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Posts Tagged ‘Joy Creek Nursery’

Friday, 11 July 2014

Garden Bloggers Fling

a fourteen hour day!

Joy Creek Nursery

joy

Our bus drivers parked in the overflow parking lot and we walked down the road to the nursery. (The driver of our bus, Andy, was so enormously kind in the way he helped me down the bus stairs each time that I became even more smitten with him.) This was the first garden stop during which I felt really hampered by my torn calf muscle, and my ability to take photos or to completely enjoy the garden was impacted. Fortunately, I have visited the nursery several times before so the most irksome part was not feeling up to going on a tour guided by owner Maurice Horn, as he is such a fount of plant knowledge. I was able to get around in the more level parts of the display garden at my own snail’s pace.

Even walking down the road was seriously painful.

Even walking down the road was seriously painful.

as one enters the diplay area

as one enters the display area

a level area through which to hobble;  How I wish I had taken friend J9's advice and acquired a cane.

a level area through which to hobble; How I wish I had taken friend J9’s advice and acquired a cane.

Actually, another blogger kindly offered me her collapsible cane, but I was afraid I would misplace it.

an enormously tall beech; didn't feel up to bending over to get a shot to the very top!

an enormously tall beech; didn’t feel up to bending over to get a shot to the very top!

display garden

The display garden is enormous.

Hydrangea aspera (so glad I have two cultivars, now languishing in gallon pots till I figure out where to put...)

Hydrangea aspera (so glad I have two cultivars, now languishing in gallon pots till I figure out where to put…)

into the shade

into the shade

colour echoes

colour echoes

the tallest monardas I've ever seen, buzzing with bees

the tallest monardas I’ve ever seen, buzzing with bees

One of the sponsors, Dramm tools, was giving a talk while the bus of dairy free or vegetarian bloggers had their lunch.

One of the fling sponsors, Dramm watering tools, was giving a talk while the bus of dairy free or vegetarian bloggers had their lunch. Our lunch would be available a little later.

Allan's photo of bloggers eating lunch and watching the Dramm demonstrations.  (They had one hose end nozzle that looked excellent to me.)

Allan’s photo of bloggers eating lunch and watching the Dramm demonstrations. (They had one hose end nozzle that looked excellent to me.)

During the part of the demo that I saw, the speaker said that people used to water with their thumb over the end of the hose. Hmm, I still water that way most of the time as almost every hose nozzle I try seems to get some sort of problem.

The Dramm speaker

The Dramm speaker

I sat next to this lovely hydrangea and soon got too hot without a hat...would have been so sensible to have brought a hat for me and for Allan.

I sat next to this lovely hydrangea and soon got too hot without a hat…I think Allan had the hat I had brought, and we had somehow not brought two despite knowing it was going to be very hot.

I had to depart from the plastic chair to seek shade. Maurice himself directed me to sit on the front porch of the house. I couldn’t get up the stairs, so I sat on them, in a nice cool place.

the view from where I sat, looking straight ahead

the view from where I sat, looking straight ahead

with Eryngiums

with Eryngiums

and to my left

and to my left, from my seat on the stairs

After a rest, I was able to hobble around some more.

the small patch of lawn, which is planted on a gravel base.

the small patch of lawn, which is planted on a gravel base.

Here is an article about the Joy Creek method of creating a gorgeous lawn.

plants

It is enormously irksome to me that I do not have Eryngium giganteum (Miss Wilmott's Ghost)

It is enormously irksome to me that I do not have Eryngium giganteum (Miss Wilmott’s Ghost)

It is a testament to how much I was hampered that I did not go straight to the sales field and look for that Eryngium to buy. I have seen it before, so why I don’t have it is beyond me. There were so many stunning specimens in the garden that they had probably sold out of it (or so I tell myself now).

pleasant shade

pleasant shade

little apricot bells

little apricot bells

See, normally I would have found out what the plant is above (a penstemon?) and rushed to buy one.

foliar drama

foliar drama

I made it up to the office area but was unable to face walking around all the tables.

I made it up to the office area but was unable to face walking around all the tables.

I did achieve my goal of leaving some rack cards for our local garden tour (Saturday, June 19th on the Long Beach Peninsula)

I did achieve my goal of leaving some rack cards for our local garden tour (Saturday, June 19th on the Long Beach Peninsula, only a two hour drive from Joy Creek)

sales area display

sales area display

a clever planting by the office

a mossy planting by the office

birdbaths

birdbaths

Last time I visited Joy Creek (in spring of 2012), I bought myself one of these birdbaths. One of the bloggers told me that they are perfect for near a beehive, because bees like water but will drown in a deep birdbath.

Another, or maybe the same blogger (I was in a daze of hot weather and leg pain) told me that there was a Melianthus major on a sales table. She had clearly been a good listener and heard me say I wanted to replace mine. (I have the straight species but my special cultivars died…OH! She must have seen me coveting the two gallon one at Cistus!) I had to walk down to see it.

Melianthus major 'Antenow's Blue' or...Red Brown?

Melianthus major ‘Antenow’s Blue’ or…Red Brown?

I thought it looked like 'Antenow's Blue' but the tag said Red Brown.

I thought it looked like ‘Antenow’s Blue’ (my favourite!) but the tag said Red Brown.

