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Posts Tagged ‘Iris unguicularis’

Monday, 11 March 2019

At last, after being on the waiting list since November, we were able to get part one of our two part Shingrix vaccinations. We had intended to languish about at home after the anti-shingles jabs, until the pharmacist said that we would have less pain if we kept our arms moving. So we went to work trimming santolinas at the port. Using The Toy made the job so fast that we got from the east end to Time Enough Books in just two hours. Amazing. Rain and wind arrived on schedule and drove us home with the west port gardens and the boatyard garden still to do.

Allan’s photos:

Some of the santolinas in this end have gotten too woody to cut back hard.

We transplanted some uppy red grasses to the fire station garden.

At home, I added santolina clippings to the compost and potted some chives for my plant sale. Allan shredded some of the debris from yesterday in The Pencil Sharpener.

The pampas grass did not shred well and will get hand chopped later.

Earlier today, before the jabs, I had taken some photos of our floriferous garden. I managed to accidentally get this post in reverse chronological order, too hard to fix on my iPad, so here are the morning photos. I really must stop blogging from my lazy chair and must start using my new camera instead of my phone. Soon, as I keep promising.

The front garden:

Poor Melianthus major got cold.

Iris unguicularis aka stylosa.

Ribes speciosum about to flower. It is summer deciduous so looks at its best now.

East side garden:

I keep forgetting to trim this epimedium so that the flowers will show.

Back garden:

The rain gauge had ice on it the first time I went outdoors today.

Sweet pea did not make it through this last set of freezing nights.

Corylopsis pauciflora

I must come up with a feature for the very back corner of the Bogsy Wood. I have some ideas.

Tomorrow should be a good day to languish because of wind and rain.

I am almost sorry to say that I found a source for Monty and Sarah Don’s old gardening show, Fork to Fork, AND a new to me show called The A to Z of TV Gardening…pronounced Zed, because it is British tv with excerpts from all sorts of shows featuring many of my favourites British telly gardeners.

My stack of books to read is dwindling terribly slowly, although I just finished a great one that I must recommend.

Her thoughts about medical testing were of great interest to me. I share her feelings about going to the doctor…even though I know of people who have been saved by medical tests.

I could personally relate to the problems of reduced attention span brought on by social media.

……and so on.

My favourite chapter was about the pressure to exercise and diet in order to grow very old (even though many successful exercisers have died far too young).

I was especially amused when I later read a yoga instructor’s self-described “rant” on social media about how his clients must find “satisfaction in the sacrifice” even though it’s “no fun”. I thought yoga was supposed to be soothing and perhaps prevent the urge to rant?

I appreciate that, as always, this author of Nickel and Dimed addresses the classism of health advice.

Finally, the author ponders death itself and shared a poem that speaks exactly to some thoughts I have been having about appreciating that life will eventually go on without me, with frogs in the pond and flowers blooming just as pleasantly without me around to enjoy them. Here it is:

 When in my white room at the Charité

I woke towards morning

And heard the blackbird, I understood

Better. Already for some time

I had lost all fear of death. For nothing

Can be wrong with me if I myself

Am nothing. Now

I managed to enjoy

The song of every blackbird after me too.

**Bertolt Brecht

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Sunday, 11 October 2015

With better weather, I began gardening at about noon.  We had unexpected company when Planter Box Teresa dropped by to offer me some blue and white bearded iris.  I took some for Golden Sands and gave her a few of the Watsonia that Prissy had brought me on Friday.  I told Teresa where she could find Debbie (at the art show up in Long Beach) to donate the rest of the iris to the Master Gardeners plant sale.

impromptu plant exchange (Allan's photo)

impromptu plant exchange (Allan’s photo)

Shortly after Teresa left, Ed and Jackson Strange came by.

Jackson eager to explore (Allan's photo)

Jackson eager to explore (Allan’s photo)

Jackson got to run around all over inside our fenced back garden.  He was a good boy and did not trample through the garden beds.

Frosty kept a close eye from my window.

Frosty kept a close eye from my window.

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)

Frosty, Smokey and Mary grew up with two dogs so are not especially scared of them.

Orange cat from across the street was not pleased.

Orange cat from across the street was not pleased.

Mary and Jackson had just been nose to nose, and she skittered up the ramp.

Mary and Jackson had just been nose to nose, and she skittered up the ramp.

my nephew jackson (who has many doting aunties)

my nephew jackson (who has many doting aunties)

In the evening, we had a rainbow and a spectacular sunset.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

(Allan's photo)

spider at home in the new arbour (Allan’s photo)

evening sky (Allan's photo)

evening sky (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

After some reading and a movie , we had some excitement quite late in the evening when a mother raccoon and two adolescent offspring came up the cat ramp.  Frosty’s growling alerted me.  This was the second time this family had made a foray at the house.  This time, I chased them away with more than stern words, pelting the midnight garden with rocks calculated to make noise but not actually hit the critters.  They left, and I worried.  The cat door must be made smaller so that raccoon butts cannot fit through.

Monday, 12 October 2015

Allan went boating (tomorrow’s post) and I went to Astoria with Garden Tour Nancy, where we dined at the Bridgewater Bistro and were so absorbed in conversation that we only noticed huge ships sailing by after they were too far past us for good photos.

the fireplace at the Bridgewater Bistro

the fireplace at the Bridgewater Bistro

and the bar

and the bar

The salads tempted me...

The salads tempted me…

As did the albacore salad wrap. However, I had the bahn mi sandwich...

As did the albacore salad wrap. However, I had the bahn mi sandwich…

and so very delicious it was.

and so very delicious it was.

Nancy's photos of her bistro salad with bleu cheese dressing...

Nancy’s photos of her bistro salad with bleu cheese dressing…

and asiago grilled chicken salad sandwich.

and asiago grilled chicken salad sandwich.

The remainder of the day was all weeding in the front garden…

I found an iris unguicularis from Todd that has sized up very well.

I found an iris unguicularis from Todd that has sized up very well.

front garden, weeded

front garden, weeded

Euonymus fortunei 'Wolong Ghost'.

Euonymus fortunei ‘Wolong Ghost’.

sanguisorba and elephant garlic

sanguisorba and elephant garlic

a slightly nibbled variegated sedum

a slightly nibbled variegated sedum

Before and after boating, Allan worked on making the cat door too small for raccoons, a project, involving shortening the top with some boards, that got done by lamplight so no photo is available.

I spent some of my non-gardening time for the last two days reading the first of Jan Bono’s mystery series, set on a lightly fictionalized North Beach Peninsula, which is the Long Beach Peninsula by another name.  Not only is it fun to read a book set among one’s local haunts, but I am also pleased to tell you that the mystery was well written and a pleasure to read.

AR-151009959

Bonus photo

While we were in the rain and grey skies, local gardener Ann Saari was attending the Trailing of the Sheep Festival in Hailey, Idaho, where she photographed this gorgeous quilt by the 5Bee Quilt Guild.  I think some of you will enjoy seeing it:

5Bee Quilt Guild raffle quilt

5Bee Quilt Guild raffle quilt

Tomorrow: Allan’s day on the water

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