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Posts Tagged ‘Iris histrioides ‘Katharine Hodgekin’’

Thursday, 27 February, 2014

Over the last couple of days, the gear shed neighbours have got all their crab pots stacked behind the shed.  I know the picturesque garden back drop will disappear under a tarp soon.

stacked pots

stacked pots

crocuses multiplying in our back garden

crocuses multiplying in our back garden

Ribes sanguineum 'Apple Blossom' starting to bloom

Ribes sanguineum ‘Apple Blossom’ starting to bloom

early tulips in the front garden

early tulips in the front garden: Tulip kaufmanniana ‘The First’ (and it is the first)

We needed to dump a large load of debris and decided to top it off with Mayor Mike’s pampas grass, just three blocks down Lake Street.

before and after

before and after

Some of the white and blue assortment of bulbs that I planted there are coming on.  The snowdrops are done, but a very nice blue and white Iris reticulata is still good.

iris reticulata

Iris reticulata

After dumping our debris at the city dump off Sandridge Road (because Peninsula Landscape Supply where we usually dump is closed for the season except by appointment, and we are too spontaneous for that), we headed north with our first destination being the Oysterville Store to take photos for the next cash mob event.

map

 

As we neared Nahcotta I suddenly remembered that we had promised a bit of gardening work to Jayne of Bailey’s Café.  I’m glad we stopped.  At first, I was just going to look and make more promises…and then decided to just get it done.

before

after, with ferns cut back

after, with ferns cut back

The Clamshell Railroad time table is on the side of the building.  Would that the train still ran but it is long gone.

Jayne wanted a little square turned into a garden bed for more herbs; it took half an hour to accomplish (with the addition of compost inside the bin).  The bin is just the top of a bin, sitting there, not buried.

before and after

before and after

finishing up

finishing up

Happily, we had a spot to dump the weeds and did not have to haul anything away from this wee job.

Near the herb bed:  evidence of Nahcotta's oyster industry

Near the herb bed: evidence of Nahcotta’s oyster industry

crows atop the oyster pile

crows atop the oyster pile

The café and herb beds are right by Willapa Bay.  Here you can see old oyster shells and the pilings where the Clamshell Railroad used to turn around.

bay

 

historic pilings

historic pilings

Unfortunately, we were on a mission and did not have time to have a delicious lunch at Bailey’s.

It was tempting....

It was tempting….

art by Pat Fagerland

art by Pat Fagerland

I had checked the Facebook page of the Oysterville Store for its hours and was sure we would be there at the right time.  Our gardening session at Bailey’s had assured that we would miss the lunch hour when the shop is closed.  A phone call would have been better as it turned out no one was there at the end of our long drive.

Oysterville Store

Oysterville Store

Our schedule, dependent on weather and the vagaries of how long each job takes, is just too darn spontaneous for phone calls.

frustrated window peering

frustrated window peering

Offseason, shops around the Peninsula do have curtailed hours.  I’ll have to make due with cash mob promo photos from the last time we visited the store.

Fortunately we had a job planned that was at the north end and we drove over to Surfside and down a ways to return to Marilyn’s garden and do more cutting back.

from 2:20 to 5:10 PM

from 2:20 to 5:10 PM

I tackled the swale behind the house where the predominant plant is Siberian iris along with some daylilies, striped running grass, and crocosmia.  From 3:30 to 4:15 I was reminded of why I don’t grow these iris in very many locations.  I simply hate cleaning them.  While I enjoy most spring clean up jobs, the cutting of sodden iris foliage depressed and irks me.  Why can’t it just pull off?  Or snip off nicely and cleanly?

before and after, with much weeding left to do

before and after, with much weeding left to do

the swale

the swale

The deer are feasting on the daylilies.

The deer are feasting on the daylilies.

We’ve been told a herd of five deer hangs out in the garden.  They’ll be shocked to find everything cut down and all their hidey places gone.  From  the photos Marilyn’s daughter, Nancy (co owner of the Depot Restaurant) has sent me, the deer are brazen enough to not need to hide.