Tragically, the pot was heavy (I was feeling terribly decrepit if I thought a damp gallon pot was too heavy; Joy Creek does mulch their pots with gravel, but still! How pitiful) so I left it behind and began to hobble back to the porch steps.

a bright sunny border on the way

a bright sunny border on the way

plants2

lilies

lilies

Near the house, Peter (Outlaw Gardener) photographs a viburnum.

Near the house, Peter (Outlaw Gardener) photographs a viburnum.

We were told it's Viburnum 'Shasta', a double file; I had no idea it could get so large.

We were told it’s Viburnum ‘Shasta’, a double file; I had no idea it could get so large.

berries

I sat for a spell, then walked down the gentle hill with considerable difficulty.

I wanted to see if the big metal sculpture was still there.

I wanted to see if the big metal sculpture was still there. It was.

gently descending path

gently descending path

Here's the flower of a large shrub that I bought at Joy Creek two years ago; it is doing wonderfully for me, but I can never remember its name.

Here’s the flower of a large shrub that I bought at Joy Creek two years ago after seeing it on display; it is doing wonderfully for me, but I can never remember its name.

cardoon, I assume;  I suddenly realize that mine did not come back after the winter.

cardoon, I assume; I suddenly realize that mine did not come back after the winter.

Maddeningly, pain made me turn back before the hydrangeas, and I could not even get to the sloping garden to my right, which I knew had interesting plants (of course)

Maddeningly, pain made me turn back before the hydrangeas, and I could not even get to the sloping garden to my right, which I knew had interesting plants (of course)

but I did have these to cheer me up

but I did have these to cheer me up

heading back to the porch steps

heading back to the porch steps

Allan had brought me my lunch so I ate it sitting there. Two or three bloggers from Texas were up on the porch chairs, discussing how folks thought they could handle heat like we were having but that in Texas, they would be indoors with the AC on sipping iced tea.

the house at Joy Creek

the house at Joy Creek, taken on our visit in March 2012 (different stairs from where I sat)

(Allan reminds me that one of the fling organizers was walking around passing out water to make sure we did not dehydrate.)

I was pining after that Melianthus major in its heavy gallon pot and asked him if he would go back to the sales area and get it for me. This series of photos were the result:

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo:  With great foresight, she had brought a tub to carry plants in on the bus.

Allan’s photo: With great foresight, she had brought a tub to carry plants in on the bus.

Allan's photo, happy shopping

Allan’s photo, happy shopping

Allan's photo.  Somehow I, the cat lover, missed meeting this kitty.

Allan’s photo. Somehow I, the cat lover, missed meeting this kitty.

sweet!

sweet!

Even sweeter:  Allan snagged the last Melianthus major...

Even sweeter: Allan snagged the last Melianthus major…

It had two tags and one does say 'Antenow's Blue'.  The Red Brown is a mystery to me AND to Google.

It had two tags and one does say ‘Antenow’s Blue’. The Red Brown is a mystery to me AND to Google.

Allan's photo in the office.  (There were chocolate chip cookies, too, a Joy Creek staple.)

Allan’s photo in the office. (There were chocolate chip cookies, too, a Joy Creek staple.)

Allan says this abutilon was getting lots of attention.

Allan says this abutilon was getting lots of attention.

a last view of Joy Creek from the bus; I will return when I am in better condition to appreciate all its beauties.

a last view of Joy Creek from the bus; I will return when I am in better condition to appreciate all its beauties.

Previous visits to Joy Creek:

in the year 2000

in 2007

in 2009 (May)

in 2009 (June)

in 2011

in 2010-2012

Next: perhaps my favourite garden of any I have ever seen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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While Allan and I most definitely went to the Northwest Flower and Garden show…and stayed at his parents’ house in north Seattle…I have no photos from that year.  It was completely new and different and fun for me to go with someone who very much wanted to attend every possible seminar and learn as much as he could about gardening.

Garden of Mu, Olympia

In the spring, Allan and I went to Olympia to help a cyber-gardening friend, Mike Unser, dig up plants from his garden to prepare for a move to his new country home near Shelton.

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden

There were many plants to dig up (and share). A number of folk from the Pacific Northwest gardening forum showed up to help. (I actually did have some people photos, somewhere…)

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden

Here was another good example of gardening friends who met online coming to know each other in person.

Joy Creek and Cistus Nurseries

For the annual trip to Joy Creek and Cistus, we met Sheila and others from the Rainyside.com garden forum for lunch and plant shopping. I was still holding to my frugal plan of buying only for my clients, and none for me.

Sheila by an Echium at Cistus

Sheila by an Echium at Cistus

at Cistus:  Echium

at Cistus: Echium

Echium

Echium

Alki Beach, Seattle

In the summer, Allan and I went to Seattle, stayed at his parents’ house, and indulged in a Northwest Perennial Alliance garden tour weekend.  I think that is the July when we were there because his mom had a hip replacement and someone needed to stay at the house for four days to take care of making dinner for his dad, making sure Dale took his medication, and so on.  Or perhaps we were there for Dale’s birthday in August.

We now come to the very photos that inspired this whole set of prequel journal posts.  I was poking back through my albums and found these and thought “I MUST share these on my blog!”  And then I thought about all the old garden photos that I had…and began the big late winter project of catching up from 198something to the year I began to blog, 2007.  (One year to go at this point!)  So…just LOOK at the plantings all over this house in the Alki Beach neighbourhood of Seattle.  And these were not even on the official weekend tour; we just happened upon this place while on a drive.

the most astounding container display

the most astounding container display

The fabulous little house was tucked away between two tall buildings.

just..wow

just…WOW

It is breathtaking.

