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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco fire station garden’

loading the van

We started by planting cosmos at our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco post office and were pleased to have a visit from our good friend Mitzu.

She was shivering from the cold.  I had actually had to put on my raincoat.

Planting in the rain is so much easier than having to water everything in.

How we plant with the ho-mi:

Next, I planted cosmos at the fire station (another volunteer project) while Allan tackled this annoying weed along the west wall.

No, I don’t mean the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

Ilwaco Fire Station, SW corner

We returned home for more cosmos (having already used more than I had planned) and planted some, along with tidying up, at the J’s across the street.

Allan pulled all the dead crocus foliage.

We like the flowers at the curb and hope that no one kills them.

Allan’s photo

A few blocks east, we did some planting and weeding at Mike’s garden, where the cherry blossoms are anointing a parked car….

Allan’s photos

and filling up the front garden.

Tulip going over:

Allan’s photo

Allan took on the raking of the front path.

I am thrilled that the boxwoods are finally growing into a proper hedge, which we will shear in June.

The north side of the house seems to have an afterthought of a garden when all the rest of it was so formally designed by Carol Jones (“The Elves Did It”, a former Peninsula business).

I planted some rosemary, thinking that it might make a low hedge.  It should get enough light because the house is a double wide, like ours, low to the ground.

We went on to the Howerton Avenue curbside beds at the port, planting a few extra clumps of plain old eryngiums with root balls too big to pot them up for my sale.

Allan’s photo

At the port office garden, which still looks terribly young, I planted some cosmos, even though I am concerned about a 30 mph wind predicted for tomorrow.

Allan’s photos

I can’t keep waiting for perfect weather.

Here is what it looked like in November 2017.

Allan’s photo

As an experiment, because Don Nisbett and Jenna give this little bed supplemental watering, we planted some cosmos in the bed east of their gallery.

We redid it last autumn and it looks rather bare.

Looking west, the mature beds are burgeoning.

At home, I worked for awhile on my plant sale plants.

The sarrecenia by the pond is blooming.

Allan’s photos

Frosty found a bed in the bags in which Rita Nicely had brought us some pots.

Allan’s photo

I will be so glad when the plant sale is over.  The garden is a right old mess.

Allan’s photo, drizzly rain

I remembered to go to the back corner of the garden and look at the little white flowered rhododendron.

My Davidia flowers are now falling.

The work board tonight:

I asked on the Rainyside Gardeners group for the ID of a weed that I find in many of our gardens.

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Monday, 8 April 2019

Long Beach

All but two photos today are by Allan.

Before we even got to Long Beach, I felt that the weather was too windy for weeding on the beach approach. We kept going because of a cheque awaiting us at city hall. While we were there, we deadheaded the city hall garden.

Even though I had every intention of just dumping debris left over from our previous beach approach session and then going home, I suddenly decided that we simply must do one section of the approach garden. And so we did, despite the pushy, cold wind.

It was good that we’d finished this part last time; it would have been sloshy work today:

Weeding this “end cap” was our goal:

We met two darling dogs. The eight month old shepherd is Athena.

Some narcissi has appeared at the edge of the beach grass.

We did meet our goal.

We now have this far to go.

Ilwaco Fire Dept volunteer garden

As we neared home, Allan suggested we check on one of our two volunteer gardens.

An early poppy:

Dutch iris buds:

Tulip greigii foliage:

A fancy tulip:

At home, in the evening, we watched a film that I had learned about in a Gardeners’ World special about allotments. We rented it from YouTube.

It is a complete delight and well worth seeking out.

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Thursday, 8 November 2018

First, a postscript to Halloween and the 6×6 art auction.  Wendy Murry is the artist on whose 6×6 piece I always bid.  Some of her work from the past, that I am so glad to own:

and my favourite:

my favourite Wendy art of all

She told me that she would not be in the art auction this year because of being so busy but that she had made me a piece of art anyway.  On Halloween, she brought it to me, and this morning I remembered to photograph it for you.  It is a depiction of Dead Man’s Cove at Cape Disappointment.

Here is a real life view.

I am pleased and touched and grateful.

Ilwaco mulching

Today we began by loading all the buckets of mulch and applying more buckets-full to our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Fire Department.

before, with mulching to the right hand side that was done last night.

The velvety verbascum that had placed itself right on the edge had to go.

after

and the long, narrow west side, too.

I think there might be a narrow bed on the east side that is just nothing; I should have a look and maybe put more Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, of which I have an endless supply, into it.

Next, we mulched our volunteer garden at the Post Office, where we used up the rest of the load of 25 five gallon buckets and 17 four gallon buckets.  That’s 193 gallons; 201 and a bit equals one cubic yard, according to my calculations.

