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Posts Tagged ‘Lady Washington’

Sunday, 24 September 2017

in which Allan sails on the Hawaiian Chieftain

The Tall Ships have been visiting Ilwaco for years, however, this is the first time I’ve actually gone out on one of their sails. I was encouraged to actually do the deed when we met the ships’ crews Friday night at a potluck dinner held for our Ilwaco volunteer firefighters (blogged here). Sunday looked to be the windiest day available and the ‘Battle Sail’ looked to be the best example of competitive sailing.

The ticket sales are done remotely from their shore office. The homesite with their schedule and pricing is at the Grays Harbor Historical Seaport site.

Below is the first photo in my digital library.  It was taken from one of our old gardening jobs to show how we often get a fine view while working.

The Lady Washington entering the Ilwaco Harbour June 2006

When I arrived at the docks on Sunday the visiting ships’ masts and spars towered over the other boats.

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I first took a tour of the Lady Washington.

Detail of the graceful iron bracing and rigging of her bow.

Eighty-nine feet of mast

A tidy mess of lines.

A detail of one of the blocks

A form of tea I had not seen before was offered below deck.

I researched this tea, and it apparently stores better this way and was often used for trading.  A small brick would have been interesting to try out but I already have a reputation of somewhat iffy experiments in the kitchen so I played it safe and bought a gift t-shirt instead.   I found out later that to prepare a tea brick, you usually first toast it for flavor and sanitation.  It is then ground to a powder before adding it to hot water. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_brick

The Tall Ships offered four programs while in Ilwaco. The first is a tour of either craft while docked with a suggested five dollar donation. Second is the ‘Adventure Tour’ of two hours “…to experience tall ship handling, sea shanty singing, and maritime amusement.”   Today I had signed up for the ‘Battle Sail’, which lasts three hours and  ” …features booming cannons, close-quarters maneuvers, and a taste of 18th century maritime life aboard tall ships. You will experience both of our tall ships in action as they attempt to win the mock battle of the day!”  I’m sure it would have featured many examples of quick reactions with the sails as they maneuvered. However, I got a call early in the day offering an adjustment or the right to cancel as, sadly, the gunpowder had not been delivered. Instead, they substituted an ‘Adventure Tour’  that turned out to be a very fine trip, too.

The fourth option, by the way, was a one-way trip to California.

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The Hawaiian Chieftain docked.

Here we are cueing up a half hour before and resolving any issues first.

We were asked to wait on the main deck opposite the dock for orientation. Much good advice was handed out: Stay alert, don’t mess with the lines. Beware where you set your stuff down as many a travel bag and expensive camera have fallen out the scuppers. We stayed in place and, as requested, stayed quiet while the crew left the dock and motored out into the bay.

Ready to work with her climbing harness.

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It looked calm in the port but the crew expected wind once we were clear of the hills.

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“Coyote (the fishing boat) one hundred feet ahead starboard” as the various hazards are called back to the captain as we safely leave the crowded port.

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A lot of pilings yet to clear. Sand Island is in the distance.

Our captain and a detail of the crews’ shirt.

Soon, members of the crew were sent aloft to prepare sails.

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First, the two  upper square sails were prepared

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After the sails were ready to deploy, each crew member made a short reverse angled climb to get off the crows nest. It was not a rope ladder down, not a rope ladder out. When swinging off the platform, one swings their feets under the platform and climbs under it.

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Finally back to the deck

The two sails were set and had the ability to pivot left or right. The fuzzy mitts on the lines reduce chaffing on the fore and aft sails.

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The engine was put in neutral and we are under sail.

A forward jib sail was set along with a similar rear mizzen sail.

A captain in training is at the wheel while we enjoy the bay.

I was impressed by the grace and playfulness of the crew that comes from their competence and enjoyment of the task at hand.

The jib being pulled to the other side after changing course.

Looking back on the ‘MapMyTracks’ app I had running on my phone, we were sailing around five mph. It was more exciting than the ferry trips on the Puget Sound that I used to enjoy.

Securing the square sails to belaying pins

Showing another crew member how to tie a stopper knot. If the line slips through the pulleys, it’s often a long tight climb to reinstall it.

Anyone losing a line through the pulleys has to buy the crew a beer, or maybe a soda.

It was joyfully announced that they had one cannon charge left over from yesterday’s ‘Battle Sail’. A random boat was signaled to pull up alongside so it could be blasted.

Stop!

The main deck is cleared of everyone except the Bosun.

He rams acharge into the cannon’s muzzle.

A signal to the other captain to move into range.

We all repeated on command “Fire in the hole!” Ears are covered, the little boat’s doom was sealed.

Hiding behind a sign didn’t save them.

