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Posts Tagged ‘Ilwaco’

Sunday, 8 October 2017

Allan and MaryBeth sail on Black Lake

To confirm I was pretty caught up on projects, I thought I should use the day to take a boat out. To make it more leisurely, I would go out on Black Lake just a mile away. But, to put some challenge into it, I invited MaryBeth, the person who sold me one of her little kayaks, one so little that it fits inside the van with room to spare. She has conquered the tippy little kayaks but had never sailed.

(Below): Here is the Black Lake Yacht Club. Don’t let the pine needles and the grass piled about fool you, nor the fact that the two white boats haven’t budged all summer. It could be a happening place! I’m appreciative that I don’t have to drag my 150-pound green boat from home.

A small retirement community.

The first item is to clean out the needles and reinstall the plugs.

The sail is only half the size of what the boat was designed for.  It makes it very stable and not too overly thrilling. The winds only reached 11.5 mph which led to a relaxing day.

A free boat several years ago, it just needed a winter’s worth of hole patching, painting, new wood…($); but it works now. I’m now the owner of a graceful boat that was saved.  

I set up the red sailboat so that I could later abandon MaryBeth to her own adventures in either boat.

First we had to row out to clear water and then south to find some ripples.

Being cranberry harvest time, the lake was down about a foot.  The McPhail cranberry farm at the north end of the lake pumps water into the cranberry bog in order to float the berries for harvesting.

MaryBeth took the controls and we drifted downwind to the southeastern tip.  There was someone fishing off every dock but Marybeth carefully avoided all their lines.

Letting out the boom.

We saw a lot of these today, who were maybe attracted to the colorful sail (and each other).

This type of sailboat can head any direction except 45 degrees left or right of a headwind. Depending on the trees, hills, and weather,  the wind speed and direction changed a lot.

We paid attention to the wind vane. Here we are angling 45 degrees into the wind.

The black streamers indicate we’re heading into the wind and about to drift backward.

We did a lot of curlicues today. When tacking upwind, and changing from one direction 90 degrees to another heading, sometimes the boat just stops. It won’t complete the turn, it drifts and won’t steer. Swinging the rudder back and forth like a Venetian gondolier sometimes moves the boat just enough, as often you’re close to shore. There’s an official nautical name somewhere but the curlicue can get you going again. The wind pushes the sail, the boat speeds up, the rudder starts working again. The boat can complete the turn and you’re off again on another tack.

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A little extra distance but hey, this isn’t a race.

 

The breeze was light and we successfully tacked nearly all the way back to the north end.

The captain’s eyes are on everything

With the wind nearly gone I started rowing. Soon I heard voices and looked over my shoulder. We were all up in this fisherman’s business. Afterwards, we beached, folded up the sail and continued by oar.

We’re the only two boats on the lake and who do I bother?

Another fisherman, minding its own business, was near the northern shore. My telephoto got a few shots of this snowy egret before my splashing oars caused it to fly off.

patient and quiet

I did not get good photos of the snowy egret. However, a local wildlife photographer recently captured these beautiful images of the Black Lake egrets and has kindly allowed us to share them here.

photo by Jane Winckler Webb

photo by Jane Winckler Webb

photo by Jane Winckler Webb

photo by Jane Winckler Webb

We rowed back through the lily pads to shore. After we failed to wrestle the boat up the bank, MaryBeth came up with the idea to use the trailer hitch to help. It only snapped one rope but we succeeded in pulling it out. Next time I’ll bring a winch. 

Solo sail, eh? Next time. She can do it now or rent a sailboat on her own. An intriguing rental place is on Seattle’s Lake Washington. It rents the smaller affordable dinghies and kayaks which I hope to visit someday (Sail Sand Point). Portland has a sailing club and school for the bigger (way over 150  lbs.) sailboats at the Island Sailing Club.

This was plenty fun and totally relaxing for both of us.

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The stats

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Saturday, 1 July 2017

We took advantage of much of what our town had to offer today.  Earlier in the week, while weeding the port gardens to get them spiffing for today’s events, I had had that feeling of being smitten with love for this little town.  The first Saturday in July is always special here, with probably the biggest Saturday market of the year followed by a fireworks extravaganza at the port in the evening.

Ilwaco Saturday Market

Knowing that the Pink Poppy Bakery booth would be at the market today is part of what drew us down there.  (Baker Maddy is pregnant and therefore not doing every week of market this summer.)

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in one of our port gardens (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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The lines were long at the food booths.

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plants for sale

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at one of the plant booths

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the cutest booth of all

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port office garden

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tied as a result of recent windstorm

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Purly Shell Fiber Arts spinning demonstration

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Frilly lamps at Suzy Q’s Magical Glass

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Salt Hotel and Pub

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booths with a view

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Charter fishing

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fresh produce

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Northwest Naturals

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Northwest Naturals

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another garden booth

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Blue Coast Farm

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another booth featuring plants.

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Pink Poppy: I acquired two slices of the marble chocolate cake, second from left.

As I walked home, I sadly contemplated the really bad pruning in the Lost Garden.

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sad

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Why do inexperienced pruners feel they just have to hack at shrubs and trees?

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I paused next door to pet Old Man Rudder.

At home, I fortified myself with a slice of Maddy’s pound cake in order to accomplish an afternoon gardening  project.  But that’s all there is about gardening in this post.  We’re going to jump straight to 8 PM and the evening’s events.

Fireworks at the Port of Ilwaco

The evening’s festivities started with a special bonus: a performance of renowned Astoria band Holiday Friends in the courtyard at Salt Hotel.

