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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco boatyard garden’

Thursday, 4 July 2019

I got such a nice card from someone who came to our plant sale from an upriver town.

Beautiful name, too. I will write back and tell her she can come to the garden anytime, just being sure to shut the deer gates, although it will not look as well-groomed as it did on plant sale weekend. (Perhaps she will see it here before I remember to write back!)

Long Beach

Planter watering day fell on the fourth of July holiday.  It was not as crowded downtown as I had feared and the day went swimmingly.

Long Beach welcome sign

downtown
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
A bee making a decision. (Allan’s photo)
busy streets (Allan’s photo)
Allan’s photo
free BBQ samples (Allan’s photo); he says it was delicious
Allan’s photo
birdseed under a tree
This busker was superb.
Mexican hat flower about to bloom.
picking up someone’s lost ice cream; tears before bedtime
basket created by Basket Case Greenhouse
lopsided planter because one pink agastache did not come back well

It has been frustrating that I can’t order the big showy agastaches.  I no longer trust the nursery (not local) that had bad ones last year, and so I have not asked the local nurseries to order any for Long Beach.  I must try to make cuttings of the good ones.

I like this t shirt that was on offer at a shop.  Much more thoughtful than a sea of red, white, and blue.  I am not a nationalist.

Allan’s photo

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ (left) came out just in time for the holiday. They look like fireworks.

Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
Why the picked hydrangea?
Why the picked and dropped flowers?

As I passed the excellent busker again, I finally had that feeling I had been waiting for all year, that feeling of fondness for the happy tourists.

“Yeah, I heard a funny thing
Somebody said to me
You know that I could be in love, with almost everyone
I think that people are the greatest fun.”

After watering Long Beach, we stopped by the Mermaid Castle, having heard that Queen La De Da had a live mermaid visiting today.

Allan’s photo

Jenna’s photo

The Depot Restaurant

We spot watered the garden (a couple of areas the sprinklers do not yet reach).

I found a rock.

Ilwaco

I weeded the boatyard garden while Allan watered the planters and street trees, post office and fire station, and helped me finish watering.

Allan’s photo

cistus
blue globe thistle
elephant garlic minus one

south end of boatyard

I got permission to dig some comfrey from the garden nearby!  Next week.

Ilwaco planter has been nibbled on. It got a spritz of deer spray. (Allan’s photo)
former location of our friend’s gallery (Allan’s photo)

We got home in time for me to churn out four blog posts about the work week (ending with this one) while our little metal house shook with the fireworks set off by people who do not care that our cats are scared and my dear neighbor dogs are next door hiding under the bed in terror.

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Thursday, 27 June 2019

I got a plant delivery from Digging Dog Nursery, including a new Molinia ‘Transparent’.  Skooter dug up the one I got last year!

Although we still felt like we had the stuffing kicked out of us from the shingrix shot, watering wouldn’t wait.  On the way to work, realizing we did not have much longer to see it, we toured the current exhibit just three blocks west at

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum.

There, I found information about the Narcissa Garden Club, whose plaque is on a memorial at Black Lake.

A museum staffer and I spoke of how in recent years, the little garden in front has had only plastic flowers.  Allan and I thought we might try to revive it after we semi-retire.  At the very least, we could plant it up with some narcissi.

I found this memorial to be deeply moving.

Also, books for troops.

I wish that the Spirit of Peace would prevail.

The Spirit of Peace, by Joe Knowles
having a pleasant confab with a friend from Ocean Park

On we went to our gardening rounds.

The Depot Restaurant

One of the restaurant staff came by and said he was amazed that the garden was already this tall from having looking like nothing when he started (in early spring when the perennials were all cut back).

An interesting rig parked for a few minutes nearby.  It appeared to be a trailer made of old trunks.  Or perhaps it was just an intriguing collection of old trunks.

On the way to Long Beach, Allan picked up his new shirt from Rip Tide Threads. He says he was tickled to get it and felt he had “moved up a social class”.