I removed some under-performing Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ to make room for a bulb of my Lily Conca D’Or.  Look how big it is after several years in the ground!

It went in the back corner.

I have mixed feelings about all that grass in the front.  I asked the opinion of a passerby, who said she liked it.

clearing out plants while mulching

post office garden after mulching

back home, this much left (Allan’s photo)

Mike’s garden

Back at home, we reloaded all the buckets and applied them at Mike’s garden, a few blocks to the east.

ready for Mike’s garden (Allan’s photo)

autumn leaves

Mike’s front garden

mulching thickly at Mike’s, where the soil is clay and fill.

Someone else is going to remove this tatty old lilac:

And we will return soon to prune the Escallonia iveyi behind it.

Back home…

Now this much is left. (Allan’s photo)

I was in suspense whether filling all the buckets for the Shelburne would use the mulch up, or whether we would have enough left for Diane’s garden.  I was so happy that some was left over.

The Shelburne Hotel

We delivered another full complement of buckets to the Shelburne.

ready to mulch (Allan’s photo)

We usually leave the right-in-front parking spots for guests.  Not today, when we had such heavy work to do.

We not only mulched but also moved some hardy fuchsias and a hydrangea to more eye-catching locations.  I planted two of my Lily Conca D’Or, some violas, and some starts of a white veronicastrum.  Three big clumps of white astilbe that had appeared in full sun got moved to happier shady spots.

I removed a lot of badasters. and must remember to put some divisions of good asters in for autumnal beauty in 2019.

nice thick layer of Soil Energy

In case you are wondering what Soil Energy consists of: “Soil Energy combines composted wood products, aged screened sawdust, screened sand, composted chicken manure, lime, fertilizer and iron. (pH 6.2, brown tan in color, 38.9% organic matter).”

We finished after sunset.

brushing footprints out of the mulch

sweeping the path

The windows of the pub (left, below) glowed so enticingly that we went in for a work reward.

Jambalaya (ordered with no oysters, please!) with a side salad, fried chicken sandwich and small chopped salad

At home, the work board reflects that Diane’s is the only mulching job left.

 

 

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Friday, 28 September 2018

 

the temperature when we left for work

Last year I swore I would not work if the temperature was over 75.  But needs must…

Shelburne Hotel

We watered the Shelburne garden just in case the predicted rain did not come.  The hotel was hosting a big weekend of food and music with a band called The Super Saturated Sugar Strings.  One of the band members, a chef, was going to prepare the Friday dinner in the Shelburne Restaurant.  I like the name of the band and it all sounded very interesting but I had no energy to attend, just to get the garden ready for guests.

The Sugar Strings event sounds fascinating as I read about it now.  I have regret at not making the effort to dig deep for a bit of extra evening energy.

“5-course dinner and Parlor in the Round music featuring members of SSSS

Sugar Strings frontman Carlyle Watt will be crafting a multi-course dinner at the historic Shelburne Hotel in Seaview, WA. Carlyle studied at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in California’s Napa Valley, and he is currently the head baker and executive chef at Alaska’s award winning bakery, Fire Island Rustic Bakeshop. In 2017, he was nominated as an outstanding baker by the James Beard Foundation. Carlyle’s ability to merge baking, pastry, and culinary techniques creates a unique and memorable dining experience. When the Sugar Strings go on tour, Carlyle brings his passion for food along, hosting pop-up dinners, guest-chef appearances, and generally keeping the band well-fed to sustain their high energy shows. 

Collaborating with Carlyle in the front of the house will be The Sugar String’s bassist, Kevin Worrell, presenting his hit Alaskan singer-songwriter showcase, Parlor In The Round. This dinner theater will feature local favorites Pretty Gritty and the Strings’ own Kat Moore, taking turns with songs and stories inspired by the evening’s bill of fare. As host, Kevin will select written submissions from the audience as prompts for musical improv games, and as fodder for his quick-witted banter.”

I don’t think I could have dug deep enough for improv energy, though.  As long as no audience participation was required, I would have been ok.

A different event was taking place in the pub tonight (the hotel has a pub and a dining room).  We think that is the event for which Todd was bringing flowers.

Allan’s photos

As Todd hurried off to another obligation, Allan and I had time, for once, to do a thorough job of weeding, deadheading, and tidying the paths without rushing off to another obligation of our own.

in the Shelburne back garden

front garden, 82 degrees F.

Japanese anemones

one of two matching planters at the front entry

Not only did we have time for a nice garden tidy (except for big projects like battling the aegepodium or houttuynia), we took time for a tasty pub lunch of two new menu items.  Because we rarely take a break for lunch during a work day, our lunch is usually some sort of home made sandwich scarfed down while we work.  This was a special reward for working in hot weather.

