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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco Community Thanksgiving dinner’

and bulb time, day 18

Thursday, 28 November, 2013

At last, a partial day off at home to plant my own bulbs!   For myself, I had some Eremerus (just three) and some rather expensive Narcissi ‘Sinopel’; the latter always entices me from the catalog, and then I allow myself ONE, and then I miss it blooming.  So this time I planted five and hope I actually see them when they bloom with an intense green cup.  Or is it green?  The Van Engelen catalog shows it as green as can be:

Sinopel, photo from Van Engelen

Sinopel, photo from Van Engelen

Other image sources show varying colours:

versions of Sinopel

versions of Sinopel

When it doubt, read the descriptions.  Van Engelen’s may explain why I did not differentiate the bulb from other small cupped Narcissi (which are my favourites so I have a lot of different ones):

 “Fragrant, it has a perfect 3″ ivory-white perianth and a bowl-shaped, greenish white cup edged in yellow. Circa 1974 and a bit like a mood ring, its dainty cup is more yellow in cool temperatures and more green when basking in warm temperatures (cherish its greenness indoors in a bud vase). Bulb size: 14/16 cm. April. 16″ to 18”. HZ: 4-8. Limited supply.”
And yet the Fairegarden blog says “Narcissus ‘Sinopel’ really has the green cup described in the catalog, and is fragrant as well.”  Oh, but they are in Tennessee.  I wonder how warm their springs are?
Today was my last chance to get photos to illustrate the difference in the size of narcissi bulbs.  Because I have been planting the big showy Narcissi this year along with my usual more tasteful choices, we have been dealing with some very large bulbs that are especially challenging to plant in hard soil.
Narcissi bulbs

Narcissi bulbs

These are all Narcissi.  The smallest bulb is ‘Baby Moon’.  The biggest of this batch was from ‘Fragrant Rose’, a substantial and tall one.  (I must remember to smell it, as it is “said to have the fragrance of raspberries and roses”, according to Van Engelen.

One would think the littler flowers would always have tinier bulbs, and yet that is not true.  “Peeping Tom’, an heirloom Narcissi with multiple flowers and a shorter height,  has bulbs of substantial size.

bulbs of Peeping Tom

bulbs of Peeping Tom

None that I planted here compare to the monstrous size of the ‘King Alfred’ Narcissi that Lorna ordered for us to plant at Andersen’s RV Park.  Fortunately, the garden there is all light, sandy soil.

Some bulbs are exceptionally shiny and beautiful.

Narcissi bulbs, possibly 'Avalanche'.

Narcissi bulbs, possibly ‘Avalanche’

(By the time I planted the bulbs in my own garden, the bags had been reused and relabeled so many times that I was not very sure about the names of some.)

While I planted my selection of home bulbs, Allan mowed the damp and quite tall lawn.

mowed for the last time this year...probably...

mowed for the last time this year…probably…and the boat is full of tulip bulbs

I was mildy distressed between noon and 1:45 PM that we had made plans to go to the community dinner on such a glorious gardening day.  Would I be losing the last three pleasant weather hours of the year in my garden?  (Because tomorrow we must work, and Saturday the weather is due to change.)  On such a windless day, there was much I could do back toward the trees.  And I had really wanted to have time to get bulbs planted in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.  However, I have set myself certain self imposed obligations to photograph events for the Discover Ilwaco Facebook page and we had our friend Kathleen S, here for the weekend from  Olympia,  to go to the dinner with us.  When she arrived just before two, I was still offloading yesterday’s debris from Jo’s garden and was in no way ready to go.  I unappreciatively bemoaned the dinner being during the day and she kindly pointed out that it draws some older people who would not want to drive and walk up the hill to the inn in the dark.  So I stopped whinging (and about bloody time).

Flinging the last of the debris on the pile, I then changed quickly into dry shoes and socks;  Allan changed from lawnmowing clothes, and off we went on the five block walk to the Inn at Harbour Village.

poster

Inn at Harbour Village, site of Ilwaco Community Dinner

Inn at Harbour Village, site of Ilwaco Community Dinner

On the way up the hill, Kathleen and Allan pointed out the cutest sight:  a little dog with a driving coat on, paws on the steering wheel:

dog

dog

Kathleen and I cresting the hill, greeting by innkeeper Chuck Parker

Kathleen and I cresting the hill, greeting by innkeeper Chuck Parker

Kathleen's photo of the Inn at Harbour Village

Kathleen’s photo of the Inn at Harbour Village

Unlike previous years when we had walked right in, this time the event had become so popular that there was a wait.  Here is where the good weather was an advantage; people were able to wait in comfort outside.  The dinner is free to all who come, although monetary donations are welcome.  It is sponsored by the owners of the Inn, who also own several stores in Long Beach, including Stormin’ Norman’s kite shop and The Wooden Horse gift shop.

waiting for dinner

waiting for dinner

Inside in the handsome parlour, Allan found some of our friends also waiting.