Long Beach

We plodded through the watering of the Long Beach planters.

found a rock
a nicely colored Cosmos ‘Sonata’
Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’

Under one of two trees where the water does not work, the plants are distressed.  The only way to water it is to carry heavy buckets for a quarter of a block. So it never gets enough without rain.

finger blight of the day

We attended to some rampant blackberries popping out of the Heron Pond salal garden.  No time for horsetail patrol here.

During horsetail patrol in Fifth Street Park, I resolved to buy some GOOD bagged mulch for the quadrant that I so far cannot get to look good this year.

Allan’s Long Beach photos:

in the only planter that still has all its alliums
Allium christophii

A gentleman from Dooger’s Restaurant wanted to know the ID of the pretty little dianthus (pinks) growing in the restaurant garden.

Even though we so did not have energy for the planters out on Sid Snyder Drive, they needed water and attention. So we attended to them.

This one has to have water hauled to it in buckets.

Ilwaco

I watered the boatyard garden while Allan bucket watered the street trees and planters.

It was another challenging watering session because of hoses going up into boats.

I had to call for Allan’s help to unhook that hose from the faucet and hook another one up. I had found this partly burst fabric hose that I could take to various faucets.

Then I hooked up the boat hose again and left all as it was before.

The horsetail, both the big kind and the even more difficult little scrimmy kind, is coming back.

No time to deal with it today.

By the way, once upon a time, years ago, I put sprinkler hoses all along this garden so that I could water by hooking them up and then weeding while watering.  They were all stolen within a few weeks.  Because I water from behind the fence, I can’t do much weeding at the same time.

The garden is not too bad.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I could see the spot above, to the lower right, where someone had picked themselves a blue flowered stem.

sweet pea success
red poppies for remembrance

We must remember to take red poppy seeds to the WWI Memorial.

I watered the fire station garden while Allan watered the post office garden.

Allan’s Ilwaco photos:

We love that the Peninsula Sanitation office has someone who waters the planter. (No one knows who planted those gladioli.)

We now have three days off, thank goodness!

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Sunday, 24 March 2019

We started the day with a couple of hours of work, mostly the planting of sweet peas at the Ilwaco boatyard.

Allan deadheaded two blocks of planter and street tree narcissi.

A mist obscured the view of Sand Island from the south end of the boatyard garden.

Allan’s photos
planting sweet peas
removing one sad euphorbia

The mist remained as we drove off to deadhead some narcissi along the port.

flowers in the port curbside gardens (Allan’s photos)

Time Enough Books and Purly Shell garden
Ilwaco pavilion garden

I spent the rest of the day in our garden.

Skooter chillaxing in the east bed

For someone not very social, I had a procession of visitors bearing gifts, to add to the generosity of dinner and gifts from Alycia last night.  Not sure what I did to deserve all this kindness.

First, we had a good visit with Devery who came to visit us and Alycia, followed later by Mark and Joseph and Gail (and dogs) bringing me some cattails (a different sort than mine) from Mark and Joseph’s pond.

We toured the garden and had some good garden conversation, and were joined at the end by MaryBeth who had arrived bearing some teapots.  More garden touring ensued.

Meanwhile, I had managed to clean out an area along the iron fence for sweet peas, another quite difficult and daunting weeding job that will need some mulch to look ok.

I am trying to make that little bed narrower toward the front in order to make the path better.  The bed to the right has been untouched for months and will be another daunting weeding job.  Someday when the Nora House belongs to someone else, we will put a narrow shed there for privacy OR a kitchen garden shared with a gardening neighbour…

Allan helped me clear out a couple of big pots and put up a bamboo tripod for more sweet peas.  A plant casualty occurred.  I will draw a veil over my sorrow over a tiny Dan Hinkley plant I had been nursing along, a case of lost-tagii so it would be hard to replace because all I know is that it was, and still is (but only two inches tall now) a special variegated shrub of some sort.  Alycia came over at the peak of my mopery with two delicious foil wrapped pita sandwiches which did much to alleviate my sadness.

These things happen and the plant casualty rather amusingly ties in with the book I am reading, We Made a Garden by Margery Fish. More on this when I finish the book.

The center bed weeding is still in the same state that it was yesterday. I am relieved to have gotten my sweet peas in, leaving just the Boreas Inn sweet peas to plant before that spring job is done.  (MaryBeth said she plants sweet peas on Presidents’ Day with success.  I have always waited till St Patrick’s Day, which means that with so many to plant, the time stretches into the last week of March.)

