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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco planters’

Sunday, 10 November 2019

I was surprised to see one of my hamamelis (witch hazel) already in bloom.

Fall colour blazed in Ilwaco.

across the street
next door
a maple and our alders

I do wish alders had good fall color.  Their leaves just turn dull greeny-brown and fall off.

a block to the west

Ilwaco Community Building

We did fall clean up and leaf collecting.

the tiered garden
after
Allan’s photo

The weekly Quaker meeting was in session.  One member had good bumper stickers.

I could imagine going to this meeting.  My long ago significant other, Bryan, was from a Quaker family, and his mother, Louise Runnings, was an inspiration to me, as was Laura Woodring, the Quaker mother of Montana Mary.

I trimmed some of the leaves from the hellebore in the entry garden (a bit early, but I don’t want to have to remember later in the year) and did not hoard all of the leaves for myself.

I worried that the heathers were too far out onto the sidewalk.

Heathers look awful trimmed back.  The ones sprawling onto the sidewalk might have to come out in the spring.  Meanwhile, they can have their winter flowers.  Perhaps they can just stay until someone complains, which might never happen.  We did trim the kinnickinnick.

Allan’s photos

I originally turned this job down because of the almost-monoculture of white winter-blooming heather (and the salal!).  Allan convinced me to take it on.  It is mostly his own particular job. Perhaps we can introduce some heather that blooms in the summer, just for variety.  

I do love the wealth of autumn leaves.

The parking lot is one of weird and awkward slopes and steep angles, hard to walk on, some sort of engineering mistake, or so I have heard.

Ilwaco planters

We tidied up the city planters at city hall….

Now they are ready for the person in the office who puts out potted plants to take them over (I hope).

We went on until dark cleaning up as many of the Ilwaco planters and street tree gardens as possible, for the last time.  We are giving up this job because of the bucket watering.

We dug golden oregano out of four of the planters where it had completely taken over.  I had planted it in small amounts from starts of mine, in an attempt to be budget minded.  It had gotten so vigorous in the last few years that I felt that it would daunt the creativity of whoever takes on the job.

It came out much quicker and easier than I had thought it would, thanks to the Root Slayer shovel.

A friend came by just in time to get a few free pieces; the rest will go to narrow, contained beds at the fire station.

The tree gardens got all tidied up, including the two with annoying perennial sweet pea and asters:

Allan’s photos

a vocal audience

We ran out of daylight with four planters left to do.


Reading

Here are some takeaways from a memoir that I read last week, one that did not fit well into the narrative flow of this blog.

I had the amazing good fortune as a child to be taken camping by my parents by a river, with a rocky beach that had a grove of (maybe) willows, and in that grove I was surrounded and landed on by butterflies in the way that Burrough describes.

The memoir is not a collection of bucolic nature stories; it is mostly about Burroughs’ tyrannical and twisted father.  Parts of it sounded so familiar to me, like this:

…my mother on the main floor, my dad in the basement, and me in the attic.

This passage…

..reminded my of the daily surge of bliss I felt in my 20s to be a grown up out on my own.

I also think, when I read friends’ (Facebook friends, mostly) stories of having had wonderful fathers, do they know how lucky they are?

What Augusten feels when he meets a father who is lovingly proud of his son:

So, if you have or had a good father, rejoice, and never take it for granted.  (I must add that when I was 32 and suffering from a broken heart, my father wrote to me an astonishing letter of support, saying the heartbreaker in question did not deserve me and other such comforting words.  It was so out of character from our usual relationship that I wish I could understand why…. Lately, I have realized how very little I know about my father. Did I ever ask him questions about his childhood in Chicago? If I did, the answers were not forthcoming and now I will never know.)

I think I have now read everything by Mr. Burroughs except for his latest book, which I have on order and await impatiently for winter reading. I was fascinated to realize that another memoir I read several years ago, Look Me in the Eye, about growing up autistic, was written by Augusten’s brother. I think I must reread it.

 

 

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Monday, 8 July 2019

Despite a forecast of rain, we did our usual watering rounds.  We cannot depend on rain, especially when the forecast calls for anything between one tenth and one half inch.

Long Beach

Allan watered the street trees and ten planters and I did the rest.

Photos taken as I walked up one side of the street and then down the other…

My second planter had a catastrophe: one of my gauras had disappeared, ruining my symmetry.

I found half of the plant left, bent sideways.