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Holiday Friends.  They were good.

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I was pleased to see books at the table next to me.

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Allan’s photo, featuring our curbside garden

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appreciative audience

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Salt Pub’s kitchen pass shows that the restaurant was busy.

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I popped into Time Enough Books…

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…to say hi to owner Karla and to store mascot Scout.

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in Time Enough Books

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port office garden

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Don Nisbett Art Gallery

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Our dear friends Jenna and Don

Darling Jenna made both me and Allan delicious tacos, saving us from standing in line at the popular food booths that had stayed on after Saturday market.

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Thank you, Jenna!

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classic fairway treat

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a growing crowd as dusk settles in

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Smoked Salmon Chowder (Allan’s photo)

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This chowder is delicious (Allan’s photo)

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good accessorizing

Allan walked out on the docks and gleaned some lovely photos of evening at the marina.

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Aallotar, built in 1926 or 7

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I found my favourite spot for taking fireworks photos, one of the bridges to the docks.

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view of the marina

High tide made the reflections especially good this year.

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Allan, more agile and adventurous and unlikely to fall off the dock in the dark, ranged from the port office deck to the docks to get his photos.

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after racing down the stairs from the deck (which was not open to the public) on the way to the docks

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the grand finale

After the fireworks comes the traffic jam…

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traffic backed with personal fireworks up on the hill

We are among the lucky ones because we only have to walk three blocks to get home.

Tomorrow: back to the usual subject with our gardening weekend.

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I’m still playing catchup with some two day posts while I try to get to only five days behind instead of fifteen.

Thursday, 21 July 2016

lilies in our volunteer garden at the post office

lilies in our volunteer garden at the post office

I planted the three little gazanias.

I planted the three little gazanias.

Rudbeckia that Our Kathleen donated last year.

Rudbeckia that Our Kathleen donated last year.

I asked Allan to photograph the Basket Case hanging baskets across the street in front of the museum (because they were on his side of the van).

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

Mike’s Garden

I had big plans to prune (or rather…have Allan prune) some of the climbing rose out of Mayor Mike’s beach pine today.  We ran out of time, though, because a couple of other jobs had suddenly joined the schedule.

NEXT week...I hope...we will thin out the rambling rose.

NEXT week…I hope…we will thin out the rambling rose.

I had big plans to get Long Beach AND Ilwaco and the Port of Ilwaco gardens done today and have Friday through Monday off.  My first thought upon waking had been “Tomorrow off!”.  Two things happened to change that when I checked my email and Facebook.  1.  I found out about an art show that would take place in Coulter Park…which was a mess.  2. I found out for sure that the sale of Jo’s house had fallen through, and because we like Jo and Bob so much, I offered to keep working there after all, deadheading and grooming once a week while it is for sale…including going there today to check on the watering.

The Depot Restaurant

While we were doing our weekly watering and deadheading, a group of garden admirers came by to chat.  The daughter was studying zoo horticulture (including what not to feed to the animals), which made for an interesting and informative conversation on all sides.  The dierama (angel’s fishing rod) was a big hit.

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north side of dining deck

north side of dining deck

lilies and helenium

lilies and helenium

more lilies

more lilies

lots of deadheads on the cosmos now (Allan's photo)

lots of deadheads on the cosmos now (Allan’s photos)

after deadheading

after deadheading

looking south

looking south

the front with barrels and window boxes by Nancy Aust of The Basket Case

the front with barrels and window boxes by Nancy Aust of The Basket Case

Long Beach

the weekly grooming of the welcome sign

the weekly grooming of the welcome sign

Cosmos 'Happy Ring' reseeded from last year

Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ reseeded from last year

one weird flower on the echibeckia

one weird flower on the echibeckia

both sides

both sides

and the back

and the back

I decided we had better check on the kite museum garden.

It is doing well this year!

It is doing well this year!

Gift shop manager Patty has been keeping it watered and deadheading the cosmos, thus the prolific blooms.

Gift shop manager Patty has been keeping it watered and deadheading the cosmos, thus the prolific blooms.

Jo’s Garden

Here we were again at Jo’s garden, making it look fresh and nice for the realtor who would meet with Jo and Bob tomorrow.

after deadheading some spent gladiolas

after deadheading some spent gladiolas

I hope a gardener buys this place.

I hope a gardener buys this place.

the center courtyard

the center courtyard

Here is the real estate listing for this dream house and garden.

back to Long Beach

We started in Long Beach town again by working together to groom the City Hall and Veterans Field gardens.

poor li'l Crimson Pygmy barberry got smashed.

poor li’l Crimson Pygmy barberry had gotten smashed.

It used to look nice like the others.

It used to look nice like this one.

Someone had left a rock in the flag pavilion, we think in memory of a loved one. (Allan's photo)

Someone had left a rock in the flag pavilion, we think in memory of a loved one. (Allan’s photo)

Then Allan and I parted ways.  While I watered all the planters, Allan tackled Coulter Park.  It had not been done for awhile, and Friday and Saturday (July 22-23), the Peninsula Art Association would be having an art sale in the old train depot building there.  It took Allan three or four hours to undo the tangles of bindweed and salmonberry which is creeping under the fence from the north.  I’ve gotten so fed up with the situation, and especially with clipping salmonberry out from the canes of a row of thorny roses, that I’ve somewhat given up.  Fortunately, Allan is made of sterner stuff.

before and after

before and after

the horror of bindweed

the horror of bindweed

before

before

after

after

the painful rose nightmare...rose and salmonberry roots intermingled, with plenty of thorns on both.

the painful rose nightmare…rose and salmonberry roots intermingled, with plenty of thorns on both, topped with bindweed and birdsfoot trefoil

after

after (the salmonberry roots are still all entwined with the roses; you can see salmonberry taller than the fence, behind)

looks nice for the art show patrons

looks nice for the art show patrons.  A monster salmonberry looms on the other side.

