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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco fire station garden’

Monday, 12 August 2019

Having pulled some of the Ilwaco art walk signs out of planters and tree gardens, because there will not be a September art walk, Allan returned them to Don Nisbett at his gallery before work.  Don showed Allan that he is now making garden flags, with your choice of art.

Long Beach

We watered the downtown street trees and planters. Today I felt the lift of joy in the Long Beach job that adds a thrill to the everyday.  It has only happened a couple of times this year, today with a feeling that lasted the entire three hours of watering.

Inside Wind World Kites, the blue shop in the above photo:

Allan’s photo
variegated silene still blooming!

I am loving the ratibidia in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter.

Agastache ‘Black Adder’

I am pleased with a re-done planter by Fifth Street Park:

Compare to last year when it was mostly Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’:

I feel satisfied at last with the Fifth Street Park gardens.

My only annoyance all day was that whoever trims the escallonia hedge at Fifth Street Park (not the city crew) drops cut rose bits into the garden…

…making for a stabby situation for us.

Allan’s photos while watering:

Busy sidewalks can make it a challenge to squeeze through with a hose and a bucket.

street tree garden

I am so jealous that Allan saw this puppy and I did not. I’m especially fond of Boston Terriers because I had one as a friend when I was a child.

Muscari (grape hyacinths) are coming up already.  (That is normal.)

We finished Long Beach by weeding the Veterans Field garden beds.

Ilwaco

We were done with Long Beach too early to water the Ilwaco planters without parking problems, so we watered our volunteer gardens at the post office and fire station first.

Allan watered the street trees and planters while I weeded at the J’s.

J’s garden looks a little different because the hedge next door got trimmed hard.

Today:

July 24th:

The mystery sunflowers are blooming in one of the Ilwaco planters.

I think I know who planted the seeds, and I think she is giving them extra water. I wish the sunflowers at the fire station had done as well; they were a complete bust this year.

book report: Down to Earth by Monty Don

Late last night I finally finished an excellent book I’ve been reading slowly at bedtime.

back cover

Here are my favourite takeaways:

A 20 mph wind is “officially classed as no more than a fresh breeze.”  !!!!

Monty has won me over to leaving the edges of the garden wild.  I am going to make a sign with words from the following passage.

My sign will say “Always have some long grass growing.  Nothing is more beneficial to insects than long grass.” And it will be stuck in to a long-grassy area under a thorny rose bush that is almost impossible to weed.

….

That could not feel more true to me.  I have felt, since I became an obsessed gardener about 30 years ago, that anyone who walks through my garden is walking through my very being.

On not being judgmental about other people’s private gardens (and I am not saying that is always easy):

…..

One of my top favorite paragraphs is this one.

In a chapter on kitchen gardening, I love that he injected a bit of social justice:

The books last chapters are one for each month of the year.  In July’s, Monty writes:

Every summer, I feel that I have not paid enough attention.  From 1995 to 2005 and beyond, when I worked so much that I did not have much time for my garden, I would think every summer, “It’s another lost year in my garden.”

Even though I like winter (reading season!) and do not suffer from seasonal depression like Monty does, I feel joy in every late October when Daylight Saving Time ends and I can draw the curtains at 4:30 and have long evenings indoors.

Three months and a bit till staycation…

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Monday, 22 July 2019

New cat Jazmin is still making my room her territory, still growling at the door and not ready to meet the other cats.

We had checked on the Ilwaco planters upon our return last night and found them wanting in moisture and even, here and there, a bit droopy.  So we reversed the polarity of the neutron flow and did Ilwaco watering first.  Almost unheard of because it’s better to water in the evening, and the parking is harder during the day. Allan had to do more walking with heavy buckets of water. (I think we will be giving up this planter job at the end of 2020. It is too hard on back and knees. Allan will be 68 by then.)

Ilwaco

We filled our 25 five gallon buckets with water at the boatyard and then I weeded and groomed the planters and street tree gardens while Allan applied the water.

at the boatyard

We took time to move the Saturday Market banner, which had been hung up behind a stately Panicum ‘Northwind’ while it was small.

 

Allan’s photo

Better to move the banner than have someone cut down the grass.