It is breathtaking.

astonishing!

astonishing!

more flower house photos

and more

As one drives along Alki past the cottage garden of annuals, one then seas a mysterious hillside garden with Asian inspired tea houses….This was the best angle I could get of that fascinating place.

Asian style garden on the hill over Alki beach

Asian style garden on the hill over Alki beach

Up the hill into West Seattle, I also had to photograph this swoopy brick wall.

bricks

bricks

Northwest Perennial Alliance Tour

On spring and summer weekend, NPA members host open gardens for each other.  If I lived in Seattle, I would go to every one.

On the one that Allan and I attended, we saw in the lower U District, near the freeway, a Jurassic garden of huge plants.  This garden was meant to be tall enough to be structurally in tune with the towers that surround it.

Jurassic garden

Jurassic garden

Gunnera

Gunnera

Below, inside one of the NPA tour houses that was near Allan’s parents’ house in north Seattle…

garden window

garden window

outside the same house's bay window

outside the same house’s bay window

The same house had its bedroom, in the back, with doors that could completely open to the garden.

bedroom

bedroom

Those were just two of the several gardens we toured that weekend….

Rainyside Tour in Portland

I was finding the garden touring to be irresistable; I’d never been able to do much touring with Robert because we were too poor and because his behavior was unpredictable. In early fall of 2005 we met up with some Rainysiders, including Sheila, for an overnight stay in Portland and touring of some gardens. I was particularly to see the one below, which was designed with 4 quadrants by Lucy Hardiman and which had been featured in her lectures at the garden show.

in the 4 quadrants garden

in the 4 quadrants garden

a gew gaw in the Lucy-designed garden

a gew gaw in the Lucy-designed garden

center of the 4 quadrants garden

center of the 4 quadrants garden

in the 4 quadrant garden

in the 4 quadrant garden

Below:  another Portland garden by…someone famous! a garden writer whose name I have forgotten.  His garden spills out onto the street.

a well known garden

a well known garden

Below:  I think this was in Kym Pykorny‘s shade garden.

water container

water container

I was thrilled to bits to visit Dulcy Mahar’s garden, because her gardening column in the Oregonian was a highlight of my weekly reading.

in Dulcy's garden

in Dulcy’s garden

Dulcy's fire circle

Dulcy’s fire circle

and...somewhere on the tour

and…somewhere on the tour

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Northwest Flower and Garden Show

Here are the usual not so great photos from the Northwest Flower and Garden Show, February 2004.  I stayed with Carol and we had a lovely time as always with a meal at the Barking Dog Alehouse which had replaced a dive bar just around the corner from her Ballard apartment.  I attended probably 18 seminars.   As I had sometimes done over the garden show years, I felt a vague envy (not too sharp) of the gardening couples that I saw sitting together during seminars.  It would be nice to have a gardening partner who took an interest in such things.   But I had profoundly enjoyed my winter of quiet solitude.

boatscape

boatscape

potting bench

potting bench

planting salad greens in straw bales

planting salad greens in straw bales

Peninsula touring

Alison, a funny cyberfriend whom I had met through an online gardening forum, came to visit; here we are at Klipsan Beach Cottages because of course I took the day off to take her on a garden tour.

Alison and me at KBC

Alison and me at KBC

me at Laurie's garden, photo by Alison

me at Laurie’s garden, photo by Alison

I wish I could find Alison again!   She moved, my computer crashed, etc….   She was so funny and smart and a great gardener.  She might have changed her last name due to a marital change, and that makes women so darned hard to find.

Buddliea in a Long Beach garden

Buddliea in a Long Beach garden

Joy Creek and Cistus

I went on a springtime shopping trip for clients at Cistus and Joy Creek Nursery with J9; stuffing as many plants as possible in her car, along with her wonderful dog, Sophie.

English delphiniums at Joy Creek Nursery

English delphiniums at Joy Creek Nursery

Cistus

Cistus

Sophie and J9 at Cistus

Sophie and J9 at Cistus

CistusCistus

The display gardens are much fuller now!

Cistus Nursery

Below: Pineapple broom…used to be Cytisus battandieri but now is (sometimes) Argyrocytisus…at Cistus.  I long for this plant to bloom in my garden. I had one at the Spring Street garden that did nothing but put out grey foliage, and I left it behind in autumn 2010 because it was quite large.   I planted one at a garden in Seaview where the house got sold, one at KBC which the slugs ate, and one at my mom’s which was also to big to move when the house sold and I now do not have one at all!

pineapple broom

pineapple broom

The flowers really do smell strongly of sweet pineapple.

Clarke Nursery

Meanwhile, Sheila came to visit. I had been plant-sitting a whole lot of potted plants for her after she sold the Harborview Motel, while she moved around (and around!) with her peripatetic spouse trying to find the perfect house to create a new garden. Here we are at Clarke Nursery in its former bayside location, where I am sure she bought a few more plants, and then took some of the ones I was storing away with her as well.
me and Sheila at Clarke Nursery

me and Sheila at Clarke Nursery

Sheila's vehicle stuffed with plants

Sheila’s vehicle stuffed with plants

Sheila says “I believe we built layers with plywood and plastic milk crates to get them all in…the layers can be seen in the back…”.  Her fig tree was laid in sideways.  She is determine to fit in at least two more plants.

