like some naked thing which for one reason or another would be better off with a few clothes on.” –Ruth Stout

Home again, we filled just the four-gallon buckets (17 in all) and finished off the boatyard garden with six of them.  The rest were destined for the fire station.  We followed the boatyard mulching with the planting of two more sea thrifts by CoHo Charters, and then we noticed the sunset and drove to the south parking lot for a quick sunset view.

The dredge was splurting out mud in its autumnal quest to keep the boating channel deep enough.

At the fire station, by street lamp, we dumped and spread the contents of our 12 remaining buckets of the day.  Tomorrow, we will begin there with more mulch.

Mulch list is getting shorter.

Mulching is exhausting work, more so for Allan who hefts the buckets into and out of the trailer because my knee won’t take the weight.  It is a blessing that darkness comes early now and makes us not work on into the late evening like we do in summer.

“Why do people who like to get up early look with disdain on those who like to lie in bed late? And why do people who like to work feel superior to those who prefer to dream?”-Ruth Stout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 15 October 2018

We had an all Ilwaco bulbing day.

J’s & Norwood’s & Mike’s garden

We started at the little blue cottage across the street.  I had noticed in a recent photo that some blue fescue looked old and tatty, so it got removed (by Allan) and new bulbs put in its place. Meanwhile, I set the bulbs out across the street at the Norwood garden and then Allan planted them while I planted at the J’s cottage.

At the J’s: azalea oddly in bloom last week, with tatty grasses

bulbs are now where fescues were

Every bulb I planted around the J’s birdbath required banging a hole through the stupid landscape fabric that is underneath this garden (not installed by the Js; it was there when they bought the place).

At the Norwoods, Allan’s befores and afters of the north side (he weeded, too, mostly pesky creeping sorrel):

before

after (I see the area where a big pieris came out needs some small shade plants added …when the weather gets damp again).

before

after

We will mulch the south side bed when we start our mulching rounds.  It is narrow and was planted by the previous owners of the house.

south side

Next we planted white and pink and blue spring flower bulbs (narcissus, tulips, crocus, iris Dutch and reticulata and assorted whatnots) at Mike’s.  His garden was looking quite fine with pink hesperantha but not one photo was taken.

Port of Ilwaco

Planting at the boatyard and the port came next.  The hot weather was more manageable down by the water.  Today, there was no wind, so our bulb bags did not blow away.  That was a treat.

boatyard garden

ceanothus and lavender

I am pleased with the tapestry of flowers.

Even the BadAster is pleasing here.

rue, euphorbia, cosmos, santolina

hot sunshine, a bit too hot for my preference

looking south from the gate

We headed down to the curbside gardens along the port with an assortment of narcissi and some species tulips that I hope are small enough to not entice deer.  I wish I could plant lots of crocus and Iris reticulata there.  It was heartbreaking a few years back when crows or seagulls pulled out almost all of those little bulbs as soon as their early green sprouts started to show.

on the way to the port…hot

Allan’s photo (obviously)

Ilwaco pavilion garden  (Allan’s photo)

Ilwaco pavilion garden

By five thirty, we had made it all the way down to the west end, putting some new bulbs in almost every bed.

west end (Allan’s photo)

shockingly hot at 5:30!

At home, the evening was pleasant, warm, windless, even after dark.  I would love to have sat around the campfire but instead I had to sort the next batches of bulbs for several more hours, with the front and back garage doors open with the van parked in the driveway to give me some privacy from the street.

work board with port and boatyard erased and more sorting done

 

 

 

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Friday, 28 September 2018

 

the temperature when we left for work

Last year I swore I would not work if the temperature was over 75.  But needs must…

Shelburne Hotel

We watered the Shelburne garden just in case the predicted rain did not come.  The hotel was hosting a big weekend of food and music with a band called The Super Saturated Sugar Strings.  One of the band members, a chef, was going to prepare the Friday dinner in the Shelburne Restaurant.  I like the name of the band and it all sounded very interesting but I had no energy to attend, just to get the garden ready for guests.

The Sugar Strings event sounds fascinating as I read about it now.  I have regret at not making the effort to dig deep for a bit of extra evening energy.

“5-course dinner and Parlor in the Round music featuring members of SSSS

Sugar Strings frontman Carlyle Watt will be crafting a multi-course dinner at the historic Shelburne Hotel in Seaview, WA. Carlyle studied at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in California’s Napa Valley, and he is currently the head baker and executive chef at Alaska’s award winning bakery, Fire Island Rustic Bakeshop. In 2017, he was nominated as an outstanding baker by the James Beard Foundation. Carlyle’s ability to merge baking, pastry, and culinary techniques creates a unique and memorable dining experience. When the Sugar Strings go on tour, Carlyle brings his passion for food along, hosting pop-up dinners, guest-chef appearances, and generally keeping the band well-fed to sustain their high energy shows. 