Meanwhile, I watered planters and did a bit of deadheading in Fifth Street Park.

Sanguisorba in Fifth Street Park

Sanguisorba in Fifth Street Park

white tigridia

white tigridia

I collect snails from the planters and, because I don’t like to kill them, I deposit them in a couple of empty lots along my route.  There was an odd moment, when I saw this one trying to leave the bucket, that I felt for one second like it was my pet, like a dog or a cat.

a strange moment indeed

a strange moment indeed

sweet pea success in one of the planters (with a tower that holds a business name sign)

sweet pea success in one of the planters (with a tower that holds a business name sign)

edging carpet of golden thyme

edging carpet of golden thyme

pizazz in miniature

pizazz in miniature

parsley

parsley

agastache and parsley

agastache and parsley

Fun Rides

Fun Rides

Not only do I like the new paint job on Fun Rides, but the new owners are playing much better carousel music.  Instead of the same carny tune over and over, I’ve heard carnivalized versions of YMCA, Heart of Glass, and several more pop/disco songs that make me happy.

Allan got done with Coulter Park in time to water four of the planters.

a stunning cosmos (Allan's photo)

a stunning cosmos…like ‘Seashells’ but fluffier.   (Allan’s photo)

We quite simply could not get to Ilwaco, sadly, so our Friday off slipped through our fingers.  I did not feel we could have gotten done even had we worked a ten hour day.  For awhile, I felt rather glum, then reminded myself that an all Ilwaco day is not such a hard thing.

Friday, 22 July 2016

I wanted to stay home with my Smokey.

I wanted to stay home with my Smokey.

post office garden

post office garden

Port of Ilwaco

Because some rain had fallen overnight, I deluded myself into thinking we wouldn’t have to water.  I was wrong.  We realized immediately upon arrival at the boatyard that the garden had not been moistened enough by the light rain.  I weeded while Allan watered.

a boat going out

a boat going out

I overheard the boat owners saying it was going to be windy this weekend.  I hoped that just meant out on the water.  One said to a friend that the boat was “so smooth you could do brain surgery while crossing the bar.”

looks like bad invasive purple loosestrife has blown in from somewhere, down where I can't get at it.

looks like bad invasive purple loosestrife has blown in from somewhere, down where I can’t get at it.

about 1/5 of the boatyard garden, looking south

about 1/5 of the boatyard garden, looking south

sweet pea success

sweet pea success

I then hoped we would not have to water the Howerton Ave. curbside gardens.  So wrong.  We ended up watering almost all of them.

a little bird in the garden at Time Enough Books

a little bird in the garden at Time Enough Books

watering the most parched west end garden bed

watering the most parched west end garden bed

Gaura 'Whirling Butterfly' (Allan's photo)

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterfly’ (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium (sea holly) (Allan's photo)

Eryngium (sea holly) (Allan’s photo)

grateful plants (Allan's photo)

grateful plants (Allan’s photo)

snaking hoses a long way from the dock (Allan's photo)

snaking hoses a long way from the dock (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' is fading to tan (Allan's photo)

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ is fading to tan (Allan’s photo)

Pokemon go players (Allan's photo)

Pokemon Go players (Allan’s photo)

still clear water today

still clear water today

a different and prettier bindweed on the bank of the marina

a different and prettier bindweed on the bank of the marina

Memorial plaques are set into the lawn at the marina. (Allan's photo)

Memorial plaques are set into the lawn at the marina. (Allan’s photo)

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Allan found the obituary of the father of the family, whose plaque is on the right.  Let’s take a moment to remember these local fishing folk.  We are always aware here that the commercial fisherfolk are a brave and hardy clan.

A light mist for about ten minutes was not enough to let us stop watering.  The water is still not on at the former Wade Gallery garden bed (which we had planted up all nice for the previous owners) so we are still bucket watering it (or rather, Allan is).

before the bucket watering, which is never enough: Even the Eryngium is suffering from lack of water.

before the bucket watering, which is never enough: Even the Eryngium is suffering from lack of water.

Penstemon longing for a good dose of hose water.

Penstemon longing for a good dose of hose water.  So frustrating.

I walked the whole length of Howerton weeding the beds.

the "drive over garden"

the “drive over garden” shows the difference when we can reach a garden with hose water.

blue catananche at the east end

blue catananche at the east end

Both Allan and I had noticed that 'Sapphire Blue' is going tan.

Both Allan and I had noticed that ‘Sapphire Blue’ is going tan.

Allan finished the workday by watering the Ilwaco street trees and planters with the water trailer while I went home and watered our own garden.  Then, our weekly meeting of the North Beach Garden Gang.  (It had been delayed one day because of a Melissa excursion to Portland on Thursday.)  We had time on the way to visit the last half an hour of the PAA art show and chat with our friend Bayside Debbie.

Debbie and her really cool jewelry

Debbie and her really cool jewelry

The Cove Restaurant

sedums in Sondra's garden outside (Allan's photo)

sedums in Sondra’s garden outside (Allan’s photo)

caesar salad (Allan's photo)

caesar salad (Allan’s photo)

ahi tuna

ahi tuna

prime rib (a Friday night offering) for Dave and Mel (Allan's photo)

prime rib (a Friday night offering) for Dave and Mel (Allan’s photo)

and a very chocolatey dessert (Allan's photo)

and a very chocolatey dessert (Allan’s photo)

lemon mascarpone cheesecake, and our dear server Lynn treated us to our desserts.

lemon mascarpone cheesecake, and our dear server Lynn treated us to our desserts.

