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Posts Tagged ‘Lobelia ‘Tupa’’

September 19, 2012

Oh, I am so hard to please about the weather.  Today was too darn hot.  Tomorrow a big rain storm is supposed to come, and then a rain and wind storm on Sunday.  I resolved not to complain that I was sweltering today because a cold and windy summer day is far worse.  But…it was hot.  All of  74.8 degrees F.

As we got ready to go to work, I noticed a good example of Cosmos ‘Seashells’ in the garden.  I couldn’t get much of it (my favourite cosmos cultivar) this year so wanted some good photos.  A friend of mine decided he just had to be in the photo shoot.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

cos

cos cos

Smokey has on his BirdsBeSafe collar.  He usually does not look this sinister.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

We did our usual compost buckert switch stop at Olde Towne…where more out of town bicycle tourists were enjoying the great ambience.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

And then went to Seaview to have a look at a couple of landscaping needs at the Sou’wester Lodge.  Oh what memories it brought back to be there because for my first year on the Peninsula, that is where I lived.

Sou'wester in snow, Dec. '92

Sou’wester in snow, Dec. ’92

Now under new ownership, The Sou’wester has a plants for sale area by the front door.

plants

To the north of the front door, the garden I planted years ago has turned to an area of large shrubs and trees.

part of my old garden

part of my old garden

In the almost twenty years since I left there, many of the garden beds around the cabins have turned back to plain lawn, as one would expect, but some plants remain including the rose Felicité et Perpetué.   I did not take as many pictures as I should have because of having an interesting time talking with new owner Thandi Rosenbaum.

I had not been back into the big historic lodge since President’s Day weekend of 1994. It was wonderful to be there again and brought back memories good and bad, but all worth having.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

We looked at the four nightly rental apartments on the second floor of the lodge.  The “honeymoon suite” has a different lace curtain hanging over the sleeping nook but has the same magical feeling.

On the second floor.

Lacy sleeping area…On the second floor.

The Sou’wester is known for its vintage trailer accommodations and Thandi has  commissioned some trailer art.

trailer paintings in apartment three

trailer paintings in apartment three

I have always loved the way the light falls through the windows of the lodge.

probably in apartment two

probably in apartment two

I think two is the one with the lacy bed…one the one with a red rug…and three and four the two west facing ones.  It has been a long time!

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

I took this photo from the same window in 1992.

I took this photo from the same window in December 1992.

I love the postcards over the bed in one of the apartments.

postcard art

postcard art

The view from apartment four made me think about how now I would know better than to plant that beech under the power lines.  I NOW remember that I thought it was going to be a short, weeping tree.  I got it from Hall Gardens, a wonderful home nursery that existed near Nahcotta way back then (and later became the private home called Gypsy Pond).

view with a potentially too large tree

view with a potentially too large tree (planted by me in 1993)

Amy, the housekeeper who has worked there for many more years than I did and who also sells plants there, asked me if I could identify two shrubs out by J Place.  One we thought must be an Osmanthus.  The other…I can almost remember.  I got it from Heronswood mail order, probably.  Thandi stands next to it for size:

She's 5'2".

She’s 5’2″.

Here’s a close up of the leaves…not very good because it was such a hot sunny day.

mystery shrub

mystery shrub

leaves

leaves…what is???

We looked inside the amazing two story trailer called The African Queen, of which I had fond memories just because I liked it.  When Amy spoke of not loving to clean it, I do remember it was a challenge with all its nooks.  I also learned that in later years the previous owners of the lodge, cabins and trailers, for whom I had worked, had the staff (staff? before, it was just me!) just put sheets and bedding in the trailers and not make up the beds.  I had to make every bed, and..with eighteen or so apartments, cabins and trailers, there were…oh I don’t even want to remember.  The trailers were, of course, the hardest, being built in tightly.

While we looked at the interesting vintage RV, Thandi and her friend Alex pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’, after we told them it could be pulled and not just cut back.

next to the African Queen

next to the African Queen

I used to have African Queen Oriental lilies and an African Queen Buddliea planted by The African Queen…I had forgotten the latter even existed till Amy reminded me.  (It is still there, planted long before Buddleias made the invasive list….)

I said the volunteer tree should be cut down so the trailer mural shows!

The mural on the Disoriented Express still shows up well.

The Disoriented Express

The Disoriented Express

I told Thandi, looking at the remains of my old garden and at the shrubs which would look so much better deadwooded, that I could imagine, if I lived in walking distance, coming over just for the fun of bringing some of it back.  She offered to have me chauffeured from Ilwaco.  Hmm.

one of my Sou'wester garden beds in 1993

one of my Sou’wester garden beds in 1993

Through making this garden I met Maxine…and her daughter Jo…and my gardening career started so it was worthwhile.

We passed this year’s possible landscaping job at Sou’wester on to our friend Ed Strange who has a young(er) helper who might feel more inclined that we do to tear out an overgrown garden bed.  Then we can help plant it with something better than Siberian iris and the blah running yellow kind of Hypericum.

After all this goofing off, we went up to Long Beach to deadhead.  With rain predicted, we skipped watering the planters.  The soil was damp, yet the plants looked a little thirsty….but a good rain will be effective because of the already wet soil in the planters.

painted sage still looking grand

painted sage still looking grand

It better HAD rain or we will have to go back and water!

painted sage and cosmos

painted sage and cosmos

Oh, big news….I know the names now of the three cultivars of painted sage (Salvia viridis, sometimes called horminum):  Marble Arch White, Blue, and Pink…looked at the seed packets at The Planters Box for a friend who needed the information.

Every year, when I see the dahlias in a couple of the planters, I think I simply must plant more “patio” dahlias.

fabulous dahlias

fabulous dahlias

Maybe in 2014 I will remember to do so.  They come back every year and bloom like crazy.

Speaking of crazy, check out the nasturtium…this one gets extra liquid fertilizer when the city crew waters the hanging basket overhead.

in front of Home at the Beach

in front of Home at the Beach

trailing into the street!

trailing into the street!

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

We next went to the Anchorage Cottages.  I intended to do nothing but quickly deadhead the containers, as we had done a lot of pruning there on Monday.  Somehow, more pruning ensued today.  Manager Beth asked if we could limb up a tree so she could get to the outside of the office window.

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

The volunteer hebe that was under a low limb is getting sun for the first time!

We also pruned the Ceanothus so that the number one shows really well at last.

Ceanothus, pruned

Ceanothus, pruned

During the course of getting tools in and out, I photographed our rake in the back of the van.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

We like the style very much and cannot seem to find a new one like it.

After The Anchorage, we deadheaded cosmos and weeded at the Boreas Inn.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

The only Lobelia tupa that bloomed for me this year still looks magnificent even as it goes to seed.

The Boreas tupa....

The Boreas tupa….

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

If the Lobelia tupa is blooming here because it is happy next to the Phormium, we have a problem…because I like to get rid of Phormiums now whenever I can!