Collaborating with Carlyle in the front of the house will be The Sugar String’s bassist, Kevin Worrell, presenting his hit Alaskan singer-songwriter showcase, Parlor In The Round. This dinner theater will feature local favorites Pretty Gritty and the Strings’ own Kat Moore, taking turns with songs and stories inspired by the evening’s bill of fare. As host, Kevin will select written submissions from the audience as prompts for musical improv games, and as fodder for his quick-witted banter.”

I don’t think I could have dug deep enough for improv energy, though.  As long as no audience participation was required, I would have been ok.

A different event was taking place in the pub tonight (the hotel has a pub and a dining room).  We think that is the event for which Todd was bringing flowers.

Allan’s photos

As Todd hurried off to another obligation, Allan and I had time, for once, to do a thorough job of weeding, deadheading, and tidying the paths without rushing off to another obligation of our own.

in the Shelburne back garden

front garden, 82 degrees F.

Japanese anemones

one of two matching planters at the front entry

Not only did we have time for a nice garden tidy (except for big projects like battling the aegepodium or houttuynia), we took time for a tasty pub lunch of two new menu items.  Because we rarely take a break for lunch during a work day, our lunch is usually some sort of home made sandwich scarfed down while we work.  This was a special reward for working in hot weather.

Allan’s photo

crab cakes with apple and fennel cabbage slaw and roasted red pepper aioli

beer battered fish and chips

and that oh so good blackberry cream cheese tart

looking north into the front garden as we depart

We thought because of the heat that it would be a good night for a campfire dinner.  Allan bought some hot dog buns at the grocery store across the street while I did a tiny bit more gardening.

Ilwaco

As soon as we approached Ilwaco, we decided the campfire idea was not a go.  Between Seaview and Ilwaco, we drove into a cool and breezy fog, so welcome after two days of heat.

I worked for awhile on the boatyard garden while Allan watered the Ilwaco planters, we fervently hope for the last time in 2018.  The Long Beach parks manager spoke this week of winterizing the LB planters because of rain being predicted, and yet the forecast only calls for slight chance of minimal rain.  I would love a good rain at last once a week now.  We are so tired of watering.

fog at the end of the boatyard

Allan’s photo

Cosmos in the boatyard that looks like ‘Happy Ring’ (which I did not plant this year).

I like Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ very much, just have not seen it for sale anywhere lately.

solidago, sweet peas, lavender, Allium christophii seedhead

tall pink aster, possibly ‘Harrington’s Pink’

looking north

I walked home via the post office and the fire station to weed and deadhead those two small volunteer gardens.

Ilwaco Fire Department

This time, the day had been well planned enough that Allan was not out watering in the dusk.

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 26 September 2018

On Monday night, at midnight, after our excellent day out gardening touring, Skooter came roaring in the cat door with someone hot on his tail.  This time Allan got a look at the culprit, probably the same one who has chased Skooter in the dark before: it was the orange cat from across the street.  He was sitting on the gate looking back.

Skooter had a trace of blood on one paw.  We cleaned it and had been watching him.  After a Tuesday of slight limping and no improvement, I made an appointment for him at Oceanside Animal Clinic for this afternoon.  He and Frosty had to stay in for the first part of the day.  I was filled with dread at the thought of keeping Skooter indoors for a week of recuperation.  Much yowling, dirty looks and spraying in the house would surely ensue.

We would have time to water the Long Beach planters before the appointment.  We also did the September Planter Reference Post.  I will add it as a bonus post tonight because it is dull for most anyone but me.  The light was difficult today with sun and shadow.  It will be the only time for the rest of the month that we will be checking each planter, though, so the reference post must be done.

Long Beach

The city crew was fixing a flagpole in Veterans Field.

I do try to get photos of the crew at work because its workers are so beloved that they have their own fan group on Facebook.

Just a few photos taken while watering:

Othonna, wish I knew which one.

new batch of Cerinthe major purpurascens

Salvia leucantha (Allan’s photo)

The carousel horses have gone into winter storage. (Allan’s photo)

Allan took a photo as a reminder that back in about the year 1998-ish, the planters were installed and each one was taken on by a volunteer.  I did four, and that is what led to my being employed by Long Beach and eventually, when the volunteers mostly fizzled out, caring for all the planters, first with Robert and now with Allan.

handsomely refurbished building for rent

WHY must people tie their dogs in the gardens?

I did find the dog’s person and she did move the dog.  I went into the shop that the dog was watching so intently and asked loud enough for all to hear (with every effort to sound friendly) whose dog it was.