The thirstiest plant in the planters was golden oregano.

Allan’s photo

I had some success with calendula seeds under a street tree.

The Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that I put in the center of each planter (economical for the city because they were free) are somewhat successful.  Deer spray has worked to protect them.  But some, in both sun and slight shade, have diseased leaves.

Per Google, probably powdery mildew. Maybe.  I will try improving the drainage in the affected planters with grit.  I had the same problem with a few purple leaved sedums last year.  Darn it.

Maybe they don’t like liquid fertilizer.

dahlias (not ours) at Ilwaco city hall

Long Beach

We picked up our check and tidied the garden at Long Beach city hall.

Long Beach City Hall

Uh-oh, we might need to lower that rhododendron so the sign shows.

Allan’s photo

elephant garlic, known in the city hall office as the Horton Hear a Who plant.

We moved the van to mid town and separated to water the street trees and some planters (Allan) and the rest of the planters (me).

I realized that I had to trim the police station roses (Rosa rugosa ‘Alba’) where they’d gotten too wide for the sidewalk.

My photos while watering:

Fifth Street Park east side

Tinkertown Mall (getting new paving)
Tigridia
new real estate office
sweet peas, Fifth Street Park west side

a handsome blue agastache

Speaking of agastaches, I was pleased to get this email from Annie’s Annuals: “…whether you say “Aga-STAK-ee” or “A-GAS-ta-key” (heck, you can even call it Aga-STASH and we won’t blink..”   I say A GAS ta key, on the advice of Bob Nold. This was the first other place where I have found that very proper pronunciation.  Even on Gardener’s World, the presenters say Agastashee…. or even Aga-stash. So I was glad to be vindicated.

I noticed another hidden sign, the new sign for the World’s End Pub.

This time it is Not My Problem (unlike the rhododendron at City Hall).

It will show from the intersection.  The pub, which will have a pirate theme, is not yet open.  I feel bad for them missing the summer trade.

Allan’s photos while watering:

golden fuchsia
Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’, Geranium ‘Rozanne’

After watering the planters, we weeded half of the beach approach garden because the Sandsations sand sculpture event starts on Wednesday.  Allan took all the photos out there.

ANOTHER coreopsis pulled out, and not by deer.

I am sure the coreopsis are being pulled by people trying to pick the flowers.

wildflower seed success

Ilwaco

We returned to our Ilwaco watering with our volunteer gardens at the fire station and post office.

fire station
fire station east side, success with calendula and bachelor buttons from seeds and happy, healthy Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (same sedum divisions as I used in the Ilwaco planters)

 

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Monday, 24 June 2019

at the post office

I had been worrying (as is my wont) for several days about the effects of our second Shingrix shot, scheduled for tomorrow.  The first shot of the shingles vaccine had knocked us, and especially Allan, out of commission for a few days.  The timing for the second one was certainly not ideal, but with a nationwide shortage we had to get it when it was offered.  So we jammed as much work into today as we could.

The Red Barn

We weeded and watered, and I doted on Cosmo the barn cat.

Allan’s photo

Cosmo hopped into the van, atop the pile of different weights of clothing for constantly changing weather.

Allan’s photo

The Tootlepedal blog has been inspiring me to do more flower close ups.

Diane’s garden

I did not pull the fireweed in the roadside garden (rosebay willowherb) because it is so pretty.

It is always a thrill to work on the roadside garden.

penstemon
Diane’s pea patch, better than any kitchen garden thing I’ve grown

The raised box garden is filling in.

When I grew Caribbean Cocktail nasturtiums last year, the flowers were all maroon and cream combos.

It has some of that this year…

…but also this orange, which is most definitely not supposed to be in Diane’s garden.

It is good that a vast sweep of reseeded California poppies stayed cream and not orange, but I fear they may have buried some perennials.

Allan’s photo
Brodiaea ‘Rudy’

Long Beach

We watered the planters and the 18 street tree gardens.

traveling sharpener
agastache
a meadowy tree garden
a Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that escaped the Chelsea chop.

I know it is now officially Hylotelephium telephium ‘Autumn Joy‘ but…please.

