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Posts Tagged ‘Long Beach planters’

Monday, 22 May 2017

I couldn’t stay at home with my friends, because we had many plants to plant.

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Smokey

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Frosty

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always in the mood for a belly rub

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Skooter on the front porch…

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blocking the door with his hind legs. “I couldn’t go to work today; my cat wouldn’t let me out.”

We did go to work, starting with picking up some more cosmos at

The Planter Box

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I could not resist this gorgeous clematis.

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a hot bright day

The temperature was already soaring, and would soon be up to 85 degrees F.

More clematis, that I did resist, so they might still be there for you:

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baby birds (Allan’s photo)

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little bitty poultry (Allan’s photo)

Erin’s garden

Melissa and Dave were working at our former job, Erin’s garden, and had some Agastaches and boxwoods for me among other Blooming treasures.  We stopped to load up the plants.  I was thrilled to see my old friend Felix:

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I’ve missed this guy!

Allan went up the stairs to look at our old garden.  I would not be surprised if those are our original santolinas from the creation of this garden several years ago.  It pleases me to see it looking so good.

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Long Beach

For the rest of the day, Allan took all but three of the photos.  My lack of enjoyment in the task of planting translates into not thinking about taking pictures.

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No plants stolen out of the most recently completely re-done planter.

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City crew member repairing the cracks from when it was driven into by an errant vehicle. They had been repaired, but needed to be mudded with a consistent color.

You can see from the lamp post flag, above, how very windy it had become.  For once, I did not mind the wind so much because it cooled the air.  However, at 20 mph, it was a little hard on the new plants we were planting.

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As we went around, I pruned Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ so that it will not be top heavy. Now the flowers will be smaller and the plants won’t splay open.

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I almost removed this stray elephant garlic just for looking like a silly onesie. It was saved by being hard to pull.

Because of the heat and wind, we had to water every planter into which we plopped cosmos starts, and each plant had to be pinched for bushier growth.

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one of our two watering apparatus

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We’re using agastaches from Blooming, via the Basket Case, for uppies by each pole.

I sent Allan to deal with the above planter.  I couldn’t face hacking into the running, aggressive Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’, left over from volunteer days.  (I think that often the volunteers just used to put in free starts from their own gardens.  Which is fine, except that free starts tend to be pushy plants.)

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The spot Allan battered out for the new plants probably won’t last for long before being encroached on again.

I swear we will redo that planter this fall, with a total dig out and new soil!

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The Agastache ‘Mexican Giant’ had better get giant quickly.

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Third Street Park. I wanted to go across and met that dog, The Mighty Quinn, but was too busy planting.  By the time I got over there with some cosmos, he was walking away.

Ilwaco

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utter chaos in the vehicle by the end of the day

We unloaded all the new plants onto the driveway so I could sort and water them.  Allan went off to water the Ilwaco planters with the first 2017 excursion of the water trailer.

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This is the second time this street tree pocket has looked like this. I think someone is helping themselves to golden marjoram starts.  Or lady’s mantle.  Speaking of invasive free plants, the trees were pretty much planted up with what we could find for free, back before there was a plant budget.

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Allan lent a hose to the local window washing crew, who had come up short from the nearest faucet.

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His loaner hose was not the best.

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the one shady planter….with some free hardy begonia transplants struggling a bit.

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last task: watering the post office garden

I had taken about the same out of time to sort and water all my new plants, then schlepping them to the ladies in waiting area.  My back hurt like the dickens.  Tomorrow: Planting Time continues.

 

 

 

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Friday, 21 April 2017

I had some small work tasks to complete, after which I figured we would make it out to the beach approach to get at least half a garden section weeded and clipped.

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My own garden looked enticing…

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…as did Smokey,

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Frosty,

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Skooter,

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and neighbour cat Onyx.

But work we must.

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work board this morning

Port of Ilwaco

A bit late, I transplanted some chives and elephant garlic to the Freedom Market garden.

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transplanted these Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ starts to a less walkedupon spot!

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Making the store’s garden as pretty as this, the curbside garden, is my goal…except for the walking upon is a problem.  So, making parts of it pretty is my goal.