At last we had come to our three day rather than four day weekend, with plans for boating, gardening, and some time touring one of our favourite local gardens with friends.


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 73):

July 21: 10:30-5:00! COOLER  Picked berries, barely enough for one breakfast.  I planned to mulch and cage the tomatoes but ended up weeding, deadheading, and watering the flower beds in upper driveway and tam area.  I pulled gobs of the perennial geranium plants that are everywhere.  Did some weeding in front “ditch” but didn’t get done so I quit working at 5:00.

July 22:  Store and errands day.  Paid electric bill, Tim’s, Payless and Stock Market.  Which is being redone by new owners (QFC) so it’s very difficult finding items.

1998 (age 74):

July 21:  I put out all my quart mayo jars to recycle.  I’ll keep all the pints.  I can use mayo pints for tomatoes.  I called Foremost Insurance Co.  They will send an agent to check damage in bathroom floor—in 3 or 4 days.  [She was getting her home ready to sell so she could move to Long Beach.]

July 22:  TOO HOT  90 degrees.  The agent called at 9:00 AM.  She will come tomorrow at 1:00.  I worked all day going over my house plants.  I repotted several, threw some out, and put the plants back in the Floralight.  I picked berries at 5:30 still hot—not many because of the heat.  I watered from 7:00 to 9:00—then showered and quit for the day.

 

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 Tuesday, 5 July 2016

apples at home (Allan's photo)

apples at home (Allan’s photo) and one scabby pear

Mike’s Garden

A few blocks east is the mayor’s garden, which we tidy up every couple of weeks.  Today:

from across the street

from across the street

from the corner

from the corner

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Mike's Escallonia iveyi

Mike’s Escallonia iveyi

I am pretty sure that this escallonia is grown from a cutting of the Escallonia iveyi at the Anchorage Cottages (originally from Heronswood Nursery, because the Anchorage was owned at one time by Dan Hinkley’s husband’s sister).  In 2003, Carol Jones of The Elves Did It Gardening worked with me there and took some cuttings. Later, she designed and installed Mayor Mike’s beautiful garden.  The ironic thing is that my own garden lacks this stunning pure white escallonia.  I tried cuttings last year; maybe some are out there and not big enough to bloom yet.

the fruit of the native wild cucumber vine

the fruit of the native wild cucumber vine in Mike’s shaded back garden.

Long Beach

We watered and groomed all the main street planters and the street tree pocket gardens.

by Lewis and Clark Square. The man with a red shirt (left) is reading his way along plaques that describe Lewis and Clark's journey.

by Lewis and Clark Square. The man with a red shirt (left) is reading his way along plaques that describe Lewis and Clark’s journey.

Big planter in L&C Square. That is Cotoneaster 'Coral Beauty' on the edge, planted 16 years ago or more. It got sort of made fun of in the lecture at Hardy Plant weekend, about new and much improved cotoneasters. I still rather like this one.

Big planter in L&C Square. That is Cotoneaster ‘Coral Beauty’ on the edge, planted 16 years ago or more. It got sort of made fun of in the lecture about new and improved cotoneasters at Hardy Plant weekend. I still rather like this one although I do regret planting something so big…I just wanted to keep people from sitting on the planter.

Public gardening: I had my bucket on this bench, and a jacket someone had left, and was just hooking up the hose when a woman came and shoved the bucket and jacket aside and lit up a cigarette. I did, softly and kindly (really!), get her to move to the planter nearby that I had already watered. (!!!)

Public gardening: I had my bucket on this bench, and a jacket someone had left, and was just hooking up the hose when a woman came and shoved the bucket and jacket aside and plopped down and lit up a cigarette. I did, softly and kindly (really!), get her to move to the planter nearby that I had already watered. (!!!) It was not her jacket.

One of my painted sage (late to bloom this year) was pulled totally out of the soil. It had happened so recently that it had not wilted at all and I think i saved it. Note to self: Geranium 'Rozanne' here next year.

One of my painted sage (late to bloom this year) was pulled totally out of the soil. It had happened so recently that it had not wilted at all and I think I saved it. Note to self: Geranium ‘Rozanne’ here next year.

Town was still busy.

Town was still busy.

On the busiest weekends, the stoplights are turned off to avoid traffic jams, so pedestrians cross every which way.

On the busiest weekends, the stoplights are turned off to avoid traffic jams, so pedestrians cross every which way.

lambs ears, and the new little round silver plant whose name I have forgotten, and santolina

three silvers: lambs ears, and the new little round silver plant whose name I have forgotten, and santolina

I encountered a young man with a guitar lounging supine on the bench and using a clump of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ as a pillow while smoking a cigarette.  I asked him to get up.  He did not.  I told him to move.  He did not.  I threatened to water him.  No motion.  I said I might call the police as he was smoking illegally close to a shop doorway.  Finally he moved.  By then it was funny and we both laughed.  I told him that public gardening can be rewarding but sometimes works my last nerve.  He said “Sorry in advance for my language, but I am sorry for being such a dick.”

sedums used as pillow

sedums used as pillow; plaque goes back to long gone planter volunteer days

Later the same guy told Allan “You’re using a LOT of water!” while Allan was watering the tree.  Allan felt it was in a reproving tone.