Susie and Bill from the Boreas Inn

Susie and Bill from the Boreas Inn

Heather Ramsay from NIVA green and local artist Joe Chasse

local artist Joe Chasse and Heather Ramsay from NIVA green

I had Bulb Knee so walked around the inn to the lower entrance, thus taking a bit longer than Allan and Kathleen and so I missed seeing our neighbours Mary and Jeff (fisherman extraordinaire) just finishing their dinners.

Jeff and Mary from two doors down, with MR on the right

 Mary and family from two doors down

And I just barely got a glimpse of Donna and MR before they left.

MR and Donna

MR and Donna

Kathleen's photo of Donna and Allan

Kathleen’s photo of Donna and Allan

at the table

at the table

centerpiece

centerpiece

pecan, apple, and pumpkin pies

pecan, apple, and pumpkin pies

the dining room

the dining room

diners

diners

coffee

The meal is set up like a restaurant with servers taking orders.

menu

menu

restaurant quality service

restaurant quality service

We were thrilled to be seated with Joe and Heather!

Heather and Joe

Heather and Joe

Heather’s Long Beach shop, NIVA green, is my source for almost all birthday and holiday presents.

At the next table, dear Sarah Sloane, local author and topiary artist, was seated when we were about halfway through our meal; due to the bustling nature of the event, we just waved and smiled.

Our Sarah

Our Sarah

Allan's photo capture the lot of us

Allan’s photo capture the lot of us

I marveled at how the kitchen staff and servers, all volunteers, kept the meals emerging to the crowded room.

in the kitchen

in the kitchen

plating

plating

plating

serving

serving

washing

washing

After our delicious pie, when we left by the back door we saw a stack that reveals how much roasting had been done so far:

roasting pans outside

roasting pans outside

another view of the kitchen

another view of the kitchen

We strolled down the hill and back to our house and visited outside for a bit.

in the garden, stunning Dichroa febrifuga

in the garden, stunning Dichroa febrifuga

Allan's garden

Allan’s garden

Kathleen took her leave to enjoy the last forty five minutes of daylight and I realized that I DID still have time to plant the bulbs at the post office.  While I would have walked down to accomplish the task, Allan was not opposed to helping out.

The Post Office garden now planted and put to bed for winter!

The Post Office garden now planted and put to bed for winter!

Afterward, with a trace of post-sunset pink still in the sky, we went down to the Port to look at the Jessie’s star.  The low tide was not good for reflective photographs.

low tide

low tide

The Canyon Cruiser with holiday lights

The Canyon Cruiser with holiday lights

Next Saturday (December 7) is the lighting of the Port’s crab pot Christmas tree and the lighted boat parade; The Canyon Cruiser is just the first to be decorated.  Last year, we had severe storms the week before that event …right about now, as the first Saturday of December in 2012 was the 1st.  People could not decorate the boats very well because of high wind.  And today…summery warmth and not a breath of wind.

Port of Ilwaco office

Port of Ilwaco office

Allan, more sure footed than I, took a walk out on to the docks.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Jessie's Ilwaco Fish Company

Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company

jessie

PB280016

Allan's photo of Waterfront Way

Allan’s photo of Waterfront Way

and a crab pot outside of Queen La De Da's Art Castle

and a crab pot outside of Queen La De Da’s Art Castle

Soon the traditional (for three years now) crab pot Christmas decor will go up around town.

I have realized over these past months of trying to write every day that my town is as almost much about our quality of life in Ilwaco and the Long Beach Peninsula as it is gardening.  That might bore all of my readers half of the time (all 30-60 of you!).

I did close the day with a last bulbing project: collecting enough glass “pebbles” from the patio to anchor my five paperwhites in a trough of water.

paperwhites

paperwhites

Is it now the official end of bulb time?  Not quite.  One more comparatively small shipment will arrive on Monday.  I just could not resist that 20% off end of season sale at Van Engelen.  300 more bulbs and we’ll be done.

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