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Posts Tagged ‘kitchen gardens’

Saturday, 14 July 2018

Colorful Coastal Gardens tour

 Grayland, Washington

presented by the Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County

Our ticket to the tour is a beautiful booklet with photos and a write up about each garden.

Each gardener chose a quotation to go with the garden description.

I must give credit to The Outlaw Gardener for the idea of using snippets of the garden descriptions throughout these posts.

As you can see, we were close to salt water all day.

Charles and Hans’ garden, Grayland

Gardeners’ quotation: “Gardening requires a lot of water, mostly in the form of perspiration.” -Lou Erickson

From the description, I expected a low maintenance and perhaps rather sparse garden.  We were delighted to find instead a lush but wisely planted garden of great beauty.

Allan’s photo

Each garden has a poster with a list of which sustainable garden practices were employed.

Hans and Charles’ garden

Our greeter and ticket stamper had on a most delightful garden hat.

A docent, neither Charles nor Han (Allan’s photo)

up the driveway (Allan’s photo)

looking back to the entry

When one of this gardener team, Charles, decided to remove a patch of lawn to install a dry river bed, he was responding to the summer drought situation this coastal region experiences. Except for small plantings, this part of the garden is watered only by rainfall.”

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

on up the driveway past the two story garage

along the side of the garage

handsome brunnera and enviably perfect hostas

farther up the shady border

Allan’s photo

across the front lawn to the sunny side

Allan’s photo

on the front porch

green and lovely table setting

At the back of the garage, on the shady side again:

Allan’s photo

looking back

from whence we came

The path around the side of the house beckons.

looking back along the side pathway

entering the back garden

Allan’s photo

“The garden behind the home invites guests into a private peaceful space of manicured lawn edged in stone block.  This formal setting contrasts with the informal dry river bed in front of the home.”

straight ahead

to my right

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

“The Lazy Gardener”

looking back

gorgeous tawny achillea

behind: the garden shed

Allan’s photo

Charles identifies a plant. (Allan’s photo)

Linaria (toadflax) was perhaps the plant in question. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan and I almost always walk through the garden by different routes and at a different pace, crossing paths occasionally, so it always interests me when we take almost the same photo.

Allan, in blue shirt, is in the above photo.

Allan’s photo

looking back

further back garden exploration

Here is the entry, through a hedge, to the field where the vegetable garden resides.

entry to the vegetable garden area (Allan’s photo)

“The vegetable garden continues to the rear of the formal garden and slips over the hillside to the raised beds designed for efficiency of labor.”

Allan’s photo

“Sand was the challenge to overcome. Compost and mulching was the answer.”

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The next door neighbour also had a vegetable garden.

Next door (Allan’s photo)

What a great start to the tour!

 

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

tour

A focus of the Master Gardener tour is very personal gardens that are designed and maintained by their owners.

Garden One: “Shades of Paris”

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Like all of the gardens on this tour, this one was located by a quiet country road.

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impeccably maintained

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tour guests checking in (Allan’s photo)

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I was well chuffed to be there.

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flowers in patterns

There were lots of zinnias and dahlias that would be in bloom not long from now.  If I lived closer than an hour away, I would be trying to get a peek when the bed above is in full bloom.

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Red white and blue in this place could evoke the French flag.

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pasture just beyond the garden

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People were walking back across the pasture from a nature path, possibly for nearby Fuss Creek.

I missed this opportunity and another, in the third garden, to explore further, because I was having an extra problem today of having a sore foot!

To my left was a fenced kitchen and flower garden.

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berries and roses

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I continued to be impressed by the complete lack of weeds.

 

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This fence was possibly designed to keep out more critters than just deer.

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Guests were invited to snack on the berries.  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

We turned our attention to the large patio at the side of the house.

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I felt this might remind the owners of the tradition of dining outdoors in France.

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waterfall pond

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Allan pointed out that the black and white photo in the program got a better overview of the pond than either of us did.

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Between garden and pasture, a wide maintenance path would make wheelbarrowing easy.

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looking back at the house

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fire circle between pond and pasture

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Allan’s photo

Neither Allan nor I got as good a photo of the fire circle as did our friend Ann (Spiffy Seeds, The Amateur Bot-ann-ist) who was touring just behind us.

