Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Little and Lewis’

Sunday, 24 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Tong Garden, Seattle

A host was giving out bottles of water under the white tent.

easy access via the driveway

around to the back garden. The green lawn is an adjacent golf course.

a glorious sun room to the left

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

I love Little and Lewis.  We toured their former garden years ago.

dripping columns

Little and Lewis columns, a dream of mine to have this

Allan’s photo: I hope he was figuring out how to make something like this!

from all angles

Everyone’s photos involved a lot of waiting for other tour guests to leave the side of the water feature.

On the terrace overlooking the Little and Lewis columns:

just around the corner

Allan’s photo, nicely trimmed and thus fresh-looking salal

Back to the terrace view: I love this sort of thing.

Allan’s photo

exploring the shady side

looking from the shady end of the garden into the bright sun

Event speakers Jimi and June Blake from Ireland

the sun room

Next, we enjoyed the front garden.

Allan’s photo

Little and Lewis pool…

I think that is Mount Rainier on the horizon.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

one more look

I could have happily lingered much longer in this small but so satisfying garden.

Read Full Post »

Sunday, 28 June 2015

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

study

Floramagoria

(or, Return to Floramagoria)

DSC05333

2

I was thrilled to return to the gloriously colourful Floramagoria garden.  Last year, during the Garden Bloggers Fling, I was so taken with the garden that it got three whole blog posts which show the garden in much more organized detail than today:

the front garden

the back garden

and the farm area

During the Bloggers Fling, we were divided into groups of (I think) 50…or 80…and since everyone was blogging, there was a lot of everyone moving out of each other’s photos.  Today, the garden was more crowded with possibly 400 people touring at approximately the same time.  It was fun to see how well it absorbed the large number of people, as it is a garden made for entertaining.  This time, just walk with me here and there through the garden, and look at my favourite bits from many angles, and you can have a browse through the old posts if you want a careful explanation of how it all fits together.

entering the front garden

entering the front garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

signs made of styrofoam (Allan said)

signs made of styrofoam 

dog

as one walks around the side of the house

as one walks around the side of the house

clematis at the side of the house

clematis at the side of the house

entering the back garden

entering the back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

slug

slug

glass

little greenhouse/shed at corner of house

little greenhouse at corner of house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in the greenhouse: Allan's photo

in the greenhouse: Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the back garden

the back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pitcher plants...I want any and all of them.

pitcher plants…I want any and all of them.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I think this is crambe maritma.

I think this is crambe maritma (sea kale)

crambe2

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

kniphofia

kniphofia

looking back at the corner greenhouse

looking back at the corner greenhouse

a stunning grass

a stunning grass

I figured that grass was a Stipa, and indeed, one of the garden owners told me it was a Stipa…something or other….I must do some Googling because I must have it.

must...

must…

have...

have…  (Is it Stipa pennata??)

nigella seed pods

nigella seed pods

water2

the Little and Lewis-y water feature

the Little and Lewis-y water feature

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

water3

That’s what I want for my garden.  My budget runs more toward plastic tubs.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

yellow

Allan's photo  (What is it?)

Allan’s photo (What is it?)

at the corner of the dining pavilion

at the corner of the dining pavilion

photo appreciation

photo appreciation

daylily (one that made me think, last year, that I need some frilly ones like this)

daylily (one that made me think, last year, that I need some frilly ones like this)

hakmak

one of two matched pillars near the dining pavilion

one of two matched pillars near the dining pavilion

I know little about the different varieties of pitcher plants, because we cannot get them anywhere around here....

I know little about the different varieties of pitcher plants, because we cannot get them anywhere around here….

(looking down from above): I want them ALL.

(looking down from above): I want them ALL.

pitcher3

I wonder if they are hardy?  I seem to recall that when I did have a few, they came back after winter.

I wonder if they are hardy? I seem to recall that when I did have a few, they came back after winter.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pitcher7

pitcher8

(Two weeks later, when we stopped by Garden Tour Nancy’s to see her recent plant acquistions from her visit to Dancing Oaks nursery, what did she have?  YES, a pot of pitcher plants!!  ARGH!