"Who's that on the porch??"

just off the back porch

Our trailer got so full of debris that we could not fit in the last of the trimmings.  I shoved them to the back of the garden.  Even if we don’t get the mess picked up, it will become hidden, as this garden gets so tall by midsummer that the neighbours’ garage will be completely hidden.

stashing debris along the back

stashing debris along the back

Shoving the last of the clippings to the back will givethe many narcissi  room to show off.  This garden does not have many other early bulbs because of the deer.   I did find one Iris ‘Katherine Hodgekin’.

Katharine, my favourite.

Katharine, my favourite.

It’s a good thing we didn’t give ourselves the luxury of lunch at Bailey’s Café as we worked till dusk.  Tomorrow’s first task will be another dump run.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 2 February 2014

On winter days like these, we usually don’t start work till noon after waiting for the air to warm up.

front path still slightly frosty at noon-ish

front path still slightly frosty at noon-ish

We went back to the Ilwaco boatyard to finish weeding its garden. A cute Siamese cat who met us near the gate was not especially interested in being petted.

note cat at stern of small boat

note cat at stern of small boat

The small Ilwaco boat has a “free” sign on it. I wish I had a place to put it, or that the port would somehow use it for a landscape display!

I’d been looking forward to weeding the south end of the two blocks long strip of garden, especially where grass crept under the chainlink fence.

creeping in

creeping in

For that project, I went to the backside of the fence.

back

before

after weeding

after weeding

In my own garden, I would have made a perfect edge with the half moon edger, but here my mission was just to get the grass pulled back from the garden and unearth some of the buried river rock.

Next to the gate, I weeded a gravel edge that has some reseeded plants but it not officially part of the garden, and I suddenly thought “SCREE GARDEN!?” Could this be a great spot for little tufts and buns of rock garden plants? It’s tempting but I fear choice and probably pricey ones might be stolen or…walked on! Or pooped on by dogs, as we often find large deposits of dog poo in this garden.

gravel garden

gravel garden…hmmm….

Allan got most of the garden itself weeded; I did not cut any more of the plants back, even though I long to (especially the Artemisias and Santolinas) because of the upcoming bitterly cold snap we are expecting.

all weeded

all weeded

Euphorbia ready to bloom

Euphorbia ready to bloom

another Euphorbia showing effects of the cold

another Euphorbia showing effects of the cold

A couple of Lavenders were so cold blasted that I yanked them.

A couple of Lavenders were so cold blasted that I yanked them.

done for now!

done for now!

The clouds by the Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Co field were stunning, promising a good sunset.

clouds over working boats

clouds over working boats

Rocky B

Rocky B

Doesn't this look like an awesome sunset coming up?

Doesn’t this look like an awesome sunset coming up?

More fluffy clouds hung over the view toward Astoria from the field where we dump our debris at the east end of the marina.

clouds and birds on the Columbia River

clouds and birds on the Columbia River

The air temperature had dropped too much to work any more. We resolved to return to the port at sunset time.

Sunsets are so hard to predict! This one turned out to be pleasant but not spectacular at all.

subtle

subtle

birds

Allan walked out on the docks where he found a carrot floating in the water….

flotsam or jetsam?

flotsam or jetsam?

We weren't the only ones not interested in the ball game that was on telly at the time.

We weren’t the only ones not interested in the ball game that was on telly at the time.

Some boat pictures from Allan:

boat

boat

P1060626

boat

We drove out to the south end of the marina to look toward Cape Disappointment and the Coast Guard station.

at the south end of the marina, looking seaward

at the south end of the marina, looking seaward
a sea serpent cloud on the horizon

a sea serpent cloud on the horizon

Monday, 3 February 2014

I had thought that, the previous evening, Allan had low enthusiasm for working another day. Yet when I got up, the lunchbox was packed and ready to go. We had gotten stuck on Friday with a half load of Long Beach debris so it seemed like a good idea to make more Long Beach debris in order to make a dumping trip up to town financially worthwhile.