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich: “my dream s’mores making fire pit”

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view over the pond from the fire circle

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beyond the garden

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hot tub

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to the next level

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The red tape was a warning where steps went down.

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a sit spot outside a fenced garden and more zinnias that will be colourful soon

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Allan’s photo

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fenced kitchen gardens with berries

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Allan’s photo

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between the house and the fenced berry patch

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Allan’s photo

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looking back as I walk around the house

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Salix integra ‘Hakuro-nishiki’ (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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zinnias, a big porch, quilt display

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I wish I had asked who was the quilter.

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leaving the colourful and impeccably maintained garden

 

 

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Sunday, 9 August 2015

Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour

The annual edible garden tour, presented by the Long Beach Grange, is a benefit for local food banks.

edibleofficial

Homewood

“A young food forest on about ½ acre, with some big changes underway this season”

Homewood lives up to its name with such a feeling of hominess.  The house was designed to have windows on two sides of every room and has an entire wall of books, something I always like to see.  Lisa, the owner of this garden, is the organizer of the Edible Tour.  She and her late spouse designed and built the house together.  She is a fiber artist as well as a food forest gardener, and her creations can be found at the Bay Avenue Gallery.  While some of her creations are elegant fashion accessories like her beaded purses, you can see that others are inspired by her kitchen garden.

photos courtesy Bay Avenue Gallery

photos courtesy Bay Avenue Gallery

So what is a food forest?  “A food forest is a gardening technique or land management system, which mimics a woodland ecosystem by substituting edible trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals. Fruit and nut trees make up the upper level, while berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals make up the lower levels.”

Lisa’s garden lives up to the description, with food at all levels of the garden.

arriving at the garden

arriving at the garden

entry, with climbing roses

entry, with climbing roses

Teresa and I enter the garden (Allan's photo)

Teresa and I enter the garden (Allan’s photo)

I love the blue trim on the house.

I love the blue trim on the house.  The white cages hold blueberries.

house

Lisa told us that she had at last successfully managed to make a deer-proof fence all around the perimeter of the property.  The smaller cages are to protect fruit from the birds; otherwise, there would be none left for Lisa of the special delicacies like blueberries.

looking south over the rain gauge: The summer has been exceptionally dry.

looking south over the rain gauge: The summer has been exceptionally dry.

I first took the path around the south side of the garden.

past the outdoor sink

past the outdoor sink

sink

sink

handy for washing soil off produce out in the garden

handy for washing soil off produce out in the garden

apples

apples (Allan’s photo)

Asian pear, Lisa's photo

Asian pear, Lisa’s photo

chairs

hydrangea

hydrangea

path

path2

Just this last month, Lisa laid this stone path instead of having grass paths.

Just this last month, Lisa laid this stone path instead of having grass paths.

nettle, a beneficial plant, caution-taped to avoid accidental contact

nettle, a beneficial plant, caution-taped to avoid accidental contact

aronia (chokecherry)

aronia (chokecherry)

path destination, a secret sit spot

path destination, a secret sit spot

bench2

around

path back to the house

path back to the house

house

Malva (mallow) flower

Malva (mallow) flower

Lisa and Teresa

Lisa and Teresa

The sunny center of the garden on the south side of the house is given to kitchen garden rows.

center

Lisa made numbered edging for the garden beds and told us that she is planning to do so for other beds, with tree names set into the concrete.

concrete mosaic row numbers

concrete mosaic row numbers

center

sun

beans

beans

beans

beans

I am sure that earlier in the year there were edible peas, as well.  By the almost mid-August date of this tour, the early season crops are done, especially in this hot dry year when the season for most flowers and fruits is earlier than usual.

sunflowers, turned away

sunflowers, turned away

sunflowers

sun

sun

cucumber tower, Lisa's photo

cucumber tower, Lisa’s photo

Bay Avenue Gallery art

Bay Avenue Gallery art (Allan’s photo)

cat from Bay Avenue Gallery

cat from Bay Avenue Gallery

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compost

east end of deck

east end of deck

refreshing herbal tea

refreshing herbal tea

edibles on display

edibles on display

cuke

Allan, Lisa, and Teresa look at the garden plan and plant lists.