Just the Eryngium (Allan's photo)

 Eryngium in street tree garden (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' in Fifth Street Park

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in Fifth Street Park

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Bees love it.

Busy town: Fifth Street Park (Allan's photo)

Busy town: Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

Full sidewalks make navigating tricky with hose and bucket. (Allan's photo)

Full sidewalks make navigating tricky with hose and bucket. (Allan’s photo)

When open, these lilies colour coordinate with the Benson's sign.

When open, these lilies colour coordinate with the Benson’s sign.

Carousel

Carousel

deadheading and watering...under the very big hanging basket

deadheading and watering…under the very big hanging basket

lavender that looks good on just one side. (The back is bare and woody). Allan's photo

lavender that looks good on just one side. (The back is bare and woody). Allan’s photo

Eryngium variifolium under a street tree (Allan's photo)

Eryngium variifolium under a street tree.  I love them all. (Allan’s photo)

two dogs. (Allan's photo)

two dogs. (Allan’s photo)

Hardy fuchsia and agastache in my favourite planter by Dennis Co. (Allan's photo)

Hardy fuchsia and Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ in my favourite planter by Dennis Co. (Allan’s photo)

This pleases my fannish heart (and shows how crowded the sidewalks were). (Allan's photo)

This pleases my fannish heart (and shows how crowded the sidewalks were). (Allan’s photo)

Fish Alley (Allan's photo)

Fish Alley (Allan’s photo)

Later, Fifth Street Park was quieter. (Allan's photo)

Later, Fifth Street Park was quieter. (Allan’s photo)

We worked on the center berm. Eventually we will be able to cross it off the work list! It is the only project on the list right now.

We worked on the center berm. Eventually we will be able to cross it off the work list! It is the only project on the list right now.

Cries of WHEEEE from the little fish rides nearby.

Cries of WHEEEE from the little fish rides nearby.

A local businessman who owns several well run local businesses has bought the rides and they will soon be refurbished, we hear.

Center berm is SO boring and may end up just getting string trimmer treatment.

Center berm is SO boring and may end up just getting string trimmer treatment.

Allan's photos: before

Allan’s photos: before (most of this was the rather pretty annual Briza media (quaking grass) that has now gone dry.

after: quick strimmer solution

after: quick strimmer solution for hardpacked miserable area

I should give up and plant more rugosas in the bare areas. Giving up because i did not want a monoculture of roses.

I should give up and plant more rugosas in the bare areas. Giving up because i did not want a monoculture of roses.  This is one place I will leave salal.

Stipa gigantea on a prettier berm (Allan's photo)

Stipa gigantea on a prettier berm (Allan’s photo)

Ilwaco

I had every intention of weeding at the Ilwaco boatyard garden while Allan watered the Ilwaco planters.  And then I simply could not.  I felt guilty till I realized that Allan would be done working quicker if he did not have to drop off the debris trailer at the boatyard, then pick up the water trailer, then take the water trailer home and come retrieve the debris trailer.  So I went home and worked on the garden tour blog posts and Allan took all the rest of these photos:

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taken while filling the water tank at the boatyard

taken while filling the water tank at the boatyard

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sweet peas on boatyard fence

sweet peas on boatyard fence

another break in the hose

another break in the hose

calendula flowers and seeds

calendula flowers and seeds

This nasturtium grows outside of our dear friend Jenna's Queen La De Da studio so gets extra water from her.

This nasturtium grows outside of our dear friend Jenna’s Queen La De Da studio so gets extra water from her.

 

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Tuesday, 24 May 2016

in our garden before work (Allan's photo)

in our garden before work, one of the chickadees that has made a home in the “motherboard birdhouse”  (Allan’s photo)

I do like a day spent all in Ilwaco.  With work never more than a few blocks from home, it feels the most comfortable of all work environments.  These all Ilwaco days are rare because, in order to not shock the budget, I do refrain from achieving complete perfection in the public gardens except for before the big holidays and events: Children’s Parade and Blessing of the Fleet day, Memorial Day, July 4th weekend, Tuna Classic, Slow Drag, Blues and Seafood, and so on.  This means that about once a month in gardening season I get to indulge in an all Ilwaco day.

We began by weeding gardens along Howerton Avenue.

looking west from Elizabeth Avenue

looking west from Elizabeth Avenue, before

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

much deadheading of sea thrift awaits...

much deadheading of sea thrift awaits…

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

determined California poppies popping up in the east parking lot

A few determined California poppies are popping up in the east parking lot.

The weedkiller applied in early spring to  the grassy parking lot areas (not by us, of course) had no lasting effect.  I rather rejoice in that.

The weedkiller applied in early spring to the grassy parking lot areas (not by us, of course) had no lasting effect. I rather rejoice in that.

after weeding and deadheading

after weeding and deadheading

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

debris, water for any thirsty plant, and the marina in the background

debris, water for any thirsty plant, and the marina in the background

lavender and Nassella tenuissima

lavender and Nassella tenuissima

We seem to have a lot of white rose campion this year, very nice.

We seem to have a lot of white rose campion this year, very nice. (backed with dog daisies that just appear on their own)

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' on north sides of the light pole.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ on north sides of the light pole.

By the old Wade Gallery (now owned by Fort George Brewery who have given us watering permission, bless them), I reflected that the soil needs mulching this fall.

Even the Agastaches need better soil

Even the Agastaches crave better soil.

I do so long to pull the fabric out of this bed.  Rock mulch would have worked better than bark.