Painted Lady Lavender Farm

I took an afternoon off to go to the Painted Lady Lavender Farm with J9.   It’s between Ilwaco and Chinook, and may have been its first or second year open to the public. Its owner had been known locally for years for her decorative painting.  I had seen her work on local garden designer Dale B’s house (now owned by our friend Patti, on the Seaview Antique Mall, and on the exterior of Payson Hall at Andersen’s RV Park.

Painted Lady Lavender Farm

Painted Lady Lavender Farm

Below: View from atop a hill at Painted Lady Lavender Farm. I was quite overcome with envy and the wish that I had the money to have a number of little cottages and enough land to plant lavishly.

overview

treehouse

treehouse

black scabiosas

black scabiosas

behind the main house

behind the main house

house and deck

house and deck

Oh how I longed for a little guest cottage like this!

Oh how I longed for a little guest cottage like this!

another adorable outbuilding

another adorable outbuilding

For several years after, I thought of revisiting but just felt too busy; every time we drove by the entrance, we were on a mission to go Astoria and points south.  Finally I got back there in 2012 and found it even more beautiful.

Portland Classical Chinese Garden

In the fall, Terran and I took a day trip to Portland and visited the Classical Chinese Garden. Sheila’s gift of an old digital camera which used floppy disks provided some interesting photographic results.   I loved the instant gratification of digital and when that camera wore out, I bought a new one and only occasionally returned to film because I had some rolls to use up.

Terran in the Chinese Garden

Terran in the Chinese Garden

Portland Classical Chinese Garden

Portland Classical Chinese Garden

in the Chinese garden

in the Chinese garden

Chinese garden

Chinese garden

Chinese garden

Chinese garden

Gardeners were walking through the ponds in hip waders cleaning up the lotus leaves.

lotus

lotus

Manzanita

I put frugality on hold for an evening when J9 and I took a trip to Manzanita to have a memorable meal at the (now sadly gone) Blue Sky Café. It was kind of a shock to eat real food, because I had been subsisting for months on frozen food after buying my first microwave earlier that same year.  I am not much for cooking but I do love restaurants.

beautiful garden bench in Manzanita

beautiful garden bench in Manzanita

But first we went to Cartm, an amazing huge recycled materials yard where I acquired a small garbage can in which to plant a phormium, the idea which I’d gotten at the Molly Ward garden/restaurant back in summer 2003.  You can find almost anything upcyclable at Cartm.  Too bad it is such a long trip from here.

Cart-em

Cartm

Non-gardening outings

Talking Tombstones in Astoria

J9 excelled at getting me to go out and do things.  At Halloween,  we went to see the “Talking Tombstones” in Astoria, where locals act in the role of the person who is buried under each stone.

tombstone
a sad tale of dying of influenza

a sad tale of dying of influenza

Talking Tombstones

Talking Tombstones

On any trip that we took across the river (or “overseas”, as old timers say around here), we stopped on the way at the excellent Chinook Coffee Company drivethrough in Chinook.

Chinook Coffee Company

Chinook Coffee Company, October 2004

Fort Clatsop

In December, J9 and I went to the old Fort Clatsop for a historical presentation about Lewis and Clark’s Christmas there.  Soon after, it would be destroyed by a fire and be reconstructed.

Fort Clatsop

Fort Clatsop

inside Fort Clatsop, the replica of Captain Meriweather Lewis’s  desk made my own tiny house look more spacious in comparison.

Lewis's desk

Lewis’s desk

boardwalk at Fort Clatsop

boardwalk at Fort Clatsop

Flavel House Museum

Always good at finding excursion, J9 took me to the Flavel House Museum for their Christmas plum pudding tea.

Flavel House on a dark December day

Flavel House on a dark December day

teatime in the Flavel House Museum

teatime in the Flavel House Museum

Looking back on this year makes me realize what a boon to my social life J9 was and I am more sorry than ever that she moved away from the Peninsula in 2012.

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In May or June, I took a road trip with Mary from Klipsan Beach Cottages.

Joy Creek Nursery, Scappoose

We stopped at Joy Creek Nursery, of course…

Joy Creek 2001

Joy Creek 2001

Joy Creek border

Joy Creek border

Lake Oswego (and a sad story)

Mary and I stayed at Sharon’s new townhome on the edge of Lake Oswego near Portland. In her divorce case, her  soon to be ex claimed the arbour Robert had built for her, on commission, purchased with her money. It was attached to the house porch railing with two screws, which made it part of the household.  She had to buy it from him for the same price that she had originally paid to Robert, so she bought it twice!   (I had remembered Robert having to build her a second one, but no, she just repurchased the original.)  She was still sad about losing the wonderful garden we had made at her former home on the bay.  Her new rented home had little space for gardening. I had testified at the trial that all the plants had been purchased with Sharon’s money, so she was allowed to take some, most of which took refuge in my garden and the gardens at China Beach Retreat and Klipsan Beach Cottages.  The ex had then sprayed the garden area (still with many plants and bulbs) with Casaron and then covered the area with landscape fabric and river rock.  Goodbye to all the lilies, tulips, alliums and narcissi.