Long Beach

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deadheaded the welcome sign, front…

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and back

We decided we had better dig out the ivy in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter next, in case we punctured the sprinkler system.  Best to not do that, but if it happened, best to do it when the city crew is available rather than after hours.

While Allan did the digging, I planted some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ in nearby planters.

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the shrubbiest planter’s one week of glory

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so called “blue” tulips for the police station

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street tree (Allan’s photo)

Folks were gathering in Veterans Field, half a block away, for a “Walk for Veterans”.

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The walk begins (Allan’s photo)

The planter in question (Allan’s photos), before:

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variegated ivy

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That was not easy.

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a lot of ivy to dump at city works

When we arrived at city works, we learned that the planter at the south end of town was ready to plant.  I’d noticed the same planter as before, still roughly mortared, but now full of soil again.  The crew had met with the frustration of the one replacement planter breaking when they tried to move it…so now they will be doing their best to re-mortar the old one and make it look good.  Therefore, it was time for us to plant it.  This changed our day by giving us a more pleasant project than weeding the beach approach.

We rescued the little roses that I had heeled into the mulch pile and that had gotten covered with a new load of mulch!

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found it!

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battered but alive; good thing I knew sort of where to dig.

I also gathered some little shrubs, left over from volunteer planter days, that I would put elsewhere rather than back into the planter.

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ready to plant a few things

Last fall, a vehicle drove into this planter and cracked it, and moved it enough to crush the plumbing system (now fixed).

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roses and Rozannes in

It makes me nervous to plant all fresh plants for fear someone will steal them.

Next…something that we had to do today…

The Red Barn’s…

…little garden needed deadheading and weeding.

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The Red Barn has crabbing as well as horses.

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crab pots

While I was weeding, one of the dogs came by…

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and snubbed me!

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all pretty well weeded

Diane’s garden

Next door, we deadheaded and weeded at Diane and Larry’s place.

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narcissi deadheads (Allan’s photo)

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new planters to drill holes in (next time)

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planter assortment

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I love fringed tulips!

In the past, fringed tulips’ edges have browned off in the rain.  This year, we got massive record breaking amounts of rain and yet the fringes look great!

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Tulip ‘Green Star’

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Diane likes pastels, and purples and whites, not yellows and reds and oranges.

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Tulip ‘White Parrot’

Basket Case Greenhouse

We drove a mile or so up Sandridge Road to get some plants for the almost empty Long Beach planter.

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pelican for sale

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Darrell, Roxanne, and me talking plants

Long Beach

Now we were able to make more of a planter impact, leaving room for annuals when the weather is a bit warmer.

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Allan’s photos

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At City Hall, we planted a couple of shrubs from the planter’s former array.

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This variegated boxwood from a planter a few years back…

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is now somewhat balanced by a variegated euonymous.

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driving home, 6 PM

It had gotten HOT today, and for once I had been grateful for a cool wind.

We just barely had time to go home, unhook the trailer, unload some plants, load a couple agastaches, drive back to Long Beach, plant the agastaches in the planter, and be ten minutes late for dinner with Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) at

The Cove Restaurant

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petting Lacy on the way in

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Cove entry garden

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arriving late

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refreshing dinner salad

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Sondra’s lasagne for me and Dave

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lemony prawns scampi for Melissa

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Reuben with waffle fries for Allan

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a dessert for four of us to share

The four of us solved some of the world’s problems (we wish); tomorrow Allan and I will try to solve more at an Earth and Science Day demonstration.

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ivy job erased!

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Tuesday, 18 April 2017

We were revived by our day off but were not ready to face the rest of the beach approach project. Today would be a day of smaller, easier jobs.

Next to the driveway as we left for work:

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tulips


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Narcissus ‘Chinita’

Port of Ilwaco

An event this Thursday at a port business inspired us to deadhead narcissi all along the Howerton Way gardens.  We won’t be attending but we expect it to draw a crowd.

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We want to make sure the gardens look nice for this business that watches out for flower jackers. (A few weeks ago, Allan got asked from the Freedom Market’s upstairs window what he was doing digging up plants in the garden. We appreciate that vigilance.)