At the end of the day, with sunset fast approaching, Allan made it over to the Ilwaco Community Building to bottom out a patch of salal.  If one MUST have salal, at least let it be green and fresh.

Tomorrow rain is predicted, the sort of cold rain that will prevent finishing my weeding goal.

Here are the darling teapots that MaryBeth brought me; she is a genius for finding them second hand.

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 14 March 2019

During the cloudy morning, the species tulips in the scree garden stayed closed.

Skooter captained the good ship Ann Lovejoy.

When we arrived at the post office, I remembered that the quilt show at the museum would mean lots of extra foot traffic Friday through Sunday, so we spent about an hour spiffing up our volunteer garden. A before photo is lacking and would have shown that Allan dug out a big self sown red grass that was right by the sidewalk. The garden shows off better now.

The grass was just past the fifth stepping stone.

Then we could get on to our paid work, taking up where we had left off on Monday with the trimming of santolinas, vastly speeded up with The Toy. We worked from Salt Hotel to the Freedom Market.

Almost all the photos today are Allan’s.

I had been eager to get the Salt sword ferns trimmed before they started to unfurl.

Allan strimmed the grassy verge by the Freedom Market because no one else does. (It’s port property next to a sidewalk between businesses.)

Almost to the west end:

Some Hermodactylus iris in the curbside garden:

The Van Engelen bulb catalog says, “Commonly referred to as the Snakes Head Iris, this graceful 1597 Mediterranean heirloom has lightly scented flowers comprised of taupe standards with yellowish-green striations and taupe-edged purplish-brown falls. A terrific garden variety, its finger-shaped tubers can multiply underground, yielding more flowering shoots as it matures over time.”

We took a load of clipped santolina home to our compost bins. The tulips had opened more as the day has brightened.

Frosty told Allan which bin to use.

Our neighbours got their daily biscuits.

The entire front garden smelled of apricots from the hamamelis.

When we arrived at the boatyard garden, the free wood bin across the street (where last week’s dozens of pallets had been taken by someone) had a cool piece of driftwood that Allan snagged and took back to our place.

We trimmed the many santolinas and did some weeding all along the boatyard.

I planted some phlomis and some tall yellow achillea, dug up from my garden, at the boatyard and the curbside gardens.

I had had an absurd fantasy that we might also have time to plant Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ starts in all of the Ilwaco Street planters. Ha. Didn’t happen. Maybe tomorrow or Saturday.

Back at home, while Allan offloaded our compostable debris and went off to dump the weeds, I unpacked an exciting box from Annie’s Annuals. The packing from Annie’s is the best and easiest to unpack of any mail order nursery of my experience.

Box of healthy plants…

Each of the three plants has its own removable box…

And that box easily deconstructs to reveal the potted plants.

So easy, especially compared to that nursery whose order last year was packed in so much shredded paper that it was hard to not damage the plants while unpacking.

The Annie’s plants are beautiful. She sells perennials as well as annuals.

Here’s what I got. I am showing you the prices, too, because they are competitive with buying in person at nurseries, and the plants are such a good size.

I got the rose ‘Grandmother’s Hat’ because of the name. The rose I want most is ‘Special Grandma’, which I have seen in the Tootlepedal blog and which seems to only be available in the U.K.

I had an exceptionally special grandma.

I was able to erase two santolina tasks from the work board. My hope is to get Long Beach santolinas done by the end of this week. I’m trying to remember if there are any left at the Boreas Inn that might need doing.

Soon (I hope) nothing will stand in the way of starting the beach approach weeding.

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Monday, 25 February 2019

The hellebore that was a birthday present a year or two ago from Our Kathleen:

Perhaps she can remind us of its name.

A bird family is making a nest outside our kitchen window.

Allan’s photo

 

Last night I had assured Allan that we would probably have today off because the weather forecast suggested the temperature would stay below 42 degrees (F). I need to stop making assurances that I cannot keep. By midmorning, a 46 degree temperature called for at least cutting back the grasses and some perennials at the Ilwaco boatyard…just when Allan was making himself a list of other things to accomplish.

