Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Klipsan Beach Cottages’

Wednesday, 13 June 2018

at home before work

The pink rose that overhangs the east corner path was one of the few plants that was here when we moved in.  It is a once bloomer; then I will cut it back to avoid the snagging that is happening now.

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

Salvia ‘Caradonna’

We’d had more wonderful rain.

Skooter wanted me to stay home.

Geranium ‘Orion’

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

rambling roses

Clivia indoors, admired while breakfasting

When we went to the Bank of the Pacific before work, I was smitten with the foliage in their landscape:

After the briefest of checks on The Red Barn garden, we went to….

Diane’s garden

….to weed and tidy and to fertilize the containers.

the raised septic box garden

Brodiaea ‘Pink Diamond’

Allium christophii, Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’

our good friend Misty

I weeded an obscure and neglected corner that I should probably take more seriously.

The roadside garden needs more plants:

The Planter Box

We stopped to pick up a few more six packs of painted sage.  I found a Sambucus ‘Lemony Lace’ that I could not resist (but did not photograph it).

zinnias…I love them but don’t use them much. Should try again.

I could not resist buying some flame-like celosia, for the fire station. (Allan’s photo)

Klipsan Beach Cottages

A deer had gotten into the fenced garden and nibbled the roses.

buttercups in the lawn

We groomed the garden for an hour and took some photos for the KBC Facebook page.

Knockout Roses (Allan’s photo)

Geranium sanguineum (Allan’s photo)

the east gate

the birdbath view

Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’ and Geranium ‘Ann Folkard’

lilies

Long Beach 

We did some tidying of the city hall garden…

a welcome snake in the garden (Allan’s photo)

…and got another buckets-load of mulch to apply to the beach approach garden.

Allan’s photo

We got to pet some adorable pomeranians, a family of four.

Allan’s photo

With hope for a better looking display, I added some painted sage to the welcome sign.

Shelburne Hotel

We had time to work on weeding the paths at the Shelburne.

I had an odd encounter while working there today.  A woman said she admired the garden and asked what the variegated figwort was.  I said the common name and then added that its name is “scrophularia’, kind of an unappealing sounding name and that, like many of the plants in the garden, it was a division from my own garden.  She told me that plants people would think scrophularia  was a fine name and that she had a degree in “plant science” and added, “You probably don’t get many compliments, but it is probably just work to you.”  I had no words to respond to that.  It is actually everything to me.

Ilwaco Fire Station

There was no room in the planter for the silly little celosias; they had to go into the garden, where they are too few.

wish this garden would hurry up

Oh, I do have a photo of the Sambucus ‘Lemony Lace’ after all, and my new “stone troughs” that Allan gleaned for me from the city works yard (with permission).

Allan’s photo

I was hoping to get more port curbside gardens weeded this evening.  We ran out of time after a nine and a half hour day and will have to start there tomorrow.

 

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 30 May 2018

The Depot Restaurant

We checked on the watering, although not the window boxes because we were in a hurry with much planned for today.

camassia and rodgersia (Allan’s photo)

The Red Barn Arena

This little pot by the barn door looked good.

The first section of garden looked good.

But further on, Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ was drooping from lack of watering.  The same thing happened last year, and I this year I decided it had to go.

I give up on the idea of yellow sunflowers by a red barn.  I have to rethink and plant only the most drought tolerant plants here.

I left a little bit of it by a barrel.  They get watered a bit more regularly and so some water might spill over.

Cosmo the barn cat

Allan’s photo

in the barn (Allan’s photo)

thirsty coreopsis by the barn

I need to remove that coreopsis and replace with something that needs minimal water.  This particular barrel used to get watered more regularly…

We then went next door to…

Diane’s garden

Allan’s photo

our good friend Misty

back yard containers

talking with client and friend Diane by the septic box garden (which still needs more!)

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Allan potted up a new calla lily that Diane had brought home.

the roadside garden

verbascum

valerian and catmint against the house (Allan’s photo)

 

Basket Case Greenhouse

It’s hard to drive by without stopping.

Penny  (Allan’s photo)

Deb’s garden

We took a break to tour two gardens: Steve and John’s bayside garden and the work going on at Deb’s garden (formerly the Barclay garden), where Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) have been working hard for the new owner.

future farmers’ market produce garden

planting trees in new berms along the driveway

North Beach Garden Gang

the way to Willapa Bay

Next door is Steve and John’s Bayside Garden.  We walked through it before returning to work.  That self guided tour will be our next post; their garden always deserves its own space.