We worked our way from east to west.

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east end, looking west


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The marina is across the east end parking lot.

 

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nautical trash

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The scrimmy little horsetails are not my mission today.


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CoHo Charters lavascape


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deadheads by the old Portside Café (Allan’s photo)


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by the Fort George Brewery office


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The old Shorebank building (now empty)


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kinnikinnick looking really quite nice and making one big buzzing bee happy


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Wax myrtle and arbutus that got the full windstorm blast from across the Shorebank parking lot…


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Another storm blasted wax myrtle

We will trim up those shrubs before the May 6th Children’s Parade and opening day of Saturday Market.  No time for that today.

Allan went on to deadhead the west end while I weeded between Shorebank and the Port Office, including the little garden on the south side of the port office building.  The tide was low…

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looking west


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Little brown birds scavenging the muddy rocks

Looking east, with lots of interesting driftwood

In the wheelie bin enclosure, I found a salvage piece which will be great to add to our fence.  Its little doors will provide a peekaboo effect.

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This went home with us.

 Interlude at home

As we parked in front of our fence, I thought about how interested I would be to see our garden as a passerby.

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I’d be looking over the fence for a better view.

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I remembered a few gardens in Seattle into which I used to peer through and over fences.

The cats had something to say about how we should stay home for the rest of the day.

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Smokey


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Skooter appears

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Frosty

Calvin, being not especially outdoorsy, doesn’t much care whether we stay home or not.

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Calvin woken from his usual daylong nap

The garden looked extra fine and tempting.

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tulips and cardoon


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Japanese maple (Allan’s photo)


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golden bleeding heart


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Tulip ‘Green Star’


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Ribes speciosum still in full flower


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Ribes speciosum and tulips


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patio tulips


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a lavishly fringed tulip (and Frosty saying, “Do stay!”)


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tempting

I have pretty good willpower about going to work (necessary for longterm self employment).  Off we went.

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Allan photographed this good old dog when we stopped at the bank to put a cheque in.

The Anchorage Cottages

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Beth and Mitzu (Allan’s photo)

We expected to just deadhead and weed.  However, Beth needed help with the climbing hydrangea which had fallen over in the recent big windstorm.

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They got it pushed back and well tied to the new trellis.

The wind was hard on a lot of the tulips in containers, especially in the office courtyard.  They fared better in the more protected center courtyard.

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center courtyard; an array of pots is just to the right


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some courtyard containers


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purple fringed tulips


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pink fringed tulip


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window boxes with tiny species flowers


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narcissi and unfurling sword fern

Long Beach

Next, we picked up from the city works yard as much Soil Energy Mulch as today’s buckets would carry.

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our mulch stash, with plants that were removed from a defunct planter

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Our first mission was to mulch the corner bed at Veterans Field.  Some sort of Veterans walk is beginning there later this week so we want it to look fluffy.

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Allan’s photos, before….


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during; an annoying and constant wind made the day cold.


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after

With that done, I went on a deadheading walkabout of the city planters and street tree gardens, while Allan went to weed and add some mulch in two areas of Fifth Street Park.

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He found this big lily bulb…


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a bright orange tulip


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and some annoyingly persistent horsetail

My photos while walking the planters:

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Tulip ‘Flaming Spring Green’

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foreground: parrot Tulip ‘Rococo’ in bud


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Tulip bakeri  ‘Lilac Wonder’


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bench sitter

Reminder to self: Put “dig out planter ivy” on the work board so I will remember it.

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horrible variegated ivy.  I blame myself from many years ago.


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exciting bud on Asphodeline


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orange tulips


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and a painted rock placed by California poppies that might be orange later on!


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pink fringed tulip, and progress on defunct planter (the lamp post has now been removed)


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some big tulips, windblown, chomped by deer, broken, or picked


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In the same planter, Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ have been blooming for weeks.

Note to self: plant many more ‘Lilac Wonder’.  They are my favourite species tulip and they do so well here.