My camera continues to have a mind of its own, taking random photos at unpredictable intervals.  It caught this one of my bucket of compost clippings.

I found a rock.

I haven’t posted the Fish Alley mural this year.

Hanging baskets are still good at the police station.

interval

We got home at 1:15 to wrangle Skooter and found two vocally unhappy cats in the house.  As soon as Skooter was in his travel box (yowling), Frosty was so grateful to go out into the sunny day.

We were so relieved that Skooter did not have an abcess on his foot, just a puffy spot where a tiny piece of the neighbor cat’s claw had broken off!  The vet said she, too, has a cat who came to her as an outdoor cat and will not settle for being indoors.

Skooters paw before the other guy’s claw piece was removed.

Skooter was happy to be let out back at home onto the soft green grass.

Allan’s photo

He pretty much slept for 30 hours because of a couple of shots that he was given, waking only to hiss at me when I cleaned his paw.

Port of Ilwaco

We returned to work by finishing the tiny garden of roots at the Port of Ilwaco.

success, with two lavenders, some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, a curry plant and some poppy seeds.

To tie in with the CoHo charters lavascape to the west, I want to get a good heather to go in here.  NOT a boring white winter blooming heather, but one of the showy spiky ones that blooms in summer.

Here is a before photo. I think the curb might have been a slight casualty. The escallonia blocked traffic sightline from parking lot driveways.

The tall ship Hawaiian Chieftain was in port.  We took a short work break to have a look.

The Salmonater belongs to our neighbour, Jeff Norwood.

After that brief break, we attacked some of the Pennisetum macrourum in the boatyard garden. For years, this pushy grass stayed in a well-behaved clump at the south end.  And then it started to run, and run, and run.

before

half an hour later

before by Allan

A member of the Peninsula Gardeners stops to tell me that some plants I gave her are doing well.

after

There is still more to dig.  We throw it out in our wheelie bin, not in any debris pile.

still do to

This evening, we quit work early to go to a meeting at

Ilwaco Timberland Library.

Allan saw this family by where he parked.

The issue was an urgent one of sudden library closures.

a crowd entering the meeting room

Librarians setting up a feed for overflow crowd in the library itself.

Allan’s photos of the full house:

The South Bend and Randle groups

From Brian Mittge on Facebook:

The people of Randle came by LEWIS Mountain bus all the way to the corner of the state in Ilwaco and spoke loudly that they would fight to keep their library after a draft Timberland Regional Library administrative report recommended closing it and many other small libraries (including Salkum, Packwood and maybe Winlock, depending on how you read between the lines). The seven members of the Timberland Board, who hadn’t seen the draft report until quite recently, voted unanimously to keep Randle open for at least one more year.

So tonight was a good night, but if y’all care about your small local libraries, it might be wise to look into budgets and facility reports. This issue isn’t going away. Check out the draft facilities plan here:http://avca_media.s3.amazonaws.com/…/Proposed_Capital_Facil…

It’s important to note that this proposal from administration doesn’t necessarily have the support of the seven trustees, who would be the ones to vote on any library closure.

By the way, props to Brian Zylstra for calmly and thoughtfully leading a meeting that could have gone sideways, and to Edna Fund for eloquence, urgency and clarity in her remarks.

Dedication to their library!

Here are the notes I took.  I started typing them into my phone halfway through the meeting.  I wish I had started earlier. Many people spoke passionately and so eloquently.  In fact, everyone was eloquent, from librarians themselves to off-the-grid residents of Randle. Could it be because all were bonded by their love of books and years of library life? I think so!

Comments from many different library patrons:

We’ve had 17 years of war maybe that’s why we don’t have money for libraries. 

The small town libraries are used as warming centers and for people who have no internet access at home to get fishing or burning permits and other online things.

These libraries are the only Community centers in small towns. 

South bend library was closed this week with no warning because of issues with the building. 

People off the grid in Randle use the library for many services.

Poverty and lack of transport even for five miles (re proposal that the Raymond library be used to replace South Bend’s library permanently.)

After school, South Bend children walk to the library.

Widening gap between haves and have nots 

Arts and humanities programs that schools no longer offer are available at the library.

Every decision we make today affects the world we live in tomorrow. We’re diminishing our future by closing libraries.

The library is an anti depressant and anti isolation for youth and seniors. The lack of a library’s community facilities will lead to depression, suicide, and geriatric death. 

Every community had the same story about how important their library is.

Why are the three lowest income highest poverty rate communities the ones with are their libraries under threat?

Montesano and Hoquiam are on the chopping block with no notice so their residents were not here. 

Many shared stories of childhood library memories. 

We need our country to be smarter and make better decisions and help the world. 

After the meeting, the Randle people gathered by their chartered bus for the three plus hour drive back home.

Allan’s photo

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