Okay, enough obsessing about this one area.

Okay, enough obsessing about this one area.

(Looks like maybe I can mail order them from here: Sarracenia Northwest, which tells me that they are indeed cold hardy.)

cannas

 

blue

 

into the shade, having walked through the dining pavilion

into the shade, having walked through the dining pavilion

the shade and bubble corner

the shade and bubble corner, so welcome because the day, while overcast, was hot

looking up into the sequoia

looking up into the sequoia  (bubbles were floating down)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

shady bench

shady bench

on the walls of the shade corner

on the walls of the shade corner

shade corner stucco walls painted green; this is the back of the blue water feature wall

shade corner stucco walls painted green; this is the back of the blue water feature wall

leaves

flower

Maybe I just need to settle for this kind of pitcher plant.

Maybe I just need to settle for this kind of pitcher plant.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back through the dining pavilion

looking back through the dining pavilion

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, Dan Hinkley and one of the garden owners

Allan’s photo, Dan Hinkley and one of the garden owners

dining pavilion chair

dining pavilion chair

from the pavilion

from the pavilion

the solidly floriferous side of the garden

the solidly floriferous side of the garden

daylilies3

daylilies

flowers3

my favourite shape of dahlias

my favourite shape of dahlias

flowers4

flowers5

another ruffly daylily

another ruffly daylily

After seeing this garden last year, I swore I was going to paint some bamboo poles and put them in the garden.

After seeing this garden last year, I swore I was going to paint some bamboo poles and put them in the garden.

Did I?  No.  Will I this year? I surely do hope so.

Did I? No. Will I this year? I surely do hope so.

poles5

poles6

cobalt

stripes

an astrantia for Mr. Tootlepedal

an astrantia for Mr. Tootlepedal

combo2

astrantia, closer

astrantia, closer

looking over the garden to the dining pavilion

looking over the garden to the dining pavilion

at the end of a dead end path in the floriferous garden

at the end of a dead end path in the floriferous garden

in the shade at the back of the flower garden

in the shade at the back of the flower garden

the covered deck behind the house

the covered deck behind the house

from up on the deck

from up on the deck

from the deck: the patio right behind the house

from the deck: the patio right behind the house

one of the hosts (Allan's photo)

one of the hosts (Allan’s photo)

near the back door

near the back door

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

corner2

on the corner of the deck (from where I had sat down)

on the corner of the deck (from where I had sat down)

another sitting down view

another sitting down view

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I spy Dan Hinkley!

I spy Dan Hinkley!

from my comfy couch seat

from my comfy couch seat

tour guests and host

tour guests and host

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo (he entered the garden via the farm area and this side entry to the deck)

more garden gazing

more garden gazing

crowds

Allan rejoined me and we exited via the “farm” side of the house.

the farm greenhouse, at the back corner of the covered deck

the farm greenhouse, past the back corner of the covered deck

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bouquets in the greenhouse

bouquets in the greenhouse

duck

the farm

the farm

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bee hive

bee hive

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking back on the farm

looking back on the farm

farm3

around the corner into the front garden

around the corner into the front garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

front garden ferns

front garden ferns

front5

tiered fern planter near front door

tiered fern planter near front door

screen for front door privacy

screen for front door privacy

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

While I can’t afford a stucco wall and dripping column water feature (and lack the skills to make one), I leave this garden (again) with the ideas that I could paint some bamboo poles and perhaps buy some metal livestock troughs to grow veg in…and get me some sarracenias.

Tomorrow: our very last garden of the 2015 study weekend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 21 June 2014

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

Lane-Allers garden

IMG_4806

Because I knew I would be taking many photos and using them for the blog, I had my resolution set rather low.  Perhaps you will be able to read this hand out that was available for tour goers:

with a magnifying glass?

with a magnifying glass?

At the streetside edge of the garden

At the streetside edge of the garden

I chose this path that led to my left away from the front driveway.

I chose this path that led to my left away from the front driveway.