Boreas, looking east

Boreas, looking east

Allan remembered that we had to deadhead the Long Beach welcome sign; I might have forgotten.

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

Six Agyranthemum Butterflies later, we departed to water again at Crank’s Roost.

Crank's, view from the back porch

Crank’s, view from the back porch

Finally, in the last hour of daylight, we filled water buckets at the boatyard and Allan watered the Ilwaco planters while I groomed them.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

I happened to see Thandi and Alex from the Sou’wester again as I deadheaded near the Ilwaco Antique Gallery.  After another pleasant conversation they went off to walk along the port and watch the moonrise.  While I did the last few planters, I suddenly had this vision of living in an old trailer at the Sou’wester again and bringing back my old gardens.  In an alternative universe, that would be fantastic.  In this one, I guess I can’t go back!

Allan and I dropped off the trailer at home as the sun set….

looking west on Lake Street

looking west on Lake Street

We had a choice between making a fire in the back yard fire pit before the rains come and get our alder wood all wet…or going to see the harvest moon rise at the port.  It would be too hard to set up a campfire at the last minute in the twilight, so the port moonrise won.

harvest moon

harvest moon

moon

The sky seemed to get lighter as the big moon rose.

moon

 

moonlight path

moonlight path

Allan’s photos:

moon

Allan did the best job of getting the moon's face.  (We both have dinky cameras.)

Allan did the best job of getting the moon’s face. (We both have dinky cameras.)

higher

higher

and higher still

over the tidal flat

over the tidal flat

moonlight on the water

moonlight on the water between the port and Stringtown Road

And then, home….to pick some eggplants, as the edible harvest continues.

another little harvest

another little harvest

These are the first eggplants I have ever grown.  I hope they were picked at the right stage.  Allan has prepared them according to Joy of Cooking while I wrote this, and now it is time to eat them.!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, August 26, 2013

Late the previous evening,  Nora’s granddaughter Alicia and some friends arrived next door to spend Monday sorting out the house just south of my friend Judy’s.  It had belonged to Nora’s mother and, with a sale pending, had to have the last of its possessions moved out.  Before we left for work we met Alicia’s friend and four young lads.  They had been admiring the garden through the fence, and we invited them on a tour.

boys

I loved that they went right into the paths through the Bogsy Wood.

Mom follows the boys.

Mom follows the boys.

They were highly amused by the exploding seeds of the wild impatiens (touch me not).

Me encouraging them to dare to pop the seeds!

Me encouraging them to dare to pop the seeds!

seeds

Alicia photographs the action.

Alicia photographs the action.

from my window

from my window

Allan took a few photos as well.

trooping past the river of Rozanne

trooping past the river of Rozanne

Then Alicia and her friend went to work on the house-sorting while the boys were off to explore the river beach by Yellow Bluff at the east end of town and Allan and I went to Long Beach to deadhead and water the planters.

When I removed one of the faucet covers, I found a nest of snails.  (I always check for baby slugs.)  This ties in with Pam Fleming’s suggestion to put upside down black plastic pots in one’s garden as snail traps; they like the warmth and will congregate inside.

snail haven

snail haven

I find snails kind of cute and pretty, so they just went into the garbage can and probably crawled right back out and back into the planter.

h well, there is always something in Long Beach town to lift my spirits, and today it was the lovely signs outside of The Wooden Horse gift shop.

happy

sign

at the Wooden Horse

At Veterans Field I finally decided to cut back the Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’.  To me, the seedheads are cool and structural but to others they probably just look like old dead things.  The garden is still looking red white and blue.

Veterans Field, looking southeast

Veterans Field, looking south

Eryngium seedheads....chopped now

Eryngium seedheads….chopped now

While I worked on the little garden, the wind whipped up considerably…

wind of 20 mph plus

wind of 20 mph plus

My goal had been to get the Long Beach planters watered before the predicted rain came.  Usually rain is not strong enough to penetrate the soil through the dense foliage.  Today, however, the rain, when it came, was definitely strong.

a sudden torrent

a sudden torrent

We were watering and fertilizing at the same time, but after one more block, we gave up and went home!

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Now I have two hanging baskets!   Last night a friend who had to leave town after a summer beach house visit gave me hers.  (You know who you are, and thanks, but I am not going to blog that your house is empty!)

two baskets by the front porch

two baskets by the front porch

I would rather have stayed home and joined Mary on the cat bench….

mary

But instead we went to work.  We do enjoy our work but perhaps not as much as a day in  our own garden.

First, The Depot Restaurant.

The Depot...an overview

The Depot…an overview

Cosmos backed with a wall of hops

Cosmos backed with a wall of hops

Then we went to turn off the soaker hoses that had been lightly dripping for two days (through the rain as well) on the Sid Snyder Drive beach approach planters.   I decided that this particular planter is one that should be completely redone this fall.

across the street from the kite museum

across the street from the kite museum

The monoculture of creeping Jenny, planted by the previous volunteer, is so dull.

Next, Diane’s garden where the Lady’s Mantle was in that horrid stage….

before and after

before and after

waiting for moist fall weather so we can fill in this bed some more!

waiting for moist fall weather so we can fill in this bed some more!

The original impetus for Diane’s roadside garden was when she fell in love with this heather:

blooming now....

blooming now….

Even though I am not much of a heaths and heather fan (except on the moors of Scotland or in the gorgeous heather bank in this garden near Eugene, Oregon), I have to admit this one is a delight.  It came from The Planter Box.  I wanted it interplanted with complementary plants but so far the progress on this garden is slow…Perhaps next year it will leap!

Diane's driveway corner with Stipa gigantea

Diane’s driveway corner with Stipa gigantea

Next door at The Red Barn, Diane’s sister and niece were just riding up….

barn

and their nice dog came to greet me.

a whippet hello

a whippet hello from Disney

Next on the agenda:  Jo’s garden.  Coco was so happy to see us that I can’t decide which photo is cuter.

Coco!

Coco!

Jo pointed out that her rhododendron has very unusual flowers.

rhodo1

rhodo2

Some of the cosmos had fallen over in yesterday’s wind and rain storm and a few stems had broken.  One that we propped up had its flowers all cattywampus but we assumed it would straighten itself out (and it did).

after the storm

after the storm

Most of the cosmos had come through just fine.

a protected corner

a protected corner

One of Jo's friends

One of Jo’s friends

Here’s a new angle on Jo’s house…from the west lawn looking east:

built in 1896 or 8...

built in 1896 or 8…

It is convenient to check the Boreas garden just north of Jo’s.  We park and enter on the west side.

Boreas Inn (and hot tub room)

Boreas Inn (and hot tub room)

I am so happy with the Boreas gardens this year!

I am so happy with the Boreas gardens this year!

The cosmos were lush and floriferous…

cosmos

cosmoscosmos2

cosmos

 

 

The fabulous Lobelia tupa continues to be the only one blooming out of two flats of them that I planted here and there in assorted gardens!

Just the one tupa!

Just the one tupa!

