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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco community building’

Sunday, 22 October 2017

Despite a forecast of rain on and off all day, I woke to fine weather and decided we must go plant bulbs.  Typing up the spreadsheets would have to wait for evenings.

Onyx, our east side neighbour (Allan’s photo). He and Skooter are mortal enemies.

Skooter (Allan’s photo)

The wheelbarrows showed the amazing amount of rain we had received over the past four days.

the final storm rain tally

 

old chair used as plant stand; its time is over.

many leaves down but only two chairs blown over

I shouldn’t have left this board propped up.

alder branch spear driven into the ground

where we are trying to raise the lawn with sod patches

The newly cleared swale did fill up.

the old swale, now with water.

Here is how it looked on Oct 14, 2016, when it filled earlier than usual.

The south end swale is full…but they all will drain soon.

Outside the fence, at our south property edge, this seasonal pond will now probably have water all winter.

looking back to the house

In the front garden, I admired windblown sanguisorba.

with cardoon overhead

Pretty sure that is S. ‘Pink Elephant’, which grows to about eight feet tall.

It is even towers over the towering Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’.

After that home garden tour, we were off to work.

Ilwaco Post Office Garden

We did a thorough clean up of toppled cosmos, tried to eliminate the volunteer perennials sweet pea that would like to infest our volunteer garden, and planted a selection of bulbs.

before (Allan’s photo)

the damnable sweet pea (Allan’s photo)

bulbing

after

has an austere look now

I put in a row of cuttings from the silver santolina, as I would like it to run all along the front.

I leave my garden much wilder in the winter, but here I needed room for bulbs, and generally people do not understand the wild winter look.

Because we had dug out the non-draining planter at the fire station, we replaced its bulbs.  I was pleased that it still looks so good; the station sheltered it from our recent windstorms.

red plants for the fire station

Allan pulled this crocosmia. I would still like to take over the fire station garden.

Ilwaco Community Building

I was pleased to find that the community building garden, cared for by Allan, needed no weeding.  This gave me time to do some pruning while Allan planted bulbs (and time to help him finish planting them).

I thinned and lowered a tree-like red twig dogwood near the library entrance.

Allan hauling my debris.

Even though this was not my intention, I realized the long red stems will make excellent Halloween decor.

entrance garden today after pruning

Compare to the photo Allan took last week:

Even though it was not the right time of year to prune the mugo pines (which would like to be tree-like), I noticed that one might soon be unable to  read the whole sign.

I was pleased enough with the pruning to clearly reveal the address number…

But the covering of the word Ilwaco had to be fixed.

I don’t want to lose any more pretty red leaves.

I do long to lose this, one of three remaining tatty invasive patches of salal.

Fall crocus knocked down by rain (Allan’s photo)

Port of Ilwaco

Much to my surprise, we had time to plant bulbs in the curbside gardens at the port, as well, even though one rain squall made me think we would not finish.  Yet we did.  We had stopped at home to get a Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ to divide and put in a curbside bed where two huge shrubs had recently been removed.

brief, light rain

planting narcissi in former shrub area

We only plant narcissi at the port (except for tulips in the Time Enough Books garden boat).  Deer would eat tulips in the curbsides, and birds (crows or gulls) pull up most of the little bulbs such as crocus and miniature iris.

Time Enough Books boat before (Allan’s photos)

and after

more bulbing

not a bulb (Allan’s photo)

On the way home, we got some photos of the Halloween preparations going on around the flatlands of Ilwaco.

Spruce Street

The spookiest house on Spruce had skipped Halloween last year. I am thrilled that they are baaaack.

The guy will be in motion on Halloween night.

a block up the hill…I love this front garden.

on top of the hill

The higher one lives on the hill, the less likely one is to get the 400 trick or treaters that we flat landers can expect.

At home, I was able to erase three bulbing jobs from the work board.


 

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Thursday, 6 April 2017

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Smokey waiting for morning rain to stop

We were surprised when the weather cleared up midmorning.  Rain, wind, or sunshine, we had been planning to tidy the Ilwaco planters and street trees.  Doing so in pleasant weather was a treat.

Ilwaco

First, we did a bucket’s worth of weeding at our volunteer post office garden.

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Post office garden has little offseason structure, leaving room for an explosion of summer flowers.


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Fritillaria meleagris, and me weeding


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Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’


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southernmost planter: finger blight evidence shows why it looks so drab.


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Allan’s photo

Even though they are still blooming, we will soon be replacing the woody old Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’.

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They have gotten too tatty looking at their bases.


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The tree gardens need some mulch.


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amazed this windblown tree has not fallen yet.


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wish I had not let the bad aster take over a couple of the tree gardens…


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Col Pacific Motel’s mini garden


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Allan’s photo


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“yellow hoop petticoats” (Allan’s photo)


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Narcissus bulbocodium (Allan’s photo)


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downtown Ilwaco (Allan’s photo)

The weather got so warm that we went back home for summer shirts.

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Look who I found snoozing together!


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secret buddies Frosty and Calvin

I also noticed a joyous sight: a special trillium from Dancing Oaks Nursery, that had been ever so tiny and that I thought had died, had popped up after all.

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We did a bit more weeding at the community building.

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Ilwaco Community Building

Long Beach

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Deer have left us the tulips at the welcome sign.

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They are even prettier inside.

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The back of the sign should have pastel tulips soon.


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I met a very nice labradoodle named Curly.


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checked up on the city hall garden, one of our best….

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trillium, which I rescued years ago from the road next to my old house when the road was being widened.


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Allan’s photo

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Pure white resists being photographed.


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hellebore


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Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’


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Peggy’s Park, sprawling old hebe…


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cut back

Peggy’s Park, on the east side of city hall, was planted by Gene and Peggy Miles and remained in memory of Peggy, who died of ovarian cancer far too young and is still much missed.

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Brunner ‘Looking Glass’, a perennial forget me not planted soon after she died.


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I think this is hosta’s best moment.

Just inside city hall, this sign made me think:

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Even when I am at my crabbiest and most anti social, it is highly probable that one of our gardens makes someone smile every day.

Next, Allan weeded and groomed Coulter Park because there will be an art show at the old train depot building over the weekend.

