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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco boatyard garden’

Wednesday, 15 November 2017

 

sun on dogwood leaves outside our kitchen window

Ilwaco

We started by pulling the rest of the now wind-battered sweet peas off of the fence at the Ilwaco boatyard and trimmed some more Stipa gigantea.

The boatyard garden is all greens and silvers now.

Long Beach

We continued to whittle down the fall clean up of the Long Beach planters, starting with taking down the last of the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ at the welcome sign.

windblown geraniums

There’s no after photo.  Just imagine it pretty much empty.

In town, we could tell the weather was about to be variable.

I had decided to clip back Geranium ‘Rozanne’ even if it still had some blue flowers.  My memory was strong of how miserable it is to do an extensive post-frost clean up in cold weather with cold hands.

before

planter in front of the Coastal Inn and Suites

Allan cleaned up under two trees just to the north of my project.

before (with Pacicum ‘Heavy Metal’ and some badasters

Panicum “Heavy Metal’ is a kind of greyish green grass in summer.

after

It is better to wait to prune down ornamental grasses in late winter.  However, sometimes I just realize that passersby do not GET this grass and probably think it looks weedy in the winter (or anytime).

The first big rain squall came.  I got into the van.  Allan was stuck under an awning (in yellow vest by the white pillars).

I had found a couple of rocks in the planter.

I am now finding painted rocks that have been hidden in the planters all summer, not very effective because they were so lost that some of their designs have worn off.  Mr. Tootlepedal asked about the painted rocks.  It’s a hobby that has caught on around here, and towns all over Washington State and Oregon, too, have groups of folks who paint and hide pretty rocks.  When you find one, you can keep it or re-hide it.  You can join the Facebook group associated with whatever group logo is (usually) painted onto the back of the rock and post a photo of it.

From one of the local groups, Ocean Park and Long Beach Rocks:

We paint rocks and hide them all over town for others to find. On the back of the rocks write Ocean Park/Long Beach Rocks and a Facebook symbol. If you find a rock, you can keep it or re-hide it for others to enjoy. You can also post pictures here of the rocks you hide, as well as the rocks you find.

This is a family friendly activity, so please don’t decorate rocks with profanity or obscenities. Always remember that this activity is about community and spreading joy, happiness and love.

They do bring me a lot of enjoyment as I find them and can brighten up a hard work day.

After the squall, finishing up the planter by Coastal Inn:

We moved on to another intersection, skipping a couple of blocks to get to the planters that I felt needed tidying the most.  The one in front of Hungry Harbor Grille, with its tired California poppies, had been on my mind.

before, with the planter by the carousel in foreground

I left this one for Allan.

Allan clipped the catmint in the near one, and I tackled the diagonal one.

before

creating a big mess

I needed the wheelbarrow!

after

after

The Hungry Harbor was getting its doors painted for Christmas. She got one door outlined in the time it took to clean the planter.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan also cleaned up the planter in front of Sweet Phees snack and pizza shop.

before cutting back the golden marjoram

after

Cutting the perennials now prevents the cutting of bulb foliage of those that come up early, and lets the flowers of the small spring bulbs show off better.  The grape hyacinths foliage is already up, which is normal.

Another tree garden cleaned up by Allan:

before, near Castaways Bar and Grille.

We had once tried to make this tree garden special, with some hardy fuchsias and fewer badaster and hesperantha.  But people park their dogs in it, and bikes, too, I suppose, and the good new plants got smashed so it went back to badaster and hesperantha.

after (Allan’s photos)

At 4:30, 45 minutes before dusk, the rain came back in earnest so we went home.

I’m spending some of my evening time reading The Grapes of Wrath, which continues to be both stressful and satisfying.  Satisfying because I so agree with John Steinbeck.

About a rich man with a vast acreage who is “mean, lonely, old, disappointed, and scared of dying.”:

How times have not changed:

The desperately hungry, who cannot find work despite daily questing for work, dream of just a small piece of land where they could grow food to eat:

Is a different time coming?