A crew member mentioned that boats often pull up alongside asking to be blasted by the cannon.

Soon it was time to strike the sails.

Not much to stand on as the sail is secured

I saw a guest come up from below where she told me we could see the little store and the rear cabin.

The crew high above as I went below.

Here’s a small sample of their library as I tried to photograph all their books to study later.

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The last scarf went home with me. This design is called a ‘square topsail ketch’ and also features a triple keel to allow it to sail in shallower water than the more traditional single keel.

A 20 page PDF of their ‘Volunteer Sail Training Handbook’ is available on this page among their application and scholarship forms. It is a good read to know what a potential crew member should expect and the history of these ships.

With the sails down, we entered the main channel back to port.

Cape Disappointment with the lighthouse off to the left.

The little boats joined us in the channel

The Port of Ilwaco off the port bow.

Among the thanks that were being given to the crew as we disembarked, I heard a crew member reply, “Thank YOU for giving us the opportunity to play on our jungle gym.”

A donation to fund the volunteer crew to help cover laundry, a meal ashore or even an emergency trip to see their families.

From my phone, this was our route which just crossed the border into Oregon.

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Over two hours of the sailing and history like it used to be, amazing.

 

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Thursday, 28 May 2015

Ilwaco

We had to attend to a pruning job for the port, one that might be our friend Ed’s job technically but which he did not have time to do.  For the length of four garden beds along Howerton, associated with the former location of the now defunct Shorebank Ilwaco, we have a continuing problem with shrubs that are too tall and wide for the space.

The Shorebank building and Ilwaco Pavilion

The Shorebank building (tall) and Ilwaco Pavilion (pale blue roof)

We used to maintain the entire garden for Shorebank but gave it up to our friend Ed; last year, we started doing just the weeding of the curbside garden.  The shrubs, some of which have been pruned in the photo above (you can see Allan sweeping up) can block the sightline of people driving out of the Sportsmen’s Cannery carpark next door.

today: before

today: before

The Arbutus, which would have beautiful strawberry like fruit, can never be allowed to get big enough to bloom.  Our plan is to have the port crew completely pull them out in the fall and end this hopeless situation.  If the shrubs were pulled out now, the garden would look raw during the summer.

after

after


after: We also cut a wax myrtle completely to the ground and clipped back some red twig dogwood.

after: We also cut a wax myrtle completely to the ground and clipped back some red twig dogwood.

Beyond the end of that line of shrubs begins my long run of low plantings all the way to the west end, with the exception of one sprawling ceanothus that would love to be too tall.  It is the only large shrub or grass that I have spared along the rest of our Howerton Street gardens.  (There are a few escallonias left but those are pruned by individual business owners who planted them.)

This job had not even been on the schedule so our day was thrown into some disarray and we barely had time to take a look at the tall ship that had sailed into port before moving on to other jobs.

Ilwaco marina

Ilwaco marina (Allan’s photo)

tallship

the poster for the event

the poster for the event, by our friend Don Nisbett

We had other plans than to attend the weekend’s tall ship events.  If you’d like to see our album of previous visits of the tall ships, here it is.

Diane’s garden and The Red Barn

With the port garden all shipshape, we did the tiniest of jobs at Diane’s garden, planting up a tiny bicycle.  For such a tiny project, it took awhile because of cutting landscape fabric rounds to hold the soil.

tiny plant bike

tiny plant bike


all planted up with some sedums and diascias.

all planted up with some sedums and diascias and one wee Penstemon davidsonii


Allium schubertii in Diane's garden

Allium schubertii in Diane’s garden

We briefly checked on the planted barrels at the Red Barn next door and then moved on.

by the Red Barn

by the Red Barn

The Basket Case Greenhouse

Scabiosa in the greenhouse

Scabiosa in the greenhouse


a frilly dianthus

a frilly dianthus

I got a couple more Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ for the Long Beach planters as I had used the previous purchase at the Boreas Inn garden instead, and a bale of mulch for the Anchorage Cottages garden.

The Anchorage Cottages

Other than applying the mulch bale, we had time for only a brief grooming of the Anchorage gardens.

by the office

by the office


Agastache 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink'

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’


the last of the Dutch Iris

the last of the Dutch Iris


Since we had to cut back an ailing ceanothus, this rose is doing much better in the light.

Since we had to cut back an ailing ceanothus, this rose is doing much better in the light.


Allium bulgaricum

Allium bulgaricum backed with Melianthus major


manager Beth was diligently weeding the patio pavers.

manager Beth was diligently weeding the patio pavers.


She did an excellent job.

She did an excellent job.