Sharon's double price arbour

Sharon’s double price arbour

Lucy Hardiman’s garden in Portland

Sharon wanted to show me the Hawthorne neighbourhood in Portland so the three of us went there for an afternoon.   I remembered that Lucy Hardiman (from whom Sharon and I had taken three workshops over the past couple of years) lived near there, and we found her address through the phone book.   Such garden celebrity stalkers we were!  Sharon, Mary and I were nosing around Lucy’s well known sidewalk garden (she calls it a “garden approach” rather than “a garden retreat”) when she saw us from her upstairs window and invited us in.

Below, we walked around the side of the house…

entering the garden

entering the garden

and the garden is revealed.

Lucy's back garden

Lucy’s back garden

looking to the house from the arbour

looking to the house from the arbour

Lucy had a VERY sweet dog.   You may be disappointed if you click to enlarge the photo;  unfortunately, my scans appear to be small.

containers in Lucy's garden

containers in Lucy’s garden

Lucy had begun to make mosaic pieces.

Lucy had begun to make mosaic pieces.

mosaic table

mosaic table

I was very taken with the shrub (below) but even though I have bought a couple since then, I have never managed to grow it successfully.  When I returned to tour Lucy’s garden some years later, the shrub was gone so it may be rather tender.

Cestrum

Cestrum

bronze fennel....now called by some a noxious weed

bronze fennel….now called by some a noxious weed because it reseeds so freely

The tiny paths in the back of her garden made me feel better about the little tiny path running up the north side of mine.

tiny secret path

tiny secret path

pots

pots on Lucy’s deck

We lingered by the beautiful sidewalk garden atop a stone wall.   Ludy often tells in lectures how she and Fred saved for years to have the wall done.

atop the wall

atop the wall

atop the wall: Origanum rotundifolium (ornamental oregano)

atop the wall: Origanum rotundifolium (ornamental oregano)

In one of her garden show slide presentations, I had first seen, growing on this wall, Salvia viridis (painted sage) and Cerinthe purpurascens, still two of my three favourite annuals.  (Number three?  Cosmos, of course!)

The centerpiece of the wall is the famous heart that reaches out to passersby.  It is overgrown with a plant in this photo:

Lucy's wall

Lucy’s wall

Another favourite Lucy story of mine is how she would sit above the wall in a hidden area behind some shrubs and listen to people’s comments about the garden.

Heirloom Roses in St. Paul

On the second day of our road trip we went to Heirloom Roses, in St Paul, Oregon, where the front arbour was more thickly covered than on my previous visits.

shop entrance

shop entrance, with cat

Below:  I think the pillar rose is Eden, which Mary of KBC fell for hard but which never grew well for us at the beach.  The flowers are so full that in our damp air, they browned off before opening fully.

Eden

Eden? and a clematis

at Heirloom Roses

at Heirloom Roses

somebody's roses!

roses

roses trained and free

roses trained and free

Ferguson’s Fragrant Nursery

We also went to the wonderful Ferguson’s Fragrant Nursery nearby.

at Ferguson's

at Ferguson’s

2001 was the year that Cathy Peterson, who wrote a weekly gardening column for the Daily Astorian, asked me if I would organize a garden tour for her and some friends, and I did.  Such fun it was!   My garden was on it, and Sheila helped me get it weeded and cleaned up in time.  I also featured Seagarden,  Patti’s garden, The Shelburne, Jo’s Long Beach garden, and Klipsan Beach Cottages.  I have no photos to show that it ever happened, but I do recall that we all had dinner on the deck at the Depot restaurant afterwards, and Cathy bought my dinner as a thank you.   I believe she wrote something about it, and it would be so wonderful if I could find it.  Why is my file cabinet of gardening articles no longer in alphabetical order?  Next winter’s project!

A few years later, Cathy retired from writing for the Astorian.  Someone else took over “In the Garden” and wrote two excellent columns, and then the Astorian dropped the column altogether.  I still miss it.  A lot.

 

A digression:  The Depot restaurant had been bought the year before by two young locals and had turned into a very good restaurant.  Before, during the year 1993 when we lived at the Sou’wester, it had been a noisy tavern with much drunken whooping every night at closing time.  Then it had sat vacant for several years.   We were so happy to see it revived.   It became the restaurant we know today (our favourite!) after Michael Lalewicz and Nancy Gorshe bought it a few years later.   Below, the Depot in 2000:

The Depot, the previous year (2000)

The Depot well before it had its north side gardens.

The Depot well before it had its north side gardens.

Below, in 2000:  The new garden being created by the new owners, Nat and Domique, and by Dirk Sweringen of the nearby English nursery. I ended up pruning these ornamental grasses every spring. They make a great rustling privacy screen for the outdoor deck.

Depot ornamental grasses, 2000

Depot ornamental grasses, 2000

 

 

 

 

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Joy Creek

Some of these photos were taken on a trip that I made in spring with Long Beach parks manager Mike Kitzman to buy plants for the new beach approach garden and some parks, but some of the photos of later summer flowers may have been taken when Mary and I went to Sauvie Island, because I cannot imagine being that close to Joy Creek without dragging her to the nursery.

spring at Joy Creek

spring at Joy Creek

English delphiniums

English delphiniums

mixed border

mixed border

Penstemons, part of the "Kissed" series for which Joy Creek is renowned.