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Allan’s photo; wind had the narcissi all facing backwards.

I deadheaded the two north blocks of planters and had a quick visit with Heather at our favourite shop, NIVA green (and refreshed my stash of photos for the shop’s Facebook page.)

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just north of NIVA


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That corner has also become a deer crossing so will not get new tulips next year.


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outside NIVA green (New, Inspired, Vintage, Artful)


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inside

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Walking back north to meet Allan, I saw more evidence that 2nd North is now a deer intersection.

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Drat.

I felt a sprinkle and looked south, to see rain heading our way from Ilwaco.

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By the time I rejoined Allan, the rain was coming down in earnest.  He had the bright idea of cheating and knocking down the last of a weedy bit with the string trimmer.  It worked a treat.

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By then, I was in the van, watching.

I thought we would have to skip my idea of getting some mulch for Fifth Street Park.  But by the time we had dumped our debris at city works, the sun was back and so we filled just four buckets with mulch.  A sight there made me decide to save the rest of the mulch.  I knew exactly where these plants came from: the southernmost planter on the east side of Pacific.  I would need the rest of the pile to eventually fill it back in.

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distinctive plants from a particular planter

I’m glad that planter got dug out.  It was too shrubby, going back to volunteer days.

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The pile is getting small.

While Allan weeded in Veterans Field, I did two more blocks of trees and planters.

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muscari in Vet Field (Allan’s photo)


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muscari (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo


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anemone (Allan’s photo)


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red white and blue (Allan’s photo)


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Tulip acuminata


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more Tulip acuminata (a favourite of mine)


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Delicate species tulips look best after our extra rainy month of march.

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The more showy tulips, like this four year old ‘Gavota’, get smaller flowers every year.


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This year the double and parrot tulips look just miserable so far.  Maybe no more next year…even though I love them so.


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note to self: dig out most of this horrible ivy soon


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It was challenging getting through the spring break crowds with my weed bucket.


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lots of narcissi under the trees


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and in the planters


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I thought my new “cushion bush” had made it through the winter.  No…all dried up.


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Zoltar offered to tell my fortune.

On my way back to meet Allan at Vet Field, I encountered a woman and little girl with a big bouquet of narcissi and grape hyacinths.  I said, “Oh, gee, I hope those did not come from the city planters.”  “No, she picked them on the beach!” said the mom.  “You must mean the beach approach garden,” I said, and she replied “No, they were on the beach.”

“On the beach, my arse,” I thought but did not say as I walked away.  I knew darn well they were from the beach approach garden because I recognized them as ones I had planted…and they do not grow on the beach.  Allan said he might have asked, “You mean the ‘beach’ area right past the Please leave the flowers for everyone to enjoy sign?”.  I’m trying not to make a tourist’s day miserable so I wouldn’t go that far but…sheesh.

We drove out to check on the Bolstad beach approach planters.

If people would just not pick the flowers, there would be dozens more to brighten everyone’s day.

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These were exactly the kind in the girl’s “beach” bouquet.

Allan dropped me off at the southernmost planters and we had a look at the empty one.  It must be going to be fixed or replaced because last year a car drove into it.

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We have never seen a planter empty before with all the works showing.


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of great interest to us

Allan went to Fifth Street Park to weed while I did the last two block of main street planters.

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My experiment in February of cutting back a big woody santolina seems to have worked.


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happy and multiplying species tulips


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narcissi and euphorbia

You might notice from these photos how much less pedestrian traffic we have on the south blocks of downtown.

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Fifth Street Park, NE side


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lily flowering tulips do well in rain


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Allan’s photo


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note to self: divide these lovely primroses to grow under some other trees, as well.


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note to self: weed southwest corner of Fifth Street Park at least once before tall plants hide it.

Allan had remembered to weed out the bad aster corner in Fifth Street Park.

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before


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after


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mulching

Finally, we deadheaded the planters on Sid Snyder Drive…

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Allan’s photo: That soil depression is the sure sign of another stolen plant.  That was after he brushed soil back into the hole.

…and last, the little garden at the World Kite Museum.

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new concrete pads


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I hope they are going to dig out this row of tatty hebes, too (hint, hint!)

The very last thing we had to do was deadhead narcissi in the window boxes at the Depot Restaurant, and we decided to eat there if they had room for us at the counter.  They did.

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Depot Restaurant and Sou’wester RV Park (Allan’s photo)


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counter view

We wanted to have delicious things that will not be on the summer menu.

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wilted spinach salad


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cinghiale with gnocchi


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French onion soup

At home: The check up list is done.  Of course, all the gardens need regular check ups from now on.  The recent check up list was because of missing almost a month at some jobs due to incessant rain.

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I’m glad we got caught up. Tomorrow’s predicted storm will most likely lay the narcissi and tulips on their sides.

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This is what’s coming. We are the blue bubble about haflway up the coast.

(As I write this on Friday, we are halfway through the storm and have lost and then regained power.  It is noisy; the tarp has blown off the stacked crab pots next door, and one of two highways leading to the Peninsula has been closed because of downed trees.  I think the worst is over, so do not worry.)

 

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Monday, 13 February 2017

Cold weather, a brief back problem, and an intense desire for hide out and read postponed our starting work this year.  I was using the excuse that the whole peninsula has been economically affected by the lack of clamming tourism this winter so no one would mind if we started up two weeks later than usual. (The clams have tested positive for a toxin, which happens sometimes, and so clam season has been delayed and delayed again.)

I’d written the first work board of the year several days ago.

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Allan had loaded the tools into our van on Saturday.  As he loaded buckets into the trailer, I talked through the window to Jasmine, one of two new neighbours right next door.

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introduced myself to Jasmine

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in our garden (Allan’s photo)

Ilwaco

We began close to home with the Ilwaco street trees and planters.

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Allan’s photo

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weeding at First and Eagle

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The boatyard garden can wait for a couple of weeks.

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Ilwaco boatyard, north side

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crocuses in the planters

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Allan’s photo

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in front of Azure Salon, before

I had been looking forward to tidying the alyssum from under the tree and to pulling a dead erysimum from this planter.