Allan, Lisa, and Teresa look at the garden plan and plant lists.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking southeast from the deck

looking southeast from the deck

Lisa and her garden, showing the south wall of the greenhouse

Lisa and her garden, showing the south wall of the greenhouse

figs against the south wall of the greenhouse

figs against the south wall of the greenhouse

fig, Lisa's photo

fig, Lisa’s photo

in the window

in the window

inside the lean-to greenhouse on the south wall of the garage

inside the lean-to greenhouse on the south wall of the garage

in the green house

in the green house

stacked rock art piece, a gift from a friend

stacked rock art piece, a gift from a friend

We walked between the house and garage to see the north side of the garden.

between house and garage, looking north

between house and garage, looking north

the between garden

the between garden

ladies in waiting against the east garage wall

ladies in waiting against the east garage wall

hydrangea and buddleia

hydrangea and buddleia

fire circle

fire circle

north side of house

north side of house

shed on north side, with a little sit spot

shed on north side, with a little sit spot

east side of house: A work area is always of interest to me.

east side of house: A work area is always of interest to me.

almonds, Lisa's photo

almonds, Lisa’s photo

We returned to the deck on the south side of the house and sat with Lisa for awhile as the tour drew to a close.

deck

view from the deck

view from the deck

south view from living room

south view from living room

in2

east windows over bookshelves

east windows over bookshelves

one of Lisa's many books

one of Lisa’s many books

At five o’clock, the official end of tour time, we departed and saw Lisa taking in the tour sign.

the end of garden tour season

the end of garden tour season

That’s the end of our local garden tour season!  There will be one more tour, the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour, in mid-September.  Meanwhile, it’s back to focusing on work and my own garden.

 

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Sunday, 9 August 2015

Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour

The annual edible garden tour, presented by the Long Beach Grange, is a benefit for local food banks.

edibleofficial

Lavender And Farm

“Living sustainably on 3 acres on the Bay.”

This lavender farm and large kitchen garden was also on the tour in 2013.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: looking east from the road

Allan’s photo: looking east from the road

looking west over the lavender field; the big building is for drying and processing.

looking west over the lavender field; the big building is for drying and processing.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking south

looking south

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tour guests and guide (Allan's photo)

tour guests and guide (Allan’s photo)

fragrant field

fragrant field

tour host and lavender wand maker

tour host and lavender wand maker (Allan’s photo)

Tours are available on most days, it seems.

Tours are available on most days, it seems.

making lavender wands

making lavender wands

the harvest

the harvest

lavender wands

lavender wands

lavender cookies and tea

lavender cookies and tea

by the lavender products sales shed

by the lavender products sales shed

We then to the path along the south side of the animal field and the large kitchen garden.  There, I saw baby goats on the loose!

They are allowed to wander as they will always come back to their mother.

They are allowed to wander as they will always come back to their mother.

Allan's photo

Hershey and Honey: Allan’s photo

The one with the tiny ears (left) is a Lamancha goat; the ears are not cropped.  The long eared one is a Nigerian Dwarf goat.

In the fenced field, grown up goats rest in the shade.

In the fenced field, grown up goats rest in the shade.

Or bask in the sun.

Or bask in the sun.

ducks

ducks

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

This is the male goat.

This is the male goat.

His name is Darling.

His name is Darling.

looking west

looking west

Teresa brought the babies, whom she has known since their birth. (Allan's photo)

Teresa brought the babies, whom she has known since their birth. (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

goats5

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

They have a great interest in the fenced kitchen garden.

They have a great interest in the fenced kitchen garden. (Allan’s photo)

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corn

corn

I love the rusty fence panels, which is concrete reinforcing grid that we were able to find at Home Depot…after a search all around these parts to find some.  It was too big to transport, and we eventually used regular wire grid for our fence (a stronger more symmetrical kind than chicken wire).  This would be my favourite fence material if I could have acquired it.

looking east

looking east

corn2

east side of garden

east side of garden

yum

greenhouse at east end of garden

greenhouse at east end of garden

greenhouse2

greenhouse (and the residence, to the right in background)

The door is on the north side.

The door is on the north side.