I passed a mirror on a wall that reminded me of how we had used a mirror for that window-like effect on our old house.

I passed a mirror on a wall that reminded me of how we had used a mirror for that window-like effect on our old house.

deeply shadowed woodland path

deeply shadowed woodland path

The hand out said all of the rocks were brought in to the property.

The hand out said all of the rocks were brought in to the property.

little bits of whimsy along the path

little bits of whimsy along the path

emerging into sunshine

emerging into sunshine

a bog, with lawn of clipped creeping buttercup

a bog, with lawn of clipped creeping buttercup

IMG_4752

a bird by the bog

a bird by the bog

walking past the buttercup lawn

walking past the buttercup lawns

with the pond to our left

with the pond to our left

Allan's most excellent photo

Allan’s most excellent photo

a rustic sit spot

a rustic sit spot

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Turning left, we cross the bridge.

Turning left, we cross the bridge.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: two garden guests pondering

Allan’s photo: two garden guests pondering

steps leading toward the house

steps leading toward the house

from the bridge

from the bridge

I've grown this primula, but it took another tour guest to show me that the flowers are sweetly fragrant.

I’ve grown this primula, but it took another tour guest to show me that the flowers are sweetly fragrant.

in bogland

in bogland

IMG_4764

Cercis 'Forest Pansy'!

Cercis ‘Forest Pansy’!  Note the glimpse of a folly just past the tree.

more of the big rocks

more of the big rocks

Someone thought this was the 20,000 lb one.

Someone thought this was the 20,000 pound one.

IMG_4770

 

Here is the folly that we saw just past the Forest Pansy tree.

Here is the folly that we saw just past the Forest Pansy tree.

For readers not from the Pacific Northwest, you may have noticed that several tour gardens have structures like this.  They were inspired by and often built by Little and Lewis.  I had the good fortune to tour their former garden once upon a time.

I would like one in my bogsy wood!

their beautiful book

their beautiful book

IMG_4791

IMG_4798

The above view was taken from these steps:

IMG_4793

IMG_4796

Now we will wend our way through the woods a bit more.

IMG_4771

IMG_4772

a glimpse of the outside world

IMG_4773

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

and of a sunlit lawn

and of a sunlit lawn

IMG_4774

out into the sunlight

out into the sunlight

a mirrored green wall

a mirrored green wall

more cunning mirror placement

more cunning mirror placement

IMG_4783

Near the mirrors, this path led right down to the street.

Near the mirrors, this path led right down to the street.

Imagine being able to have an unfenced garden without deer.  And what a surprise for anyone who wanders up that path into this amazing garden.

looking back to the sunny lawn and borders

looking back to the sunny lawn and borders

IMG_4782

Rosa pteracantha

Rosa pteracantha

and why I was so pleased to purchase a Rosa pteracantha to replace my diseased one.

and why I was so pleased to purchase a Rosa pteracantha to replace my diseased one.

That's what this rose is all about.

That’s what this rose is all about.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a totem

a totem of leaves

another woodsy path

another woodsy path

steps

Let’s go up these steps.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

by the house

by the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a patio for parties

a patio for parties

IMG_4803

IMG_4804

by the patio

by the patio

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo of an area that I somehow completely missed.

Allan’s photo of an area that I somehow completely missed.

As we depart, a neighbour swings on a garden gate watching all the comings and goings.

As we depart, a neighbour swings on a garden gate watching all the comings and goings.

I wonder if we missed anything in this intriguing garden?  We must move on as we have three more gardens to see before the evening soirée (and I can tell you now, we did not make it to the final garden because of lack of time).

You can see more glorious photos of the Lane-Allers garden here on Alison’s Bonney Lassie blog.

 

Read Full Post »

By July of 2003 when I  taking refuge from chaos at home by staying very temporarily at a friend’s Long beach cottage, Sheila, who had moved by then to Oregon, suggested she come fetch me for a road trip.  We could go up to Poulsbo to join a work party to help our cyberfriend Kellie D clean up her garden. Kellie worked at Heronswood and did so much for other people that her own garden suffered. Of course, a trip to Heronswood would be offered also, so I ran away from the Peninsula again.