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Rosemary blooming in front of Azure

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Nn front of City Hall, the plant offerings are not from me.

Anchorage Cottages

The Anchorage garden got some clipping and waking up because this coming weekend is a three day holiday (Presidents Day) which will surely attract guests.

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tidied center courtyard in 60 degree sunny weather

Allan trimmed a buddliea at the entrance.

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before

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after

I hadn’t intended it to go that far back but I think it will be fine and probably quite refreshed. If not…well…buddlieas of the old fashioned seedy kind are considered noxious weeds now, anyway.

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Allan pruned one large-ish ornamental grass….harbinger of many to do the same thing to soon.

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after

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spring bulb windowboxes

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Iris reticulata

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I was pleased to see there have been snowdrops.

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In bright sunshine, a hamamelis scents the Zen Courtyard

Long Beach City Hall

We trimmed another grass (Allan) and a hydrangea (me) before heading back to Ilwaco.  Allan’s photos:

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before

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after

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before

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pruning

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after

Ilwaco again

We finished with a tidying and clipping of sedums and ferns at the Ilwaco Community Building.

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hamamelis, probably ‘Diane’

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crocuses

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Allan’s photo

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Iris reticulata (Allan’s photo)

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by the entrance to the library

At home, I clipped back my Melianthus major, which, as Melissa had put it, was “not amused” by this winter’s heavy freeze.

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That is one small area clipped. So much more to go in our own garden.

We are expecting two more good weather days and are going to focus intensely on Long Beach town next.

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work board t0night

 

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Sunday, 6 December 2015

much rain!

Brilliant book, read it cover to cover in one sitting.

Brilliant book, read it cover to cover in one sitting.

the shocking state of Henrietta's descendants, and so many others, not having health insurance.

the shocking state of Henrietta’s descendants, and so many others, not having health insurance.

While I learned so much, Smokey enjoyed the reading day in his own way.

While I learned so much, Smokey enjoyed the reading day in his own way.

Meanwhile, Allan did his own reading and puttering and recorded his day:

garden propellers in the wind

garden propellers in the wind

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65 mph gusts at the Port of Ilwaco, somewhat less in our garden.

Terry has her trees up across the street.

Terry has her trees up across the street.

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Despite the rain, Allan managed to add blue lights to the new arbour.

Despite the rain, Allan managed to add blue lights to the new arbour.

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Monday, 7 December 2015

I started reading a book that I had begun last week and had put down to address some more pressing books that were almost overdue….

Love her show, Girls, and loved this book.

Love her show, Girls, and her film, Tiny Furniture, and loved this book.

Some takeaways from Lena:

“College was a wonderful gig, thousand of hours to tend to yourself like a garden.”  (Not an experience I was privileged to have.)

The entire chapter called Is This Even Real: Thoughts on Death and Dying

and the four page chapter of her Top Ten Health Concerns.

The last order of end-of-season sale bulbs arrived in the mid afternoon.  At least half of them were for Dave and Melissa and Todd.

Here they are...Staycation goes on hold.

Here they are…Staycation goes on hold.

I sorted bulbs.

Meanwhile, Allan went out to weed at his own job at the Ilwaco Timberland Library/Community Building garden., and in the last rainy hour of the day planted the bulbs there that I had sorted out.

Allan's photo: sodden soil

Allan’s photo: sodden soil while weeding

still windy

still windy at home

back to the community building to plant  bulb and some plants

back to the community building to plant bulb and some plants

As you can see, the soil under the new sign desperately needs mulch.  As for the plants, I had pointed him to some starts of variegated euonymous (wintercreeper) from my garden but it looks to me (above) like he got saxifrage instead.

You can see he did not have pleasant weather for the little job.

You can see he did not have pleasant weather for the little job.

traffic jam!

traffic jam!

on his way home, a detour to see the prettiest house in Ilwaco

on his way home, a detour to see the prettiest house in Ilwaco, with a small Santa glowing upstairs

and then more work on Christmas lights

and then more work on Christmas lights

By 3:30, I had all the bulbs sorted and had gone out into the rain to plant white narcissi, some crocus tommasianus, some lilies and some iris reticulata in my own garden, getting drenched at the same time that Allan was planting bulbs in the rain at the community center.  Finally, at dark-thirty, I was able to finish the Lena Dunham book and read another.  I almost wanted to never read the final Ruth Rendell novel because there will be no more.

my day: the last book by one of my top three favourite authors

the end of my day: the last book by one of my top three favourite authors

I hoped for good weather the next day in order to plant the rest of the bulbs.

Tuesday, 8 December 2015

The wind roared, the rain swept sideways, and during a lull in the gale, I took an early afternoon excursion out to the bogsy woods.

an unusual amount of water

an unusual amount of water

This sort of thing went on all day.

This sort of thing went on all day.

I think it is a first to have water this high.

I think it is a first to have standing water this high.

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next door

next door

The garden boat is almost afloat.

Our garden boat is almost afloat.

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scene of summer campfires

scene of summer campfires

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I've never seen the fence swale this high.

I’ve never seen the fence swale this high.

 

Nothing bigger than this branch had come down in the wind.

Nothing bigger than this branch had come down in the wind.

miniature rapids by the tree stump

miniature rapids by the tree stump

view to the south outside the fence

view to the south outside the fence

the outer bogsy woods, deeper than I have ever seen water here.

the outer bogsy woods, deeper than I have ever seen water here.

the middle swale in the bogsy wood

the middle swale in the bogsy wood

looking north

looking north

along the east side of the bogsy woods

along the east side of the bogsy woods

After that exciting splashy walk, I read, and read some more.

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The novel You’re Not You is SO much better than the movie adaptation that we recently saw.  I’ve just ordered all of Michelle Wildgen’s other books.  She excels at writing about food and I see with pleasure that that is a theme in her other works.  You’re Not You is laced with descriptions of the farmers market:

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and

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and in the very early spring

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and in the summertime:

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Allan went out to the post office and the library and brought me back five books by Elinor Lipman; I will read them in order by copyright date, starting with the one I began tonight:

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In the background, above, is the work board.  I hope that tomorrow will be a nice enough day to make that board almost empty by the evening.