Allan’s photo

crab cakes with apple and fennel cabbage slaw and roasted red pepper aioli

beer battered fish and chips

and that oh so good blackberry cream cheese tart

looking north into the front garden as we depart

We thought because of the heat that it would be a good night for a campfire dinner.  Allan bought some hot dog buns at the grocery store across the street while I did a tiny bit more gardening.

Ilwaco

As soon as we approached Ilwaco, we decided the campfire idea was not a go.  Between Seaview and Ilwaco, we drove into a cool and breezy fog, so welcome after two days of heat.

I worked for awhile on the boatyard garden while Allan watered the Ilwaco planters, we fervently hope for the last time in 2018.  The Long Beach parks manager spoke this week of winterizing the LB planters because of rain being predicted, and yet the forecast only calls for slight chance of minimal rain.  I would love a good rain at last once a week now.  We are so tired of watering.

fog at the end of the boatyard

Allan’s photo

Cosmos in the boatyard that looks like ‘Happy Ring’ (which I did not plant this year).

I like Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ very much, just have not seen it for sale anywhere lately.

solidago, sweet peas, lavender, Allium christophii seedhead

tall pink aster, possibly ‘Harrington’s Pink’

looking north

I walked home via the post office and the fire station to weed and deadhead those two small volunteer gardens.

Ilwaco Fire Department

This time, the day had been well planned enough that Allan was not out watering in the dusk.

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 23 August 2018

Js garden

Allan mowed the little pocket lawn and I weeded at J’s across the street.

front garden with carpet of thyme (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Long Beach

We had to trim more off the top of the dang blangity non-blooming Cosmos ‘Sensation’ mix.

feeling irritated

Of course, that will delay bloom even more.  If I had more time or energy, I might tear it all out and put something else in….but the tourist season only has two weeks to go, and by mid September surely it will throw out some side flowers…?? I live in hope.

front

back—I should have cut more.

As the director of the Bellevue Botanical Border said at Hardy Plant Weekend, “When we make a mistake, it is in public for everyone to see.”  This was not exactly a mistake because this once was a reliably good plant.

Here is the frog who lives in the water box. (Allan’s photo)

Downtown, Allan went south and I went north watering planters. While watering planters on Third Street in Long Beach, I enjoyed the music of this busker and I gave him a few dollars.

The sky was blue, the sun was out, and not too hot, and we had a brisk but not too brisk wind.  Perfect for the kite festival.  The entryway to the Bolstad approach was as close as either of us got to kite festival this week.

A city crew member jokingly asked us, “Why aren’t you out flying your kite today?” When I said no energy, he knew just how I felt.  Work consumes all my energy and then I just want to be home, gathering up some new energy from my garden for the next work week.

I walked a block to the east to get a closer look at a little garden that someone has made behind the Elks lodge in a raised round bed that used to be all horsetail.

Someone is deadheading regularly here.

I wish my fiery celosia at the fire station had done this well.

Allan noticed someone was stripping flowers off the two of the lavenders in two of the planters.

I swear I just might hang signs in them like I did on the blue globe thistle in the boatyard garden (“Please don’t pick me”, on a card hung right on the plant, proved to be effective).

We finished Long Beach with a tidy of the Veterans Field gardens.

Helenium ‘Mariachi’ (pretty sure) in Vet field

Shelburne Hotel

 We had made good time in Long Beach and got to the Shelburne 45 minutes early than usual.  We managed to keep that lead, a good thing as it is now getting dark around eight.  No more ten hour days!

We watered, deadheaded, did some but not a lot of garden clean up.  Deadheading the sweet peas is the most time consuming thing now.

sweet peas and Japanese anemones

Sweet pea ‘Blue Shift’ (maybe)

looking north

looking south

Allan was able to get onto the Room Four deck to do some much needed deadheading.  We are going to move the rose down into the garden this fall and replace it with a non deadheading sort of plant.

It looked quite sad when he got there, with black spot and dead flowers.

And will replace the cosmos with some sort of non deadhead-y plants. And will put the dahlia in the garden. It’s a nice red one.

This sort of pot, on the room 11 deck, needed no care and looks just fine.

chatting with some appreciative guests

the back garden (where you can dine from the pub menu)

one of the succulent pots on the back lower decks

Ilwaco

Allan watered the street trees and planters while I watered and did some weeding at the boatyard.

What a relief it was to breathe clean, non smoky air.

view from the south end of the boatyard today….

and on Monday, when it was so smoky I could barely see a boat coming in.

an interestingly fasciated euphorbia at the boatyard

taken from behind the fence because I water from behind the fence

as I walked along pulling horsetail; looking south

I walked home via some weeding and deadheading at the Ilwaco Fire Station garden.