Garden People

Garden People

Further east, a huge pole barn and more fenced veg on its south wall

Further east, a huge pole barn and more fenced veg on its south wall

rhubarb in quantity

rhubarb in quantity

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

road down the hill to the bay

road down the hill to the bay

Teresa and Allan walked down.  I decided not to because chunky gravel is hard on the knees.

another fenced area

another fenced area

lower level: another fenced area with fruit trees

lower level: another fenced area with fruit trees

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This yellow flower down by the bay...

This yellow flower down by the bay…

(gumweed)

(gumweed)

We IDed it through this article on the lavender wand table...but is the painting upside down?

We IDed it through this article on the lavender wand table…but is the painting upside down?  Maybe not, as it seems to grow all floppy like that.

looking up from bayside to the pole building

looking up from bayside to the pole building

wild yarrow

wild yarrow

Willapa Bay

Willapa Bay

looking west

looking west

looking east. If the Lavender Farm owners also own the tideland, they could add oysters to their sustainability.

looking east. If the Lavender Farm owners also own the tideland, they probably add oysters to their sustainability.

returning to the top of the road

returning to the top of the road

Meanwhile, I had just sat at a picnic table on the east side of the pole barn and enjoyed the view.

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Willapa Bay

Willapa Bay

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bayview2

telephoto with oyster beds

telephoto with oyster beds

lavender planted along the ridge

lavender planted along the ridge

buzzing with bees

buzzing with bees

The three of us walked down the road along the north side of the house, where the owners of the farm were cleaning an enormous tuna. I wondered if they had caught it or if they knew a tuna fisher-person.  With goats, ducks, chickens, a huge kitchen garden and lavender farm for an income, Lavender And is an impressive exercise in living off the land.

Next: the last garden of the day and one of my favourites

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Sunday, 9 August 2015

Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour

The annual edible garden tour, presented by the Long Beach Grange, is a benefit for local foodbanks.

 

 

Millner Garden (The Planter Box)

A constantly changing garden that has fed a large family for over 40 years.

The garden is behind Ray and Barbara Millner’s house, next door to the Planter Box.  Ray and Barbara are the mom and pop of the garden center, who have now mostly retired and passed the business on to their daughter, son, and daughter in law.

Some of the photos are from a pre-tour taken by me and Garden Tour Nancy on July 24th.

Next to the kitchen garden: Hardy fuchsias and hydrangeas waiting to be planted in a new park-like area.

Next to the kitchen garden: Hardy fuchsias and hydrangeas waiting to be planted in a new park-like area.

bees

bees

The main part of the kitchen garden

The main part of the kitchen garden

Actually, the kitchen garden has gotten so big that I don’t even know if it is fair to call this the main part.  I’m sure it is the original area of kitchen garden.

beans, pre-tour, 7-24

beans, pre-tour, 7-24

a classically tidy kitchen garden

a classically tidy kitchen garden

garden

Vaccinium 'Pink Lemonade' blueberry

Vaccinium ‘Pink Lemonade’ blueberry

strawberry cage

strawberry cage

netted strawberries, 7-24

netted strawberries, 7-24

the chooks

the chooks

The flock has a large field and a spacious chicken coop.

The flock has a large field and a spacious chicken coop.

enjoying a fruit snack

enjoying a fruit snack

pecking order

pecking order

friends

friends

Allan's photo: The north side of the chicken run and the first part of the eastward garden extension.

Allan’s photo: The north side of the chicken run and the first part of the eastward garden extension.

trellised vine

trellised vine

an edible tropaeolum vine

an edible tropaeolum vine

I wish I had taken notes as good as Garden Tour Nancy’s on the day of our pre-tour; I was more thinking of taking photos.

squash

squash2

Allan’s photo

The garden continues east along the pond.

berries by the pond; the water level is startlingly low this year

berries by the pond; the water level is startlingly low this year

looking south across the pond

looking south across the pond

I've never seen this pond with so much mud exposed in August.

I’ve never seen this pond with so much mud exposed in August.

looking back (west) toward the main kitchen garden

looking back (west) toward the main kitchen garden

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pondside garden

pondside garden

Flowers to attract pollinators are interspersed with fruit and vegetables.

Flowers to attract pollinators are interspersed with fruit and vegetables.

hoops

looking east toward a grape arbour

looking east toward a grape arbour

The cover protects the grapes from dew.