On the way, we stopped at a garden shop that had this “great wall of china”.

great wall of china

great wall of china

Kellie had a garden full of poppies.  At least five, maybe six garden forum friends came to stay for the weekend and do a big garden clean up.

poppies

poppies

We hit a few Bainbridge Island nurseries as well.  The weather was blazing hot.

a local nursery

a local nursery

Kellie took us to see the garden of Little and Lewis on Bainbridge Island, a place I had been wanting to see for some time, and it completely fulfilled my high expectations.

at Little and Lewis garden

at Little and Lewis garden

at Little and Lewis

at Little and Lewis

at Little and Lewis

at Little and Lewis

the famous Little and Lewis weeping tree

the famous Little and Lewis weeping tree pillar

Little and Lewis

Little and Lewis

The garden looks like it must be huge, but was relatively small….just with amazing creations at every turn.

bird bath

bird bath

at Little and Lewis

at Little and Lewis

See their book, A Garden Gallery, for more.  In this time before I had a digital camera, only some photos still survive of various garden tours.

Somewhere, perhaps at a Bainbridge nursery, we saw this wonderful garden shed.  I don’t think it was at Little and Lewis.

shed

shed

Then back to Heronswood we went…me, feeling very fortunate,  for the second time in a year.

At Heronswood, trapeoleum scrambling all over a rose in midsummer

At Heronswood, trapeoleum scrambling all over a rose in midsummer

Heronswood hot border

Heronswood hot border

I’m reminded of how Dan Hinkley of Heronswood once said in a garden lecture that a friend commented on one of the hot coloured borders, “If that was sex, it wouldn’t be safe sex.”

Look how tall the dahlia below is compared to its human admirer (lower left).

Dahlias at Heronswood.

Dahlias at Heronswood.

hot sunny day at Heronswood

hot sunny day at Heronswood

in the Heronswood vegetable garden

in the Heronswood vegetable garden

And then:  back to Seattle, work, and the resolution of problems.

I had one more big outing in 2003.  In late autumn, my dear old friend Mary who still had that nice Microsoft check took me to a wonderful two night stay at the Mallory in Portland….so glorious, and neither of us seem to have photos of our fun times at Powells Book, assorted dessert cafes, the Rimsky Korsakoffee House (owned by the same woman who owns the Sylvia Beach Hotel), the Chinese Garden and all the lovely Portland neighbourhoods. I was taken with how well the Portland areas blend into each other and how one can walk from Chinatown to the Pearl to Twenty-third…I am sure I once had photos somewhere of at least the Chinese Garden.

Read Full Post »

My old friend Mary (since age 12!) met me at the train in Seattle and the next day we went to the garden open at Heronswood near Kingston. I almost wept when entering the long driveway….It was a pilgrimage onto sacred ground.  I had been mail ordering plants from Dan Hinkley since the nursery first offered them but had never been there.  By the time it had become a tour mecca, I had already moved to the beach.

trees along the Heronswood entry driveway

trees along the Heronswood entry driveway

under the trees

under the trees

A few years before I had heard a lecture by Anne Lovejoy, in Seaside, Oregon, not about gardening but about her trip to the Cloud Forest in Costa Rica (AND she had given me an Edgeworthia chrysantha which she lugged down for me on the train, bless her!). The idea of a cloud forest made me feel way better about my shady Ilwaco garden, and so did the woodsy sections of Heronswood.