For me, the weather had been delightful reading time.  For other local towns, it was a nightmare.

down the Oregon coast

down the Oregon coast

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"Check out the view from our Executive Petty Officer's front door!!! How bout a Survival Swim Chief??"

“Check out the view from our Executive Petty Officer’s front door!!! How bout a Survival Swim Chief??”  Tillamook Bay Coast Guard Station

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 31 July 2015

Even though I’m sure it seems dull to many, I find days off without leaving my home and garden to be idyllic.

tadpoles in the water boxes:

tadpoles in the water boxes: “I don’t wanna grow up, not me!”

Allan did find one with legs!

Allan did find one with legs!

 I spent Friday planting some of the ladies in waiting and here I present the plants and tags for my own information and the amusement of other CPNs (certified plant nuts).  Before I got tucked into the task, CPN (and chef) Ann from Portland came over with her spouse, John, and a delivery of some ‘Xera Cobalt’ Agapanthus from Xera Plants.  (CPN=Certified Plant Nut.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Ann was amused by the view east from our front gate, with three boats parked along the street. Normal for Ilwaco.

Ann was amused by the view east from our front gate, with three boats parked along the street. Normal for Ilwaco.

Her father, Frank W. Amato, publishes Salmon Trout Steelheader magazine and the Flyfishing and Tying Journal so Ann took a photo of the boats on the street scene for him.

back garden, east side, room for more plants

back garden, east side, room for more plants

That daylily at the front got dug out.  It has been pouting and drooping all year and was given every chance to improve.

after, with a colour switch on the pottery balls, to tone with some new Agapanthus.

after, with a colour switch on the pottery balls, to tone with some new Agapanthus.

stonecrop

Sedum ussuriense 'Turkish Delight'

Sedum ussuriense ‘Turkish Delight’

Little Bluestem

Little Bluestem

blues

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Agapanthus 'Xera's Cobalt'

Agapanthus ‘Xera’s Cobalt’

Xera's Cobalt

Xera’s Cobalt

The colour of 'Xera's Cobalt'

The colour of ‘Xera’s Cobalt’

A plant new to me: Sideritis

A plant new to me: Sideritis ‘Touch of Spice’ (mountain tea)

Sideritis hyssopifolia 'Touch of Spice'

Sideritis hyssopifolia ‘Touch of Spice’; I think Teresa gave me this to try out.

another Agapanthus, this one from The Planter Box

another Agapanthus, this one from The Planter Box: ‘Two Times Blue’

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another area with a bit of room, thanks to removing a daylily and a siberian iris awhile back.

another area with a bit of room, thanks to removing a daylily and a siberian iris awhile back.

In went an unidentified eucomis, I hope the same one Pam grows so well in Seaside.

In went an unidentified eucomis, I hope the same one Pam grows so well in Seaside.

In the west bed: Dracocephalum 'Blue Moon', also new to me, from The Planter Box

In the west bed: Dracocephalum ‘Blue Moon’, also new to me, from The Planter Box

Sinningia: another plant new to me.

Sinningia: another plant new to me.

Also brought to me by our lovely friend Ann.

Also brought to me by our lovely friend Ann.

Because the Xera tag had the word “containers”, I decided that’s where it would go.

Sinningia roots! not what I expected.

Sinningia roots! not what I expected.

potted up

potted up

Talinium Limon, from 7 Dees, added to a big pot.

Talinium Limon, from 7 Dees, added to a big pot.

looking south over the back garden

looking south over the back garden

the plant vessel 'Ann Lovejoy'

the plant vessel ‘Ann Lovejoy’

the back garden

the back garden

Meanwhile, Allan worked on a project.

project

This is not going to be an unlawfully tall fence.

I planted some of my new Agastaches (an obsession) in the front garden.

Agastache 'Kudo's Mandarin'

Agastache ‘Kudo’s Mandarin’

kudos

I think the tags might be boring to some; I have heard that Steve likes to read them, so at least one reader does.

I find Agastache difficult to say.  I knew it was not Aga-stash, but for a long time I was saying it like I was aghast about something.  .  Here’s a good article about them (including various pronunciations, one of which does say “Aghast!”). Here is Agastache pronounced by Emma.

Later: I got the definitive pronunciation from garden writer Bob Nold, and am aGHAST that I have been pronouncing it per Emma for a few months:

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Thanks, Bob, as it is obsessively important to me to try to pronounce plant names correctly.

Kudo's Gold

Agastache ‘Kudo’s Gold’

kudosgold

Agastache 'Navajo Sunset'

Agastache ‘Navajo Sunset’

navajo

from the Planter Box: Rudbeckia 'Irish Eyes', in the front garden

from the Planter Box: Rudbeckia ‘Irish Eyes’, in the front garden

Allan's photo: Here it comes.

Allan’s photo: end of the day with six of seven posts in.

Saturday, 1 August 2015

There are all sorts of big projects in the garden that I could/should be doing.  Other than planting, I am low on energy for things like digging out sod to make gravel paths.

On Saturday, I actually left the property to walk down to the Portside Café to meet Our Kathleen for lunch; she was down for her semi-monthly visit.  It has taken us this long, what with garden tours and events, to find time to try out the Portside with new owners Debbie and Lauri.  I strolled west down the meander line from the back of my garden to the café.

Looking back to the bogsy woods. Boat trailers parked at the back of the port parking lots.

Looking east to the bogsy woods. Boat trailers parked at the back of the port parking lots.

looking west; this little road is the closest thing to the Seattle alleys that I miss so much.

looking west; this little road is the closest thing to the Seattle alleys that I miss so much.

looking east again, farther along

looking east again, farther along

boat storage yard, former Warrior of the Seas

boat storage yard, former Warrior of the Seas

looking west toward First Avenue and the boatyard

looking west toward First Avenue and the boatyard

lots of interesting stuff

lots of interesting stuff

looking east

looking east

looking west: the boatyard

looking west: the boatyard

Portside Café

One block north on First Avenue: the appealingly cute Portside Café.

One block north on First Avenue: the appealingly cute Portside Café.