As I watered, some folks were herding their two children toward a van. Each carried a kite they had made at the kite museum. The little boy, maybe 7 or 8 years of age, wailed, “Why do we have to go HOME? Why do we have to go FRICKING HOME? I don’t want to go HOOOME!”  He leaned his head against the van and wept.  In 1991 I felt the same while vacationing here.  And look what happened.

Allan’s Long Beach photos:

red hardy gladiolus

tree water hook up
tThe city crew had cleaned out this blocked one.
a tater bug convention
bindweed on a lily, before untwining

Ilwaco

While I dragged hose and watered along the port, Allan bucket watered the Ilwaco trees and planters.  The amount of watering we do of gardens that were not planned with any irrigation is pretty ridiculous.

The weather had been perfect all day.  Not too hot, not too cold, not too windy.  It could only have been more perfect had it poured rain all night so we did not have to water.

I love my santolinas. I must shear these wax myrtles soon.

Eremurus (Foxtail Lily)
my favourite bed

Dragging hose down the port definitely gets one’s heart rate up.

Our Jenna (Queen La De Da) was painting Don’s gallery.

The port office garden still looks too empty. I resolved to remember to bring some more plants for it.

I fretted over the western and easternmost beds which had not been watered for awhile.  We did not have time.

Allan’s photos: Peninsula Sanitation has been diligent in watering in between our visits which helps keep it healthy and bright.

The boatyard had been string trimmed inside the fence, even sparing some flowers that had reseeded.

We finished with Allan watering at the post office and me watering at the fire station.

fire station garden

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loading the van

We started by planting cosmos at our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco post office and were pleased to have a visit from our good friend Mitzu.

She was shivering from the cold.  I had actually had to put on my raincoat.

Planting in the rain is so much easier than having to water everything in.

How we plant with the ho-mi:

Next, I planted cosmos at the fire station (another volunteer project) while Allan tackled this annoying weed along the west wall.

No, I don’t mean the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

Ilwaco Fire Station, SW corner

We returned home for more cosmos (having already used more than I had planned) and planted some, along with tidying up, at the J’s across the street.

Allan pulled all the dead crocus foliage.

We like the flowers at the curb and hope that no one kills them.

Allan’s photo

A few blocks east, we did some planting and weeding at Mike’s garden, where the cherry blossoms are anointing a parked car….

Allan’s photos

and filling up the front garden.

Tulip going over:

Allan’s photo

Allan took on the raking of the front path.

I am thrilled that the boxwoods are finally growing into a proper hedge, which we will shear in June.

The north side of the house seems to have an afterthought of a garden when all the rest of it was so formally designed by Carol Jones (“The Elves Did It”, a former Peninsula business).

I planted some rosemary, thinking that it might make a low hedge.  It should get enough light because the house is a double wide, like ours, low to the ground.

We went on to the Howerton Avenue curbside beds at the port, planting a few extra clumps of plain old eryngiums with root balls too big to pot them up for my sale.

Allan’s photo

At the port office garden, which still looks terribly young, I planted some cosmos, even though I am concerned about a 30 mph wind predicted for tomorrow.

Allan’s photos

I can’t keep waiting for perfect weather.

Here is what it looked like in November 2017.

Allan’s photo

As an experiment, because Don Nisbett and Jenna give this little bed supplemental watering, we planted some cosmos in the bed east of their gallery.

We redid it last autumn and it looks rather bare.

Looking west, the mature beds are burgeoning.

At home, I worked for awhile on my plant sale plants.

The sarrecenia by the pond is blooming.

Allan’s photos

Frosty found a bed in the bags in which Rita Nicely had brought us some pots.

Allan’s photo

I will be so glad when the plant sale is over.  The garden is a right old mess.

Allan’s photo, drizzly rain

I remembered to go to the back corner of the garden and look at the little white flowered rhododendron.

My Davidia flowers are now falling.

The work board tonight:

I asked on the Rainyside Gardeners group for the ID of a weed that I find in many of our gardens.

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Monday, 8 April 2019

Long Beach

All but two photos today are by Allan.