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Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’

I was awfully tired for the last two blocks of deadheading and figured as soon as we got home, I would sit down.

at home

At home, I took four buckets of deadheads out to the compost bins while Allan (almost always a man of boundless evening energy) set to mowing the lawn.

The compost bins inspired some compost turning.  A day of varied jobs is much less exhausting than an all day, same place weeding project.

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I had gotten all excited when seeing the bottom of bin B:

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It looked like it might be siftable!

It wasn’t.  But soon will be if I keep turning frequently.

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bins after today’s turning

I need more green stuff before flipping another layer.

While Allan also mowed the next door lawn for our next door neighbour, I checked the hydrangeas over at the J’s garden for signs of life.  The twigs are green when snapped but still no leaves, not even at the base.

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good looking sword ferns at the J’s

Back at home, a stunning narcissus with a deep green center (and tiny spider):

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I got a bit of a start when I thought each leaf of my Davidia tree had a snail in it.  No, those are flowers buds

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Not like the horrible snails everywhere in my garden due to lack of time to properly police them.

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Allan’s photo

Tomorrow, yet another storm is due.  I look forward to reading a book.

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Thursday, 6 April 2017

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Smokey waiting for morning rain to stop

We were surprised when the weather cleared up midmorning.  Rain, wind, or sunshine, we had been planning to tidy the Ilwaco planters and street trees.  Doing so in pleasant weather was a treat.

Ilwaco

First, we did a bucket’s worth of weeding at our volunteer post office garden.

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Post office garden has little offseason structure, leaving room for an explosion of summer flowers.


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Fritillaria meleagris, and me weeding


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Muscari ‘Ocean Magic’


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southernmost planter: finger blight evidence shows why it looks so drab.


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Allan’s photo

Even though they are still blooming, we will soon be replacing the woody old Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’.

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They have gotten too tatty looking at their bases.


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The tree gardens need some mulch.


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amazed this windblown tree has not fallen yet.


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wish I had not let the bad aster take over a couple of the tree gardens…


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Col Pacific Motel’s mini garden


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Allan’s photo


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“yellow hoop petticoats” (Allan’s photo)


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Narcissus bulbocodium (Allan’s photo)


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downtown Ilwaco (Allan’s photo)

The weather got so warm that we went back home for summer shirts.

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Look who I found snoozing together!


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secret buddies Frosty and Calvin

I also noticed a joyous sight: a special trillium from Dancing Oaks Nursery, that had been ever so tiny and that I thought had died, had popped up after all.

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We did a bit more weeding at the community building.

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Ilwaco Community Building

Long Beach

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Deer have left us the tulips at the welcome sign.

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They are even prettier inside.

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The back of the sign should have pastel tulips soon.


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I met a very nice labradoodle named Curly.


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checked up on the city hall garden, one of our best….

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trillium, which I rescued years ago from the road next to my old house when the road was being widened.


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Allan’s photo

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Pure white resists being photographed.


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hellebore


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Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’


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Peggy’s Park, sprawling old hebe…


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cut back

Peggy’s Park, on the east side of city hall, was planted by Gene and Peggy Miles and remained in memory of Peggy, who died of ovarian cancer far too young and is still much missed.

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Brunner ‘Looking Glass’, a perennial forget me not planted soon after she died.


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I think this is hosta’s best moment.

Just inside city hall, this sign made me think:

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Even when I am at my crabbiest and most anti social, it is highly probable that one of our gardens makes someone smile every day.

Next, Allan weeded and groomed Coulter Park because there will be an art show at the old train depot building over the weekend.

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Allan’s photo; wind had the narcissi all facing backwards.

I deadheaded the two north blocks of planters and had a quick visit with Heather at our favourite shop, NIVA green (and refreshed my stash of photos for the shop’s Facebook page.)

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just north of NIVA


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That corner has also become a deer crossing so will not get new tulips next year.


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outside NIVA green (New, Inspired, Vintage, Artful)


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inside

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Walking back north to meet Allan, I saw more evidence that 2nd North is now a deer intersection.

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Drat.

I felt a sprinkle and looked south, to see rain heading our way from Ilwaco.

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By the time I rejoined Allan, the rain was coming down in earnest.  He had the bright idea of cheating and knocking down the last of a weedy bit with the string trimmer.  It worked a treat.