My orange chicken tropical salad and Kathleen's

My orange chicken tropical salad and Kathleen’s “hand-spanked” burger and onion rings were both big hits with these two diners.

in the Portside Café

in the Portside Café

sweet, with a framed photo (far left) that I took of Debbie and Lauri.

sweet, with a framed photo (far left) that I took of Debbie and Lauri.

looks like the back room of the café will be cozy in winter

looks like the back room of the café will be cozy in winter

Allan at work

As we dined, we saw Allan drive past with the water trailer; he had to water the Ilwaco planters.  He’d need to quit that job to have true three day weekends in summer.

Allan's photo at the boatyard, while filling the water tank.

Allan’s photo at the boatyard, while filling the water tank.

a boat coming in

a boat coming in

a deer strolling past City Hall after a nibble on the planters there

a deer strolling past City Hall after a nibble on the planters there

Ilwaco Saturday Market

I had assumed, since we had dined at one, that Kathleen would have already been to the Saturday Market.  She had not, so I walked most of the length of the market with her.

Look at the inviting tables and chairs on the deck of the Salt Hotel.

Look at the inviting tables and chairs on the deck of the Salt Hotel.

This little piggy went to market!

This little piggy went to market!

I petted the darling pig, and she wagged her tail.  And as she walked along, when something amused her, she again wagged her tail like a happy dog.  Allan had been to the market on his own and had also seen the pig.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pretty fruit tarts

pretty fruit tarts

I covet about ten of these to hang in a garden tree.

I covet about ten of these to hang in a garden tree.

glass2

De Asis produce

De Asis Farm produce

De Asis Farm

De Asis Farm

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Of course, I bought a dessert (lime bundt cake) from Pink Poppy Bakery.

Of course, I bought a dessert (lime bundt cake) from Pink Poppy Bakery.

a noble dog outside Time Enough Books

a noble dog outside Time Enough Books

Blue Coast Farms gave me a bag of runner beans; she had an oversupply. They were delicious cooked up for dinner three nights in a row.

Blue Coast Farms gave me a bag of runner beans; she had an oversupply. They were delicious cooked up for dinner three nights in a row.

at home

This is one of the paths I wish to dig up and turn to gravel. So far, just wishin'.

This is one of the paths I wish to dig up and turn to gravel. So far, just wishin’.

Allan working on the project.

Allan working on the project.

I frittered the late afternoon and evening away with garden blogging, as I was still catching up on garden tour posts from Music in the Gardens.

Sunday, 2 August 2015

On the next day, a cold strong wind blew and I did not set foot out of the house except for a half an hour of bundled up plant watering.  I occupied myself with photo sorting and finishing the Music in the Gardens tour blog entries.  The cats appreciate a day like that.

Frosty

Frosty

Mary

Mary

Smokey

Smokey

Allan took a boating trip on Sunday.  It did not work out quite as he had planned, as the person he had arranged to go with canceled after he had arrived at her house.  My editorial comment:  I did not like that, as he had gotten up extra early (for us).  However, he was resourceful and he regrouped and went out on his own on the other side of the bay.  I am going to make that a bonus post for tonight so that this one is not too ridiculously long.

Even after a boating trip, Allan managed to weed and water the Ilwaco Community Building garden, a job to which he has dedicated himself once a week.

We are still mystified by the huge pile of discarded potatoes below the building, cast off from the senior lunch program for some reason.

We are still mystified by the huge pile of discarded potatoes below the building, cast off from the senior lunch program for some reason.

nasturtiums reseeded from when planters used to be by the library

nasturtiums reseeded from when planters used to be by the library

(Allan's photo): home at dusk after a long day

(Allan’s photo): home at dusk after a long day. Sadly, the next day someone folded this elephant garlic but didn’t it pose for a grand picture?

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a three day post so we can get back to garden touring!

Friday, 10 July 2015

We certainly are becoming slackers with having so many fewer jobs.  I’d been waiting all week to plant my ladies in waiting.

These are Allan's ladies in waiting.

These are Allan’s ladies in waiting.

and mine

and mine

and more of mine

and more of mine

Speaking of new plants, check out how tall my Eccremocarpus scaber, birthday present from Garden Tour Nancy via Annie’s Annuals, has gotten.

Eccremocarpus scaber and honeysuckle

Eccremocarpus scaber and honeysuckle

I meant to do the planting in the back garden, but instead picked up a few plants for the front garden and went there instead to the west end which had been full of self seeded poppies.

front garden: room for more

front garden: room for more

and more room

and more room

sweet peas on old crab pot

sweet peas on old crab pot

Planted a eucalyptus as I begin my plan to make the front garden more drought tolerant, more Cistus-y.

Planted a eucalyptus as I begin my plan to make the front garden more drought tolerant.

xera

Here's the plant Allan one at the Hardy Plant Study Weekend as a door prize.  I stole it from him.

Here’s the plant Allan won at the Hardy Plant Study Weekend as a door prize. I stole it from him.

ozo

Baptisia 'Solar Flame'

Baptisia ‘Solar Flame’

Baptisia 'Solar Flame'

Baptisia ‘Solar Flame’ from Blooming Junction

I then had a visitor who proved to be a big distraction.

a dog of mystery

a dog of mystery

This little guy seemed lost, worried, and had no collar.  He’d wander away and then come back.

dog

He seemed happy when he was close by me.

My neighbour Paula drove up and he ran after her truck.  She’s quite a dog person, so since he seemed not traffic savvy, she took him with her on an errand to Salt Hotel and then to her local shop (a crafty design shop she is opening downtown; she’s a carpenter and interior designer and refurbisher of cool vintage stuff, and has worked on the Salt Hotel).  I was then able to get back to planting.

(It turned out later that the dog belonged to a neighbour just three doors down.  I’d only met him once, and though I thought he might be hers, I was not sure.  She was grateful to us for rescuing him, and plans to work on reinforcing her fence where the little rascal dug out.)

A really mean acanthus I got from Xera Plants in Portland.

A really mean acanthus I got from Xera Plants in Portland.

acanthus

That plant stabbed me so hard when I was carrying my tray of plants out of Xera that I later found a blood blister on my shoulder!  Someone asked me what I should buy such a mean plant.  Because it is cool!