Before we even got to Long Beach, I felt that the weather was too windy for weeding on the beach approach. We kept going because of a cheque awaiting us at city hall. While we were there, we deadheaded the city hall garden.

Even though I had every intention of just dumping debris left over from our previous beach approach session and then going home, I suddenly decided that we simply must do one section of the approach garden. And so we did, despite the pushy, cold wind.

It was good that we’d finished this part last time; it would have been sloshy work today:

Weeding this “end cap” was our goal:

We met two darling dogs. The eight month old shepherd is Athena.

Some narcissi has appeared at the edge of the beach grass.

We did meet our goal.

We now have this far to go.

Ilwaco Fire Dept volunteer garden

As we neared home, Allan suggested we check on one of our two volunteer gardens.

An early poppy:

Dutch iris buds:

Tulip greigii foliage:

A fancy tulip:

At home, in the evening, we watched a film that I had learned about in a Gardeners’ World special about allotments. We rented it from YouTube.

It is a complete delight and well worth seeking out.

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Thursday, 8 November 2018

First, a postscript to Halloween and the 6×6 art auction.  Wendy Murry is the artist on whose 6×6 piece I always bid.  Some of her work from the past, that I am so glad to own:

and my favourite:

my favourite Wendy art of all

She told me that she would not be in the art auction this year because of being so busy but that she had made me a piece of art anyway.  On Halloween, she brought it to me, and this morning I remembered to photograph it for you.  It is a depiction of Dead Man’s Cove at Cape Disappointment.

Here is a real life view.

I am pleased and touched and grateful.

Ilwaco mulching

Today we began by loading all the buckets of mulch and applying more buckets-full to our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Fire Department.

before, with mulching to the right hand side that was done last night.

The velvety verbascum that had placed itself right on the edge had to go.

after

and the long, narrow west side, too.

I think there might be a narrow bed on the east side that is just nothing; I should have a look and maybe put more Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, of which I have an endless supply, into it.

Next, we mulched our volunteer garden at the Post Office, where we used up the rest of the load of 25 five gallon buckets and 17 four gallon buckets.  That’s 193 gallons; 201 and a bit equals one cubic yard, according to my calculations.

I removed some under-performing Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ to make room for a bulb of my Lily Conca D’Or.  Look how big it is after several years in the ground!

It went in the back corner.

I have mixed feelings about all that grass in the front.  I asked the opinion of a passerby, who said she liked it.

clearing out plants while mulching

post office garden after mulching

back home, this much left (Allan’s photo)

Mike’s garden

Back at home, we reloaded all the buckets and applied them at Mike’s garden, a few blocks to the east.

ready for Mike’s garden (Allan’s photo)

autumn leaves

Mike’s front garden

mulching thickly at Mike’s, where the soil is clay and fill.

Someone else is going to remove this tatty old lilac:

And we will return soon to prune the Escallonia iveyi behind it.

Back home…

Now this much is left. (Allan’s photo)

I was in suspense whether filling all the buckets for the Shelburne would use the mulch up, or whether we would have enough left for Diane’s garden.  I was so happy that some was left over.

The Shelburne Hotel

We delivered another full complement of buckets to the Shelburne.

ready to mulch (Allan’s photo)

We usually leave the right-in-front parking spots for guests.  Not today, when we had such heavy work to do.

We not only mulched but also moved some hardy fuchsias and a hydrangea to more eye-catching locations.  I planted two of my Lily Conca D’Or, some violas, and some starts of a white veronicastrum.  Three big clumps of white astilbe that had appeared in full sun got moved to happier shady spots.

I removed a lot of badasters. and must remember to put some divisions of good asters in for autumnal beauty in 2019.

nice thick layer of Soil Energy

In case you are wondering what Soil Energy consists of: “Soil Energy combines composted wood products, aged screened sawdust, screened sand, composted chicken manure, lime, fertilizer and iron. (pH 6.2, brown tan in color, 38.9% organic matter).”

We finished after sunset.

brushing footprints out of the mulch

sweeping the path

The windows of the pub (left, below) glowed so enticingly that we went in for a work reward.

Jambalaya (ordered with no oysters, please!) with a side salad, fried chicken sandwich and small chopped salad

At home, the work board reflects that Diane’s is the only mulching job left.