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By then, I was in the van, watching.

I thought we would have to skip my idea of getting some mulch for Fifth Street Park.  But by the time we had dumped our debris at city works, the sun was back and so we filled just four buckets with mulch.  A sight there made me decide to save the rest of the mulch.  I knew exactly where these plants came from: the southernmost planter on the east side of Pacific.  I would need the rest of the pile to eventually fill it back in.

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distinctive plants from a particular planter

I’m glad that planter got dug out.  It was too shrubby, going back to volunteer days.

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The pile is getting small.

While Allan weeded in Veterans Field, I did two more blocks of trees and planters.

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muscari in Vet Field (Allan’s photo)


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muscari (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo


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anemone (Allan’s photo)


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red white and blue (Allan’s photo)


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Tulip acuminata


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more Tulip acuminata (a favourite of mine)


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Delicate species tulips look best after our extra rainy month of march.

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The more showy tulips, like this four year old ‘Gavota’, get smaller flowers every year.


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This year the double and parrot tulips look just miserable so far.  Maybe no more next year…even though I love them so.


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note to self: dig out most of this horrible ivy soon


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It was challenging getting through the spring break crowds with my weed bucket.


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lots of narcissi under the trees


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and in the planters


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I thought my new “cushion bush” had made it through the winter.  No…all dried up.


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Zoltar offered to tell my fortune.

On my way back to meet Allan at Vet Field, I encountered a woman and little girl with a big bouquet of narcissi and grape hyacinths.  I said, “Oh, gee, I hope those did not come from the city planters.”  “No, she picked them on the beach!” said the mom.  “You must mean the beach approach garden,” I said, and she replied “No, they were on the beach.”

“On the beach, my arse,” I thought but did not say as I walked away.  I knew darn well they were from the beach approach garden because I recognized them as ones I had planted…and they do not grow on the beach.  Allan said he might have asked, “You mean the ‘beach’ area right past the Please leave the flowers for everyone to enjoy sign?”.  I’m trying not to make a tourist’s day miserable so I wouldn’t go that far but…sheesh.

We drove out to check on the Bolstad beach approach planters.

If people would just not pick the flowers, there would be dozens more to brighten everyone’s day.

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These were exactly the kind in the girl’s “beach” bouquet.

Allan dropped me off at the southernmost planters and we had a look at the empty one.  It must be going to be fixed or replaced because last year a car drove into it.

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We have never seen a planter empty before with all the works showing.


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of great interest to us

Allan went to Fifth Street Park to weed while I did the last two block of main street planters.

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My experiment in February of cutting back a big woody santolina seems to have worked.


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happy and multiplying species tulips


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narcissi and euphorbia

You might notice from these photos how much less pedestrian traffic we have on the south blocks of downtown.

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Fifth Street Park, NE side


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lily flowering tulips do well in rain


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Allan’s photo


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note to self: divide these lovely primroses to grow under some other trees, as well.


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note to self: weed southwest corner of Fifth Street Park at least once before tall plants hide it.

Allan had remembered to weed out the bad aster corner in Fifth Street Park.

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before


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after


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mulching

Finally, we deadheaded the planters on Sid Snyder Drive…

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Allan’s photo: That soil depression is the sure sign of another stolen plant.  That was after he brushed soil back into the hole.

…and last, the little garden at the World Kite Museum.

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new concrete pads


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I hope they are going to dig out this row of tatty hebes, too (hint, hint!)

The very last thing we had to do was deadhead narcissi in the window boxes at the Depot Restaurant, and we decided to eat there if they had room for us at the counter.  They did.

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Depot Restaurant and Sou’wester RV Park (Allan’s photo)


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counter view

We wanted to have delicious things that will not be on the summer menu.

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wilted spinach salad


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cinghiale with gnocchi


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French onion soup

At home: The check up list is done.  Of course, all the gardens need regular check ups from now on.  The recent check up list was because of missing almost a month at some jobs due to incessant rain.

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I’m glad we got caught up. Tomorrow’s predicted storm will most likely lay the narcissi and tulips on their sides.