Steve and John’s garden from Deb’s (Allan’s photo)

Klipsan Beach Cottages

This year, we did not get around to cutting back a native grass on the edge of the woodsy swale.  I asked Allan to just dig it out, which I have thought of doing every year.

before

It was big.

after (Allan’s photos)

elephant garlic (Allan’s photo)

Sarah (Allan’s photo)

There is some talk that if Mary and Denny move away after retiring, we might take Sarah and her brother Timmy.

After grooming the garden, I took some photos for the Klipsan Beach Cottages Facebook page.

Tetrapanax

bearded iris

Allium bulgaricum

also known as Nectaroscordum

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’

birdbath view

Tiger Eyes sumac

corokia cotoneaster

On the way south, we stopped at…

The Planter Box

I sought and acquired a pineapple sage.

And a couple more tomatoes and some cukes.

Shelburne Hotel

Allan screwed some wire between trellis and big flower pots to help mitigate the windsail effect on the trellises.

Allan’s photos

I trimmed back the big sanguisorba that I had transplanted from KBC last week; it had just kept on looking a bit wilty around the edges.

Allan’s photo

Port of Ilwaco

We watered several of the gardens along Howerton Avenue.

on Waterfront Way (Allan’s photo)

in a curbside garden (Allan’s photo)

Montana Mary had asked why we call one little garden “the driveover garden”.  Here it is, a tiny bed between big parking lots and driveways.  Big trucks drive over it sometimes.

Another tiny bed by the port office:

Linaria purpurea (toadflax) seeds itself around but is not really up to the harsh conditons:

The Depot Restaurant

We had our North Beach Garden Gang dinner tonight.  On the way in to the restaurant, I saw that the window boxes were not getting watered.  (Roxanne from The Basket Case plants them up and we care for them, relying on the sprinkler system to water them.)  This led to a flurry to Allan watering them with a jug of water that we carry for emergencies, me fretting over them, and texts to various people.

Finally, dinner.  It was burger night.  We are thankful at this time of year for restaurants that let us dine at eight.  Restaurants that close at eight are no good to us now.

Allan’s photo

chocolate pot du creme

Annuals planting time is over except for at home, where I soon have to plant in my garden two six packs of painted sage and tomatoes and cukes from the Planter Box.

 

Read Full Post »

Wednesday, 23 May 2018

I was chuffed when Kilyn, who visited on Saturday, posted this on her Instagram.

Red Barn Arena

While checking on the Red Barn planters, which I am happy to report had been watered, I saw this handsome horse named Sven.  I thought he was an appaloosa.  He is, in fact, a knabstrupper.

Diane’s garden

Allan’s photo: plants on a bench to protect from Holly the puppy.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo, septic box garden

I usually do not like double narcissi, but this one…wow, so late blooming.

Narcissus albus plenus odoratus

Based on the name, I should have stopped to smell the flower.

Basket Case Greenhouse

Allan’s photo; definitely should have smelled that narcissus.

I picked up some Salvia viridis (painted sage) that Roxanne had grown.

And some Cosmos ‘Xanthos’; I had given her some seeds.  I look forward to seeing this one bloom; it is new, and said to be a pale yellow dwarf cosmos.

staff member (Allan’s photo)

Silene dioica ‘Clifford Moor’ (Allan’s photo)

The Planter Box

I wanted some more of their excellent annuals.

portulacas

osterspermums

spoon osteos

I got myself a new Cool Blue variegated ceanothus.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

KBC has long been my favourite job. I finally have permission to reveal that owners/managers Mary and Denny are retiring at the end of this year.  2018 will therefore be our last year working there.  We certainly hope someone buys the cottage resort and we will recommend our favourite gardeners to take over when the time comes.  It is a long drive north to do an hour or two a week at just this one job, our last remaining job at the north end of the peninsula.  Not having this job will feel like having almost an extra day per week for our other jobs…maybe the end of nine hour days in summer in 2019. We need to cut back for our health and sanity, so I am not in mourning (yet). It has been an odd feeling to care for the garden with no future plans for it, no thinking ahead to “next year”.  I’ve known about the end coming for about a year now.

I was intensely relieved that all the agastaches, from the first batch of healthy plants, still look fine in the KBC garden.  Thank goodness.

Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’

I was jealous because my own Golden Jubilee was one of the later-purchased diseased ones.  My favourite, and I don’t have one.   And now I am scared to buy any!  I will take a cutting of this one later this summer.

not sure which one this is but it looks fine…

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’

another healthy specimen: Sarah

a monster creeping buttercup (Allan’s photo)

After planting some cosmos and painted sage and doing some weeding, I took some photos of the garden for the KBC Facebook page (which I will, obviously, give up administering when Mary and Denny have moved on).

in the fenced garden

Next year the rampant Japanese anemone will be someone else’s problem!

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

outside the fenced garden:

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Rhododendron ‘Cynthia’

Mary and Denny’s house

Now I do feel verklempt.  It is a beautiful garden.  Over the years, Mary has been wanting more space to show between plants.  That has been hard for me to achieve!

The Shelburne Hotel

Back south again in Seaview, outside the Shelburne, we encountered my former co gardener, Robert.  I asked his opinion on which lavender to use in some new urns there.

I liked the tall one (‘Phenomenal’).  Allan and Robert both preferred the short one.  I was impressed when Robert asked, “Is the Melianthus major still in Fifth Street Park?  I didn’t see it; did you cut it back?”  (Yes.)

We had three planters to plant up by the bocce ball court.  We used herbs to fit in with the kitchen theme of the back yard.  There is not much garden space back here; I have some herbs and flowers along the edges. The old and unkempt kitchen garden of six railroad tie squares were removed to make the courtyard.  I was amused to see that potatoes and raspberries are determinedly making a comeback.

The front garden:

north half

Port of Ilwaco

We watered the curbside gardens by Salt Hotel, Skywater Gallery, and Freedom Market.

Salt garden santolinas (Allan’s photo)

Allan liked the santolina festooned with creeping charlie.

Salt garden (Allan’s photo). The river rock is hard for me to work on.

Freedom Market garden

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The columbines also appeared on their own.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

I did not plant the dog daisies.  They also appeared on their own.

looking west (Allan’s photo)

As we left, a light mist had begun to fall.  I was pleased the plants would get more water.  The drizzle would not have been enough moisure on its own.

At home, I was able to erase KBC from the annuals list.

Round 2 has appeared on the list. Then we will be done.

A 9.5 hour day.

I was hoping tomorrow could be All Shelburne.  It is not to be, but perhaps we can have a long afternoon there.

Read Full Post »

Monday, 30 April 2018

Skooter taking in the sun on the front porch

My most beloved Monty Don (host of Gardeners’ World) says that black beetles are a sign of a healthy garden, and that they eat slugs.

Here’s one crossing our driveway this morning. (Allan’s photo)

I love the way the slightly darker, glossier post office sets off our volunteer garden:

Stipa gigantea

By the way, someone convinced me that Stipa should be pronounced with an i like pipe or ripe.  Montagu DON says Stee-pa. So! Stee-pa it is.

Allium neapolitanum

The Red Barn Arena

We met the new barn cat, Cosmo.

A Coast Guard helicopter flew overhead while we worked.

Allan’s photos

my new friend, 9 months old

Someone had left a gift of buttercup flowers in a barrel.

We are still not over our bad, debilitating colds, but we do feel more energetic today.

Tulip clusiana ‘Lady Jane’

crabbing gear at the barn

Diane’s garden

Allan added a bale of Gardner and Bloome mulch to the driveway corner garden.

before

after

I added an Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’ and some more sweet pea seeds to the long roadside bed.

Our main focus was adding some Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ and ‘Sangria’, Salvia patens, Nicotiana langsdorfii, and some seeds (alyssum, pale yellow cosmos ‘Xanthos’, night scented stock, peachy nasturtiums) to the raised septic garden.

Over the fence:

Allan’s photo

I am most pleased with the display so far in this new raised bed.

Tulip ‘Cummins’

Tulip ‘Cummins’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

Tulip ‘China Town’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’ in a pot

The Planter Box

We visited The Planter Box to see if they might have a columnar ornamental pear to replace one that got taken out by a drunk driver in Ilwaco.  The only one was THIS size:

PB co-owner Raymond is a tall man. This tree is maybe even too big to even fit in the sidewalk hole!

Well.  We had thought we were not going to have to be the ones to deal with the tree issue at all, and now that it is so late, we may just have to plant flowers in that one sidewalk spot. I heartily rejected the proposed idea (not proposed at the Planter Box!) that we should just put in a different kind of tree.  You cannot put in one odd duck in a run of ten street trees.