The only thing I do not like in the west side Boreas garden is the old daylily bed:

the original patch of daylilies

the original patch of daylilies

I am determined…and when I suggested it, Susie agreed…to dig these out and replace them with, perhaps, a good medium sized ornamental grass like Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’.    Maybe a couple of narrow upright evergreens like Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’! (which the deer will leave alone).

Boreas:  looking west to the beach path

Boreas: looking west to the beach path

Speaking of Cosmos, we stopped on the way home to deadhead the park by Marsh’s Museum, having been rained out of doing so yesterday.

Marsh's Free Museum, home of Jake the Alligator Man

Marsh’s Free Museum, home of Jake the Alligator Man

And at home, on the last evening of her visit, Alicia was roasting marshmallows over her cute little charcoal pig.

pig

We agreed that her grandma Nora would have loved it.

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

The compost bucket needed switching at Olde Towne…

an old sign from when Olde Towne was an antique store with no café

an old sign from when Olde Towne was an antique store with no café

Luanne tucks into one of her signature breakfasts, waffled with strawberries and whipped cream!

Luanne tucks into one of her signature breakfasts, waffled with strawberries and whipped cream!

We could not linger because work beckoned.

At Golden Sands Assisted Living, we had intended to check how the newly repaired sprinkler system was doing.  Too much rain had made it impossible to tell the difference between watered and unwatered.  We did get permission to move the bench on of these days, so that the NW quadrant garden shows up better.

soon....

soon….

We at last had time to work hard on two of the quadrants.

thinned and tidied

thinned and tidied

Before we bring in some more mulch, I very much want to get the damnable beach strawberries removed from the backside of the four flower beds.

quite a project

quite a project

Next, the very civilized garden at Klipsan Beach Cottages.  We can always count on owners Mary and Denny Caldwell to water so every week we can concentrate just on the gardening.

inside the deer fence garden

inside the deer fence garden

at KBC: the berries of Billardia longiflora

at KBC: the berries of Billardia longiflora

KBC: the driveway garden

KBC: the driveway garden

Further north in Surfside at Marilyn’s garden we did some light deadheading just to keep it looking fine after its turn in the spotlight on garden tour day.

The Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' is now in bloom.

The Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ is now in bloom.

I am still trying to ID this pink flower that is at Jo’s, and here.  The deer do not eat it.  I think it is a phlox.  It runs politely here, but runs like a thug at Jo’s, where I am trying to get rid of most of it.

phlox?

phlox?

I posted a photo of it on a plant ID group and was advised it is a Dianthus, but I think not!

It is as tall as some of the cosmos...

It is as tall as some of the cosmos…

the lushness of Marilyn's garden, looking northwest

the lushness of Marilyn’s garden, looking northwest

the giant Miscanthus grows this big in one season!

the giant Miscanthus grows this big in one season!

Even though I love its foliage and velvety magenta, pink, or white flowers, I get tired of the prolific reseeding of Lychnis coronaria (rose campion) and yet….each seedling is so very pretty.

in the gravel path

in the gravel path

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ is one of the search terms that most often leads people to my blog!

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning' at Marilyn's

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ at Marilyn’s

We closed the work day at the Wiegardt Gallery with a serious thinning out on the west side…

future plan:  add some Ilex 'Sky Pencil'

future plan: add some Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’

Mostly the dreaded Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’ came out, as it also did in this neglected spot on the SE corner of the building.

pulling...and done

pulling…and done

Why we don’t take this corner more seriously I do not know.  I am thinking lavender…or rosemary, which Eric’s wife, Ann, likes.  It is backed with a rhododendron which I cut down hard a couple of years ago, and another winter blooming one that gallery manager Christl limbed up.  And with sword ferns.

Thursday, August 29, 2013

We woke to rain.  Allan cleverly remembered that we had been meaning to visit the  railroad exhibit at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum just three blocks east of us.

From the Water to the Woods:  125 Years of Local Rail

train exhibit at the museum

train exhibit at the museum

If I could go back in time and do one thing, it would be to ride on the Clamshell Railroad that used to go up and down the Peninsula.

sign

one of the exhibit’s fascinating signs

an old railroad seat

an old railroad seat…cranberry plush!

Part of the exhibit was about trains in logging camps and the trains that helped build the ocean jetties.

logging

A slideshow played of photos by a photographer named Darius Kinsey, who chronicled life in the logging camps including this stump cottage!

one big stump

one big stump

When my friends and I had stopped at Bailey’s Café in Nahcotta on a garden tour day, I had tried to remember if the old pilings going out into Willapa Bay were from the old railroad line.  I thought so….and this photo proves it.

old Nahcotta

old Nahcotta

Oh I do wish I could have seen this:

fact

This lumberyard was where the Ilwaco boatyard is today:

lumberyard

No one was hurt when the train went off the Ilwaco dock!

oops

So many photos to peruse:

exhibit

In the rest of the museum, I learned something new about salmonberries.

salmonberry facts

salmonberry facts:  I did not know one can eat the shoots!

After the exhibit, we did an afternoon and early evening of work.

The Anchorage gardens looked windblown...

The Anchorage Cottages gardens looked windblown…

as did the Payson Hall planters at Andersen's RV Park.

as did the Payson Hall planters at Andersen’s RV Park.

At this time of year, deadheading the annuals takes hours…

Just one of many Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' at Andersen's!

Just one of many Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ at Andersen’s!

Payson Hall after much deadheading

Payson Hall after much deadheading

We cleaned out and raked the walking path in the now-not-so-poppy field at Andersen’s.

path

As we left, we saw a most interesting vehicle.  Allan said it was like our van but turned into a camper.

Jucy Van

Jucy Van

We saw the Jucy Van couple again when we stopped at the Depot Restaurant to deadhead.  They were just going for a delicious dinner and told us that a slideshow of the van can be seen at jucyrentals.com.

Usually we do the Depot garden before the restaurant opens but I had forgotten it.  Fortunately, the vehicles happened to be parked in a way that gave us easy access.

diners' vehicles

diners’ vehicles

Just as it had been coming into bloom, Solidago ‘Fireworks’ was laid out by the rain.

kind of sideways

kind of sideways

Last, more tedious deadheading at the Long Beach welcome sign where the south side has lots of Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.  The cosmos on the north side have petered out.  Allan had a great idea: to use Geranium ‘Rozanne’ as the blue accent next year.  I am all for it as the blue Brachychome has gotten almost buried under yellow.

yellow Bidens taking over

yellow Bidens taking over

Friday, August 30, 2013

At Mayor Mike’s garden the time had come to chop the catmint:

before and after

before and after

In the back garden at Mike’s, I recognized the berry of a Lonicera that his previous gardener, Carol of The Elves Did It, probably got from me!

boxleaf honeysuckle

boxleaf honeysuckle

I got many sprouts of this to share from my old garden.

Kitty corner from Mike’s garden, we found some company in the new outdoor cat room at Cheri and Charlie’s!