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This is what’s coming. We are the blue bubble about haflway up the coast.

(As I write this on Friday, we are halfway through the storm and have lost and then regained power.  It is noisy; the tarp has blown off the stacked crab pots next door, and one of two highways leading to the Peninsula has been closed because of downed trees.  I think the worst is over, so do not worry.)

 

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Thursday, 23 March 2017

I might have tried to work if the weather had been good.  I did not want to go out, feeling poorly, in rain and wind.

When the sun appeared in the mid afternoon, Allan departed for Long Beach to do some weeding and deadheading.

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returning a book to the Ilwaco library (Deep Survival, I read it, did not love it)

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Long Beach welcome sign

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He laid out the deadheads to show me how many there were.

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welcome sign

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Long Beach city crew putting up banners.

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deer-pulled tulips in a planter on one of the main deer intersections (where we no longer plant new tulips)

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Narcissi and primrose.  It is hard to get ALL the tatty hesperantha (formerly schizostylis) foliage pulled.

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crocuses chomped by deer.  Pretty sure they had flowered first.  Also on one of the main deer intersections (7th South)

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tulips

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deadheads. so glad Allan went to pick them

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after, with grape hyacinth

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Muscari (grape hyacinth) and lavender

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Tulipa sylvestris, one of my favourites

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snail damage

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Sluggo got applied.

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lilies emerging in Fifth Street Park

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Muscari, one narcissi, scilla (which I did not plant…it goes back to volunteer days).

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by Fifth Street Park

 

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the rain returned

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narcissi and rhododendron

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more white and blue scilla (which would take over if I let it)

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more banners, with Fitz and Parks Manager Mike

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in a street tree garden

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tulips and crocuses 

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By Stormin’ Norman’s. Calocephalus brownii came through the winter.

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under a street tree

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Allan checked on the Veterans Field gardens:

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anemones

Meanwhile, at home:

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I’ve never seen Skooter and Smokey snuggle up before.  It was Smokey’s idea; he tucked himself in under Skooter’s head.

I had read about Jaywick, a semi-derelict English seaside town recently in A Kingdom By The Sea by Paul Theroux and decided to look at a video about it, which turned into watching several.  I could actually afford a bungalow there.

The longest and most official Jaywick video is here.

From that, instead of reading, I segued into the Bill Bryon Notes from a Small Island series on youtube.  I meant to watch only the first one and ended up watching all of them in my comfy chair. Partway through my watching, Allan returned with a tasty crab roll for me from Captain Bob’s Chowder.

In closing, here is a public service announcement from Steve of the Bayside garden:

There are two upcoming special events which Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden hosts — the “Early Show” and “Mother’s Day” events.    Details on one-sheet, attached.    Both have judged flower shows and plant sales.  Info on rules, etc., on both at:  http://rhodies.org/chapter/pdx_activities_detailed.htm#early a page available at www.rhodies.org, the Portland Chapter’s website.

 It could be a worthwhile day trip for Peninsula people.

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21 March: from my chair

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Because of a rather bad case of the sneezes and sniffles, I spent the day in my chair reading an excellent curmudgeonly memoir about a clockwise, three month trip around the coast of England, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Scotland. 


Certain passages reminded me of life in our own seaside towns, especially since the day was again windy and rainy. 

“Vacationers sitting under a dark sky were waiting for the sun to shine, but the forecast was rain for the next five months. ‘Bracing’ was the northern euphemism for stinging cold and it always justified the sadism in the English seaside taunt, ‘Let’s get some color in those cheeks.’ It was another way of making a freezing wind compensate for the lack of sunshine.”
“I imagined day-trippers getting off the train and taking one look and bursting into tears. But of course most people at Morecambe were enjoying themselves in the drizzle, and the fault was mine, not theirs. This was just another cultural barrier I was incapable of surmounting. 

Nothing is more bewildering to a foreigner then a nation’s pleasures, and I never felt more alien in Britain then when I was watching people enjoying their sort of a seaside vacation.”

A passage near the end describes how the English coast has changed.  Theroux found the Scottish coast to still be wild. 