Hydrangea 'Pistachio' on the north wall side of the front garden.

Hydrangea ‘Pistachio’ on the north wall side of the front garden.

Melianthus major 'Purple Haze'

Melianthus major ‘Purple Haze’

melianthuspurplehaze

a handsome penstemon

a handsome penstemon (Sour Grapes)

an Agastache from Blooming Junction

an Agastache from Blooming Junction

filling in

filling in

all planted up...even though it does not look full, these plants will touch when they mature.

all planted up…even though it does not look full, these plants will touch when they mature.

Allan hung up our new sign, present from Jo and Bob, on the sunporch.

porch

Allan did some watering and weeding at the Ilwaco community building garden so missed the whole lost dog adventure; he has taken that community building job on as his full responsibility and gives up part of a day off to maintain it weekly.

watering the ICB garden

watering the ICB garden

Just a few California poppies that I planted came up.

Just a few California poppies that I planted came up.

weeds from the community building (Allan's photo)

weeds from the community building (Allan’s photo)

Saturday, 11 July 2015

Allan took a trip of errands to Astoria, to get the van’s oil changed and shop for groceries.  He began by going to the Saturday market at the port, only to find that because of intense wind, two thirds of the vendors had packed their tents and gone home.  It’s no fun to have your tent and all your goods blow over.

Allan's photo: not much at the market, just a few really tough vendors down at the far end.

Allan’s photo: not much at the market, just a few really tough vendors down at the far end.

In Astoria:  There is no big excitement about crossing the bridge when Allan goes by himself.

Astoria: He bought some spices at The Spice Rack.

Astoria: He bought some spices at The Spice Rack…next door to the above shop.

a nearby planting on his way to sit and wait at the oil change place.

a nearby planting on his way to sit and wait at the oil change place.

Meanwhile, at home, I stayed in working on the Hardy Plant Weekend garden tour entries on this blog, with the excuse of the 20ish mph wind.  A glorious rain fell in the afternoon and I took a walk outside around the house to rejoice in it.

Rain!

Rain!

actual raindrops

actual raindrops

more rain drops

another rain drop

north window view of rain

north window view of rain

view from Allan's room of rain

view from Allan’s room of rain

 checking out the rain barrels

checking out the rain barrels

barrel2

rain drop in the water box

rain drop in the water box

We have seven barrels in all.

We have seven barrels in all.

These waterfalls were hugely thrilling to me, as the barrels have been empty.

These waterfalls were hugely thrilling to me, as the barrels have been empty.

a damp front garden

a damp front garden

Rose 'Paul's Himalayan Musk' is done with its blooming for this year.

Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’ is done with its blooming for this year.

Imagine wind roaring in the trees.

Imagine wind roaring in the trees.

my garden boat, the 'Ann Lovejoy'

my garden boat, the ‘Ann Lovejoy’

my river of Rozanne (the the boat floated in on?)

my river of Rozanne (the the boat floated in on?)

sanguisorba

sanguisorba

lilies

lilies

When Allan returned, the light rain had already stopped.  He worked on getting the fixed sprinkler for the front garden positioned just right.

sprinkler on a post, idea from Pink Poppy Farm

sprinkler on a post, idea from Pink Poppy Farm

The sprinkler water that hits the gutter runs into this barrel.

The sprinkler water that hits the gutter that runs into this barrel.

Sunday, 12 July 2015

After all that, this is all the rainwater that collected in each barrel.

After all that, this is all the rainwater that collected in each barrel.

Allan’s trip to Cullaby Lake, Oregon

Allan went to the north Oregon coast for a brief adventure.  In his words:

The tide was too low for the local rivers, or the bay, so a lake was in order.  I came across this one that was close that I’d never visited before, it looked wide, and why not? I was sure to tie the boat tightly and redundantly because if anything fell off on the Astoria bridge, it would get a long drag.

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 1.05.53 AM

About the length of Loomis Lake, but wider and with a large park, Cullaby Lake is inland about halfway between Warrenton & Gearhart

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Requires a $3 day pass available in the lot.

DSC02614

Unlike the lakes around Ilwaco, Cullaby has power boats. This particular boat never started up as something was broken or leaking. Sounded more like a leak from what I heard, but even if the drain plug was missing…anyway a bad day for them.

DSC02616

The little sailboat with the sail rolled up and the rudder flipped up. Wish there was more wind.

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Today three of these little motorcycle boats were buzzing around, sometimes dragging a raft of shrieking revelers. Still, the lake is not overly crowded, just not the quiet sort.

DSC02619

There is a little plant growth along the sides but overall the lake is very clear and wide.

DSC02623

A view south from the narrow northern channel. Except for the duck family, a heron and swallows, the wildlife was shy today.

DSC02624

A family of ducks just about to cross in front of a gardener’s house. I was photographing from far away as I didn’t want to disturb either.

 

DSC02625

Here is the gardener tending her daisies and over eight equally spaced potted plants.

DSC02626

More gardening details, a shed that keeps growing.

DSC02634

A large mowed grass park for fishing and swimming.

DSC02639

DSC02643

The wind was less than 10 mph but this is a good lake to sail and is quiet enough for a quiet paddle at either end.

DSC02645

With large mowed lawns, playground equipment, and marked swimming areas this is a versatile park more like the ones I remember around Seattle. A raft of kids is just taking off.

This cabin is also in the park and can be toured most of the day.

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Once the trees were so big it took only five planks to side a house.

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A house at the corner of the Highway 101 entrance sells bouquets.

DSC02654

A view over the flower seller’s gate that might tempt Skyler for a visit someday to see the rest of this garden.

meanwhile, at home

I got more ladies in waiting planted in the back garden.

poppies and Geranium 'Rozanne'

poppies and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

redrotune

 

a new grass and a new geranium (lower right)

a new grass and a new geranium (lower right)

geraniumharveyi

agopyron

an Agastache added...

an Agastache added…

flame

 

done

was flummoxed where to put this "wire bush" so it went in the center of a pot.

was flummoxed where to put this corokia so it went in the center of a pot.

corokia

was flummoxed where to out a 6 foot tall Miscanthus (thought it was shorter)

was flummoxed where to out a 6 foot tall Miscanthus (thought it was shorter)

poor thing went back in partial shade (which the tag says is ok)

poor thing went back in partial shade (which the tag says is ok)

So Allan had gotten in a boating trip and useful errands over our three days off, and I had had my perfect weekend: Except for the adventure of the little lost dog, which required me to walk partway down the block, I had not left my property for three whole days.