I do so long to pull the fabric out of this old bed. Rock mulch would have worked better than bark.  The adjacent business does the escallonia pruning.

At the Craft 3 bank building, we did some pruning for sightlines.

Allan's photos, before

Allan’s photos, before

and after

and after

I finally made the decision to take a pair of wax myrtles to the ground.  They have been pruned harshly in the past (not by us) and looked all stumpy but with fresh new growth at the base.

before

before

making the decision

making the decision

making a further decision to get radical

making a further decision to get radical

after

after

Pretty shocking, but we did the same thing to a myrtle just one garden west, and it has come back nicely and is easy to keep low and shapely.

Here is the result we hope for.

Here is the result we hope for.

No regrets; my mission was clear sightlines while pulling out of that parking lot.

No regrets; my mission was clear sight lines to the west while pulling out of that parking lot.

My favourite garden bed is still the same as last year: the one with the clipped wax myrtle.  Allan took some photos of it at my request:

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pink California poppies

lavender

lavender

We worked our way west and when we got to the port office curbside garden, I went to the south side of the building to check on the little garden there.

port office garden with baskets from Basket Case Greenhouse

port office garden with baskets from Basket Case Greenhouse

a lovely tall allium

a lovely tall allium

But wait, what's this? FINGER BLIGHT!

But wait, what’s this? FINGER BLIGHT!

Each allium has just one flower per year, a flower that will dry and look grand on the stem all summer long.  Nancy and April in the port office were so mad when they saw that the one above had been picked that they made a sign.

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back to Howerton Ave: Port Office garden looking east

back to Howerton Ave: Port Office garden looking east

I also learned that one of the two businesses that wouldn’t let us use their hose for the curbside bed is gone.  I hope the new business going into its place, which happens to be a marijuana shop (so I hear), will be friendly enough toward plants to be generous with a splash of water during the dry season.

new business

new business

I would be surprised if they were not kind to plant life.  Fortunately, it has been raining enough lately that I don’t have to worry about that at the moment.

westernmost Howerton bed (Allan's photo)

westernmost Howerton bed (Allan’s photo)

a weed and an ornamental grass that died from lack of water last year

a weed (not “weed”) and an ornamental grass that died from lack of water last year

finished with our Howerton curbside weeding (Allan's photo)

finished with our Howerton curbside weeding (Allan’s photo); in the very west end only the most drought tolerant survived last summer.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The dog daisy is actually a weed.  I choose my battles to be kind to the budget.  (Allan's photo)

The dog daisy is actually a weed. I choose my battles to be kind to the budget. (Allan’s photo)

 

After weeding the cursbide gardens, Allan left me at the boatyard and went off to water Ilwaco planters and street trees with the water trailer.  As I pulled horsetail and bindweed, I reflected after awhile that he was taking a terribly long time.  He returned at almost sunset with the dire news that the water pump had stopped working, necessitating watering with just gravity feed.  Eventually, that had taken too long so he left me again to dump debris and then finish the last few planters with hand-lugged buckets, the old way.  I kept weeding even though I was longing to stop.

bucket watering the last few planters (Allan's photos)

bucket watering the last few planters (Allan’s photos)

boatyard at twilight

boatyard at twilight

I hadn’t gotten the bed on the south side of the gate weeded.  It has so much less horsetail and bindweed that I said it would just have to do for the Memorial Day weekend. We were out of time for this project.

boatyard looking south

boatyard looking south from midway along

twilight poppies and ceanothus

twilight poppies and ceanothus

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' (Allan's photo)

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Very last task:  At my request, Allan shifted one of our polite Do Not Pick signs to hang right over the plant that gets picked the most.  Or rather, people try to pick it, but the stem is tough and often the flower just gets twisted and bent over, and then sometimes the would-be pickers return with clippers.

Echinops ritro (blue globe thistle), a prime finger blight target

Echinops ritro (blue globe thistle), a prime finger blight target

While he was zip tying the sign onto the fence, a fellow from the Harvey O chatted with us and admired the gardens.  He imparted the interesting information that Harvey O is an old boat with a lot of history, can be seen in a video at the local museum, and used to be docked in Juneau, Alaska.

The Harvey O

The Harvey O

I wrote a couple of blog posts about the boatyard in my Ilwaco blog, reflecting in one that boats are more often named for women than for men.

The day had turned out to be longer than I’d expected (9.5 hours), and it was a little frustrating to not get the whole boatyard weeded.  It was no doubt more frustrating for Allan who spent another hour after dark working on the pump, and satisfying that he managed to fix it.

He says it was corroded electrical parts.

He says it was corroded electrical parts.

Meanwhile in Scotland…(yesterday)

I forgot to add this yesterday:  On our way home from work I read the Tootlepedal blog, after having been advised by Mr T. in a comment on my blog that I might want to be sitting down while reading it.  I was sitting, in the van, and a good thing, because there were Garden Tour Nancy and her spouse, Phil, at Mr and Mrs T’s garden.  Even though I knew they were visiting Scotland, and that Nancy is a daily reader of that excellent blog, it had never occurred to me they might visit Langholm.  (I probably would have been too shy.)  Today via email, Nancy sent me these photos:

Nancy (center) with the Tootlepedals

Nancy (center) with the Tootlepedals

Nancy with Mrs T

Nancy with Mrs T

You can read all about it from Mr Tootlepedal’s point of view here.