I was especially fascinated by Jaywick, an English seaside town that has fallen on hard times and looks like it could be a dreamy place if a bunch of artist types, and I don’t mean the gentrification type, moved in. I began looking at seaside bungalows for sale. I’d like this little bungalow, please. With this little garden:


While I sat and dreamed, the rain stopped. Allan (who felt just a bit sickly, not as bad as me) embarked on some errands. I asked for him to gather some photos of narcissi in Long Beach. 

At the Ilwaco library:



At Beachdog in north Long Beach:



and narcissi and more in the Long Beach planters and street tree gardens and pocket parks. 



He did some deadheading. 

A camellia just north of Scoopers:


The carousel has been assembled:


I appreciate seeing all the flowers I might otherwise have missed and, even though the reading day was glorious, I look forward to getting back out there. 

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Saturday, 18 February 2017

Long Beach

I had big plans to get four things crossed off the work list.  We started with the tree that has pesky rugosa roses and with the planter nearest to it.

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planter yesterday

After cutting out the poky thing by the bench, I felt inspired to remove as much hesperantha and tired old ornamental grass as possible.

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Allan helping with the biggest grass

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during

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after

Meanwhile, Allan went after the annoying patch of volunteer rugosa roses, roots and all.  (Because they are pesky and the roots run like fury, we will have to watch for returning sprouts.)

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before

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a thuggish rose

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after

Next, we wanted to polish off the first spring clean up of Fifth Street Park.

Allan started with the hydrangea in the southeast corner.

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before

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Allan’s photos: before

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after

I wanted the right hand one a little more upright.  Easy to fix later.

It was a busy day because of a three day weekend.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

My first project was the patch of hesperantha (formerly schizostylis) by the restroom.

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before

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after

By pulling a lot of the hesperantha, and getting its annoying self out of the other plants (like Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, which Allan clipped after the above photo), we will still have plenty for next fall while having a tidier garden bed now.

I did the same to the nearby street tree garden:

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before

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after

In a nearby planter, I found…

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a tiny painted rock

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and emerging tulip foliage.

The northwest quadrant of the park also got a hesperantha going-over.

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before

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after

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Here’s what it looks like on a good summer day. (This was in 2014.)

Allan had joined me before I finished.  We’d got caught in a torrent of rain but had an escape at hand.

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inside Captain Bob’s  Chowder

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looking out: clean up abandoned for half an hour

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delicious fish tacos (before applying a yummy creamy tequila sauce)

As the rain intensity decreased, my Dark Sky app was accurate about it stopping in 15 minutes.  The prediction of drizzle for the following hour was, happily, inaccurate.

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By the end of the rain squall, I knew we would only get two out of four planned projects done today.  The temperature had dropped and a chilly wind kicked up.  We went to the two northernmost blocks and finished the planters and street trees.

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crocuses and iris reticulata (Allan’s photo)

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Iris reticulata ‘Clairette’

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Iris reticulata

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crocuses

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more crocuses

In the last planter of the day, we cut back the escallonia. Why a volunteer, back in the day, planted Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’ in two of the planters is beyond me.  It would like to be at least 15 feet tall.  By chopping it hard now, I won’t have to be clipping it all summer long.

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halfway done

and I did NOT see that piece of trash till I looked at this photo!  (Later: Allan says he saw it and disposed of it.)

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done… The green santolina on each end also got clipped.

Before we dumped our full load of debris, I popped into NIVA green (my favourite shop).  Almost a month ago I had taken some photos for its Facebook page.  Every time I chose photos to post, I could not bear to post one of a copper clad “stump” because I wanted it for myself.  It was a bit pricey and yet it had haunted me. Would it still be there a month later?

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in mid January

Yes! Twice,  people had put holds on it and then not come back to pick it up.

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It is mine now!  (It’s hollow copper clad aluminium, I’m told, so probably not for outdoors.)

Just after we dumped our debris, as Allan was locking the gate of the city works yard, the rain returned.  Perfect timing.

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At home, I got to erase two items but not the pond and popouts.  Maybe tomorrow, or maybe not with wind and rain predicted.

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