In his review of the film of The Grapes of Wrath, Roger Ebert wrote, “Of course Tom [Joad] didn’t know the end of the story, about how the Okies would go to work in war industries and their children would prosper more in California than they would have in Oklahoma, and their grandchildren would star in Beach Boys songs. It is easy to forget that for many, “The Grapes of Wrath” had a happy, unwritten, fourth act.”  Fortunately, I did not read the review till after I’d finished the book; it has a big spoiler about the book’s final scene.

Roger Ebert was not entirely optimistic about the fate of the workers:

 “The story, which seems to be about the resiliency and courage of “the people,” is built on a foundation of fear: Fear of losing jobs, land, self-respect. To those who had felt that fear, who had gone hungry or been homeless, it would never become dated. And its sense of injustice, I believe, is still relevant. The banks and land agents of the 1930s have been replaced by financial pyramids so huge and so chummy with the government that Enron, for example, had to tractor itself off its own land.”

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 9 November 2017

I got eight hours of sleep for the first time since my cat Smoky got sick.  This meant a late start to the day.  I had barely settled in to what I thought would be a reading afternoon when the sun emerged from rain and we decided to go to work.  We picked the Ilwaco boatyard so we would not get drenched far from home if rain returned.

I left Frosty in his peculiar new favourite spot:

smack dab in the middle of the back bedroom floor

On the way to work, we clipped the Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ at the back of our volunteer post office garden.

Allan’s photo; no before; the Helianthus had been in the back corner.

Ilwaco boatyard

I had decided to take down some of the annuals now instead of waiting for frost, because I remembered how hard they were to pull from frozen ground.

sweet peas all the way to the top of the fence

Turns out that while I did pull some of the sweet peas and the taller cosmos, I could not bear to pull them all.

Tall cosmos and the tallest sweet peas and the verbascums got pulled.

Allan’s photo; We did get caught in a couple of brief squalls

Allan’s photo: This re-seeded euphorbia had to go, as it was too close to the sidewalk

Allan’s photos: All but the two Stipa gigantea at the center of the garden got their long stems trimmed.

Allan’s photos: sweet peas that I left blooming.

In pulling the old foliage off of a big Geranium ‘Rozanne’, I found a pair of clippers that I had lost over the summer.

The clippers had been hiding inside a santolina whose dead flowers I had sheared a month or more ago.

We had time to do a pretty good weeding all along the boatyard garden, as well, and to sow a bucket of poppy seeds that I had saved from deadheading there in late summer.  I thought the poppies might not reseed naturally because we had added a lot of mulch at the end of summer, smothering seedlings.  But I found quite a few new little poppy seedlings despite that, so good.

The crab pot tree has been assembled.  Allan will help decorate it later this month.

bare bones of the crab pot tree (Allan’s photo)

event poster by Don Nisbett

A fishing boat was pulling in to the nearby processing company, Ilwaco Landing.

 

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We dumped a few buckets of weeds at our dump spot, and took all the cosmos, sweet peas and clean non weedy clippings home to my compost mountain.

view from the east end of the marina

debris haul to compost bins (Allan’s photo)

the rain gauge from last night (Allan’s photo)

A dear local friend of ours is having post surgery woes.  Allan ran her son to McDonalds to get a meal, and then he and I went to meet Dave and Melissa for dinner at

Salt Pub.

It’s now dark when we go to dinner. Salt courtyard, Allan’s photo

Dave’s eyes were on a televised football game at the other end of the room.

fish and chips and sliders

clam chowder

Tomorrow we do expect the weather to be good enough for working, followed by a rainy weekend that I hope to devote to reading.