I usually do not envy travel.  I have to admit I felt a stab of it, not initially, but later when I thought more about it!  I was comforted by Mr T’s own comment that due to the distance and his dislike of flying, he would be unlikely to take them up on the invitation to come to the peninsula garden tour.  (I would love if they did visit.  His comment made me feel less alone in my disinclination to travel long distances; financial conditions are another reason, of course.) From reading his blog every day, I sometimes almost feel like I am standing in Mrs. T’s garden anyway.


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 73):

May 24:  After going to the store, I worked outside.  I planted Freesia by the Hydrangea; caladiums in a container.  In the front of the tam area [formerly juniper tams, now flowers, by the road], I planted 100+ anemones, Pulmonarias, and the new mums, also the yellow daylilies (Stella D’Oro) from Raintree last year.  I came in at 5:00 shaking from exhaustion.

 

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One day early:

Saturday, 30 April 2016

Ilwaco’s Annual Children’s Parade

Allan headed downtown (a few blocks west) to photograph the parade, while I walked to the port because I was not sure I could keep up with even the smallest children for the entire parade route.  I picked a big bouquet with some of the last tulips and some of the first Siberian iris and delivered it to Salt Hotel, and took a photo of it that did not work out because I accidentally had the camera on time delay.  Good thing I figured that out before the parade.

Allan’s photos:

Allan’s photos were the first in sequence of the parade.  It was fortunate that I did not see some of them till I got home later, as they made me fume:

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A sign had been nailed BACK onto the tree.

Various butts on planters:

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Note the ‘Baby Moon’ narcissi getting crushed by the human posterior.  I had been so happy that those narcissi were still blooming for the parade.

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OUCH

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YOUNG woman with at least two big fancy cameras, right on top of new plants.

Below: Why did these wheels just have to be placed into the perfectly weeded pocket garden?  Allan did not see this one until he looked at the full photo later on.  I am being kind enough to conceal the full shots of the people.

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WHY?

More on this topic at the end of this post.

Some of Allan’s more pleasing photos:

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Astoria Regatta float with model of the Astoria bridge and the beloved Waterfront Trolley.  Well done!

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passing by the boatyard garden, with Ilwaco Volunteer Fire Department trucks

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by the boatyard garden

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These folks were showing appreciation by photographing poppies.

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I love these people!

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cars following the parade on Howerton

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crowds of people

my photos:

Because I knew nothing of the planter sitters, I had a pleasant time photographing the parade after it had turned the corner from First Avenue to Howerton.  People were respecting the curbside gardens and the only near plant casualty was when I stopped a large labradoodle from sitting on a just about to bloom penstemon.

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Salt Hotel curbside garden

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west end of Howerton Avenue

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Peninsula Beginning Band

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super power!

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Having Salt Hotel and Pub has so enhanced the port this past year.

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Ceanothus by Time Enough Books

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The charming children’s parade has long gaps, and some paraders are simply parents walking with their little ones.

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Clowns kind of scare me.

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The Wishkah Loggers marching band from Wishkah, Washington

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Fire Chief Tommy

You can see every parade photo here on the Discover Ilwaco Facebook page.

Saturday Market

Allan and I did not find each other till after we had each taken photos of the opening day of the Saturday Market for Discover Ilwaco.  Here are my favourites of the day:

my photos:

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Northwest Naturals

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Northwest Naturals

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in his guardian’s shadow

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Blue Collar Eats

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plants for sale

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I’d like a dog just like this one.

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Jacob at Pink Poppy Bakery with sprouts; I got a lime bundt cake.

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more plants

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new plant vendor, will be mostly cut flowers later in the season

Allan’s photos

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after the parade

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Blackberry Bog Farm

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That’s our Mayor (and garden client) Mike handing out parade awards.

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South Pacific County Humane Society Raffle Booth

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Blessing of the Fleet

Every first Saturday in May is the Blessing of the Fleet ceremony, offering free boat rides on the charter boat fleet.  I always think I might go…and never do.  I thought..maybe this year…till I saw how low the tide was and how steep the ramps to the docks.

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I was hobbling with a cane today, and there was no way I could get down that grated metal ramp with any dignity or safety.

I also thought I would find it hard to get on and off the boats, and that would be embarrassing.  If only my hair would turn grey, I would feel less embarrassed about asking for help.

Allan went down to the docks and got some photos of the boats going out.  He did go out a few years ago.  All the boats proceed to the Columbia River bar, where the Coast Guard helicopter circles and drops a wreath and flowers are strewn on the water in memory of lost seafarers.

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people watching from the condor statue

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the market from the dock

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boats departing

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Our friend Butch piloting his boat, the CoHo King

Our friend Wendy did go out on one of the boats and took these excellent photos:

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photo by Wendy Murry

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photo by Wendy Murry

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photo by Wendy Murry

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photo by Wendy Murry; her daughter with a flower to throw onto the water

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photo by Wendy Murry

planter thoughts

When I got home and saw Allan’s photos of people’s posteriors parked on the planters, I felt disheartened and lost my drive to go outside and weed.  (A cold wind was another good reason to stay in.)  So, of course, I posted about it on Facebook.  Among ideas about planting prickly pear cactus or putting sharp things in the planters came a gentler idea that perhaps there could be some sort of planter design or edging that would deter sitters without harming them.  The city probably has no budget to re-fit the planters, though.  I regret having put new plants in BEFORE the parade.  I know better than to do so in Long Beach before tomorrow’s much bigger parade.

My friend Beth Sheresh (she who officiated Allan’s and my wedding in 2005) shared this essay that she wrote.  I like it so much that I think I will eventually create a permanent blog page around it:

Public Plants Public Service Announcement  by Beth Sheresh

General PSA about flowers and other plants in public places.