American shorthaired cats

American shorthaired cats

She's my favourite and she knows it!

She’s my favourite and she knows it!

the black one looks just like my Calvin!

the black one looks just like my Calvin!

I think his name is Elwood!

I think his name is Elwood!

We got some work done, too…including the odd little task of taking the “covers” off the money plant so that it shines all silvery and pretty.

before and after: Lunaria

before and after: Lunaria

translucent

translucent

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' at Cheri's

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ at Cheri’s

We stopped at home to divest ourselves of a trailer load of compostable debris from both Mike’s and Cheri’s garden and as we were offloading, Judy came from four doors down to go tomato farming.

Judy in my greenhouse!

Judy in my greenhouse!

Judy's harvest from my edible garden!

Judy’s harvest from my edible garden!

We still had work to do in Long Beach due to having been rained out a couple of times during the week.  The Columbia Pacific Farmers Market was just setting up.

at Veterans Field

at Veterans Field

I just had time to deadhead before all the vendors arrived.

In Fish Alley, the nice variegated sedum I got for the whiskey barrels did not look good at all.  I hope it is just rain spotting and not mildew.

Fish Alley worry

Fish Alley worry

Across the street from city hall, as I deadheaded, I admired the fresh paint job on the “Akari Space” building which will house the Pink Poppy Bakery and Starvation Alley Farms new coffee shop.

love the colour, the pop! of the orange foliage, and the wood trim

love the colour, the pop! of the orange foliage, and the wood trim

This post has gone on almost as long as our work week did so I will repost the photo that appeared at the beginning showing the planter in front of Wind World Kites all full of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

a sudden torrent

a sudden torrent…on Monday!

The kite guy likes the big batch of Phormium but I had been looking forward to cutting it down now that it is done…

after removing the Phormium on Friday...now the Fuchsias show!

after removing the Phormium on Friday…now the Fuchsias show!

Back at Veterans Field, the market had begun and a child was skillfully leaping back and forth across the garden.

kids

As the Naselle Marimba band played….

I like the Naselle Marimba Band very much.

I like the Naselle Marimba Band very much.

We had to check the deadheading at the Boreas Inn one more time because garden blogger Alison was staying there for the weekend!

'Jade Frost'

‘Jade Frost’

I noticed the leaves of the Jade Frost Eryngium is reverting to green…as it does.  There is nothing to be done about it….The flowers will still be as beautiful.

tip of the week: when deadheading Cosmos, cut out the old stem candelabras

tip of the week: when deadheading Cosmos, cut out the old stem candelabras

the wind had battered the cosmos....

the wind had battered the cosmos….

but the garden still looked lovely....here, looking west to the beach path

but the garden still looked lovely….here, looking west to the beach path

We ended the increasingly cool and foggy day by caring for the gardens by the Port of Ilwaco office, both the south and north sides.

On the south side, the hanging baskets had been taken down because of the wind....

On the south side, the hanging baskets had been taken down because of the wind….

on the marina, masts in the fog

on the marina, masts in the fog

a little skiff...

a little skiff…

to and fro in the mist...

to and fro in the mist…

on the docks

on the docks

more fog rolling in

more fog rolling in

on the north side, a view of fog over School Hill

on the north side, a view of fog over School Hill

After finishing the Port Office gardens, we attended to the one down by Queen La De Da’s.  The alliums had blown over, so I tucked them into a planter by her back door.  Wonder if she noticed?

by the queen's doorway

by the queen’s doorway

In a garden behind Queen La De Da’s, an old Arundo donax looms in the fog.

a handsome ornamental grass

a handsome ornamental grass

Even derelict natural spots have their beauty like this dead blackberry cane against a hotel-for-sale next door to Queen La De Da’s building.

very wabi sabi

very wabi sabi

If you have made it this far, thanks for joining us for our whole working week.  It was an easier one than usual because we did not have to do any watering after the rains came.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 20, 2013

Our day began….with a frog on a daisy.  I was watering a few containers in the the back garden when I saw it, and it stayed put till I went into the house and returned with my camera.

daisy

Pacific tree frog

Pacific tree frog

froggie

My first stop was the Depot Restaurant.  Here is a different view from the usual:

the outdoor dining deck

the outdoor dining deck

and the usual garden view

and the usual garden view

and an update on the herb garden (rosemary, oregano, chives and some thyme in the foreground)

and an update on the herb garden (rosemary, oregano, chives and some thyme in the foreground)

Then I walked to meet Allan who was watering at Crank’s Roost.

I love this house sign between the Depot and Crank's.

I love this house sign between the Depot and Crank’s.

I had said goodbye to Crank’s a few posts ago, so I asked Allan if he would take a photo essay of what was most evocative to him of the essence of Crank’s Roost, and here it is:

Allan’s Crank’s Roost photos:

crank

crank

door

door

crank

lighthouse bird

blue

crank

shed

crank

fern

crank

crank

 

You can see that Crank’s Roost is a wonderful place to think a green thought in a green shade.

Jo’s garden and the Boreas Inn

We then worked on the gardens on 6th North in Long Beach:  Jo’s on the south side of the road and the Boreas on the north side.

At Jo's: a large patch of daisies to deadhead

At Jo’s: a large patch of daisies to deadhead

Jo and Bob's bird sanctuary

Jo and Bob’s bird sanctuary

agapanthus

agapanthus

snapdragons

snapdragons

Uh oh, Coco chewed through another sprinkler head!  Fortunately, Allan carried parts to replace it because occasionally we snip one when it is entwined with plant stems.

Oh, Coco!

Oh, Coco!

Poor Coco looked sad after being shown the sprinkler head by Jo and told not to do it again.  It has been rather chronic…

Coco

Coco:  Who, me?

coco

I confess.

Then: The Boreas Inn garden.

looking east toward the Boreas Inn

looking east toward the Boreas Inn

The newly redone beds have been gorgeous this year.

beds

I acquired a few flats of Lobelia tupa this year and planted it in pretty much every garden I could get my hands on….and the one at the Boreas is the only one that has bloomed!

Lobelia tupa, why so temperamental?

Lobelia tupa, why so temperamental?

stunning Lobelia tupa

stunning Lobelia tupa

Only Susie of the Boreas is going to believe me about what a gorgeous plant this is!

cosmos at the Boreas

cosmos at the Boreas…at least I can count on them everywhere

We stopped work a bit early to go the the retirement party for Jim Neva, Port of Ilwaco manager.  He has been such a great friend of landscaping at the port…and has been instrumental in supporting our work in the boatyard garden and Howerton street gardens.

to the right: Jim Neva

to the right: Jim Neva

The party was the the museum and the theme was Hawaiian because Jim is retiring partly to spend more time with his wife Jet’s family in Hawaii.  The food was delicious!

a feast

a feast

food

The new port manager, Guy Glenn Jr, says he is going to be just as much a friend of the gardens as Jim was.  We are very happy about that.

left: Mark, who oversees the boatyard; Guy, our new friend of gardens, and Allan

left: Mark, who oversees the boatyard; Guy, our new friend of gardens, and Allan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 10:  It is easier to go to work while the cats snooze than it was during wild late winter weather.  They seem to pick such uncomfortable places…

Mary and Smokey

Mary and Smokey

We began with a check up on Diane’s Sandridge garden.  I am happy with the way the roadside bed is filling in (thanks in part of Larry’s good watering).

It looks even better if (right) I use a slight telephoto effect and squeeze the plants closer together.

It looks even better if (right) I use a slight telephoto effect and squeeze the plants closer together.

Next door, the garden by the Red Barn is looking better…

Red Barn garden

Red Barn garden

And in the barn, I could not resist going to look at a burro (or donkey?)

donkey

And a horse, maybe named Peace or maybe that is the sentiment of the horse’s person.

peace

peace

From there, we stopped at The Basket Case so I could get myself one of those Banana Cream daisies, and I also picked up some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ to add to the Long Beach planters.  I will probably hold them till better planting weather in fall.

Lobelia tupa is coming into bud!

Lobelia tupa is coming into bud!

Echinacea looking fabulous

Echinacea looking fabulous

Then on to Peninsula Landscape Supply to dump debris and get half a yard of Soil Energy to add to Marilyn’s.  We arrived at an exciting time when a big delivery of stone arrived.

much activity

much activity

Garden tour poster in the window

Garden tour poster in the window

Peninsula Landscape Supply will be one of the ticket sales points for the July 20th tour.

In the midst of all the action, Colleen loaded us up…

Colleen

and off we went to Marilyn’s.  The garden is looking pretty tour worthy!

tour ready

shasta daisies and painted sage and more

shasta daisies and painted sage and more

I took lots of photos so that I could get the deer page ready by Friday when tickets (with the link) were to go on sale.  We had the strimmer and used it along the backside of the garden so it now looks good from all angles.

behind the garden

behind the garden

The two Rozannes ended up at Marilyn’s along the driveway after we had added the mulch to that area and to another path spot behind the back porch…and then we were off back south to the Wiegardt Gallery in Ocean Park.

Wiegardt Gallery front garden

Wiegardt Gallery front garden

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Gallery manager Christl expressed amazement that the Eryngium just keeps getting more intensely blue.

Eric Wiegardt himself showed up with a new painting, and lots of cars arrived for a workshop he was about to teach.

The Artist

The Artist

We left for Klipsan Beach Cottages to do weeding and deadheading.  Two slightly different views than the usual:

the garden view people get when they check in

the garden view people get when they check in

a view from inside a garden bed while weeding

a view from inside a garden bed while weeding

I am not just weeding out weeds but trying to get rid of damnable Japanese anemone, a plant I once liked till I found how invasively it runs through a garden.

The sweet peas at KBC are doing better than mine.  So are the ones at Andersen’s…I think because they got more care than mine at home!

sweet peas and Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

sweet peas and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

sweet pea and Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

sweet pea and Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

We then went to Golden Sands Assisted Living, where I took the usual pictures of the four quadrants.  We had to water around the edges again but this time I had a great talk with the maintenance man who is going to address the powers that be about getting some better sprinklers set up.  The ones they have a pretty twirly things that get baffled by plants growing in to them and that do not reach the edges of the gardens.  We discussed how I could get the courtyard looking good enough to be on the garden tour if the water situation got resolved and if we had some help cleaning up the pitifully weedy and drab areas outside the quadrants, where I actually think bark mulch (NOT RED) would help.

outside the quadrant

outside the quadrants

southwest  quadrant

southwest quadrant

detail: Sanguisorba

detail: Sanguisorba

NW quadrant...still needs mulch!

NW quadrant…still needs mulch!

NE quadrant

NE quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant detail

SE quadrant detail

By the time we were almost ready to leave, some of the residents were taking an after dinner walk through the courtyard and we were most pleased to hear their happy words about the flowers.

Not done yet, we spent an hour or so at Andersen’s RV Park.  The main show of poppies in the west garden is declining but some of the newly planted areas are coming on with poppies sown this year rather than reseeded ones.

west garden at Andersen's

west garden at Andersen’s: middle section is petering out

but the south side has new poppies

but the south side has new poppies

and so does the west end.

and so does the west end.

Here’s a different view than the usual one of the picket fence garden on the east side of Lorna’s house.

Usually I take a photo looking south over the fence.  This is looking north.

Usually I take a photo looking south over the fence. This is looking north.

For your amusement: a cute staff dog!

For your amusement: a cute staff dog!  What a face!

and the garden tour poster in the window!

and the garden tour poster in the window!

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Today was not a hellish planting day because the batches of plants were small and very few of them were in time consuming and fiddly six packs.

I think we have every garden pretty much planted up now!

We made two stops at the Depot Restaurant, first to assess the situation and plant a couple of Rosemary, then back to plant some more yellow annuals in the east facing whiskey barrel. Still not much going on with the Cosmos other than green growth.

still coming on

still coming on

Then a stop at Gene’s garden to assess how many perennials are needed to fill out the streetside bed, and then on to the nurseries.

At The Planter Box, I got one flat of short cosmos for the Long Beach welcome sign. The Cosmos for sale are looking just wonderful, and I wish people would go buy some to make the whole Peninsula more beautiful. They are my favourite annual.

Planter Box Cosmos

Planter Box Cosmos

I also very much like these annual Coreopsis:

the brown and white one is 'Jive'

the brown and white one is ‘Jive’

We also got some of their annual Salpiglossis (also an unusual find; when it starts to bloom it will sell like mad) and some of their excellent variegated thymes (for the Bolstadt Beach approach).

Then on to The Basket Case, where I admired Rosa mutabilis in bloom…

It is only around $12 in a gallon pot!

It is only around $12 in a gallon pot!

and wondered why no one but me is buying the amazing Lobelia tupa:

Lobelia tupa (Devils' Cardinal Flower), very choice and unusual.

Lobelia tupa (Devils’ Cardinal Flower), very choice and unusual.

There are still many gorgeous baskets. I just don’t have time to think about getting one or more for me right now.

Nancy's basket artistry

Nancy’s basket artistry

On the beach approach, plants from the two nurseries combined to fill up the planters with plants that will take the salt and wind and little water. The one thing they will not survive is people who swipe them, so we hope these will not be too tempting. (Actually, they might survive just fine in a thieves garden, but they are lost to Long Beach and me when that happens.)

beachy planter on the Bolstadt beach approach

beachy planter on the Bolstadt beach approach

We still need more plants in Gene’s Peggy Memorial Garden, but after today’s additions, it is coming along. Soon the flowering will begin and it will be a pleasant surprise for passersby, we hope.

Gene and Peggy's garden

Gene and Peggy’s garden

The one big established plant in the streetside bed is the lavender at the corner. Bees were all over it.

all abuzz with bees

all abuzz with bees

The backside of the Long Beach welcome sign (the side that says “Thank you”) had been showing colour with some Cosmos ‘Sonata’. My big idea of using just Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ for a big yellow show on the front side was not working out yet because the Agyrs were not flowering, so we put 24 cosmos ‘Cutesy’ on the “Welcome” side.

The back was just better, but now they match.  Bulb foliage will be removed soon.

The back was better, but now they match. Bulb foliage will be removed soon.

The annuals on the edge are also slow to bloom this year…so much cold and rain. But I much prefer this for planting weather than the hot spell we had a couple of weeks ago. We are saving lots of time by not having to water everything in.

After our second stop at the Depot Restaurant, we went back up to Jo’s garden in Long Beach to plant just eight more plants, some short Cosmos, three Salpiglossis, a Verbena bonariensis…and dashed away without even a hello and no time to weed. I just wanted to get all the plants in! Doing Jo’s AFTER the Depot meant backing and forthing but we wanted to get the Depot done before they open at five.

At Larry and Robert’s in Ilwaco, we planted pots on their front steps and added some more annuals (Sanvitalia and Salpiglossis) to the boat. There the Cosmos ‘Cutesy’ or ‘Sonata’ are showing a bit of colour.

garden boat

garden boat

Then came about the umpteenth squall of the day, this time a fierce one, so we went home since we were but half a block away and hoped it would pass.

from the garage

from the garage

I passed the time by planting four more tomatoes in my greenhouse, out of the rain. (Planter Box had some nice new ones for sale today.) From the greenhouse door, the sky looked promisingly light around the edges.

to the south and to the west

to the southwest and to the west

You can see it got worse before it got better…but there was that white edge.

I ran out of potting soil and ended up putting a tomato in a pot that once held a Datura. I hope it will be safe to eat!

In the house, a poppy glowed on the kitchen windowsill, promising me the weather was brightening up.

poppy

We decided we had to go back out, and in a light drizzle planted a few perennials in the garden at the west end of Howerton (mostly Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’). Then down to the east end we went with hopes of weeding that bed at last. Cold wet windy rain ensues so we postponed the job again…

east end...pretty but very weedy.

east end…pretty but very weedy.

The very last three Gauras were slated for the boatyard. We drove down Lake Street and saw the classic “light around the edges” view but still had to plant in the rain.

heading west on Lake

heading west on Lake

With the Gauras in, I gave up on the outdoors and decided to do the very necessary task of transferring a month’s worth of paper plant lists onto spreadsheets for each job. I booted the computer, got myself a cup of tea…and the weather became glorious. Of course.

from my window

from my window

How frustrating! But I knew I had better do the paperwork. Allan offered to go back out and weed that east end garden. By now it was 7. Two hours later, he returned with a report that he got over halfway done….and with much difficult thinking and adding and deciphering my notes, I took the same amount of time to transfer all my scribbled lists.

And now….these are the only plants that remain to be planted:

three artichokes for Leanne, one four o clock for Golden Sands!

three artichokes for Leanne, one four o clock for Golden Sands, one green echinacea for Wiegardt!!

 

 

 

 

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It kind of bothers me that local gardeners are missing out on the wonderful collection of perennials offered by The Basket Case Greenhouse at 12106 Sandridge Road.  Maybe because a lot of them are not yet blooming, people do not realize how beautiful they will be.  Basket Case owners Fred and Nancy try to close the nursery each year sometime in July (reopening in very early spring), so get them while you can! I would not even reveal the secrets of this outstanding collection if it were not for the fact that I have already bought mine!

Here are some of my favourites.  Get ’em while you can!

Lobelia tupa

The tag says “Devil’s cardinal flower”.  This perennial might not come through a cold wet winter, but with good sized plants like these, you should get a good show the first year.

Lobelia tupa

Lobelia tupa

It has been a plant of great desirability for me ever since I saw it almost in bloom at Joy Creek nursery some years back.

in bud

in bud

It was so hard to find that I searched for it in Seattle nurseries and was able, at the time, to find only three!  Yet here they are at the Basket Case just waiting for you….Unless I decide I have to have them all.  (I think I have already purchased almost a full flat!)   My great gardening friend Sheila says she has killed it twice, and I have heard other tales of woe, but if one has it for one season it would be worth it.  Check out the gallery of images.

Perovskia ‘Lacey Blue’

There is only ONE of these left.  I bought all the others or talked clients into buying them.  This Russian sage is worthwhile for the gorgeous foliage alone.

Perovskia 'Lacey Blue'

Perovskia ‘Lacey Blue’

It is supposed to be compact, so might be good for containers.

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

I have these in almost every one of my gardens.  It has the usual coreopsis flowers but on stems that get up to eight feet tall.  I just find it so very fun and amusing to grow!  One you have a good clump of it, you can divide it and give it to friends.  That’s the only reason I have not purchased many more of these plants this year.

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower'

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

Protect it from slugs;  they seem to like the new shoots, but I have not lost a plant of this to slugs OR weather in three years.

Here it is blooming as tall as the greenhouse at Klipsan Beach Cottages in October 2012.

fun!

fun!

Sanguisorbas

Nobody but me seems to “get” the burnets!   The sanguisorba collection at The Basket case is not your usual herby burnet that seeds around and has small flowers.  These have assorted big feathery plumes that I love and have sought out every since I saw a seminar slideshow by Piet Oudolf at the Seattle garden show years ago.

Sanguisorba 'Red Thunder' and another

Sanguisorba ‘Red Thunder’ and another

The “Red Thunder’ one is new to me this year.  I have forgotten which is the one on the right, above, but there is only one of it left.  I bought all the others!  You will see an assortment of three or four kinds in the park in front of Captain Bob’s Chowder and Marsh’s in Long Beach this summer, and in my own garden I have as many kinds as I have been able to find over the years.  The only thing that has prevented me from buying all of those ‘Red Thunder’ ones is that the deer do eat sanguisorbas so that limits the gardens I can plant them in.

Chelone obliqua

It used to be most unusual to find this in a nursery.  I had to mail order mine before this year when Basket Case started to carry them.  The “turtlehead” flowers bloom in the late summer.  The only reason there is still a batch of these at Basket Case is that I have not got around to buying them yet, but I will, if someone does not beat me to it.  It likes part shade and moisty soil.  It bloomed for me last year in dry shade but the foliage did not look happy so I have moved mine into a wetter area.

Chelone obliqua...pink turtlehead

Chelone obliqua…pink turtlehead

I had one in my former, dampish garden along a stream that was spectacular in late summer, but I didn’t have a digital camera during most of my time there so I don’t have a record of its glory.

Scrophularia variegata

With a name like that, no wonder the tag says variegated figwort.  This is another plant that is still at the Basket Case only because we have a small car and can’t fit everything in that we want.

variegated figwort

Rene Eisenbart wrote in the Oregonian:  “one of the choicest variegated foliage plants the perennial world has to offer. Extremely bright and full of optimism, with conspicuously large and crinkled leaves, it has a rigid upright habit that makes it a beacon in the garden.”

I had better get back there and buy all the rest of these, unless someone beats me to it.  I need them!

Penstemons

I have found penstemons to be drought resistant and so far the deer have left them alone except for the occasional experimental nibble.  Basket Case has a good selection, including this one new to me:

Penstemon 'Burgundy Brew'

Penstemon ‘Burgundy Brew’

There are not very many of these left, and I just thought of how a client of ours who likes wine really should have one of these.  And now I can think of two clients who are wine connoiseurs.  Make that three.   Are there even enough of these left for me?  Basket Case has also had ‘Apple Blossom’ and ‘Thorn’ this year and I have bought some of each.  Burgundy Brew is said to have unusually large flowers.  Good thing I am going back to Basket Case within two days so I can snag at least one more of these.

Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’

Verbascum ‘Clementine’ was a big hit earlier this season at the Basket Case and I think it is sold out, but there is still perhaps only ONE plant of the gorgeous, drought tolerant, sunny border plant ‘Jackie in Yellow’ left.

Verbascum 'Jackie in Yellow'

Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’

I have never tried these as cut flowers but Google tells me they are good in bouquets.

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

Fred tells me I am the only one who has bought this plant, and I am astonished.  The foliage is striking.

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

But when it blooms, it should be a knock out.  The plain green leafed Knautia macedonica is one of the most admired plants in our garden at the Wiegardt Gallery.  Looks like this one will have the same dark flowers.

Knautia at Wiegardt Gallery

Knautia at Wiegardt Gallery (the tall burgundy one)

I just bought six more ‘Thunder and Lightnings’ today but there are a few left.  For now.  I have decided they might look spiffing in some of the Long Beach planters!

Phygelius

There are at least three cultivars of this available. They are all good, deer resistant and sun loving, drought tolerant plants.  Hummingbirds love them.  They can be runners but I have never found them to be a problem because I like getting the offshoots.  The one that really struck my fancy this year was the white one (I think it is called ‘Snow White’) because it is unusual.

Phygelius

Phygelius

I do not understand why these are not being bought up!  Note on the left of the photos, you can just see the one (I forget the name) with gorgeous gold foliage.

Rosa mutabilis

This rose was spectacular in my old garden.  I think there are three left of the six that Basket Case got in this year.  I bought the other three.  Don’t miss out!

Rosa mutabilis

Rosa mutabilis

Here it is in my old garden:

Rose

Agastache (Hyssop)

The Agastaches that I planted from Basket Case last year were the hit of my garden when it was on the garden tour and through the summer whenever someone visited.

Agastaches

Agastaches

I think I bought all the Golden Jubilee and the apricot and salmon coloured one might be gone, but there are still some Acapulco Orange and some with the very amusing name ‘Black Adder’ and possibly some violet-blue ones.

The leaves often smell deliciously of licorice.  I am in love with all of these.

an Agastache from Basket Case last summer in my garden

an Agastache from Basket Case last summer in my garden

Eryngiums

Finally, my favourite perennials, the Eryngiums.  The Basket Case has two on offer, the first being one that was introduced just a few years ago and cost about $30 a gallon then.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Because I collect them, I had to have it then.   I have found that the pretty foliage tends to want to revert to green after a year or two, but the flower is so spectacular that I love it anyway.  Now that Basket Case has them for a reasonable price, I will just get new ones each year for the foliage colour.

There are still four left!

There are still four left!

Here it is flowering, with blue thistle-like balls, in my garden last year on tour day:

Eryngium 'Jade Frost' in flower

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ in flower

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ is probably THE most asked about flower in any of my gardens.  I use it in every single one.  The deer leave it alone, the flowers are an incredible blue, and they dry on the plant in an attractive way.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

People go into businesses, even the Port Office, and ask what this plant is.  The Basket Case is on its second shipment of these and has a few left.

Here it is in the Hornbuckle garden on May 8th this year:

green buds

green buds

Here it is yesterday in my friend Nancy’s garden:

just colouring up, 5-23-13

just colouring up, 5-23-13

June 2012, a bee magnet

June 2012, a bee magnet

2011, at the Wiegardt Gallery

2011, at the Wiegardt Gallery

It’s a wonderful plant that never fails to get attention and compliments.

So when you visit the Basket Case, don’t just look at their wonderful selection of annuals.  Look closely at the tags in the perennials house, because all those plants that just look green and maybe not very exciting now will do great things in the garden, and they long to get out of their pots and into the ground.

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If the weather had been nicer I would have felt guilty about the amount of time we spent socializing today, but the intense chill in the air gave us a good excuse to goof off.

We did take the work trailer with us just in case (and also because I knew we had a couple of large plants to pick up at The Basket Case). Our initial mission, however, was social and community minded. With new local friend Michelle Z, I started a “Peninsula Cash Mob” over the winter. Every three weeks or so we promote, on Facebook, a local shop with the idea that people will gather there on a certain mid morning to shop, spending between $5 and $20 (or even just being there) and then some will also have lunch at a local restaurant. Today our focus shop was Stylin’: A Unique Consignment Shop in Long Beach. Because of it being a women’s clothing and accessory store, we did not get our usual mixed gender crowd but still had a good turn out.

Stylin'

Stylin’ just north of downtown Long Beach

While we were there the wind and rain battered away outside so I felt no worries about hanging around for an hour taking photos. I even bought a sweater with a lovely gold dragon on it. But I had no idea, not being much of a femme dresser, what the initials L-RL stood for below the dragon. Someone told me…something to do with Ralph Lauren? But who is the first L? I remain mystified.

If I carried purses, I might go for these flowery ones:

indoor flowers of the day

indoor flowers of the day

And while I could not even imagine getting my toes into these shoes, I had to admire their intricate look and could imagine them as part of a steampunk ensemble:

shoes

In continued icy rain and a harsh wintery wind, we drove to the day’s cash mob lunch spot, The Lightship Restaurant, where we had the pleasure of sitting with Michelle and with Robbie, local animal rescuer and critter sitter.

me and Robbie

me and Robbie

Robbie is an expert orchid enthusiast who will be teaching a class on the subject at our local college. As with many local friends, most of our getting to know each other has been on Facebook and I think this is the first time we had actually spent time together at a social event, but we already knew each well. (She also commented that Allan is very, very funny.)

We solved a number of local problems during out lunch chat.

We solved a number of local problems during our lunch chat.

our delicious food items.  (My burrito will be a late snack as well!)

our delicious food items. (My burrito will be a late snack as well!)

After lunch, I got to meet Nugget, Michelle’s supposed foster dog and now Michelle’s actual permanent dog, a clever little escapee who ran away the minute he arrived on the Peninsula and spent 12 worrisome days scampering around the Long Beach Golf Course, afraid of all humans. Robbie was a part of the team of rescuers who tracked and fed him for days till he came home. He’s now a lovely little pampered companion dog.

with local celebrity Nugget

with local celebrity Nugget

And then the sun came out so off went Allan and I to some deadheading and pruning at The Anchorage Cottages. Here are the best tulips of the day:

tulipstulips

tulips

I do feel that Tulip ‘Gavota’ and whatever that other one is look excellent with brick. No sign yet of sweet pea sprouts along the chimney base, but they were planted about a week later that the ones at Andersen’s RV Park (that are breaking ground now).

Just as we were dealing with the last of the small weeds a sudden mixed rain and hailstorm drenched us and pinged painfully off our heads while we loaded ourselves into the car. This was a good time to make another buying trip to The Basket Case. I needed to make sure I got my mitts on enough Jade Frost Eryngium (even though in my experience the leaves do like to revert to green), and I’m thrilled to be able to buy many reasonably priced and healthy plants of Lobelia tupa, a plant that used to be very hard to find around here.

Lobelia tupa

Lobelia tupa

I kindly left behind just a few of those and of Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ for other customers.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', my favourite perennial

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, my favourite perennial

With the car fully packed, we drove in another spot of clear weather to check on a container planting request at the office of longtime client Cheri’s Discovery Coast Real Estate. The containers turned out to be quite a bit smaller than I had imagined, but one had the very nasty Aegepodium weed…a MUST not plant that some nurseries still sell, so the soil from that one will go in our garbage can.

I should have taken a photo to warn you all off that horrible, horrible groundcover…but at the end of the little project, this happened:

cold rain

cold rain

We could definitely see that the sky was light around the edges but with the wind blowing at 20 mph it seemed that any light spot would blow over us quickly and bring more rain. The temperature of about 45 degrees F felt much colder to me, and my weather wimpiness led to this:

Olde Towne

Olde Towne

a few customers lingering at closing time

a few customers lingering at closing time

During the less than an hour that we indulged in another break, rain and sun, rain and sun passed in quick succession. And now, at home, while Allan determinedly runs the weedeater around the garden bed edges, I am firmly settled into my computer chair where I will upload the day’s cash mob photos to Facebook and then…a relaxing joy!…reenter the world of Mr. and Mrs. Tootlepedal in 2011.

If I could have managed it, or if I had been braver, I might have moved to Scotland years ago, but I can inhabit the beautiful border countryside in my imagination through the Tootlepedal blog…just as I have mentally lived through many gardening years in New Zealand through Moosey’s Country Garden. I am now glad that I did not go because I do believe that my right livelihood is right exactly where I live today.

 

 

 

 

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haunted by memories of an extraordinary garden

As I write this on July 13th, it has been 6 days since we visited the Old Germantown Road Garden for an HPSO open day….and I can’t stop thinking about the garden’s greatness. At the HPSO study weekend, Sheila and I had sat at the dinnertable with its owners and creators, Bruce Wakefield and Jerry Grossnickle, yet we had not felt we had time to drive to see their outlying garden. I think we made the right choice, because it required far more time to view than a hasty walk through with anxious thoughts of getting back to the train station in time for the trip home.  You could walk through the gardens all day and still find new magical surprises.  I had a feeling this was a garden we needed to see, so Allan and I went to its very next open day (a four hour round trip).

view from house deck and from greenhouse terrace

After a breathtaking entry past a sweep of Sedum’ Autumn Joy’ and the thought that with a huge garden one COULD have huge sweeps of plants, we rounded the driveway circle and were welcomed into the house with a sign advising us to view the garden from the deck…the route to which took us past Jerry serving up his famous chocolate swirl cookies and delicious iced punch. An idea of the vastness of the garden could be had from the driveway, but even looking down from the deck it was hard to grasp the sheer size.  I think it is three acres, two in cultivation.  [2012 note: I think now it is five acres, two in cultivatation…The article says how big…] We were given a map to guide us through the gardens: Cardiocrinum garden, Orchard, Primula Gardens, Arches, Mediterranean Garden, Woodland Garden, Gazebo, Pond, Rock Garden…..and more…

greenhouse and descending terraces

The terrace greenhouse was filled with exotics.  What entranced me was the round pond (with a concrete bench in it…I did not think to check if the water was hot or cold) from which ran a rill across the terrace, splashing narrowly next to steps to a second terrace, when it flowed into a fascinatingly deep green little pool under a mysteriously floating boulder. It was about then that I decided I was in the best garden of my experience.

passing through the rock garden…and finding the gazebo

Onward down natural stone steps, past a striking patch of cacti, we were given a staggering choice of paths and were drawn by the bright lawn borders which we had seen from above. Everywhere, dwarf conifers were brilliantly used as punctuation.  Oh, to have more room for such!

ponds small and large

Past the sweeping lawn borders and gazebo we felt we were entering a series of rooms.  We happened upon this wee pond (above left) and moments later found this glorious large pond (right) with enormous koi and an inviting stone bench at one end.  One could walk all the way round it, and indeed other members of the HPSO were going round and round. Just sitting and watching those fish could take all day.

a secret garden…………………..and another enticing path

Paths offer many choices and the worry that one might miss something extraordinary.  One mossy set of steps lead to a secret garden with bench.  These gardens abound with sit spots and with beautiful objects.

art in the garden

From the deck, another gardener and I both thought the metal sculptures, below left, were actual huge Allium schubertii.

garden art, garden arch

Past the rose arches we were offered more tantalizing path choices; steps or gravel? We paused to enjoy the Mediterranan garden with its drinking fountain, the handle propped on with a stone to provide visitors with water on such a hot bright day.

drinking fountain…and back to the lychnis (rose campion) at orchard entry

But I have gotten ahead of myself. After the ponds we plunged into the woodland paths. Under a collection of wonderful trees grew silver-leaved brunnera, ferns, hellebores which must have been amazing in bloom, and Cardiocrinums just going to seed; then we emerged into bright sunshine accentuated by a splash of hot magenta lychnis at the entrance to the orchard. Again: the joy of having the space to use a big splash of a common but striking plant. I loved all the raised beds as we left the woods and worked our way up toward the Mediterranean garden and its drinking fountain.

so many paths

And did I mention paths? Dark and light, shaded, subtle, revealing a secret garden or bursting out into waves of colour….

shady paths

into the sun

The colours…the raised beds…the fascinating perennials and the conifer punctuation….By the time we had circulated through the entire garden and had a refill of icy fruit drink and another cookie, I sat in a daze on the curved wall of that terrace with the deep green little pool and the splashing rill.  Allan reentered the house to listen to gardeners talking out on the deck.  And I looked up to see what provided me with cool shade, to see a small forest of Tetranpanax papirefer ‘Steroidal Giant’ overhead…a precursor to what I might eventually expect from my precious two year old plant.

the small green pond fed by a rill……………………the tetrapanax grove

And now…six days later….I can’t stop thinking about the paths wooded and sunny, the raised beds and conifers, the deep green small pool, the Lobelia tupa which I must buy somewhere, and what the gardens must be like in different seasons, and what in the world I can do to make our two city lots more magical and mysterious.

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