The cover protects the grapes from dew.

Ray on our pre-tour, 7-24

Ray on our pre-tour, 7-24

Ray says next time he would make the cover a dome, as the vines need more room.

Ray says next time he would make the cover a dome, as the vines need more room.

And they say you can't grow grapes at the beach!

And they say you can’t grow grapes at the beach!

grapes4

flowers2

A long awaited bridge was built by Ray’s son, Raymond, right before the tour.

bridge of recycled lumber and pallets

bridge of recycled lumber and pallets

This open up the area to the east of the pond, which Ray intends to turn into a parklike setting with hydrangeas and hardy fuchsias.

looking west from across the bridge

looking west from across the bridge

Ray leading a guided tour of the garden (Allan's photo)

Ray leading a guided tour of the garden (Allan’s photo)

looking west over the pond

looking west over the pond

Allan saw several dragonflies by the shoreline:

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looking north across the pond

looking north across the pond

Ray describing his parkland vision. (Allan's photo)

Ray describing his parkland vision. (Allan’s photo)

Several hundred feet east on that green road is Ray’s potato patch.  He put it far enough out that it encourages him to take a good long walk to check on it.

We caught up to Ray’s guided tour as they left the third part of the kitchen garden, behind the greenhouses of the Planter Box garden center.

Ray and tour guests

Ray and tour guests

east of The Planter Box itself, another garden area...

east of The Planter Box itself, another garden area…

built on compost and garden debris from the nursery....

built on aged compost and garden debris from the nursery….

lush thriving plants

lush thriving plants

garlic harvest drying in a shed

garlic harvest drying in a shed

It’s a spectacular kitchen garden that feeds an extended family with produce left over for friends and Grange members.  While I took lousy notes (ie. none), I share with you here some plant names that Nancy noted on our pre-tour day:

Caroline raspberry best for fall

Territorial fall and winter blend

Valley girl tomatoes

White runner beans

Gray grillers zucchini for grilling.

Julia tomatoes good for canning and dry

Wild treasure BlackBerries

Eating on the Wild Side book

As we were about to depart, I picked up a few plants for the Long Beach planters, and we also added Planter Box Teresa to our touring party for the remainder of the day.

front display at Planter Box; still lots of good plants for sale.

front display at Planter Box; still lots of good plants for sale.

Cosmos

Cosmos

Celosias

Celosias

We were glad Teresa was able to get away from the nursery and come with us to see the rest of the gardens.

Next: three of the smaller gardens.

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 9 August 2015

Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour

The annual edible garden tour, presented by the Long Beach Grange, is a benefit for local food banks.

Little Tyke Garden

John and Judy named their garden “Little Tyke” and describe it as “simple, easy, fun”.  I visited it with Garden Tour Nancy not long ago and on that day was able to tour the flower garden part.  Today, that had caution tape because the paths are narrow.  The main edible tour feature was John’s container kitchen garden, but for me the whole garden is a delight, especially his garden art from found objects.

Little Tyke

Little Tyke

front garden

front garden

Only the balloons hint at the artful garden in back.

Only the balloons hint at the artful garden in back. (Allan’s photo)

compost sifter on wheelbarrow

compost sifter on wheelbarrow

garden table divides kitchen garden from flower garden

garden table divides kitchen garden from flower garden (Allan’s photo)

one of John's cool art creations

one of John’s cool art creations

I like it very much.

I like it very much.

driftwood and found objects make art

driftwood and found objects make art

looking south into the flower garden

looking south into the flower garden

Driftwood protects a fish pond from raccoons.

Driftwood protects a fish pond from raccoons.  (Allan’s photo)

The sign is one that they found.

The sign is one that they found.

A tour guest in the container veg garden peer into the flower garden.

A tour guest in the container veg garden peer into the flower garden.  (Allan’s photo)

tomatoes on south wall of garage

tomatoes on south wall of garage

container kitchen garden

container kitchen garden

backlit chard

backlit chard

looking back at the house

looking back at the house

deck railing

deck railing

on the deck

on the deck

on the deck

on the deck (Allan’s photo)

another critter by John

another critter by John

deck windows looking east

deck windows looking east (Allan’s photo)

a shovel critter that rocked

a shovel critter that rocked (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo of me photographing John and a tour guests. John's in the Hawaiian shirt.