 

 

 

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Thursday, 26 October 2017

At midnight, just as the clock turned to Thursday, a crisis struck.  My best beloved cat, Smoky, had been sleeping in my room and then sitting on my lap.  All seemed normal until I saw him walking…He looked enormous.  He had somehow bloated up all through his sides and belly, so quickly, since he had looked normal two days ago.  Yet he was eating, drinking, purring.  I called the vet and heard the “Please call the emergency vet only in a real emergency” message and felt I should wait till morning.  But I started shaking, as hard as any cliché you can think of, teeth chattering, while I tried to look up causes of cat bloating.  Dr Google was not reassuring.

I managed to get five hours of broken sleep, with Smoky sleeping and purring on my feet.  This in itself is unusual; he usually sleeps in the living room, lately curled up with Calvin, the neurotic black cat who finally has a friend to cuddle with.

At 7:30, I woke and bided my time till exactly 8 when I called the Oceanside Animal Clinic and got a 9:15 appointment.  Smoky was still purring and eating a bit of food, but he could hardly walk.  He would take a few steps, find his hind legs burdened by his increased size, and he’d just stop, like this:

I was frantic inside; I love this cat so very much.  We got him and his brother Frosty and mother Mary (who died of lung cancer last year) from a neighbour of our old house.  The cats’ first seven years were well loved and lived inside a moldy broken down motor home with a heavy smoker who doted on them. Before he died of lung cancer, he asked me to take his three cats.

At the vet, Smoky’s abdomen was tapped and drained of some fluid, which was sent off for a test that will take a week.  He had blood tests and X rays which showed a lot of internal fluid and reasonably good heart and liver, so the tentative diagnosis is a serious cancer.

a little dog to pet while we waited for the blood test results

We got to take Smoky home, with some pain medication, and we could take him back to be “tapped and drained” when the fluid builds up again.  He’s only 12.  I have been worried about him being 12, after his mother’s death at 13.  I wanted at least two more years with my best little friend. (Later I realized that he is either recently turned thirteen or is almost thirteen.)

Smoky back at home, on a sheet covering the bed blankets, because his abdomen would be “leaking”.

We went to work, bulbing.  If we could get three jobs done, we could take four or five days off.  I had been so looking forward to that time off of planting my own bulbs, decorating for Halloween, and cleaning the house for Halloween company.  Now I wish I had nothing to do other than just spending time with Smoky.  (Maybe he will feel well enough to come outdoors with me.)  The house is a tip, though. The better I clean it, the more time I’ll be indoors with my precious cat.

Today we were back to beautiful summer-like weather.  We started by planting some white narcissi and tulips at Mike’s garden.  When we stopped back at home, a package of the second round of bulbs (shipped later) had arrived, and we distributed some to Time Enough Books, the boatyard garden, and the community building garden.

Boatyard got Narcissi ‘Green Eyed Lady’ and ‘Latvian Freedom’.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo; new blooms from the Echinops I had cut back to the ground.

Sweet peas are still blooming.  I asked Allan to take these sweet pea photos.

I was going to make an end of season sale order of more narcissi for the boatyard, but after a $400 vet bill, I don’t want to tempt my budget with any more bulb purchases this fall.  I also feel somewhat tentative about planting more narcissi here, since last spring someone picked about a hundred (that is, all of them) overnight.  (The local vet is reasonably priced.  The $400 included expensive tests and x rays.)

We planted some more bulbs at the Ilwaco Community Building.

Ilwaco Community Building

a test planting of tulips. We have seen deer in this tiered garden so….it is only a test.

autumn blooming crocus

Allan’s photo

We then got back to our planned planting and clean up at

The Depot Restaurant

where Allan cleared the hops from the dining deck lattice while I planted bulbs.

tulips and narcissi set up to plant

Allan’s befores and afters of the hops project:

the hops project, before, showing the door that leads from restaurant to dining deck

after

before, the ramp to the dining deck

after

a Pacific tree frog in the lattice

After today’s work. More fall clean up will be done after frost. 

Long Beach

We now had five more white narcissi for the Vet Field corner.  While Allan planted them, I planted a combination of yellow tulips in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter.

L&C planter; Allan helped me by pulling the bad asters that had appeared, as they seem to blow in from the dunes or other gardens.