If only the Planter Box had had one the size of their manageable apple trees:

At the Planter Box:

Armeria maritima (sea thrift)

artichokes

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Due to bad weather, and our bad colds, and our Shelburne Hotel garden project, we had not been to KBC all month.  We found that the deer had been getting into the fenced garden and eating the roses.  Other than that, all looked well enough and we got the garden somewhat groomed and a few plants planted in a busy two hour gardening frenzy.  I was grateful that Allan did all the planting—my least favourite gardening job.

Allan’s photos:

a new Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ 

The podophyllum has gone from one leaf to three this year.

unfurling sword ferns

My photos:

tree peony

roses stripped by deer

Thalictrum ‘Elin’

Tulips ‘Black Hero’ and ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulip ‘Formosa’

Tulip ‘Formosa’

Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

Tetrapanax

viridiflora tulips

pond garden

tulips and Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

taking leave of the tidied up garden

more

On the way home, we made one little stop at the Shelburne, where Allan staked a little (will be big) Fuchsia ‘Sharpitor Aurea’; I had gotten worried it would be stepped on.

I had to do billing, so might not get to watch any Gardeners’ World this evening.  Maybe…just one episode at bedtime.

later:

Bliss. In episode five of year 2015, a jungle garden is visited.

You can watch the segment Here .

At age 60, Monty can gracefully flop to the ground to commune with the plants.

I envy that spryness.

Takeaway: “It is important to make ponds because we’ve lost the ponds that used to be on farmlands all over the country.”

Read Full Post »

Thursday, 22 March 2018

We did not do much work today.  We’d have done none, had we not had an appointment with our excellent new accountant who lives at the north end of the Peninsula about forty minutes away.  Since we were driving north, we also resolved to do a bit of work up that way.

First, we stopped in at the Port of Ilwaco office to try to find out more about the boatyard garden (will it be dug up for an important water project, and if so, how much?).  I could not connect with the port manager today to find out. We did deadhead the narcissi on the south side of the office in the full-on cold wind. A shopper from the Don Nisbett Art Gallery next door got caught in my photo because I was too eager to escape the wind to let him walk out of the way before snapping the shot.

On the way north, we bought some potting soil and two more packets of sweet pea seeds at

The Planter Box.

(I have resolved to plant sweet peas along the boatyard fence as I always do.  Surely the diggers, if diggers they be, would not dig by the fence all the way along.)

at The Planter Box

violas

After our accounting appointment, we briefly worked at

Klipsan Beach Cottages

where Allan trimmed a big sword fern and I planted a few sweet pea and poppy seeds.

looking in the east gate of the fenced garden

I recently came across a photo that compares the yews when Robert and Denny laid the pavers and the yews were first planted in 2003:

and now:

The garden, while still somewhat bare, has plenty to show of interest:

early tulips

blooming rosemary

blueberries

new foliage of Thalictrum ‘Elin’ which will tower overhead.

summer in the fenced garden with Thalictrum ‘Elin’ at middle right

Euphorbia characias subsp. wulfenii

Euphorbia (dulcis ‘Chameleon, probably)

Euphorbia myrsinites (donkeytail spurge)

daphne (several years old despite a miffy reputation)

azalea

double hellebore

pieris

pulmonarias

hyacinths

camellia (Allan’s photo)

And inside, out of the bitter cold and wind that was blustering even in that sheltered garden:

our good friend Bella, sensibly indoors

Ed’s garden

On the way south, we visited our friends Ed and Jackson Strange to drop off some plant starts (libertia and Lonicera fragrantissima and some rugosa roses; he can pot up and sell the latter at his big plant sale on Memorial Day weekend).

Jackson was most excited to see us.

We humans toured Ed’s exquisite small garden.

a WELL mulched gunnera

the deck

Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’

In the back garden, I scored a presale on the sort of garden bench I have wanted for a long time.

Ed helped Allan load it into our trailer, where it still sits, because I can’t help unload it.  We need help to get it into the back yard; the top piece is SOOOO heavy.

Long Beach

The sun had come out again as we drove further south.  Even though the wind was cold and fierce, we decided we could just about stand getting some buckets of mulch for Fifth Street Park.

Allan’s photo

before

after (Allan’s photos)

While Allan applied the mulch, I deadheaded narcissi in front of the Hungry Harbor, and then we rewarded ourselves for our work in truly miserable wind, with crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder.

Captain Bob’s is behind the NW quadrant of the park.

Captain Bob’s cookies

Refreshed and warm again, we soon got cold by deadheading a few narcissi at city hall and then a rough deadheading of the narcissi at the welcome sign.

before

I took my after photo from inside the van….