I had to trim the remainder of the right hand one by half and then had to cut the other one by half to match.  The joys of public gardening.  I hope people know that my intentions were better than what they get to see.

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’

In two planters, the knautias that used to be the variegated ‘Thunder and Lightning’ are too big and sprawling.

One variegated leaf has come back in the messy middle.

Perhaps in the autumn, I will remember to dig these out and put them under a street tree or in a park.

Last week’s mulch has slowed down the horsetail in Fifth Street Park.

I had some sweet pea success, although some of the leaves look ominously on the verge of mildew.

California poppies
Allium christophii tied into a bundle

I had begged some string from Captain Bob’s Chowder but did not take enough for the second trio of alliums.

Veronica is regrowing where I sheared it back hard.

The dampest corner of Fifth Street Park:

No one has cut into the biggest lavender yet!

lavender abuzz

The lilies in Fifth Street Park and in my own garden are shorter than usual this year.

Allan’s photos while watering:

Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’

rugosa rose
a couple getting a photo in front of the blooming ‘Super Dorothy’ rose

Ilwaco

I tidied up the planters while Allan bucket watered them.

Someone planted sunflowers in this one.

Maybe a bird did it.

view of the boatyard

The deer spray (Liquid Fence) is preventing the sedums from getting munched.

Someone who came to my plant sale at the end of May told me to look for a little garden behind a building.  I remembered today.

very nice indeed

The annoying perennial sweet pea looks pretty right now.

We did not plant it.

City Hall

We finished by watering our volunteer gardens at the post office and fire station.

fire station garden
east side, new this year

It was 71 degrees as we finished watering.

At home, my next door neighbour was feasting on bindweed.

I potted up a big comfrey that we had dug up, with permission, from a garden near the boatyard.

Skooter helped.

 

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Friday, 15 March 2019

Before work, I had an exciting delivery from Gossler Farms, a Stachyurus praecox.  I have been looking for this plant since I left my old garden and had to leave a large one behind.  (It probably got crushed when the new owner had some danger trees felled from the slope above it.)  It is a winter blooming shrub that I adore.

Allan’s photos

It is gorgeous.  Now I just have to figure out how to squeeze it in to a garden bed that I can see from my living room desk in early spring.

I dug up several clumps of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and one clump each of a couple of more special sedums (“Strawberries and Cream’ and one with more glaucous foliage whose name I forget) to plant as the new center plant in the

Ilwaco planters.

Allan took most of the photos for this first part of the day.

in the boatyard

My hope is to make the small round easily-baked-in-the-sun planters need watering only once a week…or even just once every five days, or even four, would be an improvement.  We had removed the winter battered Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ which have been the centerpieces for years.

loads of snails in a planter near the boatyard

under a street tree

I admired both the south facing window and the garden bed below it at the Col Pacific Motel.

One of three erysimums that we had left because they looked ok looked so bad close up that I was sorry I had left it.

A variegated sedum had been taken over by a green reversion.  I axed all the green parts off and I do hope it will stay the handsome variegated form.

Just look how much it had reverted!  I had all but forgotten that it was anything but the plain green form.

The offending green parts in a bucket will be welcome elsewhere.

Long Beach

We began with a quick check up and some tidying at the city hall garden….

a corner at city hall before…

and after

The old lavatera in the west side garden beds that were planted by Gene and Peggy Miles has become so worn that this is probably its last year.  I will need to plant something low there because the office staff likes to be able to see out the window.

And then we trimmed santolinas and did some other grooming on the planters on the Sid Snyder approach and the six downtown blocks.

Sid Snyder Drive

The trimming will inspire the santolinas to have a nice round shape instead of getting raggedy.

before…this one took a lot of hand trimming rather than the speedy Stihl trimmer….

…because it was so intertwined with narcissi.

Allan took on the truly horrid job of clipping the rugosa roses that volunteered itself under one of the trees and then weeding it for the first time this year.

before

after

I walked back and forth between planters and street trees, heading north and trimming santolinas as I went.

This is the planter that started it all, one of four that I did back in about 1998 when they were all done by different volunteers.  The city administrator at the time said it was “magnificent”.  It still has the original santolinas.

before

A few years ago, I got so bored while hand trimming the furthest one that I suddenly cut it back to the trunk! It took it two years to come back.  I am glad I have The Toy now which makes the job fun rather than high pressure and tedious.

after (I blocked part of the photo with my thumb, oops)

Allan caught up to me halfway through town and removed the protective old leaves from the Fifth Street Park gunnera…

…and then trimmed a couple of blocks of planters himself.

The carousel is back, a sure sign of the tourist season.

I love small cupped narcissi.

I realized I would not have the satisfaction of erasing santolinas from the work board because we still have the ten or so planters on Bolstad beach approach to trim.  At five o clock, I was too exhausted to do it even though in past years I’d have gone on till dark to get it done.  I blamed the after effects of the Shingrix vaccine (whose side effects can last 3-5 days) rather than aging.

I did not even think I could muster the energy for the last two untrimmed planters north of the stoplight that I saw when we were on our way to dump debris. But I did (which means Allan did, too) because those blocks would be more crowded on a Saturday.

one of the last two planters

The downtown santolina trimming used to take all day, with sore hands from clipping afterwards.  The Toy made it take just the afternoon.

The work board tonight:

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 4 March 2019

I felt the need to work despite the morning being so chilly that we discussed taking the day off.

The water boxes were frozen…

As were the ponds.

…so frozen that tossed pebbles just sat on the ice.

Cota and Bentley next door enjoyed an icy apple each.

We mulched the rose beds at the J’s garden across the street. The first bed is empty and needs a new rose.

And it needs a trellis to match the one at the other end.

Fortunately, there is a trellis going spare behind the flowering quince on the west fence.

Now we have a tiny future project, to move a trellis (Allan) and find a red or pink climbing rose (me).

The J’s garden front garden has plenty of crocuses.

To further test out the weather, we tidied the Ilwaco planters and street tree pocket gardens. Fortunately, lack of wind made 45 degrees workable. All but two of the tatty old erysimums came out of the planters today. (The two least tatty ones get a reprieve for now.)

Allan’s photo

Tatty (Allan’s photo)

I will wait till the nights are above freezing to add some Sedums. It would be great to have some hens and chickens and even echeverias, but the cooler the plant is, the more likely it will be stolen, so I must stick with something as basic as Autumn Joy that I can replace without expense.

As the day felt a bit balmier, we went on to Long Beach, first to Fifth Street Park to finish a bit of trimming in the northeast quadrant.

Allan trimmed a rudbeckia and a lavender…

…and was asked by the owners of the new barbershop to trim a rhododendron. He referred that to me. It was full of buds so I did the barest of trimming so that it does not dare to actually touch the building. It was enough to make the new business happy and feel welcomed.

You probably can’t even see a difference. Most of the pruning was at the back. People like to be listened to, and they saw me carry off several branches. I’ll try to remember to continue to leave an inch of space between the shrub and the building.

Allan had a look inside the spiffing new barber shop.

In a planter by the park, Allan saw this sorry sight in an ash tray by a planter.

Other than the rhododendron, I further pruned a row of Super Dorothy roses that had looked too thick in Allan’s after photo from last week:

After, today:

We went on to the Bolstad beach approach to check the planters. A plant thief has indeed helped themselves to some of our new sea thrifts. I think it must have happened before someone added primroses to the Lisa Bonney memorial planter, or surely there would be two holes instead of one.

We worked our way all along the beach approach garden, trimming ornamental grasses and pulling crocosmia. The weeding will come later.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

I was pleased to find that The Toy made quick work of most of the small stems of rugosa roses along the edge.

A hellebore at city Hall:

Allan’s photo

The planters on the Sud Snyder Drive beach approach got their late winter tidy.

The planter furthest east has become a smoking lounge.

I left the smokers a wee notice.

The next planter to the west is also a smoking lounge, but those smokers have thoughtfully put a bucket by the planter for their cigarette butts.

We had time to tidy up the World Kite Museum garden at four o clock, as the temperature began to fall quickly.

It’s a shame I had not put the beach approach trimming on the work board, as I did not get the pleasure of erasing it. At least I could erase three things, leaving a short list of late winter garden check ups still to do.

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Wednesday, 14 November 2018

We had an errand before work that took us near a former job of ours, so we took ourselves on a brief tour of

Discovery Heights,

a series of entry gardens that we planted and maintained from 2005 through…I can’t quite recall when we stopped gardening there.  As these photos show, the job entails a lot of climbing up onto raised, boulder-edged beds, something that became difficult as my knee got worse.  The garden is now in the capable hands of Terran Bruinier of BeeKissed Gardening.

lower garden, south side

The middle garden:

All montbretia in the gardens were brought in with the soil (not my choice of soil, not sure where it came from).

Salal, to the right, most definitely not planted by us!

Some of “my” ceanothus still survive…

…including this large one.

When we first began this job, I asked if the community was going to be gated and was told no.  I have a preference of not working in gated neighbourhoods, but I was fully invested in the job when the gate went in.

Driving back down the hill to where the Discovery Heights entry road intersects with the 100 Loop road that goes to Cape Disappointment State Park:

lower garden, south side, am pleased at how the plants drape the rocks as planned (cotoneasters, and I think some prostrate ceanothus)

lower garden, north side, on heavy clay

Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’ pruned into balls (left)

I regretted having planted the escallonias at the front of the top tier.  Terran’s solution to their height works.

Salal…snuck in!

Rugosa roses (left) are finally outpacing the deer.

from the loop road

It is pleasing to see the garden full grown.  The first flat terrace was always a problem because of such heavy clay and a break in the irrigation line.  My camera failed to get a driveby of the back of the garden where some rhododendrons, once quite small from the Clarke Nursery going out of business one gallon sale, are now full sized.

We went on to work at

Mike’s garden.

Our task was the last of the fall tidying, along with pruning an Escallonia iveyi that was hanging out into the sidewalk area…or the area where a sidewalk would be if there were one.

My preference with escallonia is to have them thick and shrublike all the way to the ground, so that it looks like this (same escallonia, this past July).

Escallonia iveyi

However, it was now growing well over the property line and Mike wanted it pruned. Cutting it back to the line revealed a tree like rather than shrub like form.  I had to work with that, and also had to reduce the height, because that is what people generally want when they ask for a shrub to be pruned.  Given what we had to do, here are the befores and afters:

before

after

The lilac to the left is going to be completely removed…by someone else…because it is pestering a sewer line.

before

after

It is rather shocking how much had to be cut to get it back behind the railroad tie edge.  At least I managed to save a layer of foliage that will give privacy for the deck.

before

after

Poor thing!  It should fill out again quickly next year.  It is now possible to easily walk the path behind it, also, which was party blocked before the pruning.  If it had to be done, I would rather it be done by me that someone else who might have just leveled it off halfway down and left nothing but shrubs.

We left Mike’s and turned our attention to the

Ilwaco planters and street tree gardens.

I was not sure if we would get through them all.  Rain was predicted.  The sky was so dark for awhile that it felt more like dusk than midday.

The city crew (a much smaller crew than that of Long Beach) was installing the cords for the lighted crab pot holiday decorations.

Allan made quick work under the trees with The Toy (our new Stihl rechargeable trimmer).

before (the truly horrible perennial sweet pea)

after (Allan’s photos)

That darn invasive pea under one tree has swamped all the “winter interest” plants, as have the BadAsters in the other tree garden pictured above.

Here is a before with no after…

The blob of blue felicia daisy got cut way back because it looks silly.

I got distracted from taking an after photo by my thoughts about the post office garden. I’d been asked by the crew if a crab pot could go IN the garden and had said yes, if they would just avoid tramping around with their boots.  I suddenly decided we had better go to the post office and make some clear space.

before

after

We had pulled all the cosmos.  The Toy worked a treat trimming the Stipa gigantea (the tall airy grass in the center).

Back to the planters, I left a few of the healthier nasturtiums just out of curiosity about how long they will last.

We are said to be due for an extra mild “El Nino’ winter.

trailing rosemary in a planter (Allan’s photo)

That rosemary is in one of the two planters on Spruce Street, out of the First Avenue wind tunnel that damages the ones I have tried there.

With the planters done, Allan went to dump the debris while I used The Toy at the Norwood garden, two doors down from ours.

before; I scored some of those leaves (left), too.

after; Allan helps clean up in the dusk while I weeded the north bed.

before (twilight)

after

The Toy made what would have been tedious clipping into a less than five minute shear!

We just had time before dark to check up on and pull some montbretia out of the J’s back garden, leading to some happy erasure on the work board.

I am hoping for semi-staycation to begin in two days.  I am calling it semi this year because we cannot completely neglect the Shelburne and Long Beach for two and a half months.  Post frost clean up—if we get frost—will be necessary in a few locations.

I had a nice cuppa tea at home.  Only one Builders tea bag remains and I am saving it…

Allan’s photo

As we watched an amusing show on telly, I was astonished by a city street scene. I had to hit pause in amazement.

Look at that overhead tram, and all the traffic, and bridges.  I reflected on my 38 years of city life in Seattle and on how much quieter my last quarter century has been here at the beach.

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 31 August 2018

It had not taken long to get used to having Fridays off.  Now we have to shift our work week because of the Monday holiday (Labor Day).

Long Beach

First, I fretted over the dangity blang non blooming cosmos in the welcome sign.  It was a mistake to live in hope.  I had to trim them again so the sign shows.

It occurred to me that at least I could also trim some side branches so that the Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ shows better.

Next year will be better.  Could hardly be worse.

the back side (Allan’s photo)

We decided to change up the order and water the Sid Snyder beach approach planters first.

horse rides on Sid Snyder Drive

I enjoyed seeing this youngling.

furthest west planter (Allan’s photo)

After watering, we were parked by Adrift Distillery, so we took a peek inside.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo (I got to pet this nice dog.)

We checked on the Bolstad beach approach planters and garden.  The little bird house with the squirrels is gone.  I have no idea what happened there.

We split up to water the downtown planters.

Wind World Kites guy carried my bucket of water to the far planters in Fish Alley.

Thank you!

downtown

Gladiolus papilio (Allan’s photo)

Gladiolus papilio (Allan’s photo)

Mexican bush sage (Allan’s photo)

Mexican bush sage (Allan’s photo)

Allan got done first and had time to do some string trimming on the dry and dull center parking lot berm.

before

after; the berms get no supplemental water at all.

Ilwaco

I did a walkabout, checking all the planters.  It takes a long time to carefully tidy and de-chickweed each one, time Allan does not have while watering, so I need to do this every other week or so.

by the Sou’wester RV repair shop (where they work on RVs for the Sou’wester trailer court)

NW stoplight corner (We are a one stoplight town.)

by Queen La De Da’s gallery

NE stoplight corner

…where someone had broken the top of the trailing rosemary 😦

by the old Oddfellows hall

by the Doupé Building

by Ilwaco Pharmacy

Ilwaco Pharmacy

The old Doupé Building had some clean up done, and the crew found and displayed the old HARDWARE sign.  Per the local paper, the work will be done “in stages”.  We are excited to see further developments and hope they begin soon.

by empty lot, before, with lots of chickweed

After: Sometimes clean up leaves a planter looking tired.

also by empty lot

NW corner Lake Street

by Driver Licensing

I did not check closely on the planter by driver licensing because a local person who yells a lot was by the empty storefront next door yelling.

By Azure Salon

by antique shop

I love the little meadow square where a tree got taken out by a drunk driver.

Raymond Millner of The Planter Box is going to replace the tree this fall.  I am not involved, other than making connections, because I am the Gardener of Small Things.

SW corner Lake Street, where an old tavern, now empty, might become a “law enforcement training facility”—quite a change. The blue felicia daisy got too big….

Main Street by the old laundromat, now purchased to become we know not what. Seems like a laundromat was something Ilwaco sorely needs.

Main Street is a deer corridor, so the nasturtiums in the above planter got munched.

Main Street by Col Pacific Hotel. Crossing paths with Allan, watering.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Main Street, another huge felicia daisy

NW corner Eagle Street

NE corner Eagle Street. Tired golden oregano to be dug out this fall.

Eagle Street; due for a total dig out this fall.  Will put this teucrium (?) down in the curbside gardens.

boatyard corner

I went on to water the boatyard garden and do just a small bit of weeding.

Someone(s) keep pulling out the elephant garlic. 😦

I need to use more Jackman’s Blue rue. It is wonderful.

Note to self: also use more baptisia; it does not flop over in dry conditions.

must divide this helenium and put some at fire station

Someone spray painted a Stipa from behind the fence.  (The fence was spray painted, too.)

looking north

looking south

looking north

I walked home by the feral cat colony and was lucky enough to pass by just as a woman was feeding them.

So I got to see the one who looks so much like my Smoky.

could be twins…this one is so shy, or I would take him home…

I was all choked up, thinking about my Smoky, as I walked the four more blocks to home.

My darling Smoky and Calvin, how I miss them.

It had been ten months today since Smoky died (October 31, 2017).

When Allan got home, he saw one of our neighbours in the meadow behind the Nora house.