Then on to the last of today’s planned jobs,

Diane’s garden.

before (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo, bulbs laid out to plant

bulb tossing

All done…Planting bulbs in the soft soil of the septic box was so easy.

Red Barn in the background.

Diane was pleased to see all the bulbs go on, and of course she was sympathetic about Smoky.  I got to give good dog Misty a good belly rub.

Allan also planted clumps of narcissi in the newly restored roadside garden.

The recent heavy rain had not washed out the new garden strip.

Last thing: cutting back some short (due to lack of frequent watering) Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ at the Red Barn.

our little Red Barn garden

As you can imagine, my bulbing today was done in a somber and anxious mood.

At home

There was little joy in erasing bulbing jobs from the work board.

I sat with Smoky, who purred while I wept, trying and failing not to cry because I don’t want to upset him.  I fretted about whether he was again retaining fluid and mourned over the thought of soon losing my softest, plushest, kindest cat ever.

Allan heard the sounds of the big homecoming football game up on School Hill. He walked up the hill to watch the halftime show which he’s always missed before.  The marching band often does a Halloween themed show which he wished to see.

halftime fireworks

They did not disappoint.

This year included music from Nightmare Before Christmas.

The score was Ilwaco 39, guest 0 when Allan left after the show.

The most comforting thing for me about Smoky’s dire prognosis was the support of Facebook friends.  After writing about the visit to the vet, I changed my profile photo to one of me and Smoky at one of our backyard campfires.

The comment that got to me the most was when I wrote how much I had been looking forward to my staycation reading with my best friend, Smoky.  Shannon, friend of Tony, wrote, His book says “Dear Mama — you’re the best one.” He reads it over and over.

 

 

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Tuesday, 10 October 2017

Allan found a critter before we left for work:

We had a meeting scheduled for 1 PM and somehow got a late start. I wanted a yard of Soil Energy so we took the risk that 45 minutes was enough time to get to Peninsula Landcape Supply and back.

We were thrilled to see a great big new pile of mulch had arrived.

plenty for all

loading up

On the way south, we made a three minute stop at the Planter Box, looking for orange violas that I had seen the last week.  Someone else had snapped them up, as I should have done.

Allan’s photo

Pumpkins were in. (Allan’s photo)

We got to our appointment with Shelly Pollock at NW Insurance and Financial in Long Beach with five minutes to spare.

in Shelly’s waiting room; to the right is the enjoyable local mystery series by Jan Bono.

It looks like Allan has a new business partner. That’s Shelly’s dog, Bella.

Shelly guided through Medicare choices.  Allan will be elevated to the safety of good health care on January 1st.  We were sadly surprised with how much Medicare costs (cheap compared to full price insurance, of course, and with no dreaded deductible that keeps even insured people from going to the doctor).  Nor does him being on Medicare cut my solo insurance cost in half.  Phooey.  I asked what would happen to someone who, with minimal social security, ends up too poor to pay the Medicare fees.  When does one then qualify for Medicaid, I wondered.  Apparently only if one makes under $12,000 a year Social Security…so if one is living on a not luxurious 14K a year, Medicare would take a painful slice out of that.  The image of sitting at the curb in a cardboard box came to mind.  It does not look like retirement will be in the cards for us, after all.  Good thing we like what we do; I hope we can keep doing it.

I was awash with relief that this fall, Shelly will be able to help me sort my way through the complicated and rather scary application for individual insurance.  The affordable ACA plan with which I have been blessed is in jeopardy right now because of the whims of the Trump administration; I just hope to be able to afford insurance for two and a half more years.

After the appointment, we checked on the planters on Sid Snyder Drive…

Too many wild beach strawberries in this one, we agreed.

…and spent the rest of the day mulching, first finishing up the end of the Ilwaco Boatyard garden.