I am still using my phone to take photos because I want to sit in my lazy comfy chair when I get home and type on my pad rather than at my desk with my computer. This despite the arrival of a new (used) camera whose photos would be much crisper.

Lots of crocuses and iris in the post office garden:

Boatyard, before, looking south, with Panicum ‘Northwind’, which I intend to divide into three later in the spring:

I found that The Toy (shown above at the edge of the sidewalk) made quick work of the grass, and, to my great job, also is strong enough to trim the santolinas…

…although I am going to wait till the nights are above 30 degrees before I trim them. The experience of trimming them with The Toy was such a delight that it was hard to resist doing them all today.

Looking north

Lots of little poppy seeds:

Allan’s photo

The Toy also works great at trimming the new growth of Ceanothus back from the sidewalk edge.

Across the street from the boatyard was the biggest pile of free pallets I have ever seen. I found myself pondering more compost bins.

You might want to read up on the supposed residual toxicity of some pallets vs others and how to allegedly tell the difference. I haven’t bothered…but there might be something to it.

We met a pleasant tourist, who stopped his car to ask us where he and his mother would enjoy visiting here. I suggested the two lighthouses at Cape D; he said his mother collects lighthouses and had never actually seen one! And I suggested the Ilwaco marina, with Time Enough Books and the Don Nisbett Gallery, and the Long Beach boardwalk, and Oysterville. Awhile later he drive by, now heading from the marina to the lighthouses, and told us how much they had enjoyed meeting Don and that they had bought a painting. Don later gave Allan and I a chocolate candy each and told us the painting had been one of clammers.

The boat that sank and is now being worked on:

Allan’s photo

Befores and afters (Allan’s photos):

The view from the south end of the boatyard garden:

Allan’s (tele)photo

Finishing up:

It took us only three and a half hours to weed and trim the whole boatyard garden (except for santolinas), a speed unheard of before, thanks to us each wielding The Toy. We bought two so have invested over $200 in working faster and therefore making less money, a bit of a conundrum.

During our boatyard session, Amy and April of the Port Office staff had walked by on their lunch break. We were able to find out that the former garden by the south wall of the office is indeed to be a garden again and so we went to weed it.

My view while weeding there:

Allan’s photos:

Our good friend Ernie walked by with his human.

Allan’s photo

Afterward, we hauled a large quantity of non-weedy compost to our home compost bins, which are now heaped high with unchopped debris.

The work board tonight :

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Wednesday, 5 December 2018

With some colder weather in store, Allan had tried adding some plastic to the sides of the greenhouse lean to:

Allan’s photo

We found out this morning that it was so flappy and noisy in the wind that I worried it would keep our neighbours to the east awake.  Adding weights to the bottom did not help, so down it came.  The lean-to is useful enough without doors as it should keep frost off of tender plants.  Allan may add something stronger, but removable, for the coldest nights, once it gets figured out…

I began a project of cutting back honeysuckle and hops, all tangled with a lot of dead in it, on the arbors to the east of the compost bins.

before

I was quite enjoying the task when I happened to look at my pineapple sage and realized that the cold had surely damaged plants in the less sheltered Long Beach gardens.

pineapple sage

and Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’

So halfway into the afternoon, we had to switch gears and go to work.

We pulled the last of the Ilwaco cosmos…

….at the boatyard garden…

….and the Ilwaco pavilion garden.

We checked on the window boxes and barrels at the Depot Restaurant in Seaview and found that the annuals were still not ready to pull, even though I wish they were.

Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ still has some yellow daisies….

and the window boxes still have some flowers.

In Long Beach, we cut down chrysanthemums and Salvia leucantha in several planters.  The city crew has had to dig in one of them, probably for electrical Christmas lights reasons.

Oh, dear.

I visited NIVA green for a bit of Christmas shopping.

beautiful new velvet bags, too soft for my lifestyle

There is one photo I cannot show because a Christmas present is front and center.