Now for three much anticipated days off, two at home and one garden tour day on the north Oregon coast.  It will be the last touring trip off the peninsula this year.  We are skipping the Cannon Beach cottage tour so that Allan can enjoy the Rod Run auto show here with Scott and Tony.  And…I am tired and just want to stay on the peninsula for September. So…if you count on us to show you that tour by blogging about it, you had best get yourself tickets and go.

Allan’s photo: He finished watering at the post office garden at sunset.

I wrote a blog post while Allan worked on his boating blog and then made dinner.  (For those who wonder how I garden, read, and blog, it is because Allan cooks dinner that this blog can happen on a daily basis in work season.)  Just as we sat down to eat and watch telly at ten PM, I noticed that my night blooming cereus flower had opened.  It did not seem as scented as usual.  To think we might have missed it!

As we watched our telly, the delicate scent of the flower emerged and floated around the room.

I am so happy that our three day weekend starts tomorrow.  This time, I will not stay on the property the whole time, because on Saturday we are going garden touring.

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Thursday, 9 August 2018

Long Beach

As we got our hoses together to water, I heard the Ramones’s song I Wanna Be Sedated coming from the Fun Rides.  My favourite band; it made me happy.

I pulled bindweed in Lewis and Clark Square park and at the police station before I started to water my half of the Long Beach planters.

I wonder if Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ has crossed with orange crocosmia to make a short red one.

little fig tree with one fig

I met some darling dogs…

and then they multiplied.

And I got to give Sophie the bulldog a nice drink of water.

And I often have an audience of passing dogs.

The planters are looking fine.  Next week I will do the planter reference post for August.

Allan’s photo, Geranium ‘Rozanne’

Allan’s photo

The Rides are being remodeled. (Allan’s photo)

inside (Allan’s photo)

I trimmed some crocosmia at the Wind World Kites planter.

after; there is a difference

In the planter by Funland I saw a hole…

and when I looked to the other side I realized someone had stolen one of my nice santolinas, which I cannot replace now.

Damn it all.

I thought, You might as well take them both, you evil selfish yobbo.  Having the symmetry destroyed till next year is so upsetting.  This is why I plan to quit Long Beach in two years.

Allan trimmed the lady’s mantle in Fifth Street Park and we both deadheaded the roses.

before

after (Allan’s photos)

I would cut the foliage back harder on the alchemilla.  Later. Maybe with a string trimmer.

Basket Case basket by the restroom (Allan’s photo)

On the way south, we passed a cute beach cottage.

At the welcome sign, the cosmos are still not blooming and yet were so tall I had to trim back the foliage.  There are no flower buds.

I hate to but I must give up on cosmos…or must I?  I might try Cosmos ‘Cupcake’ which bloomed so well this year.  The sign has ‘Sensation’ which has been a bust.  I resolved to give up using ‘Sensation’ mix cosmos.

Shelburne Hotel

We got there earlier than usual so had more time to garden as well as watering.

the totem garden

I forgot to return with big loppers to remove a dead blackberry cane from next door that is draped on the totem pole’s beak.

This bed, infested with houttynia and with montbretia returning, will need a lot of digging this fall:

bocce ball patio

beans

They are Sunset runner beans.

Agastaches from the first batch I got from That Nursery (the one whose second batch of agastaches were so very bad) are still looking great.

Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’

I was unhappy to find that the hops on the shady side of the pub deck railing were developing sooty mold.  Lest it be worse by Monday, I trimmed a lot of leaves, leaving my hands blackened with the mold.

I read that you can spray the leaves with soapy water and then later with clear water and the mold will wash off, leaving clean leaves.  I don’t have time for that, though. (Of course, I disinfected my clippers and hands before touching any other plants.)

after

Allan’s photo

I think next year I might do like hops growers do and just let there be a few of the vining stems.

back garden dining (Allan’s photo)

Just as I was finishing this and feeling morose, a blog reader appeared and cheered me up immensely.

Bartender Juan jovially asks, “What happened to my hops?” and a darling blog reader stands by to chase away my hops gloom.

making life better; thank you.

It takes a lot of deadheading now to keep the sweet peas going.

Ilwaco

I watered the boatyard.  For the first time this year, a hose was going up into one of the boats…

…but I managed to find another hose.

After watering, I walked home, admiring our volunteer post office garden…

…and I deadheaded our volunteer garden at the fire station.

…and finished by weeding the Norwood garden, where I admired the new paint job.

such a pretty blue house

hydrangea bed weeded

Meanwhile, Allan had watered the Ilwaco street trees and planters and the post office and fire station gardens.

Allan’s photos:

darling Queenie at Azure Salon

swallows nest in a doorway

He finished by watering our new little plants down at the port…

…where he applied Sluggo to protect the Crambe martima.

A nine hour day for me, nine and a half for him, and we now have three days off.

 

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