The key to the city works yard gate got changed and we don’t have our own copy yet. We work different hours from the crew and often have a load to dump well after they have gone home for the day, especially in the long days of summer.

I didn’t have a plan for what to actually accomplish in Long Beach. Allan suggested the parking lot berms, a great idea because they would create lots of debris.

north berm, before, with Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

north berm, before, with Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

after

after

south berm, with another dratted phormium

south berm, with another dratted phormium

Back when I couldn’t bear to throw away a plant, I’d move Phormiums from one place to another. Now I wish I had just ditched them all!

We acquired a whole trailer load of debris but delivered it to the dump site in two trips so that we could go at break time and try to get a key. No joy! but we’ve been promised one as soon as they make more copies. (Honest, it’s not because of us that they changed the lock!)

south berm.  That was supposed to be a dwarf mugo pine.

south berm. That was supposed to be a dwarf mugo pine.

We did very little weeding, just chopping and clipping and pulling tatty rose campions. The weeding will come another day.

early Narcissi on the south berm

early Narcissi on the south berm

and some species crocus

and some species crocus

On our second dump run, we found treasure in the brush pile! The crew had thrown out the old fence from the police station garden, the one that was run into by a car late last year. Allan can make it into a shorter fence. Score!

salvage!

salvage!

We still had daylight left; we’d had to get into the city works gate before it closes at four. So we went downtown to trim up a few planters near The Cottage Bakery. (This did lead to the acquisition of two delicious tiger paw pastries.)

I was so disappointed to see that the Phormiums in the garden south of Funland (the one that looks like it is a city garden but is not) had been cut back rather than removed. I had lobbied hard for their removal.

horrendous Phormium (the biggest)

horrendous Phormium (the biggest) a couple of weeks ago

today

today

I felt all disgruntled and wished if someone decided to just cut it back, could they not leave it stumpy like that? We did not prune that!

Oh well, on to the planters.

before

before

after

after

Allan worked across the street from me, including trimming plants in the whiskey barrel planters in Fish Alley. He called out, “There is a beautiful iris here; it’s three colours and looks like an insect’s wings.” I said, “Must be Katherine Hodgekin!” and indeed she was. Katharine Hodgekin is a rock garden iris cultivar that I haven’t grown before and I’ve been waiting for her to make an appearance. The Royal Horticultural Society calls her an iris reticulata but I bought her as Iris histrioides.

Iris 'Katharine Hodgekin'

Iris ‘Katharine Hodgekin’

from Allan's iPhone camera

from Allan’s iPhone camera

another, next to Sedum 'Cape Blanco'

another, next to Sedum ‘Cape Blanco’

Iris reticulata from a mix

Iris reticulata from a mix

One of the barrels had some lichen on the side.

barrel

a close up for Mr Tootlepedal, who has been photographing lots of lichens of late

a close up for Mr Tootlepedal, who has been photographing lots of lichens of late

Update: Mr Tootlepedal says it is a fungi.

more Iris reticulata in one of the street planters

more Iris reticulata in one of the street planters

How I love them! I do hope passersby are noticing them. Two people have commented about them to me at Olde Towne Café, so I know some people do see them.

Again, the clouds looked like a good sunset was brewing. I felt too tired to chase it down at the port so just went out to the back yard next door to see it.

I could tell by the line of light over the western hills that the sunset over the ocean was spectacular...

I could tell by the line of light over the western hills that the sunset over the ocean was spectacular…

I settled for reflective clouds over School Hill.

I settled for reflective clouds over School Hill…

and to the east over my garden.

and to the east over my garden.

I do fervently hope to have a few more staycation days starting on Tuesday… Surely it is not good for the plants to be cut back right before a cold snap so we can slack off for another week or so? I still have such a very large pile of library books to read. There is a sure sign that staycation is sort of over, though:

The work board is full again!

The work board is full again! (not in order of importance)

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