 

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Monday, 20 April 2015

I continued to work on my rather overwhelming garden, while Allan went to weed the terribly weedy garden at the community building, a project that I foolishly agreed to last week.  I so appreciated him deciding to get that started rather than taking a day off.  Here’s the problem:  I need time off more than I need money at the moment, and so does he.  We can’t afford to retire for several years, but we can afford to cut back…and yet, how can we with so many jobs?  Then I think…we should keep working like mad in case we have medical bills before medicare age (as in insurance co-pays and deductibles, something you UK readers don’t have to worry about).  And THEN I think, as Allan has pointed out, NOW is the time to have more time off while we are healthy enough to still enjoy it.  I remind myself that my mother was able to garden till age 82…but that was with me helping her.  She could garden on her own till about age 77…I hope I am as fortunate.  She retired at age 55, and that may have contributed to her years of healthiness.

my day at home

Before he left for work, Allan caught this bird checking out one of the birdhouses.

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The first thing I heard when I finally got outside at noon-ish was a great roar out beyond the bogsy wood, and I saw that the south gate was mysteriously wide open.  I don’t know how long it had been that way.  On the way out, I checked for a herd of deer in the garden.  None could be found, and the roses did not appear to be eaten.

Smokey followed me all the way out.

Smokey followed me all the way out.

The sound was from a big mower beyond the trees, and some sort of tree-mauler that was cutting down some of the willow that had sprouted up on the edge of the lawn between the port parking lots and us.

The view at noon.  I still have strimmed to the bench by the seasonal pond.

The view at noon. I still have strimmed to the bench by the seasonal pond.

The noise got louder and all the willows started to shake.  I hoped that all the little frogs could hop fast.  It must have been a bad time for them.

at 1:05

at 1:05

at 1:05 outside the gate, with the big machine tearing at the big willows

at 1:05 outside the gate, with the big machine tearing at the big willows

Fortunately, the trunks of the two big willows are on our property, which runs roughly to the middle of the ditch.

Fortunately, the trunks of the two big willows are on our property, which runs roughly to the middle of the ditch.

the view to the south at 1:30

the view to the south at 1:30

Well.  We will certainly have a better view of what is going on down at the port now.  Poor little frogs, though.  (Update: For the next several nights, I could hear the frogs peeping from the other ends of the ditch, but not from the middle part that had been mown and chopped.)

The seasonal pond all covered with floating wood chips.

The seasonal pond all covered with floating wood chips.

I'm glad I left a long grass frog haven on my side.

I’m glad I left a long grass frog haven on my side.

I had asked Allan to move two planted chairs all the way from a corner of the front garden to somewhere that they did not have to be shifted for weeding.  I like where he put them, in the salmonberry groves:

chairs

While all the tree-ripping was going on, I got much planting done: two trays of Nicotiana langsdorfii and several assorted Agastaches (‘Apricot Sunsrise’, ‘Summer Glow’, ‘Tutti Frutii’, ‘Cotton Candy’, ‘Sangria’, and ‘Mexican Giant’).

Later, I got my new Hellebores in and my two birthday plants.

I found that this new area was really pretty much full, if I am to leave proper room between plants.

I found that this new area was really pretty much full, if I am to leave proper room between plants.

my new little bloodroot right at the edge of the new garden bed

my new little bloodroot right at the edge of the new garden bed

a cool pulsatilla about to bloom

a cool pulsatilla about to bloom

in another bed, two little noses coming up...very big event for a CPN

in another bed, two little noses coming up…very big event for a CPN

My new candy lily seemed right for the mini-scree bed.

My new candy lily seemed right for the mini-scree bed.

Yesterday, when Debbie came to pick up plants for the Master Gardener plant sale (I’m not in the MGs, although I did take the course years ago), she gave me a flower sculpture by Sue Raymond of Bay Avenue Gallery

.  I installed it today, placing it where I could tie the stake to a post.

I love this exotic flower.

I love this exotic flower.

our garden boat, the Ann Lovejoy

our garden boat, the Ann Lovejoy

in the boat:  Tulip 'Green Wave'

in the boat: Tulip ‘Green Wave’

Tulip 'Angelique'  (pretty sure, although that green flame confuses me)

Tulip ‘Angelique’ (pretty sure, although that green flame confuses me)

Tulip 'Akebono' and 'Green Wave' in bud

Tulip ‘Akebono’ and ‘Green Wave’ in bud

More 'Green Wave' because it is my favourite this week.

More ‘Green Wave’ because it is my favourite this week.

Tulip 'Green Star'

Tulip ‘Green Star’

After the work done by the port staff, our view corridor is back.  The garden was designed around this in the first place.

view

When we first moved here in October 2010, the bogsy woods was thick with junk and brambles and we cleared a path through and eventually build the fence and the south gate; outside the gate is only lightly gardened on occasion and is a haven for happy frogs. Below, the bottom photo shows the area which is the view corridor now.

what our woods looked like in Oct. 2010 when we bought the place

what our woods looked like in Oct. 2010 when we bought the place

To whoever it was who did one of those annoying blog posts about words and phrases that she or he never wanted to read in another gardening blog, and included “view corridor”:  Oh, well!

The east bed still has lots of small (for now!) weeds and will be my next big project.

The east bed still has lots of small (for now!) weeds and will be my next big project.

The west bed is pretty well weeded except for a strip all along the back side, and an area behind the blue chairs.

The west bed is pretty well weeded except for a strip all along the back side, and an area behind the blue chairs.

that tall heather from the front garden...I keep trying to appreciate it more.

that tall heather from the front garden…I keep trying to appreciate it more.  I think I like it best in a pot.