Allan’s photo of me photographing John and a tour guests. John’s in the Hawaiian shirt.

Allan's photo: tour host Judy and me.

Allan’s photo: tour host Judy and me.

I said to Judy “Your voice, the way you move, and the way you look are so much like a Judy I used to know that it’s spooky.”  She said “I AM that Judy!”  It was funny.  She modestly had a name tag just saying “John’s wife”, because she said the kitchen garden is his project.  She made me laugh.

She invited me in to see a wintertime project of John’s:

a button head with watches for eyes

a button head with watches for eyes

her friendly little dog

her friendly little dog (Allan’s photo)

very friendly

very friendly – I wonder if he is “little tyke”

flowers on the deck

flowers on the deck (Allan’s photo)

looking northeast over the garden

looking northeast over the garden

over

dawson

SE view

SE view

corner

all kinds of fun objects

all kinds of fun objects

rounds

John his ownself

John his ownself

from my pre-tour visit

from my pre-tour visit

I was sorry to leave because I’d really taken to John and Judy on both visits to their garden.  However, we have seven more gardens to see.  Before we leave for the next one, let’s look around the charming cul-de-sac on which John and Judy live.

intermission

This house is at the entrance and is next to the original house on the block.

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You can just see a taller house behind it that was the first house on the block:

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An arbour on the other side of the street from Little Tyke:

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pretty window boxes at the end of the little street

pretty window boxes at the end of the little street

a pond makes a nice view for end of the block houses

a pond makes a nice view for end of the block houses

Next: the garden behind the Planter Box garden center that feeds a large family.

 

 

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Friday, 24 July 2015

Garden Tour Nancy and I had plans for some Edible Garden Tour pre-touring, but first, we went by invitation to see a charming small Seaview garden.

Sue’s Garden

My Facebook friend Betty had told me about the garden of her neighbour, Sue.  First, Nancy and I had a look over the fence at the well-grown vegetables on Betty’s “Farm”.

Betty's farm

Betty’s farm

and her darling dog, Ella

and her darling dog, Ella

We then went to view the cottage garden next door belonging to flower-loving neighbour, Sue.  Betty had told me it was a good example of how someone on a budget and a small space can have a garden with, as Betty says, “just love and hard work. She looks for ‘deals’ and nurtures them into lush, healthy plants. Sue grows most of her garden from seeds which she shares freely.”

Black Eyed Susan vine at the gate

Black Eyed Susan vine at the gate

Sue's flower garden, staged in containers.  Later there will be sunflowers along the fence.

Sue’s flower garden, staged in containers. Later there will be sunflowers along the fence.

zinnia

zinnia

zinnia

zinnia

zinnias

beans

beans

morning glory

morning glory

We had an audience.

We had an audience.

cat2

rose

sweet peas

sweet peas

sweet peas

sweet peas

Nancy and I were both delighted.  I would much rather see a tiny garden grown from scratch and from sharing than the grandest estate.

Dawson Garden

Next, Nancy and I visited another small garden in Long Beach to get some sneak peek photos for the Edible Garden tour (which, by the time you read this, will have taken place on August 9th.  Although I’ll save most of the photos for my edible tour posts.  Upon arrival, we were offered a free hydrangea which Nancy happily arranged to dig up this fall.

the hydrangea in question

the hydrangea in question

a well grown delphinium

a well grown delphinium

The edible portion of the garden is in containers, and I am sure, or at least I assume, that’s because, like me, the gardeners are more into using the majority of the space for a flower garden.  Because the paths are narrow, they’ll have that part of the garden blocked off during tour day.  Owners John and Judy let us go through it.

This driftwood is piled over a little fish pond to protect the fish from the local raccoons.