Pulmonaria 'Cotton Cool'

Pulmonaria ‘Cotton Cool’

Heronswood

the Gunnera with tiny leaves!

the Gunnera with tiny leaves! magellanica, I think

To be at Heronswood was like a happy dream.  I was thrilled to see in person the famous Heronswood lawn with Hakonechloa macra aureola grass along the edge.

the lawn border that I had seen in many photos

the lawn border that I had seen in many photos

approaching the house garden

approaching the house garden

Mary and I also got to hear Dan Hinkley give a lecture, and she finally experienced first hand how very witty he is.  I was pleased to see that even though she was not at all a gardener obsessed, she laughed and laughed!

the famous (not so) clipped Hornbeam hedge

the famous (not so) clipped Hornbeam hedge

adorable ferns near the house

adorable ferns near the house

In the back of the vegetable garden, you can see the famous hand washing sink created by Little and Lewis.

the vegetable garden

the vegetable garden

Aeonium 'Schwarzkopf'

Aeonium ‘Schwarzkopf’

details

details

The Little and Lewis pillars in the boggy garden

 Little and Lewis pillars 

the top of more pillars

the top of more pillars

I think you would have to go out on the nearby pond in a boat to photograph this whole glorious structure.

detail at the base of the pillars

detail at the base of the pillars

Blue Himalayan Poppy

Blue Himalayan Poppy

poppy

poppy

After Heronswood, Mary and I had a delicious meal at Molly Ward Gardens restaurant.  The food was wonderful. I seem to recall a cold melon soup. The restaurant was housed in an old barn that had once housed a yard shop.

at Molly Ward gardens

at Molly Ward gardens

Peeking into the Molly Ward courtyard

Peeking into the Molly Ward courtyard

the courtyard

the courtyard

Phormium contained

Phormium contained

The Phormium in a small garbage can is an idea I have used several times since then.

in the Molly Ward garden

in the Molly Ward garden

courtyard seating

courtyard seating

And then….back to Bellevue and Seattle for more garden touring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Okay, I’ll admit it: I have issues about the way the Heronswood garden closed.  When we joined other gardeners for dinner at the end of the day, many cooler heads had thoughtful things to say, but before that, when we drove onto the grounds and saw cars parked where greenhouses used to be, I got teary-eyed and not from garden joy.  I had a little inside information (from a relative of one of the owners) back at the time of the sale that running the business side of the growing nursery was exhausting to them and had sapped their joie de vivre.   Some say that Burpee closing the nursery and moving the operation to Pennsylvania was fine because a lot of money was paid for it.  I believe that the owners would not have agreed to the sale if they had been able to forsee the garden’s closing; that they would have found another way; that no amount of money was worth what happened.  Now, that is just my opinion, based on all that I have read, and cooler heads may disagree and speak of both sides of the story.

So just let me share a few of the iconic scenes of Heronswood, the vignettes that will stay with me through the years.  I hope the garden ends up being preserved and enhanced by a group like the Garden Conservancy or the Pacific Northwest Horticultural Conservancy, on whose website you can see glorious photos of Heronswood.  [2012 note: this preservation effort failed, and I have no idea how well Burpee has done at maintaining the garden.] And now that Allan has seen it he can understand why all of the avid Northwest gardeners he has met since starting to work with me have been in mourning that H’wood is now longer a place where we can go, like mecca, to purchase amazing plants.  Allan already has seen the loss of the wonderful, funny and literate catalogs plantsman Dan Hinkley used to write before Burpee changed the catalog to be, well, glossy.

car park and dismantled greenhouses

This is where I got all choked up: a parking lot where  we used to buy plants, and some derelict greenhouses off to the side.  I remember the Heronswood open days, two of which I travelled for miles to see (and friend Sheila travelled even farther) and how Dan would always give his humourous lectures and slideshows. (My visits came after Burpee purchased H’wood, but when the arrangement seemed to provide the best of both worlds: Dan’s influence and wisdom and collecting, and the practical side run by Burpee).

into the woodland

Into the grounds we then went, while I muttered for awhile about the lost greenhouses…down the long driveway with side gardens of astonishing forest plants from around the world, all of which I want of course. A fallen tree had its base planted with bromeliads.