Allan’s photo

All the way to the end of the boatyard garden with mulch!

sweeping up

Next, we mulched four of the garden beds (two large, two small) on Howerton Avenue, with an interruption that took us by surprise.

a heavy squall

Allan’s photo

Port Office gardens tidied and mulched

I clipped several santolinas.  An art event will take place on the weekend, so I wanted the gardens to look refreshed.

Time Enough Books/Purly Shell garden clipped and mulched

Looking north across the port parking lot, we could see Melissa finishing up the Norwood hedge.

in the boat storage yard by the parking lots

We had divided the cost of mulch so as to keep some for our own garden.  At home, we finished unloading and wheelbarrowed the soil back to the newly cleared bogsy woods area.

First, I got to see my good friend Royal setting out with Devery for his evening walk.

This much rain in the wheelbarrow from today.

before

after

after

Mulching the port got erased from the work board.

I have a month and a half to get a good weeding done at home before year’s end! It has been on the board since late spring.

 

 

 

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Thursday, 5 October 2017

While divesting ourselves of the Ilwaco street tree branches that we had pruned yesterday evening, we  admired of the east end of the marina.

I found out later that the floating enclosure is a pen…


…for young salmon, used in a recent study of some sort.


Butch, the owner of Coho Charters (the red building) is my go to person for fishing questions.

We headed north, with a brief stop at the Basket Case Greenhouse.

Allan’s photo, getting rady for Halloween


a selection of new plants at the Basket Case


including nice Euphorbia ‘Glacier Blue’

Next stop: picking up a yard of Soil Energy at Peninsula Landscape Supply. We were worried because the Soil Energy pile had been way low last time, and might be all gone.  When we arrived, we saw a truck and trailer ahead of us.  Who were these people competing with us for the last of the pile, I thought anxiously….until I saw they were our good friends Judy and Larry.

Allan’s photo


Larry, Judy, me: friends with similar goals


We were glad there was enough in the Soil Energy bin for two loads.


We parked off to the side and the mulch came to us. (Allan’s photo)

Klipsan Beach Cottages  

Our first actual job of the day was a tidying and some cutting back at KBC.

Allan dug out a daylily, the same kind that he dug out for me in my own garden recently.

It is prone to daylily leaf streak. (Allan’s photo).  The flowers are hardy fuchsia.


before cutting back Thalictrum ‘Elin’


and after


The thalictrum will come home with us for Halloween decor.

Allan cut down one part of the rugosa rose.  The whole shrub is going to come down later.

After. Now you can see through to the lower fenced garden.

As you can see, the day was (too) warm and bright.

view in the east gate


the birdbath view


the inner bench circle


a huge bud on the Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’


fall colour on hamamelis


Allan captured the moment when Mary noticed the leaf colour.

We didn’t see Denny today.  He had had a knee replacement (his second) on Tuesday and was at home napping.

                           Long Beach

On the way south, we checked up on the beach approach gardens and the Long Beach city hall garden.  This weekend’s two days of clamming will generate a lot of passersby.

the foyer at city hall (Allan’s photo)

MaryBeth stopped by when she saw us at City Hall.  She gave us a present that she had been carrying with her for the next time our paths crossed.

After checking on the Sid Snyder approach planters…

the westernmost Sid Snyder planter (Allan’s photo)

…we made sure the World Kite Museum garden looked good, because their annual One Sky One World event is this weekend.  The philosophy of One Sky, One World is needed more than ever now.

Pleased with the new containers at the kite museum.

Ilwaco

The south third of the Ilwaco boatyard garden was our destination for the yard of Soil Energy that we’d been hauling with us.

looking south from the gate, before


soil applied by bucket


cutting back Pennisetum macrourum from the sidewalk


and after….I had suddenly realized the garden should start where the paved sidewalk starts.

The dredge has been at work lately, clearing mud from the channel which is so necessary for the marina to thrive.

scooping up mud


and depositing it on a barge.


boats


Allan’s photo


Allan’s photo

We still have sweet peas blooming on the fence.

sweet peas all the way to the top


bright red sweet peas

We had run out of Soil Energy about twenty feet from the end of the garden, so another load will be necessary.  The end needs such a small amount that I sort of cheated and erased boatyard mulching from the work list, changing it to mulching at the port and Time Enough Books.