Penstemons, part of the “Kissed” series for which Joy Creek is renowned.

mixed border

mixed border

Penstemon

Penstemon

Canna and Brugmansia

Canna and Brugmansia

Canna and Brugmansia

Canna and Brugmansia

A couple of years before, Ann Lovejoy and Lucy Hardiman had given a workshop at Joy Creek in creating a texture garden, so that rock and gravel area was of particular interest to me.

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

in the texture garden

Lobelia tupa

Lobelia tupa

Sauvie Island

My dear friend Mary (friends since age 12) had gotten a very good job and for three years in a row, she took me on a fabulous overnight trip!  The first one was to Sauvie Island, almost to Portland….a world of its own.

On the way, we passed this cute place in a little Columbia River-side Oregon town.

in a small town

in a small town

Sauvie Island is surrounded by dikes, and when we climbed over the one by the B and B we saw this huge ship on its way back from Portland…You can just see the lights of Portland in the distance, and a half moon.

Sauvie Island

Sauvie Island

Lots of ornamental plants are grown commercially there.

farm

farm

I wonder if Cistus Nursery had started up then?  If it had, I certainly don’t seem to have discovered it yet.

We stayed in kind of a funny bed and breakfast where we had the two downstairs bedrooms.  The basement was still decorated with family photos and we felt like we were the kids home from college.  It was sweet.  We heard cows mooing into the night.  Well, I did.  Mary had earplugs.   I was delighted to find by my bed a sequel to one of my favourite books ever, The Bachelor Brothers Bed and Breakfast.  The next  morning at breakfast, our host told us that the Oregon B&B Association had asked the author to give a speech, but he declined, saying he really knew nothing of B&Bs.  The books feel so real, you would think he did.

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In June, 1999, Sharon and I and Mary from Klipsan Beach Cottages went to see the amazing rose gardens at Heirloom Old Garden Roses in St. Paul, Oregon, and also to Joy Creek Nursery in Scappoose. We were on a buying trip for Sharon’s garden and Klipsan Beach Cottages.

Heirloom Roses in 1999

I had been to Heirloom once before with Mike Kitzman on a buying trip for the Fifth Street Park in Long Beach, but it had been before the roses were in bloom.  This time, I got to see the rose garden at its peak.

Heirloom Roses

Heirloom Roses

arbour near the shop

arbour near the shop

banks of roses

banks of roses

Fourth of July' rose at Heirloom Roses.

Fourth of July’ rose at Heirloom Roses.

To this day, roses ‘Polka’ and ‘Jude the Obscure’ from Heirloom Roses are showpieces of the Klipsan Beach Cottages gardens.

Joy Creek Nursery

My visit with Sharon and Mary was my first of many yearly visits to Joy Creek.

Robert and I worked in the spring and summer for a millionaire named George Fiske-Hammond III, whose meticulously designed small garden in Seaview I wish I had photographed. The second time I went to Joy Creek Nursery, shown here, was on a buying trip with him, during which he generously lavished me with plants and a good lunch.

Joy Creek 1999

Joy Creek 1999

Joy Creek 1999

Joy Creek 1999

The George job would all come to grief later in the year when George, who was in Al Anon, had a deep rift with Robert over an incident where he felt Robert was argumentative. When he wanted me to keep working for him and not allow Robert to be there, I resigned.  He encountered me at the grocery store and lamented “You were a huge disappointment to me.”  If I had NOT resigned, my home life would have become even more difficult.

Seaside

On the way to buy plants at Raintree Nursery in Seaside, Oregon (now Seven D’s), we would take a detour to admire the streetside plantings there.  That is a detour that Allan and I take years later.

Seaside, Oregon

Seaside, Oregon

Cannon Beach

Here is where my memory fails, because in  my photo albums I have TWO sets of photos for Haystack Rock summer education program workshops with Ann Lovejoy and Lucy Hardiman.  Did I really attend these two years in a row with my friend Sharon?  I do know that 1998 was the garden tour one, which I have already written about.  But apparently in ’99 there was another one, the garden design focused one (so what was the ’98 one?)   The second day of the ’99 workshop, Lucy Hardiman’s spouse gave a workshop on building copper garden structures, and I have photos to prove it.

Fred Hardiman

Fred Hardiman

Fred's copper spiral

Fred’s copper spiral

copper pipe arbour

copper pipe arbour

Below, Fred cutting the copper with a special cutter, which I simply could not get the hang of, thus I was hampered in trying to make things like this.

cutter

cutter

Fred cutting the copper with a special cutter, which I simply could not get the hang of, thus I was hampered in trying to make things like this.

making a trellis

making a trellis

If I could only operate the pipe cutter thing, I could make things like this!

On lunch breaks, Sharon and I took walks through Cannon Beach and admired the gardens. I think 80% of each commercial property’s surrounds have to be landscaped by law there. Or something like that.  The effects are marvelous.