The iconic lawn……and the iconic hornbeam hedge with some amazing lemony-white tall lilies in front

Past the lawn edged with Hakanechloa macra ‘Aureola’…perhaps the most famous scene at Heronswood…Through the sunny borders…around the house…past the renowned arched hornbeam hedge, into the vegetable parterres enhanced with bright flowers….and the secret garden around the house.  By now we were again with Rainysiders; one said that she had never seen the private area around the house, which was usually roped off on open days.  I had been to an open day which had included the house gardens, and they had certainly had more amazing plants in pots way back then (even though it was after Hinkley had moved to his new house).  That and more little weeds here and there were signs of change.

More iconic views: The famous columnar tree underplanted with black mondo grass, echoed by a black pool of water at the other end of the path.

the vegetable garden….where even the sink is a work of art…

Back through the woods, to the famous Little and Lewis “ruins”, past frequent bottlenecks where folks would stop to photograph one amazing plant after another…

The bright dahlias (center) always speak to me of Sheila, lover of hot colours, with whom I have visited Heronswood before.

Twice we had circled through the gardens, storing up memories.  I look forward to the book that Dan Hinkley is writing about his years there.

Read Full Post »

After another short week of frenzied work, off we went to Seattle to stay with Allan’s folks and go to nurseries and to the Garden Conservancy tour of 3 Bainbridge Island gardens plus Heronswood.  Up at seven on Saturday, a shockingly early hour for us, we headed for the ferry and then for the McFarlane Garden overlooking the water at the island’s south end.  A grand house confused us with gates and entries: which one to take? Inside we heard voices (which turned out to be those of the Rainysiders who we were meeting for part of the tour.) Finally a quite beautiful man with dreadlocks and a charming Jamaican accent guided us through a gate; when we had arrived and parked at the end of the cul de sac we had seen him doing the final touches of pruning.  We also noted that a bed in the park across the street was being landscaped with overflow from the house gardens, a generous gesture and helpful when a gardener runs out of room.

McFarlane garden

The house was grand, the gardens mostly formal and structured with some exuberant plantings and some restful Italianate scenes.

verticality in the MacFarlane garden

While I enjoyed walking through and admired every inch, I was not deeply moved perhaps because it all seemed so far beyond my reach (a feeling I did not get in the grandeur of the Old Germantown Road Garden, oddly enough).  I enjoyed but did not gasp or get teary-eyed with gardening joy.

Maybe I just was not awake enough yet, because it truly was an impressive garden, and Allan said he appreciated the style because “there was no chaos” and if he were taking care of the garden, he would be “very proud of how tidy it was.”  He pointed out the the Germantown garden is totally maintained by the owners and perhaps that made it more exciting to me.

The next stop, the famous Little and Lewis garden, did bring gasps and thrills and joy.  I’d been there before but would never tire of it, and I wanted Allan to see it (and, later, especially, Heronswood).  Allan commented that it is very small compared to “how big it photographs” and marveled at how much is there.  It’s the Tardis effect: bigger on the inside than it is on the outside.  He also noted what pleasant hosts the artists/owners are. You can see far more wonderful photos of the garden in Little and Lewis’ own book, A Garden Gallery, but I must share some of my favourite scenes.

entry courtyard, so vibrant; the famous gunnera leaf; raccoon sculpture

(left) the famous painted pillars (right)One of the beautiful painted walls with the ever so famous weeping tree of ferns and baby tears.

Onward to the nearby Skyler garden where the sunny entryway gave little hint of the winding maze of paths.  Allan liked it becaue of the paths, and the variety of materials used to make them, and the “changes of character and mood” as we moved through the garden.

entering the Skyler garden

I especially appreciated and felt empowered by the narrowness of some of the paths and by how the garden was opened to us despite its admirers having to move carefully one by one. (Empowered because sometimes I question the narrowness of some of my own paths.  But even Lucy Hardiman has narrow paths at the back of her garden.)

paths in the Skyler garden

(Above) Paths narrow, and narrower, and one which had charmingly disappeared.  It was there, if one looked closely under the foliage, but we had to backtrack, and I loved that: the plants came first.  By now, we had diverged from the Rainyside group, most of whom were planning an hour and a half social picnic lunch…but we had several nurseries to visit before touring Heronswood so would be waiting till dinnertime to socialize.

Read Full Post »