Allan’s mulching project:

Gardner-Bloome-Soil-Building-Compost

before, where we had replaced a tatty leatherleaf viburnum

before, where we had replaced a tatty leatherleaf viburnum with some small sea thrift


after

after


with enough left over for this

with enough left over for this

Long Beach

Finally, we got to our big job of the day, the first official watering of all the Pacific Way Long Beach planters.  This is where the struggle came in (although the pruning had been a bit of a struggle and so had planting up the tiny bicycle): Of course, it turned out that some of the in-planter water was not turned on. We water by hooking up a short hose with a quick-connect to a faucet in each planter. Allan bucket watered one block of planters (consisting of just two of them) at the north end of town.  I called Parks Manager Mike in despair at the next block with no water, to find that the fixture that runs that whole block (with two trees and four planters) was broken and might not be fixed till next week.  The planters were DRY and needed water badly.  Bless his heart, he promised that the next day, the crew member who waters the hanging baskets would also water those planters so we did not have to haul heavy buckets across the street.

 The first watering is always stressful, finding out which hose connectors are clogged, and which ones are going to give us trouble of some sort of another, so I struggled through it without taking photos…except for a brief stop, at the very beginning, at NIVA green to collect some new photos for the shop’s Facebook page.  The fifteen photos I took will keep the page refreshed for another fifteen days.

NIVA green, my favourite shop

NIVA green, my favourite shop


outside NIVA green

outside NIVA green


inside, a new lamp by Heather Ramsay

inside, a new lamp by Heather Ramsay


I should have bought this; was too frazzled to think of how it matches some other little dishes that I have.

I should have bought this; was too frazzled to think of how it matches some other little dishes that I have.

We were trying to fertilize with Fox Farms Tiger Bloom instead of Miracle Gro.  That lasted for two blocks.  I realized that it was taking much much longer, as the fertilizer had to be mixed in a bucket because I’m not sure how to make it work in a hose end sprayer…and I also realized it would cost $100 each time we fertilize because the stuff is over $50 a jug.  That is ridiculous.  It only costs about $6 to water all the planters with the blue stuff.   And the jug was heavy, and and and….  This is impossible!!! With my mind simply exploding I said we are going back to Miracle Gro.  I’m sad, and wanted to go completely organic, but it is just too hard in Long Beach, and seems like a futile quest when the hanging baskets there are watered with Miracle Gro anyway.  The Fox Farms fert will be fine in planters at the Anchorage, Ilwaco, and my garden, where there aren’t so many and they aren’t such BIG planters.  So much for my principles, huh?

I must have recovered and had a burst of inspiration when we got to Fifth Street Park, as I managed a few photos there.

Sanguisorba in the park ('Pink Elephant', perhaps)

Sanguisorba in the park (‘Pink Elephant’, perhaps)


Allium bulgaricum in the park

Allium bulgaricum in the park


Geranium 'Rozanne' in one of the planters

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ in one of the planters


I was closely observed.

I was closely observed.

As we went along watering, we added “uppies” to the planters that had been missed before.

Allan's photo: adding two uppies

Allan’s photo: adding two uppies (Salvia ‘Hot Lips’), one on each side of the pole

After the watering was done, with our shirt sleeves soaked by hose mishaps, we planted a couple of Agastaches to fluff up the garden at the World Kite Museum.

Allan's photo: placing two agastaches

Allan’s photo: placing two agastaches


I fretted over not having a matched set...but that's the way it worked out, with one 'Blue Blazer' and one 'Kudos Gold'.  The best laid plans....

I fretted over not having a matched set…but that’s the way it worked out, with one ‘Blue Blazer’ and one ‘Kudos Gold’. The best laid plans….


Allan planting at the kite museum entry garden

Allan planting at the kite museum entry garden

The Cove Restaurant

We did not get to the Cove till after seven for our traditional Thursday dinner.

Parking Lot Cat greeted us.

Parking Lot Cat greeted us.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


my good friend Parking Lot Cat

my good friend Parking Lot Cat

When we entered, we heard the singing of happy birthday, and knew it was for our friend J9 who was having one of several birthday dinners tonight, this one with her friend Judi.  Our celebration with her will be next week.

Their birthday dessert: cannoli

Their birthday dessert: cannoli

When we saw the cannoli, I immediately asked owner Sondra if there were any left, and she saved the last cannolo for us.

Allan's noodle bowl

Allan’s noodle bowl


Thursday evening rest and relaxation

Thursday evening rest and relaxation


my ahi tuna

my ahi tuna


so delicious

so delicious, with tiny Peruvian peppers


our cannolo

our cannolo


We shared nicely.

We shared nicely.


golf course wildflower garden

golf course wildflower garden

At home, just look at the work board; all the annuals are planted.

home

I might get some more cosmos and painted sage to plant here and there, but the official Annuals Planting Time is done.

 

 

 

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