I’ve been leaving a couple of windfall apples by this corner every day.

 

 

 

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Thursday, 2 August 2018

before work…

Skooter followed me while I pulled up a piece of variegated iris for the Shelburne mini-bog garden.

I was thrilled to see my replacement rose, Ghislane de Feligonde, is blooming.

I love this rose and had quested hard for it when my previous one died.

Before leaving Ilwaco, we tidied up and weeded at the J’s across the street.

J’s, with one hydrangea behind the birdbath getting missed by the sprinkler:

Long Beach

Still no cosmos flowers at the welcome sign….

We split up to water the downtown Long Beach planters.

I found a painted rock, a rarity for me this year.

I pulled bindweed in a park

with a special rhododendron.

the meadow look

Cosmos ‘Cupcake Mix’

a nice batch of painted sage

Someone left a tip for cleaning up their ciggie butt.

But I usually just get butts (even though almost every planter has an ash tray receptacle next to it).

Some alliums have survived.

Allan’s photo

It was hard to squeeze through the crowds with hose and bucket. (Allan’s photo)

With only two planters left to water, a light rain appeared.  It has been so dry that the streets fogged up.

Allan’s photo

The rain did not last long enough to make any difference to plants.

one of the Basket Case Greenhouse baskets

We weeded and groomed in Veterans Field, which will see a crowd this weekend for the Jake the Alligatorman event.

Vet field Eryngium (Allan’s photo)

Vet field corner garden is even too messy for me. (Allan’s photo); it is not getting hit well by sprinkler water and it looks tired.

We tidied up this pocket park on our way to dump debris.

before

after: if only I had a silver santolina, because one has gone missing and its absence is notable.

We quickly tidied the Fifth Street Park gardens.

Allan’s photo

Shelburne Hotel

We watered, and I had to pull a lot of crocosmia and hops because it was getting rust and sooty mold, respectively.

To the right is the bad patch…too much shade, not enough air circulation

pulled out some crocosmia and trimmed out all the hops

I am going to transplant three small hydrangeas into that spot come fall (which will involve much digging to get rid of the hops and crocosmia).

It looks better without sooty hops leaves.

I pondered the views from the ramp to the back door of the restaurant dining room.

Joe Pye Weed

I so look forward to fall when I can do some extensive editing.

A frog has moved into the little bog garden.  Allan’s photos:

Ilwaco

Because of the Ilwaco art walk tomorrow night, when theoretically people will be strolling by the planters (although I think they mostly drive from downtown to the port), I walked the planter and street tree route checking on them all while Allan started his watering rounds.  I photographed every one except the two city hall planters that are not on my walking route; I don’t think I have done that before.

I don’t like the Art Walk signs to block part of my art, so I moved some of them to the back of the planter instead of in the middle.  Example, by the Sou’wester RV repair garage:

before

after

The worst planter for chickweed is the NW corner of the stoplight intersection.

before

after

another angle

by the former bingo hall; an old but still vigorous Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ has moved itself sideways.

 

another angle (diascia in three colors)

around the corner on Spruce Street

That sign was a traffic sight blocker so I moved it down the block to…

planter by Queen La De Da’s

Queen La De Da’s

First Ave by Doupé Building (which has sold to someone who is going to fix it up wonderfully)

another angle

by the pharmacy

by empty lot before chickweed removal

and after

by empty lot, another angle

by empty lot, further south

by Driver Licensing

by Azure. The blue felicia daisy is in an off spell and maybe the trailing rosemary takes up too much room.

by antique shop

opposite corner

Those blue felicia daisies came through the winter.  They might have gotten too big!

Missing tree still not replaced and I do not care. I love this little patch of flowers.

by Col Pacific Motel

across the street, with gladiolus that someone stuck in

by Trav’s Place Café

by Wilcox and Fliegel oil company

First and Eagle. Old golden oregano needs to come out.

view of the Ilwaco boatyard

First and Eagle. This teucrium or whatever it is needs to go somewhere else. Too vigorous!

First and Eagle

First and Eagle

I then tidied the boatyard garden, especially the south end of it, and gave it a quick watering.

watering till dusk

Allan finished his watering rounds, and we went down to Howerton Avenue at the port and hand watered the several new Eryngium giganteum and Crambe maritima in the curbside gardens.

watering by streetlight (Allan’s photo)

A ten hour day—with the reward of three days off starting tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

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