 Cannon Beach garden

And we walked through the Presidential blocks of Cannon Beach where I photographed my favourite little house. It’s almost always the tiny ones that catch my eye.

a favourite sight in Cannon Beach

a favourite sight in Cannon Beach

Even thought I have claimed that during the ’98 workshop, Sharon saved for me this Bubble and Flow sketch by Ann Lovejoy and gave it to me later as a gift, maybe that happened in 1999!  If I ever go through all my years of seminar and workshop notes, I might find out.

bubble and flow

bubble and flow

Joy Creek again

In fall of 1999, I took a design workshop with Sharon at Joy Creek Nursery;  Anne Lovejoy and Lucy Hardiman supervised the redesign of one of the display garden borders.  Below, some class members and the Joy Creek work crew (who RAN with wheelbarrows full of gravel and soil!) rework the border.

border redesign

border redesign

the new border being planted

the new border being planted

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

Joy Creek sculpture

Joy Creek sculpture

mesh and metal sculpture

mesh and metal sculpture

sculpture

sculpture

sculpture

sculpture

Had a digital camera been at hand in 1999, I am sure I would have more photos, including pictures of Lucy and Ann teaching.  I was kind of shy of taking photos of them….would not be so today!

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I love our yearly trip to Joy Creek and its neighbour down the road, Cistus Nursery.  Because if you are still slogging through all these garden tours, you are probably also a plant nut, here are scenes from three years of spring shopping trips.  I do remember one glorious year that I was there more than once, and once I even got to take a design workshop there with Lucy Hardiman and Ann Lovejoy.  The Joy Creek schedule of classes would be well worth attending every single spring-autumn weekend were it not for the fact that we live two hours way.

3 May 2010

Agave with the house in background; Oddly I have never taken much to Agave...but it looks wonderful here.

Sambucus 'Sutherland Gold' (??)

Alliums by the small circular lawn

the border we worked on in the Ann & Lucy workshop; It's been redone since then.

gravel path

wind resistant English delphiniums in bud

glorious piles of ingredients

Joy Creek is very big on using quarter-ten washed gravel in the garden beds.

Just Google “Joy Creek gravel” and you will find plenty of information.

They even use it under their small lawn near the house.  If you poke your finger at the grass roots you can feel the gravel base which helps the lawn hold up beautifully to lots of foot traffic.

I love the way the gravel sweeps from the paths right in to mulch the beds.

sunny path

mid spring

Dodecathon?

display gardens go on and on...

and have a variety of metal sculptures...

mixed borders...shrubs, trees, perennials

splash of gold

Dianthus

magestic

27 April 2011


Many plants are tagged; if not, you can show the photo on your phone or camera to the helpful staff to get the ID

Gunnera leaves emerging

Rheum...something...ornamental rhubarb. I had one at my old house...wish I had bought one...

Springtime was LATE in 2011.

Euphorbia backed with gold

If that's a Forsythia, and I think it is, I want to prune mine like that.

textural gravel

more gold

tulips and gravel-based lawn

bright tulips

Pulsatilla

must have....

I was completely smitten with this tree that was sitting on the sold table.  Around and around the table I walked taking photos of the tree.   Took photo of tag on tree: Crataegus Laevigata Contorta …contorted ‘Paul’s Scarlet’ Hawthorn.  Turned out it was the only one…and had been sold to Kathy, one of the nursery workers (or Katie, I wrote it down..somewhere). So she let me buy it, because she can get the next one that comes in. I have Googled it and find the uncontorted version gets to 20′, but this tag says 6′. Wondering if that is true.  We planted it in our front garden, and as it went in the ground I heard the trunk make an ominous crack.  But although it was shocky for awhile, it came through winter of 2011-12 and is leafing out nicely in spring 2012.

12 April 2012

Never have we gone on our spring road trip this early….but I had a nagging desire to shop for the coolest plants ever since having found out a couple of weeks before that our garden had been selected as one of the tour gardens for the Music in the Gardens tour for 2012.  And because we were selected as Ilwaco’s business of the year for 2010….but the ceremony was in autumn of 2011….it seems one of our duties is to be grand marshalls of  the early May  Loyalty Day parade in Ilwaco.  (This is ironic because I often grumbled in the past about the McCarthy-esque origins of Loyalty Day, and being a non-patriot who’s fond of the world and who does not like nationalism….well, I could go on, but it might sound unappreciative of the honour, and I do believe it is an honour.)  Along with that, we have to make Long Beach perfect for its parade day (Ilwaco is Saturday, Long Beach is Sunday) and that’s a longwinded way of explaining why we went to Joy Creek so early, before more tender plants were on offer.

The gardens were rather bare. I like this fencing.

another neat fence barrier

early spring pizzazz

tufts of moss atop a stone fence pillar with garden beyond

Look at the way the white petals have drifted down one side of the tree...

rebar art

The sales area had some wonderful rebar trellises including this fan shaped one.  As some of my friends know, my former co-gardener made exceptional rebar garden art.  I wish I had taken up on his offer to teach me to weld with his oxygen and acetylene (??) torch but I was kinda scared of it.  Kaboom!

A ceramic artist had made birdbaths so beautifully mounted on little tree trunk poles.  I had to have the fish one.  Because we are going to be on the garden tour and need beautiful objects to keep up with all those fancy gardens I’ve toured in the cities.

How could I resist?

She had also made clever birdhouses with the holes sized, we were told, just right for the birds.

birdhouses

I resisted the birdhouses because I had not resisted pretty much any plant that caught my fancy….again with the garden tour excuse.  And our next stop at Cistus would assuredly provide more plant temptations.