This driftwood is piled over a little fish pond to protect the fish from the local raccoons.

pond

protected pond

John makes garden art from objects.

art

driftwood decor

driftwood decor

screened fish tub

screened fish tub

and another tub protected with driftwood

and another tub protected with driftwood

view from the deck

view from the deck

potted plants on the deck

potted plants on the deck

overlooking the garden

overlooking the garden

another creation

another creation

ingredients

ingredients

a pond next door

a pond next door

The home is on a cul-de-sac where several other homes also have gardens, and one gets the feeling it’s a friendly street to live on.

a tidy house at the inside end of the cul-de-sac

a tidy house at the inside end of the cul-de-sac

42nd Street Café

Nancy and I replenished our strength..and talked about garden tours…over lunch at the 42nd Street Café.

locally canned albacore tuna sandwich with house made potato chips

locally canned albacore tuna sandwich with house made potato chips

Russian vegetarian scramble with sour cream

Russian vegetarian scramble with sour cream

homemade jellies

homemade jellies

Gene Miles, retired Long Beach city administrator, was at the café and showed us some photos of how he is remodeling his garden, which was on the garden tour in 2013.  I got him to email them to me and will share them a little later.

On the way to our next pre-tour, Nancy and I went to the

Columbia Pacific Farmers Market 

It takes place every Friday afternoon at Veterans Field in Long Beach.

produce stall

produce stall

flowers

flowers

Nancy admires some fresh berries.

Nancy admires some fresh berries.

berries2

Double J and the Boys on stage (except more girls than boys today)

Double J and the Boys on stage (except more girls than boys today)

our neighbours' farm, Starvation Alley

our neighbours’ farm, Starvation Alley

Our garden makes a nice backdrop.

Our Vet Field corner garden bed makes a nice backdrop.

the Humane Society raffle booth...with kitty litter buckets holding down the tent in the ubiquitous wind

the Humane Society raffle booth…with kitty litter buckets holding down the tent in the ubiquitous wind

plants

plants

onions and flowers

onions and flowers

dahlias

green

Nancy's bouquet

Nancy’s bouquet

Pink Poppy Bakery

Pink Poppy Bakery

squash blossoms from Pink Poppy Farm

squash blossoms from Pink Poppy Farm

another good backdrop: our flag pavilion garden

another good backdrop: our flag pavilion garden

Garden Tour Nancy

Garden Tour Nancy

The Planter Box garden

pb

Next, Nancy and I went on a sneak peek pretour of the expansive vegetable garden grown by Ray Millner, patriarch of The Planter Box.  He and his wife, Barbara, have pretty much retired and passed on the garden center to their son and daughter, Raymond and Teresa, and Ray devotes himself to growing enough food to feed his extended family.

Ray and his grapes, protected from dew.  He says he will remodel the top to be domed.

Ray and his grapes, protected from dew. He says he will remodel the top to be domed.

I am saving the photos for the edible tour coverage.  But here is the hand of a gardener:

hand

On the way home, in Long Beach, we saw the family of deer that eat from the planters on Seventh Street (which is just north of where they are).

at home in the town

at home in the town

in my own garden

This is a before photo of an upcoming project area.

This is a before photo of an upcoming project area.

I had thought I was going to spend most of my weekend painting lumber and was thrilled to find that Allan had already done it.

posts

posts

And he was now mowing the lawn.

And he was now mowing the lawn.  At least the part in back that is still growing.

While watering, I found a Todd plant that had suddenly sprouted!

While watering, I found a Todd plant that had suddenly sprouted! I up-potted it right away.

The tadpoles in the water box are refusing to turn into frogs.

The tadpoles in the water box are refusing to turn into frogs.

passion flowers

passion flowers

with sweet peas

with sweet peas

After dark, I heard the sound of rain.

rain, making a puddle! thrilling!

rain, making a puddle! thrilling!

Gene’s Garden

Gene had emailed me the photos of his Long Beach garden and here they are.  You may remember his garden from the 2013 garden tour, or from this article by Debbie Teashon.

the driveway container garden

the driveway container garden

new: a two tiered deck on the west side

new: a two tiered deck on the west side, surrounded by garden beds…and do I see a new fence?

the view from the driveway

the view from the driveway…hey, that fence is new along the street!

I am so impressed with the new streetside fence and sweet peas.

I am so impressed with the new streetside fence and sweet peas.

sweet peas

sweet peas

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ might have come back from 2013.

what was a too-narrow straight edged bed along the house

what was a too-narrow straight edged bed along the house

Thanks, Gene, for the virtual garden tour.  You have done grand improvements.

 

 

 

 

 

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