The summer is long gone and I still have not accomplished one thorough, end to end good weeding at home.

At home: The garden gift from MaryBeth.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

El Compadre Mexican Restaurant

We had this week’s North Beach Garden Gang dinner with Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) at El Compadre.

hard to get a good photo of the inlaid tables that I admire so much.


Allan’s photo


tiled window frames


As often happens, we were the last to leave.

Now for an extra long weekend, during the quiet time before fall clean up and bulbs.  My goal is to not leave my property for four days while I accomplish some gardening.  Allan has some boating goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 29 September 2017

Allan was sad to see the painting of the shed gutter had not worked.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo: Paint had fallen into a spider web.

This spider, who had likely entered the van on some plant debris, had made a web inside my van door.  I did not let her come to work with us.

These garden spiders don’t scare me.

We stopped at Dennis Co on the way to work to get some paint for the window trim (which you have seen in yesterday’s post).  Allan was also able to repaint the gutter successfully.

Anchorage Cottages

The weather was just too hot to do any of the pruning projects we had planned.

These viburnums can wait for another day.

arbutus and hydrangea in the center courtyard

On the way to our next job, I was appalled at the temperature.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We stayed only to do the most important deadheading and tidying.  The heat was just too much.

bird bath view

roses

the other bird bath with Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

Japanese anemone

hardy fuchsia

autumnal hamamelis

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We picked up a yard of Soil Energy.

bird baths by the pond

We learned that starting next week, PLS will be going to their off season hours, open till three on Tuesday, Thursdays, Saturdays.  This will require us to be less spontaneous during mulching season. We will have to make proper plans and schedules.

signs available in the office

On the way back to Ilwaco, we decided we had to delay our boatyard mulching project till early evening’s cooler weather.

Ridiculous weather! What happened to our nice crisp autumn?

home

This is the handsome gate of our “Starvation Alley Cranberry Farm” neighbours to the east.

At the base of the ornamental plum in our front garden (a tree I did not plant) is a hamamelis glowing with autumn colour.

Look to the left side of the tree trunk.

 

Tiger Eyes sumac

another hamamelis

I retreated indoors from the heat and was joined for a bit by our neighbours to the west, Devery, and her dog Royal.

It was Royal’s first time in our house. He was excited.

Ilwaco boatyard

After five o clock, we mulched 1/3 of the boatyard.  I think my estimate that three yards will cover it all is pretty close.

before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

Allan sweeps up

Aster ‘Harrington’s Pink’

leveling mulch with a broom

looking south from the north end

As we had begun our mulching, a Londoner on a bicycle had stopped to ask the location of Salt Pub.  I had to tell him the sad news that it is closed on Wednesdays.  Where could he eat, he asked, after returning from a two block jaunt to make sure Salt was closed.  I was sad to say that the only option was our little local market.  In an ideal world, we would have invited him to come to our house for a campfire, with sausages, and then driven him to his campsite at Cape Disappointment, but our conversation took place just as we got stuck in to an hour of unloading mulch.

After work, we went to the little market ourselves in search of some fancy sausages, and found him outside.  He had managed to find an apple for his dinner, with some cheese that he already had.  I was afraid that “Disappointment” might sum up his feelings, and I did so wish he had been here on a night when Salt was open.

the Londoner

I was able to guide him to having breakfast tomorrow morning at the Portside Café, where his quest for pancakes should be well satisfied.

We had a good chinwag about politics.  He said he almost bet £5000 on Brexit not passing, and woke up in shock that morning (and relief that he had not made the bet). He had experienced the same shock and dismay last November 9 at the result of our election.

I told him that I used to be married to a Leedsman.  “Oh, that must have been tough!” said he.