I was able to tell Heather in person that I was going to remove myself as co-administrator of the NIVA green Facebook page, because her assistant, Wes, is now doing such a great job with it.  It is much better for someone who is on the spot to do it, and my grandmother told me many times that too many cooks spoil the broth.  I have another place to share my photos: the “favourite shops” album on my own Our Long Beach Peninsula page.  For all its flaws, Facebook is a strong connector in our beach communities.

We finished Long Beach by clipping back some frost-limp perennials in Fifth Street Park, where the very last cosmos got pulled.  Allan had covered the gunnera with leaves during an errand run the day before.

Our last work stop was brief.  I finally cut the Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen that was STILL blooming in front of the Shelburne.  I no longer wanted to wonder every day if it looked good or was frost blackened.

This one lonely stem had emerged unplanned.

the fig tree

pineapple sage looking better than mine

We rewarded ourselves for our staycation work day with dinner at the pub.

Our drinks:

I had never heard of a Salty Dog drink.  Delicious because I love salt and I love grapefruit juice.  Amazingly, Allan had never before had a hot buttered rum.

view from our favourite table

chopped salad with chicken and a pub burger

and our favourite desserts

My BOOK had arrived at the post office today, per an email notice, but it was closed so I would have to wait till tomorrow.  I read a short book instead, which turned out to be a moderately well written and quite interesting experience of the Hillary Clinton campaign, 2016.

As with Hillary’s memoir, What Happened, I felt by the end that Hillary would be a good and kind person to know (and a much finer president than what we have now).

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 20 November 2018

Port of Ilwaco

We had to rise “early” to be to the port by ten so that Allan could help with the crab pot tree.

While he and others got started, I did some planting in the boatyard garden of plants I had dug in a path widening project yesterday: Egyptian walking onions, sanguisorba, some Persicaria ‘Firetail’ and some phlomis.

still interesting

cosmos, pink yarrow, California poppies (and santolina)

rosemary and ceanothus both sporting some blue flowers

lavender

California poppies

penstemons

cosmos

A the end of the boatyard, the CoHo King came in for its off season paint job.

CoHo Charters Captain Butch Smith in yellow

me and Butch making sure all goes well

Just past the boatyard stands the crab pot tree, where more floats were added and lights secured with zip ties.

A float for Kevin Soule, who died in a crabbing accident on Willapa Bay this past year.

the volunteers, organized by Our Jenna (Queen La De Da)

The star had been left in a storage unit in north Long Beach.  While it was fetched, I took a walk along the marina with Della and her corgis.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Howerton Avenue (telephoto)

Both Jim and Della are in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, so I got her to tell me about some of what they do, including safety instruction and even escorting boats upriver.

Salt Pub is being remodeled to include the lower floor.

a new bar top being stained in beautifully warm weather

Laila of Salt meets a corgi

high tide

the condor

Back at the crab pot tree, the star had arrived.

Allan and Jim on the tree

Jim at the top

Della hands up some ties.

They all said it was easier to climb up than to get down.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Coast Guard floats

Allan’s photo

Jim installing the star (Allan’s photo)

As a finishing touch, CoHo Butch brought some fishermen’s boots for the crab pot snowman.

I learned that Evertuff boots are the favourite brand.

I was then very proud of us for going to the pharmacy and getting flu jabs, which we have never done before.  I had a terrible fear of side effects interfering with work so had waited till the good weather was done.  As I write this three days later, neither of us had any side effects at all.

home

The crab pot time had given me only about an hour to do some weeding.

Skooter helped.

I moved this last bit of firewood under cover behind the garage.

That was the end of last winter’s windfalls.

A horrid sight by the wood pile: the golden foliage threaded through the eucalyptus is bindweed that has crept in from the gear shed yard.

ominous

Allan added a third birdhouse to where I had noticed a lack with only two.

I went with Allan while he grocery shopped at Sid’s supermarket, right across the street from the Shelburne Hotel, and in the hotel garden I planted a goodly start of Thalictrum ‘Elin’ from our last day at Klipsan Beach Cottages, and some Egyptian walking onions, and put some decorative branches in containers:

We watered the Depot Restaurant window boxes and went home again, where Allan managed some more work on his greenhouse lean-to project before night fell.

Much later in the evening as we watched some telly, we heard the rain finally begin.

 

 

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