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At just the brink of summer, Allan and I drove to Portland so that I could join Sheila for an exciting Hardy Plant Society Study weekend (commencing with an all day workshop by the famed Fergus Garret, right hand man of Christopher Lloyd).  On the way we stopped at Joy Creek and Cistus nurseries and filled the car with plants which Allan would bring back to our new garden.  It is rare for me to get to see the joys of early summer at these nurseries as we usually visit around the first days of May.  What a difference seven weeks makes!

gravel path

approaching the lawn

the little lawn

lushness

a stunning shrubby Clematis

the sculpture screen

Rosa moyesii 'Geranium'; Reader, I bought one.

the amazing, enormous, wind-resistant English delphiniums

English delphiniums

wind resistant, not wind proof

the delphinium patch

as tall as Allan (5'8ish) and by the way, this is a windy site.

pruned bamboo

an Eryngium, my favourite perennial

verdant summer border

Sculptures which stood bare in spring are now surrounded.

red

pink astrantia

summer rose

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at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

In spring of 2008 we agreed to let our garden be on the Peninsula garden tour.  I had long resisted, never feeling ready, but finally our friend Patti, tour organizer, said to me “You know you are going to do it eventually, so why not get it over with?”

As soon as I had committed, plant shopping took on a whole new meaning because now we were shopping for our own garden.  With this in mind we took our usual beginning of May trip to Cistus and Joy Creek and returned with as many cool plants as we could stuff into our small car.

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

 

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

at Joy Creek

Euphorbias at Joy Creek

Our garden was still a mess.  Friends visited from the midwest on Memorial Day weekend and as we walked through the garden I could see their (non-gardener) skepticism when I told them we would be on a tour in less than a month.  Could we do it?

In early June we began a serious clean-up of all our garden paths.  (I estimated that we lost over $1000 in income slacking off on work in order to bring our own place to perfection.)  Because the Hardy Plant Study Weekend would be the weekend before the garden tour, a great deal had to be accomplished before then.

By the 7th of June the paths looked as perfect as if they had been freshly laid….Weeded, topped with fresh gravel, and rolled.

garden paths

gardens paths of perfection

JUST the week before leaving for study weekend, I decided that the tiny little path on the lower north side of the garden simply had to be widened and in a frenzy tore up the concrete molded fake rock pavers, dug the bed a foot wider on each side and then with Allan’s helped laid landscape fabric and all fresh gravel. There’s nothing like imagining people tripping up on a bad path to inspire one to finally get the project done.

decorating

decorating with rust

We decorated every surface as I had intended to all along but had never taken the time.  Patti showed up every few days with another old rusty thing like these wire boxes that Allan hung up on the silver shed.

Meanwhile we had to keep up with work, at least on our public jobs.  More of the Long Beach planters (the ones where the volunteers had slacked off) had fallen into our clutches and by May 11th the plants were blending together and looking stunning.

Long Beach Planters

Long Beach planters, 11 May

Up until my departure on Thursday June 19th to Shedd, Oregon, my friend Sheila’s house and the departure point for study weekend, Allan and I  fussed around in our garden till dark-thirty despite the evening torment of clouds of no-seeums.  I would not be back till Monday June 23.  Allan tells me he worked for the three days till he came to meet me at Sheila’s on  Sunday…probably watering, and possibly taking motorcycle rides.  I did not realize how sore I was till my legs cramped up on the crowded bus from Portland to Albany.  I could barely hobble down the steps where Sheila waited to whisk me off for a long awaited introduction to Dancing Oaks Nursery.  I was about to fulfill more of the Big Revelation of June 2007:  visiting more gardens and nurseries.

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Onward to Cistus with the Rainysiders, CPNs all. (Certified Plant Nuts). From Scappoose we all drove to Portland and crossed the bridge to Sauvie Island’s bucolic farmland, where eventually a grove of Eucalyptus and the roofs of the interesting garden houses said Cistus! long before we could read the sign.  The nursery throws a spell of sparkling silver and grey all around itself. The first time I went there was before the garden houses were built, and I immediately realized I knew very few plant names for their exotic specimens.  I’ve never felt so out of my depth in a nursery, not even at Heronswood.  Of course, that meant I wanted one of everything.

Other than the overwhelming and intoxicating selection of plants, one thing I love about Cistus is that it abounds in cats and dogs.

This kitty knows where to lounge to maximize attention. Last year, Allan took a photo of the same white cat sleeping on the checkout desk computer (right).  A friendly orange cat twined around the plant sales tables….and a faithful lab  followed her owner worker from place to place and finally took a rest. Another old dog slept behind the counter.

but back to plants…

Looking toward the checkstand (L) and from the checkstand out toward more plants (R)

Cistus Nursery container display and shopping wagon

My plant haul starts to form up on a green cart…I got some trees for Solstice House and another Tetrapanax papirifer ‘Steroidal Giant’’, this one for my mom’s birthday present.  (I love mine.)

Finally, a comparison” both these vignettes grabbed me: the first is at Joy Creek, the second at Cistus…both with Euphorbia in front of a pink flowering tree!

Oh, and that flash of desire I had in winter for big blowsy colour in my garden?  I have totally returned to wanting my garden to be a tapestry of silver and structure a la Cistus.  (Cistus will have plenty of flowers through the season, but the structure is so strong and so intricate; it would be easier to achieve in my mom’s sunny garden than in my own.)

We returned home to the news of a large pick up truck having driven into the Shelburne garden….Well….garden accidents can lead to a clean slate for new planting.  Good thing I have a pile of new plants ready for new homes!

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