I had a feeling my brand new Hosta 'Stiletto' would be slug food.  Dang it.

I had a feeling my brand new narrow leaved Hosta ‘Stiletto’ would be slug food. Dang it.

Next to it, the hosta I got from Mary Fluaitt when she moved away is proving to be very strong, just like its former owner.

Next to it, the hosta I got from Mary Fluaitt when she moved away is proving to be very strong, just like its former owner.

I'm loving the bronzy top knot on this mahonia in Allan's garden.

I’m loving the bronzy top knot on this mahonia in Allan’s garden.

Another look at the results of the weekend's main project.

Another look at the results of the weekend’s main projects…the front border…

...and the northeast corner.

…and the northeast corner.

my double file viburnum on the west side of the garage

my double file viburnum on the west side of the garage (deer proof!)

my lovely silver name-us forgettii

my lovely silver nameus forgettii  (Help me remember?)

One fringed Tulip 'Aleppo' has returned from a planting a few years old.

One fringed Tulip ‘Aleppo’ has returned from a planting a few years old.

Tulip 'Aleppo'

Tulip ‘Aleppo’

I got my new outdoor sit spot almost back…for now.  It will fill again quickly when annuals planting time arrives in a couple of weeks.

weeding and planting at home await me.

my sit spot two days ago

and this evening

and this evening

Allan’s day on

Meanwhile, Allan had nobly gone to weed at the community center for seven and a half hours.  Perhaps because his area of our garden is small (by his choice, as he has boating and motorcycling as hobbies as well as gardening, unlike my one-track mind), he is more willing to give up a day off.

Ilwaco Community Building

Ilwaco Community Building

The gardens are all on the west side of the building, which houses our beloved Ilwaco Timberland Library, a low cost lunch room for seniors, Ilwaco City Council meetings and Toastmaster meetings.  We have declined this gardening job several times.  Now it seems there is just NO ONE else willing to take it on, and even though we feel a great need for free time, a love for Ilwaco has trumped all and we are going to try to do it.  By try, I mean we will see how long we can stand it.

Here are Allan’s photos:

He started at the driveway entrance with the theory that is best to do the areas first that are parked next to or walked past by Ilwaco Timberland Library patrons.  The first area gave him hope that the job might go quickly.  The kinnickinnick sprawls around and while I feel it is kind of boring looking, there were not many weeds.

before and after

before and after; maybe someone else had pulled bindweed out of here earlier.

When he moved on the the top of two tiers between the parking lot and the sidewalk, he knew this was more than a one day job.  (Last year, we saw someone weeding for a whole week in these beds.  We wish she was still doing it!)

top tier, before

top tier, before

DSC00058

before

after

after

after

after

I look upon this with despair as I can’t stand heather in a flat garden.  The other day a friend said that even though the boatyard garden is so very long, it helped to have interesting plants to weed among.  I am going to have to do something with this garden to make it more interesting to me if we are going to keep it in the long term.  Allan just quietly stated that he doesn’t like the heathers, either, nor does he like the fact that there is nothing flowering in the garden in the summer.  He also commented, and of course I agree, that it is a pain to have salal in the garden because it is popping up through everything, including the heather.  If we keep this job long term, the salal is going to be our mortal enemy.  (I think it is just lovely in the wild woods, by the way.)

behind the sign

behind the sign, before

after

after

strip along the sidewalk, before

strip along the sidewalk, before

before

before

after

after

another area along the sidewalk

another area along the sidewalk, before

after

after

How did we get into this?  It is one job I firmly did not want to take on because it has bindweed, horsetail, and, quite frankly, I am only interested in maintaining gardens we have created, with just a couple of exceptions. (Mayor Mike’s pretty little garden comes to mind because it was designed by a friend of mine who moved away, and I like it.)

I remember when the garden was being developed by a group of volunteers and I saw the big pile of dirt that they were planning to put back in.  I said “No!  No!  Don’t use that; it is FULL of BINDWEED!”  Bindweed was sprouting up all over it.  There was a chance that if that soil, dug out during the re-do of the parking lot, was just discarded, some of the bindweed would go away.  However, even a few little roots left down in the ground would easily create a menace within a year.  (I don’t know if that soil was re-used or not.)

The entrance garden: the outside was fine, as if someone has already weeded it.

The entrance garden: the outside was fine, as if someone has already weeded it.

Last time I saw the area above, it had dandelions.  We wonder if someone else is still doing part of the job and if there is going to be some mix up about us being hired.

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the entrance garden behind the wall, which we quite like, before

before

before

after, with ferns trimmed

after, with ferns trimmed

The last area that remained is the hardest, a tiered garden covered with vetch, bindweed, and a haze of other weeds.

a before photo of an area he did not get to today.  What a mess of vetch obscuring all the good plants.

a before photo of an area he did not get to today. What a mess of vetch obscuring all the good plants.

YOIKS!

YOIKS!

This area is steeply tiered and would be hard on my knee.

After some weeding. This area is steeply tiered and would be hard on my knee.

I can already see in my mind some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and Eryngium migrating from my garden over to the bare areas in the community building garden.  Free plants would fit in well with the budget, and would add some summer colour.  Some clumps of baby poppies could perhaps be moved up from the boatyard, as there are certainly MORE than enough poppies in that garden.   With that sort of change, I could get up more enthusiasm for this new job.

When Allan got home, I said he should have a look at the work the port crew had done at the south end of our property.  He went and took this photo from the outside, and said something about going in there and prettying it up with a better sawing job.  Otherwise, he agreed that it is a positive thing to have our view of the port returned.  You can even see our sitting bench now.

our property, south side, now

our property, south side, now

Tomorrow, we must get back to work if the weather allows.  The forecast is iffy.  There are new roses to plant and fertilizer to apply at Jo’s garden.

Postscript:   Tuesday’s weather, drizzly with 23 mile an hour winds, inspired me to take another day off.  Allan worked a tiny bit, digging up about a dozen drab roses at Jo’s garden in preparation for planting some new ones, and helping Ed Strange shift some pots of bamboo at the Boreas Inn.   I had time to write a paean of praise to The Big Tiny and have set it to be a bonus book post tonight.

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