Flowers planted along city streets sure are beautiful, aren’t they? Makes you want to pick one or two to take home. I mean, there are a bunch, who would notice?

Please don’t.

Those flowers represent a lot of time and money, much of which may be volunteered and.or donated.

Each planter or bed has to be planted, watered, pruned, weeded, watered, cleaned out (why do people throw trash in planters?), weeded, watered, deadheaded, replanted because it’s late July and the early plants are bloomed out. This cycle can happen several times a year, depending on the plantings. It’s essentially never-ending.

It’s also costly, and not just in terms of the time represented by the work I just talked about. Plants are expensive and have a high attrition rate, even without people swiping a bloom or two.

Then there are the people who ignore the work and smash plants. Planters are not benches, nor are they designed to hold your packages while you chat with a friend.

And while I have you here, trees don’t like nails, so please don’t use them as posts for hanging flyers.

Short version: Please be nice to public/city plants. Someone worked hard to make them pretty for you to enjoy *looking* at.

Thank you, Beth!  I particularly like that she understands the repetitiveness of weeding, watering, and deadheading.

You can read more by Beth Sheresh on her Kitchenmage blog.

Tomorrow, I’ll be publishing my mother’s garden diaries for April, illustrated, including her April 30th entry.  Meanwhile,  I hope to enjoy two peaceful and productive days at home.

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Tuesday, 19 April 2016

Much as I wanted another day off to keep weeding at home, we needed to work or we’d fall behind…especially since I had garden touring plans for Thursday.

Mike’s garden

We began our work day pulling little weeds and deadheading narcissi and tulips at Mayor Mike’s garden.

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Mike’s ornamental cherry in bloom

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me and Mike admiring

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Pieris and flowering cherry (Allan’s photo)

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Tulips ‘Green Star’, ‘Greenland’, and ‘Virichic’

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Tulip ‘Green Wave’

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Tulip ‘Green Wave’ is my favourite tulip of all.

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Tulip ‘White Parrot’

Just as I pruned back the hardy fuchsia so that the parrot tulips and the Scrophularia variegata would show, my lower back went SPROING.  Usually I can count on my back being strong.  The spasming out of alignment led to some unpleasant moments over the next two days.  However, work must go on and it’s not as bad as the slipped discs and other back ills that some friends have had.

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Tulip ‘White Parrot’

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I suppose we should prune the boxwoods.  I wish they would grow enough to blend together.

Ilwaco

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our volunteer garden at the post office

We did some post office weeding and I heard that there is a new postmaster.  I hope he like an exuberant flower garden and does not prefer lawn or one rhododendron.  I experienced some anxiety as I weeded, bending over very carefully because of the back wonkiness.

Next, Allan completely re-did an overgrown Ilwaco planter, for which no one thought to take a before photo.  It had lots of narcissi, and two valerian and three geums (I have no idea who planted them as was certainly not me).

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during (Allan’s photo)

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after (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo: Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ ringed with golden oregano, golden thyme, variegated oregano, Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’, and a little dusky sedum,

We planted a few more plants in the Ilwaco planters and checked to make sure the new plants from last week were damp enough.

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adding some diascias (Allan’s photo)

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a stray viola got a little drink of water (Allan’s photo)

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This one had ALREADY had a brand new lemon thyme stolen out of it.

If someone steals today’s ‘Blackthorn Apricot’ diascias, I am going to be very very very sad.  Maybe these thieves think I have an endless supply of replacement plants.  In fact, I don’t even have access to more choice lemon thymes OR Blackthorn Apricots and I CANNOT REPLACE THEM.  This is not a big city with an endless supply of good nursery plants.

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The fire station garden continues to cry out to me for help.

We stopped off at home for a few more plants.

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Tulips ‘Flaming Spring Green’and ‘Spring Green’ at home

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Tulip ‘Leo’

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Ribes speciosum has been blooming for weeks.

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Davidia ‘Sonoma’ flowers

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Davidia ‘Sonoma’

Ilwaco Boatyard garden

While Allan pulled grass and horsetail from the boatyard garden, I replanted lots of narcissi that we had removed from the overcrowded Ilwaco planters, along with the valerian and geums from today’s planter project, and then helped finish the weeding.  It was not a perfect weeding job; that will wait till just before the annual children’s parade (April 30th this year).  I try to balance perfection with not overdoing our clients’ landscape maintenance budgets, so today’s job was to just keep the garden from looking like the horsetail was winning.

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Allan’s photo, before, north end boatyard garden (looking south)

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the horsetail, huge and fierce (Allan’s photo)

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horsetail (Allan’s photo); the curse of this garden

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after (Allan’s photo)

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Allan hung some new signs

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chatting with Port Office Nancy

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meanwhile, in the boatyard (Allan’s photo)

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south end of boatyard garden

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poppies

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Allan’s photo

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sparaxis (Allan’s photo)

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Stipa gigantea flowers

We finished by deadheading narcissi along Howerton Avenue.

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by the Ilwaco Pavilion

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love Helianthemum, wish they bloomed longer.

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Allan’s photo: California poppies

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transplanting an old, tired Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ in hopes of a bit more bloom from it.

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I got to pet this nice dog named ‘Fahrv’ as in “Farvenugen: It’s what makes a car a Volkswagen.” Allan thinks it named itself.

Blissfully for me, the hot weather was about to end with a cooling fog hanging over the Columbia River.

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east of the marina

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welcome grayness

(For those who enjoy the excerpts from my mother’s old garden diaries: There was no entry corresponding with today’s date.)

 

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