 

 

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Friday, 28 September 2018

 

the temperature when we left for work

Last year I swore I would not work if the temperature was over 75.  But needs must…

Shelburne Hotel

We watered the Shelburne garden just in case the predicted rain did not come.  The hotel was hosting a big weekend of food and music with a band called The Super Saturated Sugar Strings.  One of the band members, a chef, was going to prepare the Friday dinner in the Shelburne Restaurant.  I like the name of the band and it all sounded very interesting but I had no energy to attend, just to get the garden ready for guests.

The Sugar Strings event sounds fascinating as I read about it now.  I have regret at not making the effort to dig deep for a bit of extra evening energy.

“5-course dinner and Parlor in the Round music featuring members of SSSS

Sugar Strings frontman Carlyle Watt will be crafting a multi-course dinner at the historic Shelburne Hotel in Seaview, WA. Carlyle studied at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in California’s Napa Valley, and he is currently the head baker and executive chef at Alaska’s award winning bakery, Fire Island Rustic Bakeshop. In 2017, he was nominated as an outstanding baker by the James Beard Foundation. Carlyle’s ability to merge baking, pastry, and culinary techniques creates a unique and memorable dining experience. When the Sugar Strings go on tour, Carlyle brings his passion for food along, hosting pop-up dinners, guest-chef appearances, and generally keeping the band well-fed to sustain their high energy shows. 

Collaborating with Carlyle in the front of the house will be The Sugar String’s bassist, Kevin Worrell, presenting his hit Alaskan singer-songwriter showcase, Parlor In The Round. This dinner theater will feature local favorites Pretty Gritty and the Strings’ own Kat Moore, taking turns with songs and stories inspired by the evening’s bill of fare. As host, Kevin will select written submissions from the audience as prompts for musical improv games, and as fodder for his quick-witted banter.”

I don’t think I could have dug deep enough for improv energy, though.  As long as no audience participation was required, I would have been ok.

A different event was taking place in the pub tonight (the hotel has a pub and a dining room).  We think that is the event for which Todd was bringing flowers.

Allan’s photos

As Todd hurried off to another obligation, Allan and I had time, for once, to do a thorough job of weeding, deadheading, and tidying the paths without rushing off to another obligation of our own.

in the Shelburne back garden

front garden, 82 degrees F.

Japanese anemones

one of two matching planters at the front entry

Not only did we have time for a nice garden tidy (except for big projects like battling the aegepodium or houttuynia), we took time for a tasty pub lunch of two new menu items.  Because we rarely take a break for lunch during a work day, our lunch is usually some sort of home made sandwich scarfed down while we work.  This was a special reward for working in hot weather.

Allan’s photo

crab cakes with apple and fennel cabbage slaw and roasted red pepper aioli

beer battered fish and chips

and that oh so good blackberry cream cheese tart

looking north into the front garden as we depart

We thought because of the heat that it would be a good night for a campfire dinner.  Allan bought some hot dog buns at the grocery store across the street while I did a tiny bit more gardening.

Ilwaco

As soon as we approached Ilwaco, we decided the campfire idea was not a go.  Between Seaview and Ilwaco, we drove into a cool and breezy fog, so welcome after two days of heat.

I worked for awhile on the boatyard garden while Allan watered the Ilwaco planters, we fervently hope for the last time in 2018.  The Long Beach parks manager spoke this week of winterizing the LB planters because of rain being predicted, and yet the forecast only calls for slight chance of minimal rain.  I would love a good rain at last once a week now.  We are so tired of watering.

fog at the end of the boatyard

Allan’s photo

Cosmos in the boatyard that looks like ‘Happy Ring’ (which I did not plant this year).

I like Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ very much, just have not seen it for sale anywhere lately.

solidago, sweet peas, lavender, Allium christophii seedhead

tall pink aster, possibly ‘Harrington’s Pink’

looking north

I walked home via the post office and the fire station to weed and deadhead those two small volunteer gardens.

Ilwaco Fire Department

This time, the day had been well planned enough that Allan was not out watering in the dusk.

 

 

 

 

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