Allan and I did not succeed at the local in our quest for fancy sausages so drove on up to Sid’s Market in Seaview, where we met with success.  We also met again a nice RVing couple who had asked us at the boatyard where to shop for groceries.  They, too, had met with shopping success. We then went home to have a campfire on the one of the warmest evenings of the year.

Nicotiana by the campfire

the moon just caught in the trees

Allan’s photo

coals

When I looked at the temperature at 1 AM, it was still 72 degrees outside.  That is just unheard of here at the beach.

Friday, 29 September 2017

After taking Thursday off so Allan could finish painting the shed, we slept late.

Skooter slept late, too. He puts his feet over Allan’s head like earmuffs.

We had believed the forecast of a half inch of rain.  The rain came overnight rather than during the day, which turned out so fine that tourists would be looking at our public gardens.  While we did not have to water, we certainly had to tidy after all.

This much rain overnight!

By the post office, we saw the first sign of Ilwaco Halloween.

And so it begins.

The Depot Restaurant

just some quick deadheading

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ towering

Long Beach

the welcome sign

We tidied the gardens at Veterans Field while the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market was in session.

Allan’s photo

I found a home for a duplicate plant of mine in Fifth Street Park. I had bought in, then realized it was the same white sanguisorba I had acquired at a Hardy Plant sale from Dan Hinkley, back when it just had a number, not a name.

Allan planted it in here, toward the back.

Needing energy, we got coffee to go.

at Abbracci Coffee Bar

We did a walk around town just to deadhead the planters.

passing by the farmers market again

I stopped it at NIVA green to take a few photos for their Facebook page, and for some reason I had to buy this little stove.

It spoke to me somehow.  Now it is mine and I don’t quite know what to do with it.

Allan pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from under the street tree near the pharmacy.

before

after

Here is a sad thing: The old, peeling cranberry mural on the south end of Dennis Company is now almost covered.  $58,000 has been spent to try to restore it five different times, and it is now too far gone to save.

Goodbye to a Long Beach icon. (Allan’s photos)

The paint peeled badly after a restoration just a couple of years ago.

Here it is in better days.  I will miss it.

We then drove up to Peninsula Landscape Supply for another yard of Soil Energy.

The shaved ice booth was heading down to Ilwaco for Saturday Market.

Ilwaco boatyard garden

We got another third of the garden mulched, all the way to the south side of the gate.

Unfortunately, we have to cover a multitude of poppy seeds.  In my own garden, I might dig and replant them.  No time for that here.

I’ve saved seeds and will re-sow.

To finish our relatively short day, we deadheaded the cosmos at the port office and Time Enough Books gardens.  I took some photos of the marina from near the port office.

someone else enjoying the view

an hour before sunset, along Howerton Avenue

home

Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’ is changing shape.

Devery came to pick some Cripp’s Pink apples to make some applesauce.

She stood on a bucket to get some.

Canna in bloom in the water boxes

I made a sit spot in the new bogsy wood clearing.

on the table: broken china bits that I found in 2010 when making our garden

I had a sudden brainstorm which Allan helped me bring to fruition.

Skooter supervising

He helped me move this….

…out to the salmonberry cave….

…where I like it very much.

And it gave me room for a new little sit spot on the east wall of the house.

Next: another long weekend.  We are enjoying the short work weeks between tourist season and the soon to arrive fall clean up and bulb season.

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Friday, 22 September 2017

Although we were not quite ready for a true day off, we did get to have the easiest sort of day: short, and all Ilwaco.

We’d had this much rain.

Our day began with picking flowers for a big do at the Fire Station.  The seemingly indefatigable Jenna (Queen La De Da) was organizing the event, put on by the Ilwaco Merchants Association to celebrate our volunteer fire department’s 130th anniversary.

fire station memorabilia

The fire station burned down in 2006, destroying a lot of historical papers and photos.  The yellow fire helmet in the photo above was scorched in the fire.

