Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Leptospermum’

Saturday, 7 March 2015

Because Seaside gardener Pam Fleming was on the Peninsula for a consultation, we were all (Pam, me, Allan) invited to lunch at Steve and John’s and a late winter tour of their garden on the bay.  You may remember it from previous posts such as “A Bayside Garden” “Bayside Garden in Springtime“, “A Bayside Garden Interlude“. “September in the Bayside Garden” and “McCormick-Stephens Garden” (on the garden tour).

On the way north, I admired our pot of tulips at the Ilwaco post office…

starring Tulip sylvestris

starring Tulip sylvestris

and we stopped at the Basket Case as they had their first shipment of perennials for the year…

Basket Case, the perennial greenhouse

Basket Case, the perennial greenhouse

including some plants that I especially admire:

Viola 'Etain'

Viola ‘Etain’

Hebe 'Boughton Dome'

Hebe ‘Boughton Dome’

Stachys 'Primrose Heron'

Stachys ‘Primrose Heron’

Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'

Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

and three cultivars of santolina.

and three cultivars of santolina.

And then on to lunch with people I admire.

John and Steve’s Bayside Garden

When we arrived at the entry drive, I had Allan drop me off so I could take some photos of the sweep of red twig dogwoods along the lower driveway.

Cornus alba

Cornus alba

cornus

cornusalba

I walked up the long drive, cheating by getting an advance peek of the plants alongside it.

an early blooming rhododendron

an early blooming rhododendron

an edgeworthia that aroused envy because mine died...

an edgeworthia that aroused envy because mine died…

a freshly mulched bed

a freshly mulched bed

Allan's photo of me taking the above photo

Allan’s photo of me taking the above photo (I think)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the top of the driveway

the top of the driveway

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Coral Bark maples by the front door

Coral Bark maples by the front door

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I carried in a bouquet of hellebores and a few narcissi.

a fistful of hellebores

a fistful of hellebores (Allan’s photo)

Me and John, who was putting the final touches on dessert.

Me and John, who was putting the final touches on dessert.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Pam had already arrived.  We found her sitting with Steve in the living room talking plants.

pam

After some coffee and plant talk, lunch was served.  Chef Steve had prepared spicy prawns and salsa to be rolled in butter lettuce.

lunch

John takes a seat.  The view is of Willapa Bay.

The second course was orange beef, as good as a fine Thai restaurant.

The second course was orange beef, as good as a fine Thai restaurant.

John had baked a scrumptious coconut buttermilk cake.

John had baked a scrumptious coconut buttermilk cake.

After more coffee, and interesting talk about plants, and garden shows, and the Sylvia Beach Hotel, and about Chess and Mani, the purebred border collies, we emerged into the chilly afternoon sunshine to tour the garden.

the coral bark maple

one of the coral bark maples

Allan's photo: the stroll begins

Allan’s photo: the stroll begins

Sweet scent wafted from this Osmanthus.

Sweet scent wafted from this Osmanthus.

closer

closer

and from this nearby Daphne

and from this nearby Daphne

closer

closer

I envied the handsome Euphorbia 'Tasmanian Tiger' as...mine plotzed.

I envied the handsome Euphorbia ‘Tasmanian Tiger’ as…mine plotzed.  It’s backed with Pieris, and the Daphne is to the top right.

Pam and I admiring the Euphorbia, Allan's photo

Pam and I admiring the Euphorbia, Allan’s photo

Steve and John had just replanted tender succulents, sent by a California friend, on their pumphouse roof.

roof

John gives a sense of scale as we worry over cold nights.

John gives a sense of scale as we worry over cold nights.

We begin our walk through the shady garden down to the sunny field to the west.

On the way: Ribes sanguineum (flowering currant)

On the way: Ribes sanguineum (flowering currant)

closer

closer

The garden holds a large collection of young rhododendrons, along with old well established ones.

The garden holds a large collection of young rhododendrons, along with old well established ones.

Backlighting for a cryptomeria.

Backlighting for a cryptomeria.

I thought I heard this IDed as Cryptomeria arachnoides...like a spider...but I find it as Araucarioides...I guess.  Pam says it gets big.

I thought I heard this IDed as Cryptomeria arachnoides…like a spider…but I find it as Araucarioides…I guess. Pam says it gets big.

a baby rhodo, with boot for scale (accidentally)

a baby rhodo ‘Queen Bee’, with boot for scale (accidentally)

Rhodendron 'Ever Red'

Rhodendron ‘Ever Red’

Camellia 'Brushfield's Yellow'

Camellia ‘Brushfield’s Yellow’

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Pam and John (Allan's photo)

Pam and John (Allan’s photo)

Rhododendron fletcherianum

Steve and John identified Rhododendron fletcherianum, the one I had admired on the way in

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We all admired its corky bark.

We all admired its corky bark.

The irrigation pond for the old Clarke Nursery, which used to be on this and the neighbouring property.

The irrigation pond for the old Clarke Nursery, which used to be on this and the neighbouring property.

We all strolled along the big sunny field southwest of the pond, as Pam was proposing ideas for how to best landscape it.  I came up with one idea: a sweep of Stipa gigantea somewhere.

sunny field

Pam, Steve, and John

A metasequoia that was supposed to have one leader.

A metasequoia that was supposed to have one leader, but has decided to do its own thing.

Pam says this Leptospermum from Xera Plants will get large.

Pam says this silver Leptospermum from Xera Plants will get large.  (There’s a boot for scale again!)

Allan's photo: Every plant is admired, and some are caressed.

Allan’s photo: Every plant is admired, and some are caressed.

newish beds to the north of the pond

newish beds to the north of the pond

Pam and John discussing the field, with Genista in the foreground.

Pam and John discussing the field, with Genista in the foreground.

I asked yet again for the name of this tree: Cupresses 'Blue Ice'

I asked yet again for the name of this tree: Cupressus ‘Blue Ice’

Closer; I do wish I had room for trees like this.

Closer; I do wish I had room for trees like this.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another leptospermum

another leptospermum

I love the way Pam gets tactile with the plants.

I love the way Pam gets tactile with the plants.  (Allan’s photo)

I've admired her Seaside, Oregon gardens for so long that I sort of see her like this, an image captured by Allan.

I’ve admired her Seaside, Oregon gardens for so long that I see her like this image captured by Allan.

As we walked back to the house, we admired a reddish Pieris in the distance, through the glade of old rhododendrons.

telephoto brought it closer

telephoto brought it closer

I wish I had thought to take photos of the many tree roots, humped out of the ground and coated with moss.  I noticed them later, on departure, driving away when picture time was over.  You can get a hint of it at the bottom of the above photo.

We went back into the house for some more visiting, and when we left at almost dusk the garden by the house glowed in the early evening light.

dusk

dusk

that enviable euphorbia

There’s that enviable euphorbia again.

The rhododendrons hold their leaves partly closed in winter, for protection.

The rhododendrons hold their leaves partly closed in winter, for protection.

I always feel like I’ve entered a marvelous other world when I visit this garden, so different from mine (which is more full of fiddly little things).

On the way home, I got that anxious after-social feeling that I had talked too much about certain border collies and Long Beach work and decided I was lucky to get asked out at all.  Therefore, I was especially delighted when Pam pulled up behind us and asked to tour our garden, as well.  We had a pleasant walk around before dusk.

Next: Allan and I have different ways to enjoy a day off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »