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Posts Tagged ‘Long Beach planters’

Thursday, 1 August 2019

We took Don Nisbett a birthday card and gift certificate to Ilwaco Bakery.

by the port office
in Don’s art gallery

When we stopped back at home for a few minutes, Frosty did not want us to go to work.

We photographed the new paint job on one of Ilwaco’s handsomest houses.

Depot Restaurant

We did our spot watering and deadheading.

Lonicera ‘Baggeson’s Gold’, Geranium ‘Rozanne’, Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Nasturtium ‘Moonlight’ has arranged itself prettily on the lonicera and on the escallonia.

Lower left corner, above, a Nicotiana langsdorfii that reseeded.  I find that exciting.  I later read a Facebook post by Ann Amato that said that nicotianas reseed a lot.  That pleases me.

I liked this lily partly hidden with bamboo.  When I looked again, Allan had trimmed the bamboo so that the lily showed better.

Long Beach

We deadheaded at the welcome sign.

Allan’s photo

We each watered half the planters. I was happy that no one yelled at us that it was going to rain.  Rain was in the forecast, but only for 1/4 inch, not enough to skip watering planters.  Their foliage is too thick for any but the heaviest rain to penetrate.

I tidied the front circle garden of Coulter Park, and a good thing, too.  The memorial plaque was almost lost to a hebe.

I took the hebe branches home to make cuttings.

There really is a plaque in there:

In the northernmost planter, I have a favourite oregano, ‘Hopley’s Purple’.  I have divided it and it is now in almost all of the planters.

I found a note in that planter: Mom dus [does] love me.

“Mom dus love me.” This gave me at least a block worth of poignant thoughts.  As a child, I was never sure my mother did love me.  One of her favorite things to say to me was, “I always said I wanted six boys and if I had a girl, I’d drown her.” Her favorite thing to say to others was, “We liked her until she turned two and learned to say no.” Words like that really make a child wonder. Fortunately for me, I knew my grandmother did love me and, because she was my daily caregiver, I have many happy childhood memories.

Now that my mother has gone, I have figured out that she did love me, in her way. As is so often true, I wish I had figured it out while she was still alive.  She told me in the last years of her life that she was “not a nurturing person”.  Even her plants felt this; if she wanted to plant a shade plant in the sun, she would, and “it could take its chances.”  She confessed that if there had not been societal pressure to be a mother, she would probably have chosen to be childless.  This did not bother me, as an adult, because it made sense of so much. She had recently diagnosed herself with social anxiety disorder and felt that it explained a lot about her life and loneliness.

If only we’d had another year or two, I think we would have had a communication breakthrough. I had tried hard for the breakthrough and then given up. My words to her as I stood in a hospital room with her body, after her second heart attack, were “I’m sorry I didn’t try harder.”

I do wonder what the story is behind the child’s note that I found. Is it as poignant as it seemed to me?

Gardening, especially weeding and watering, is more conducive to pondering and reminiscing than careers that take more mental attention.

Allan’s photos while watering:

miniature rose
Doogers Restaurant is now the Drop Anchor.
Basket Case Greenhouse makes the baskets for the town.
The Fifth Street Park pond had been cleaned.

Allan pulled bindweed from the shady back corner of Fifth Street Park’s SE quadrant while I weeded other areas.

ivy on the Benson’s Restaurant side

Even though English Ivy is a noxious weed here, it is not our place to remove it from the fence on the edge of this park.

rudbeckia in the sunny NE quadrant (Allan’s photos)

Ilwaco

I had been going to skip watering the boatyard garden because of the rain forecast.  However, I had kept checking the weather and found the amount was being changed from 1/4 inch to 1/10 inch and then just to occasional showers.  Better to water anyway than have to come back out on a weekend day off.

One of the boat owners agreed with me that the chance of rain looked slim and that “we might just get a bit of mist.”

The job was not unproductive.  I managed to pull a lot of grass back and out from the inside of the fence while wielding the hose.

Meanwhile, Allan watered the street trees and planters and lent his tire jack to two women from Azure Salon who had a flat tire.

in a planter (Allan’s photo)

We did dare to skip watering the volunteer gardens at the post office and fire station, hoping for rain.  Otherwise, we would be back out with a hose on the weekend.

at home

Frosty
Sanguisorba ‘Lilac Squirrel’ and lilies
Echinops and lilies

I was thrilled to see my Angelica gigas in bloom.

It certainly did not feel like rain.

Now for three days off.  Tomorrow, the door to my room will open and Jazmin will simply have to deal with the world of the rest of the house and the two other cats.

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Monday, 22 July 2019

New cat Jazmin is still making my room her territory, still growling at the door and not ready to meet the other cats.

We had checked on the Ilwaco planters upon our return last night and found them wanting in moisture and even, here and there, a bit droopy.  So we reversed the polarity of the neutron flow and did Ilwaco watering first.  Almost unheard of because it’s better to water in the evening, and the parking is harder during the day. Allan had to do more walking with heavy buckets of water. (I think we will be giving up this planter job at the end of 2020. It is too hard on back and knees. Allan will be 68 by then.)

Ilwaco

We filled our 25 five gallon buckets with water at the boatyard and then I weeded and groomed the planters and street tree gardens while Allan applied the water.

at the boatyard

We took time to move the Saturday Market banner, which had been hung up behind a stately Panicum ‘Northwind’ while it was small.

 

Allan’s photo

Better to move the banner than have someone cut down the grass.

The thirstiest plant in the planters was golden oregano.

Allan’s photo

I had some success with calendula seeds under a street tree.

The Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that I put in the center of each planter (economical for the city because they were free) are somewhat successful.  Deer spray has worked to protect them.  But some, in both sun and slight shade, have diseased leaves.

Per Google, probably powdery mildew. Maybe.  I will try improving the drainage in the affected planters with grit.  I had the same problem with a few purple leaved sedums last year.  Darn it.

Maybe they don’t like liquid fertilizer.

dahlias (not ours) at Ilwaco city hall

Long Beach

We picked up our check and tidied the garden at Long Beach city hall.

Long Beach City Hall

Uh-oh, we might need to lower that rhododendron so the sign shows.

Allan’s photo

elephant garlic, known in the city hall office as the Horton Hear a Who plant.

We moved the van to mid town and separated to water the street trees and some planters (Allan) and the rest of the planters (me).

I realized that I had to trim the police station roses (Rosa rugosa ‘Alba’) where they’d gotten too wide for the sidewalk.

My photos while watering:

Fifth Street Park east side

Tinkertown Mall (getting new paving)
Tigridia
new real estate office
sweet peas, Fifth Street Park west side

a handsome blue agastache

Speaking of agastaches, I was pleased to get this email from Annie’s Annuals: “…whether you say “Aga-STAK-ee” or “A-GAS-ta-key” (heck, you can even call it Aga-STASH and we won’t blink..”   I say A GAS ta key, on the advice of Bob Nold. This was the first other place where I have found that very proper pronunciation.  Even on Gardener’s World, the presenters say Agastashee…. or even Aga-stash. So I was glad to be vindicated.

I noticed another hidden sign, the new sign for the World’s End Pub.

This time it is Not My Problem (unlike the rhododendron at City Hall).

It will show from the intersection.  The pub, which will have a pirate theme, is not yet open.  I feel bad for them missing the summer trade.

Allan’s photos while watering:

golden fuchsia
Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’, Geranium ‘Rozanne’

After watering the planters, we weeded half of the beach approach garden because the Sandsations sand sculpture event starts on Wednesday.  Allan took all the photos out there.

ANOTHER coreopsis pulled out, and not by deer.

I am sure the coreopsis are being pulled by people trying to pick the flowers.

wildflower seed success

Ilwaco

We returned to our Ilwaco watering with our volunteer gardens at the fire station and post office.

fire station
fire station east side, success with calendula and bachelor buttons from seeds and happy, healthy Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (same sedum divisions as I used in the Ilwaco planters)

 

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Monday, 8 July 2019

Despite a forecast of rain, we did our usual watering rounds.  We cannot depend on rain, especially when the forecast calls for anything between one tenth and one half inch.

Long Beach

Allan watered the street trees and ten planters and I did the rest.

Photos taken as I walked up one side of the street and then down the other…

My second planter had a catastrophe: one of my gauras had disappeared, ruining my symmetry.

I found half of the plant left, bent sideways.

I had to trim the remainder of the right hand one by half and then had to cut the other one by half to match.  The joys of public gardening.  I hope people know that my intentions were better than what they get to see.

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’

In two planters, the knautias that used to be the variegated ‘Thunder and Lightning’ are too big and sprawling.

One variegated leaf has come back in the messy middle.

Perhaps in the autumn, I will remember to dig these out and put them under a street tree or in a park.

Last week’s mulch has slowed down the horsetail in Fifth Street Park.

I had some sweet pea success, although some of the leaves look ominously on the verge of mildew.

California poppies
Allium christophii tied into a bundle

I had begged some string from Captain Bob’s Chowder but did not take enough for the second trio of alliums.

Veronica is regrowing where I sheared it back hard.

The dampest corner of Fifth Street Park:

No one has cut into the biggest lavender yet!

lavender abuzz

The lilies in Fifth Street Park and in my own garden are shorter than usual this year.

Allan’s photos while watering:

Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’

rugosa rose
a couple getting a photo in front of the blooming ‘Super Dorothy’ rose

Ilwaco

I tidied up the planters while Allan bucket watered them.

Someone planted sunflowers in this one.

Maybe a bird did it.

view of the boatyard

The deer spray (Liquid Fence) is preventing the sedums from getting munched.

Someone who came to my plant sale at the end of May told me to look for a little garden behind a building.  I remembered today.

very nice indeed

The annoying perennial sweet pea looks pretty right now.

We did not plant it.

City Hall

We finished by watering our volunteer gardens at the post office and fire station.

fire station garden
east side, new this year

It was 71 degrees as we finished watering.

At home, my next door neighbour was feasting on bindweed.

I potted up a big comfrey that we had dug up, with permission, from a garden near the boatyard.

Skooter helped.

 

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Thursday, 4 July 2019

I got such a nice card from someone who came to our plant sale from an upriver town.

Beautiful name, too. I will write back and tell her she can come to the garden anytime, just being sure to shut the deer gates, although it will not look as well-groomed as it did on plant sale weekend. (Perhaps she will see it here before I remember to write back!)

Long Beach

Planter watering day fell on the fourth of July holiday.  It was not as crowded downtown as I had feared and the day went swimmingly.

Long Beach welcome sign

downtown
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
A bee making a decision. (Allan’s photo)
busy streets (Allan’s photo)
Allan’s photo
free BBQ samples (Allan’s photo); he says it was delicious
Allan’s photo
birdseed under a tree
This busker was superb.
Mexican hat flower about to bloom.
picking up someone’s lost ice cream; tears before bedtime
basket created by Basket Case Greenhouse
lopsided planter because one pink agastache did not come back well

It has been frustrating that I can’t order the big showy agastaches.  I no longer trust the nursery (not local) that had bad ones last year, and so I have not asked the local nurseries to order any for Long Beach.  I must try to make cuttings of the good ones.

I like this t shirt that was on offer at a shop.  Much more thoughtful than a sea of red, white, and blue.  I am not a nationalist.

Allan’s photo

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ (left) came out just in time for the holiday. They look like fireworks.

Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)
Allan’s photo
Allan’s photo
Why the picked hydrangea?
Why the picked and dropped flowers?

As I passed the excellent busker again, I finally had that feeling I had been waiting for all year, that feeling of fondness for the happy tourists.

“Yeah, I heard a funny thing
Somebody said to me
You know that I could be in love, with almost everyone
I think that people are the greatest fun.”

After watering Long Beach, we stopped by the Mermaid Castle, having heard that Queen La De Da had a live mermaid visiting today.

Allan’s photo

Jenna’s photo

The Depot Restaurant

We spot watered the garden (a couple of areas the sprinklers do not yet reach).

I found a rock.

Ilwaco

I weeded the boatyard garden while Allan watered the planters and street trees, post office and fire station, and helped me finish watering.

Allan’s photo

cistus
blue globe thistle
elephant garlic minus one

south end of boatyard

I got permission to dig some comfrey from the garden nearby!  Next week.

Ilwaco planter has been nibbled on. It got a spritz of deer spray. (Allan’s photo)
former location of our friend’s gallery (Allan’s photo)

We got home in time for me to churn out four blog posts about the work week (ending with this one) while our little metal house shook with the fireworks set off by people who do not care that our cats are scared and my dear neighbor dogs are next door hiding under the bed in terror.

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Monday, 1 July 2019

I was pleased to find two callistemons in bloom in my garden.

Callistemon viridiflorus is still rather stressed from its move from Klipsan Beach Cottages to here eight months ago, but it is blooming.

Woodlanders Red seems very happy.

Long Beach

Before the watering rounds, we weeded the resurgence of horsetail out of Fifth Street Park’s NW quadrant and then mulched with two bales of Gardner and Bloome Soil Conditioner.

before

It had only taken since Thursday’s weeding for the horsetail to return.

also before
after
Above: That’s Captain Bob in the doorway of his chowder house.

In spring, we had removed tired and sickly old catmints and replaced them with santolina for a nice edging because the park had been rather dry.  Then the sprinklers were readjusted (I think) and now it is very wet, making the horsetail ever so happy and the centerpiece sanguisorba all floppy.  At least it may look better for this weekend.  I’m not at all happy with it.

Our other non-watering mission was to trim back the edge all along the street side of the Bolstad beach approach garden.  The Toy makes this much easier than it used to be.  Allan’s photos:

some weeding, too

We saw a little boy with his dad.  The boy had a nice bouquet of gaillardias and coreopsis.  We gently pointed out that there are not many flowers to pick in that garden and that if everyone did, blah blah blah, closing with, “I wouldn’t even say this to you if there were a million trillion flowers out here.”  Both dad and boy looked thoughtful.

Someone had pulled up coreopsis by the roots and left them to die.  There are not many of those in the garden, either.  

Still more coreopsis.  Not happy.

I took them home in a bucket of water and potted them up at end of day.

Onward we went with watering the street trees and planters.

a would-be great escape

(I re-home snails in areas of rough grass far from planters and gardens.)

Cosmos ‘Sonata’
I like parsley used ornamentally.
I do like a symmetrical planter.

The tree that we wish did not have accidental rugosa roses actually looks great right now.

Allan’s weekly struggle with the tree watering, illustrated: He thinks a mole filled up the valve from the bottom as the soil was soft.

He spotted a rock….

…inside this old Hebe ‘Boughton’s Dome’.

These pink oenotheras always remind me of my first ever attendance of a gardening lecture, when Ann Lovejoy said we could just ask for the pink evening primrose instead of remembering “ee-noth-era”.

another symmetrical planter

The weather was perfect, grey (which I prefer to sunshine) and not windy.

Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’ (Allan’s photo)
Pacific tree frog! (Allan’s photo)
Long Beach Tavern’s flowers (Allan’s photo)
the much too invasive variegated vinca under a tree, to my regret (Allan’s photo)

When I pulled bindweed at the police station and at the little park behind Lewis and Clark Square, two little birds had much to say about their nest or their fledgings (which I did not see).

This little twining weed in a planter is quite pretty. But what is it?

I remembered to get some cuttings of Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’ from one of the planters—my favourite dianthus.

Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’

Ilwaco

While Allan watered the street trees and planters, the post office and fire station gardens, I potted my cuttings (my grandma would have called them “slips”), weeded the Norwood and J’s gardens and almost finished the monthly billing.

Norwood garden
Berberis darwinii berries hanging over into the J’s garden from next door

At the fire station, Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ is the only original plant in the revamped garden.

volunteer garden at the fire station

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Thursday, 27 June 2019

I got a plant delivery from Digging Dog Nursery, including a new Molinia ‘Transparent’.  Skooter dug up the one I got last year!

Although we still felt like we had the stuffing kicked out of us from the shingrix shot, watering wouldn’t wait.  On the way to work, realizing we did not have much longer to see it, we toured the current exhibit just three blocks west at

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum.

There, I found information about the Narcissa Garden Club, whose plaque is on a memorial at Black Lake.

A museum staffer and I spoke of how in recent years, the little garden in front has had only plastic flowers.  Allan and I thought we might try to revive it after we semi-retire.  At the very least, we could plant it up with some narcissi.

I found this memorial to be deeply moving.

Also, books for troops.

I wish that the Spirit of Peace would prevail.

The Spirit of Peace, by Joe Knowles
having a pleasant confab with a friend from Ocean Park

On we went to our gardening rounds.

The Depot Restaurant

One of the restaurant staff came by and said he was amazed that the garden was already this tall from having looking like nothing when he started (in early spring when the perennials were all cut back).

An interesting rig parked for a few minutes nearby.  It appeared to be a trailer made of old trunks.  Or perhaps it was just an intriguing collection of old trunks.

On the way to Long Beach, Allan picked up his new shirt from Rip Tide Threads. He says he was tickled to get it and felt he had “moved up a social class”.

Long Beach

We plodded through the watering of the Long Beach planters.

found a rock
a nicely colored Cosmos ‘Sonata’
Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’

Under one of two trees where the water does not work, the plants are distressed.  The only way to water it is to carry heavy buckets for a quarter of a block. So it never gets enough without rain.

finger blight of the day

We attended to some rampant blackberries popping out of the Heron Pond salal garden.  No time for horsetail patrol here.

During horsetail patrol in Fifth Street Park, I resolved to buy some GOOD bagged mulch for the quadrant that I so far cannot get to look good this year.

Allan’s Long Beach photos:

in the only planter that still has all its alliums
Allium christophii

A gentleman from Dooger’s Restaurant wanted to know the ID of the pretty little dianthus (pinks) growing in the restaurant garden.

Even though we so did not have energy for the planters out on Sid Snyder Drive, they needed water and attention. So we attended to them.

This one has to have water hauled to it in buckets.

Ilwaco

I watered the boatyard garden while Allan bucket watered the street trees and planters.

It was another challenging watering session because of hoses going up into boats.

I had to call for Allan’s help to unhook that hose from the faucet and hook another one up. I had found this partly burst fabric hose that I could take to various faucets.

Then I hooked up the boat hose again and left all as it was before.

The horsetail, both the big kind and the even more difficult little scrimmy kind, is coming back.

No time to deal with it today.

By the way, once upon a time, years ago, I put sprinkler hoses all along this garden so that I could water by hooking them up and then weeding while watering.  They were all stolen within a few weeks.  Because I water from behind the fence, I can’t do much weeding at the same time.

The garden is not too bad.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I could see the spot above, to the lower right, where someone had picked themselves a blue flowered stem.

sweet pea success
red poppies for remembrance

We must remember to take red poppy seeds to the WWI Memorial.

I watered the fire station garden while Allan watered the post office garden.

Allan’s Ilwaco photos:

We love that the Peninsula Sanitation office has someone who waters the planter. (No one knows who planted those gladioli.)

We now have three days off, thank goodness!

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Monday, 24 June 2019

at the post office

I had been worrying (as is my wont) for several days about the effects of our second Shingrix shot, scheduled for tomorrow.  The first shot of the shingles vaccine had knocked us, and especially Allan, out of commission for a few days.  The timing for the second one was certainly not ideal, but with a nationwide shortage we had to get it when it was offered.  So we jammed as much work into today as we could.

The Red Barn

We weeded and watered, and I doted on Cosmo the barn cat.

Allan’s photo

Cosmo hopped into the van, atop the pile of different weights of clothing for constantly changing weather.

Allan’s photo

The Tootlepedal blog has been inspiring me to do more flower close ups.

Diane’s garden

I did not pull the fireweed in the roadside garden (rosebay willowherb) because it is so pretty.

It is always a thrill to work on the roadside garden.

penstemon
Diane’s pea patch, better than any kitchen garden thing I’ve grown

The raised box garden is filling in.

When I grew Caribbean Cocktail nasturtiums last year, the flowers were all maroon and cream combos.

It has some of that this year…

…but also this orange, which is most definitely not supposed to be in Diane’s garden.

It is good that a vast sweep of reseeded California poppies stayed cream and not orange, but I fear they may have buried some perennials.

Allan’s photo
Brodiaea ‘Rudy’

Long Beach

We watered the planters and the 18 street tree gardens.

traveling sharpener
agastache
a meadowy tree garden
a Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that escaped the Chelsea chop.

I know it is now officially Hylotelephium telephium ‘Autumn Joy‘ but…please.

As I watered, some folks were herding their two children toward a van. Each carried a kite they had made at the kite museum. The little boy, maybe 7 or 8 years of age, wailed, “Why do we have to go HOME? Why do we have to go FRICKING HOME? I don’t want to go HOOOME!”  He leaned his head against the van and wept.  In 1991 I felt the same while vacationing here.  And look what happened.

Allan’s Long Beach photos:

red hardy gladiolus

tree water hook up
tThe city crew had cleaned out this blocked one.
a tater bug convention
bindweed on a lily, before untwining

Ilwaco

While I dragged hose and watered along the port, Allan bucket watered the Ilwaco trees and planters.  The amount of watering we do of gardens that were not planned with any irrigation is pretty ridiculous.

The weather had been perfect all day.  Not too hot, not too cold, not too windy.  It could only have been more perfect had it poured rain all night so we did not have to water.

I love my santolinas. I must shear these wax myrtles soon.

Eremurus (Foxtail Lily)
my favourite bed

Dragging hose down the port definitely gets one’s heart rate up.

Our Jenna (Queen La De Da) was painting Don’s gallery.

The port office garden still looks too empty. I resolved to remember to bring some more plants for it.

I fretted over the western and easternmost beds which had not been watered for awhile.  We did not have time.

Allan’s photos: Peninsula Sanitation has been diligent in watering in between our visits which helps keep it healthy and bright.

The boatyard had been string trimmed inside the fence, even sparing some flowers that had reseeded.

We finished with Allan watering at the post office and me watering at the fire station.

fire station garden

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