We went with Jenna to her gallery to collect some vases.

outside Jenna’s gallery

Jenna had the idea of putting the flowers in fire boots.  Getting them to stand up was a trick, till we figured out that we could tie them to the staircase railing.  I’d like to have a floor like the fire station’s; the drain in the middle made getting rid of a boot full of tipped over water quite easy. Below: The bouquets are partially done; we would be bringing more flowers in the early evening before the event.

The pampas grass is from yesterday’s Long Beach clean up, and the two showy orange flowers are Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’.

We weeded and deadheaded for an hour at the port and the boatyard.

Howerton Avenue curbside (Allan’s photo)


Allan’s photo


Todd showed up for a boatyard visit with his son, Dawson, and Ansel the pup. (Allan’s photos)

 

boatyard looking north

lavender abuzz with bees

looking south


helenium


almost done

It was a pleasure to not have to water the boatyard or the Ilwaco planters.

At home by the early afternoon, Allan started painting his shed.

before (Allan’s photo)

I puttered in the garden and, way out in the willow grove on the southernmost edge, I saw something that I had wondered about last winter.

in the willow grove


What is that? I could get to it now because the ditch is dry.

This had blown from the port during a winter storm.

The fire station do would give me the opportunity to find out if the derby fisherfolk wanted it back.  (Yes, they do.)

4:30 PM


Allan’s photo

I did not leave myself as much time as I should have to pick more flowers, leading to a tad bit of stress.

Allan’s photo


Allan’s photo


flowers to add to the fire boot bouquets

We arrived back at the station with bouquets at 5:30 instead of 5.  Plenty of time, as the event did not start till 6:30.

fire boot bouquets

podium bouquet

buffet bouquet


dessert table; I had broken my own rule and picked sweet peas from the boatyard!

As we walked the two blocks home to change from our work clothes, the owners of Himani Indian Cuisine (Astoria) were preparing chicken and kebabs on the grill.

superb grilling by Himani Indian Cuisine

We returned at 6:30 to enjoy the….

Ilwaco Volunteer Fire Department 130th Anniversary Celebration

new art by Don Nisbett (Jenna’s spouse)


a mug to be given to each firefighter


Don and his art (Allan’s photo)

Don Nisbett prepares to address the crowd.


Allan’s photo


Allan’s photo


left, Mayor Mike Cassinelli, right, Fire Chief Tommy Williams

The tall ships Hawaiian Chieftain and Lady Washington had just sailed into port a couple of hours before and the crew had been invited to feast with us.  They introduced themselves one by one, mostly young people from all over the country who had joined the sailing adventure.

Tall Ships crew members


Tall Ships crew members


Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo


Firefighter John Grocott distributing the mugs.

John, who lives across the street from the station, played a big part during the station fire of 2006.

In the early stages of the response, Fire Chief Tom Williams was trying to put together a plan of attack. With no bunker gear, engines or equipment and heavy smoke pouring out of the building there was not much he could do. Somehow two of the bay doors opened on their own showing the 1st out engine and brush truck still intact. Assistant Chief Kerry Suomela jumped in the brush truck and Lieutenant John Grocott jumped in the engine. Lt. Grocott was able to drive the engine out of the station but the door in front of the brush truck came back down again. Asst. Chief Suomela was able to start the brush truck and drive it through the closed door.”

In the background, in caps: Our probably future mayor, Gary Forner, and our current mayor (and gardening client) Mike Cassinelli.


Allan’s photo


Fire Chief Tommy Williams addresses the crowd. (Allan’s photo)

Then came a delicious feast.

Allan’s photo

The tall ships crew members regales us with sea shanties.

Jenna and her god daughter, Nirah from Himani’s Indian Cuisine

The Ilwaco Volunteer Fire Department

retired members of the IFD


And maybe a future firefighter.

At the end of the day, we took one of the big bouquets down to Salt Hotel, where members of the Tall Ships crew were bunking for the weekend.

Allan’s photo

The night was still and almost warm, the marina was beautiful, the event had been happy and moving and it was one of those many days that I was reminded of how much I love this little town.

 

 

 

 

 

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