….while Allan finished up the back of the sign, somewhat out of the wind and in a rain squall.

The rain stopped again.  We had had enough.  The local weather shows why we could not take anymore today, with 34.5 mph wind that felt like 35 degrees:

 

I had some cyclamens from MaryBeth to plant at the Shelburne. Next time!

At the library, we picked up a book and Allan took these photos:

Fritillaria meleagris

hellebore

and a quilt

At home, I delivered some narcissi clippings to the compost bins and ever so briefly enjoyed my garden.

Corylopsis pauciflora

a good crop of shotweed in this bed

window box

Frosty came with.

Allan’s photo

None of us stayed outside for long.

All I could erase today was one sweet pea task; Fifth Street still needs more mulch.

I am determined to take tomorrow off in order to avoid more cold wind.

 

 

Read Full Post »

Public Service Announcement (because we’ve been saying Basket Case will reopen on March 2nd):

Monday, 27 February 2018

We had a beautiful sunny day to head north to Klipsan Beach Cottages and then south to the Shelburne.  Before work, I dug up some cool plants for the Shelburne garden.

acquiring a clump of Solidago ‘Fireworks’

I was so sad to find that my Sanguisorba ‘Lilac Squirrel’ looks dead, and even sadder on the following day when I found that all sources for it appear to be sold out (Digging Dog, Far Reaches Farm, and Plant Delights).

I dug up some Persicaria ‘Firetail’ and some Persicaria bistorta superba (not sure about that one because it has a rather short period of bloom), two kinds of sanguisorba and a helenium, some elephant garlic and some little starts of a showy red mustard, and some Egyptian walking onions (cute and ornamental).

While loading the plant buckets into the trailer, we saw this neighbour.

Allan’s photos

strolling west, looking for another garden to snack on

Our volunteer Ilwaco post office garden needs some weeding.  No time for that today.  There is a chunk out of the golden oregano (front corner) where I swiped some for the Shelburne last week.

crocus close up

On the way, to work, we made a hellebore quest at

The Planter Box.

Jackpot. I just needed one.

an artistic display in the garden shop

Klipsan Beach Cottages

On our first visit this year to Klipsan Beach Cottages, we mostly did the clipping back of sword and deer ferns so that their new unfurling fronds will show (and because the old foliage will look tatty by midsummer).  Also pruned some roses and hydrangeas.

Allan makes the yearly bold leap over the pond to trim the ferns. So far, he has not fallen in, but I am always ready for an even more exciting photo.

after

before

after (Allan’s photos)

Pulmonaria in bloom on the pond island bed.

Looking in the east gate of the fenced garden

inside the fenced garden before going after that big sword fern

after

Bella examines my work

Bella thinks it is time to go to the beach. Mary chases after. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

sword ferns by cottage 8, before and after (Allan’s photos)

The garden is just waking up.

crocuses

The bench holds lily bags; I planted some in big pots to be brought forward when in bloom.

I clipped old hellebore leaves from the lawn border.

NOW I spy a little snail.

After the work at KBC, I dug up starts of plants to take to the Shelburne: Sanguisorba obtusa (the kind with pink feathers although not as good as ‘Lilac Squirrel’), Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’, Arisarum proboscideum (mouse plant), Saxifraga dentata.  It’s been awhile since I had a garden (other than the port gardens) that needed lots of plants.  I rotate plants around all “my” gardens.  Skyler giveth and Skyler taketh away.

The Shelburne Hotel (and Pub)

We planted lots of free starts and a couple of hellebores and three different dicentra and some lily bulbs and 40 sprouted but healthy looking yellow tulip bulbs from an anonymous well-wisher.

The street in front and the parking lot were so full that we parked on the next block to the north.  We soon learned that the pub was having a “soft opening” by word of mouth to people connected with the hotel restaurants (plural, because the same owners, Tiffany and Brady, also own the Adrift Hotel and its [pickled fish] restaurant.

With almost all the plants in, I had a bit of a crisis.  I could not find my most special pink feathery sanguisorba!  I searched anxiously….

There they are, at last! in a pile.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We then repaired to the pub and sat at one of the new tables in the main lobby.  The pub has been cleverly expanded to include a larger area than it used to.

in the Shelburne pub

our table in the lobby, with glassless  interior windows into the pub.

Allan’s photo

On the way out, I looked at the garden with all its new plant babies.  I am eager to see them grow.

Looking north: Allan made a bamboo mini-teepee over each clump of lilies.

looking south

Ilwaco Community Building

We were just in time for the city council meeting.

shade garden at the entry to the Ilwaco community building.

Allan’s photo, crocuses closed up for the evening (with poppy foliage)

City Council meeting was brief but productive.

Allan’s photo

We were home by 6:45, giving me time to do a post for books read in 1996.

At home, KBC came off the work board for now.

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Friday, 17 November 201

At the post office, I got another meaningful and tender card about my Smoky cat, from our friend Jan Bono (author of the excellent local Sylvia Avery mystery series).

My main goal today was to get to Klipsan Beach Cottages, because I had promised Mary that we’d be there on the next workable day.  I couldn’t resist working on some Long Beach planters on the way.  I had made a list of block by block work on my iPhone notes that I would take pleasure in erasing as each task was done.

Long Beach

We finished the “Shelly block”, as I had called the southernmost block that we had not completed in yesterday’s storm.

I found two very worn rocks hidden in one of the planters.

Moving on, I cleaned up the planter by the Herb N’ Legend Smoke Shop, cutting back the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ even though it still had flowers.  I want the work to be done rather than going back and dealing with mushy, icy cold plants later on.  If the winter is mild, Rozanne might even throw out some more foliage and flowers.  However, forecasters are predicting a cold and even snowy winter.

before

after; I do feel bad about cutting perennials that are still flowering.

navigating puddles

I wanted to do two more planter intersections.  Fortunately, I realized that if we did, we would run out of time up at KBC.

I still have not been sleeping well, averaging six hours a night.  I needed coffee, and we found our favourite Great Escape barista on duty.

Great Escape espresso drive through

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We vigorously attacked the fall clean up.

honeysuckle arbor at 2:15

Before cutting the honeysuckle and rose way way back so that Denny can repair the fence panels, Allan chopped two big patches of shasta daisies.

before

after (Allan’s photos)

I think of a passage I read about Christopher Lloyd in which that great gardener would criticize any worker who left stubs on a plant like daisies, stubs that would be sharp and painful the next year when one weeded among the new growth.  Christo would approve of Allan’s work.

I also remember reading that leaving stubs of woody hollow stemmed plants, like Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed), encourages beneficial little pollinators to nest.

Allan then turned his attention to the arbor.

before

He also tidied up a bit out by the road sign, an area that we don’t often work on.

before

after (Allan’s photos, and he thinks the vacancy sign should be raised up higher).

At three o clock, I became deeply worried that we should not have done any Long Beach work today, and that we were going to run out of daylight before the job was done.  Fortunately, by working at a maniacal pace for three hours and a bit, we got ‘er done by the time the twinkling garden lights came on at dusk.

clipping perennials (a mushy agapanthus)

An hour before dusk, the sky darkened and it felt like we were going to get squalled on.  All we had was a rainbow without rain.

rainbow over Mary and Denny’s house (Allan’s photo)

5:24 PM

I took some final garden photos for the album on the KBC Facebook page. (I may get more in December when we deliver holiday gifts.)

Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’

Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ flower buds

Frost or nights too cold will probably come before the white tetrapanax flowers come out.   I have never seen them fully open here.  Here is a photo of what the flowers would look like.

black currant

autumn colour on blueberries (right)

Iris foetidissima

birdbath view

Mary had come out to work with us and had laid down a couple of bales of Gardner and Bloome Soil Conditioner mulch.

looking in the east gate

east gate

pink snowberry

south of the fenced garden

the pond

the fenced garden

Mary showed us a photo she had taken while walking her dog, Bella, to the beach.  This is a bear print, next to the paw of a very large Great Pyrenees dog.

bear paw print and Great Pyrenees paw, photo by Mary Caldwell

Mary had to answer an important phone call in the house just as we were finishing up, so we did not get to put out the winter garden signs.  (We don’t know where she keeps them.)  Here they are from a previous year.

Earlier in the day, while dumping debris at Long Beach City Works, one of the crew had told us they would be turning on the holiday lights in town tonight to test that all are working.  As we drove home, we saw that almost all are (except for a few of the lamp post garland lights that did not go on).

Long Beach town; I love the banner over the street.

At home, I was able to erase just one thing off the work board.

Tomorrow, good weather should continue and I hope to erase several things.

We have been binge watching This Is Us all week, after Allan suggested we get season one from the library.  I had thought I would find it schlocky and unlikeable.  How wrong I was.  Tonight, we streamed five episodes and are now caught up to the present in season two.  And I finished The Grapes of Wrath and embarked upon Cannery Row.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »