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Posts Tagged ‘Long Beach planters’

Thursday, 28 March 2019

We’d had this much rain.

The new water feature still has a slow leak.  The bow seat is still under water; the stern seat is exposed.

We drove by the Ilwaco fire station garden on the way to work…

…and then deadheaded Long Beach planters.

The welcome sign did not needs its narcissi deadheaded quite yet.

There was plenty of deadheading here and there on the main street (Pacific).

Allan’s before

and after

by Cottage Bakery

some primulas that I transplanted, blooming by Mostly Hats

Fritillaria meleagris

a bit of a color clash

I found a frog hopping along the curb.  It went into a tree garden drain pipe that I know will be parched dry this summer.  So I nabbed it, and even though I had sworn I was going to wait till frogs discovered our new pond, we took a break from work and drove froggie to our garden.

I hope it will like this better than a drainpipe next to a parking place.

Bentley, my friend next door, has had a haircut.

Allan’s photos

biscuit time

Bentley always has much to say, often in vocalizations other than barking.

 

Back to Long Beach…. We finished our deadheading.

By Malai Thai, our main patch of primroses

Fifth Street Park. NW quadrant

Fifth Street Park, NE quadrant

Allan’s photo

by fun rides

Tulipa sylvestris along the edge of a planter

The very pale Muscari is ‘Valerie Finnis’

Allan’s photos:

I rarely use double narcissi; they look splodgy to me.

Cerinthe major purpurascens

On to the Boreas Inn, where we finished mulching the lower and upper lawn beds.  I got an assortment of California poppies planted. Allan took all the photos:

deer tracks in bed mulched last time

before

before

after (two different beds)

I had brought my little red wheelbarrow, which I find easier to maneuver with a load of mulch.

old dahlia bed, before

so weedy; Allan tackled it while I planted poppies.

after

At home, sweet peas are erased the work board along with the poppies for the Boreas. We still need to get some mulch to the front entry garden at the Boreas.

 

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Friday, 15 March 2019

Before work, I had an exciting delivery from Gossler Farms, a Stachyurus praecox.  I have been looking for this plant since I left my old garden and had to leave a large one behind.  (It probably got crushed when the new owner had some danger trees felled from the slope above it.)  It is a winter blooming shrub that I adore.

Allan’s photos

It is gorgeous.  Now I just have to figure out how to squeeze it in to a garden bed that I can see from my living room desk in early spring.

I dug up several clumps of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and one clump each of a couple of more special sedums (“Strawberries and Cream’ and one with more glaucous foliage whose name I forget) to plant as the new center plant in the

Ilwaco planters.

Allan took most of the photos for this first part of the day.

in the boatyard

My hope is to make the small round easily-baked-in-the-sun planters need watering only once a week…or even just once every five days, or even four, would be an improvement.  We had removed the winter battered Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ which have been the centerpieces for years.

loads of snails in a planter near the boatyard

under a street tree

I admired both the south facing window and the garden bed below it at the Col Pacific Motel.

One of three erysimums that we had left because they looked ok looked so bad close up that I was sorry I had left it.

A variegated sedum had been taken over by a green reversion.  I axed all the green parts off and I do hope it will stay the handsome variegated form.

Just look how much it had reverted!  I had all but forgotten that it was anything but the plain green form.

The offending green parts in a bucket will be welcome elsewhere.

Long Beach

We began with a quick check up and some tidying at the city hall garden….

a corner at city hall before…

and after

The old lavatera in the west side garden beds that were planted by Gene and Peggy Miles has become so worn that this is probably its last year.  I will need to plant something low there because the office staff likes to be able to see out the window.

And then we trimmed santolinas and did some other grooming on the planters on the Sid Snyder approach and the six downtown blocks.

Sid Snyder Drive

The trimming will inspire the santolinas to have a nice round shape instead of getting raggedy.

before…this one took a lot of hand trimming rather than the speedy Stihl trimmer….

…because it was so intertwined with narcissi.

Allan took on the truly horrid job of clipping the rugosa roses that volunteered itself under one of the trees and then weeding it for the first time this year.

before

after

I walked back and forth between planters and street trees, heading north and trimming santolinas as I went.

This is the planter that started it all, one of four that I did back in about 1998 when they were all done by different volunteers.  The city administrator at the time said it was “magnificent”.  It still has the original santolinas.

before

A few years ago, I got so bored while hand trimming the furthest one that I suddenly cut it back to the trunk! It took it two years to come back.  I am glad I have The Toy now which makes the job fun rather than high pressure and tedious.

after (I blocked part of the photo with my thumb, oops)

Allan caught up to me halfway through town and removed the protective old leaves from the Fifth Street Park gunnera…

…and then trimmed a couple of blocks of planters himself.

The carousel is back, a sure sign of the tourist season.

I love small cupped narcissi.

I realized I would not have the satisfaction of erasing santolinas from the work board because we still have the ten or so planters on Bolstad beach approach to trim.  At five o clock, I was too exhausted to do it even though in past years I’d have gone on till dark to get it done.  I blamed the after effects of the Shingrix vaccine (whose side effects can last 3-5 days) rather than aging.

I did not even think I could muster the energy for the last two untrimmed planters north of the stoplight that I saw when we were on our way to dump debris. But I did (which means Allan did, too) because those blocks would be more crowded on a Saturday.

one of the last two planters

The downtown santolina trimming used to take all day, with sore hands from clipping afterwards.  The Toy made it take just the afternoon.

The work board tonight:

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 18 February 2019

Long Beach

We would have started at the Heron Pond had there been a parking place.  Instead, we began with the City Hall gardens.

I was so pleased with how the Stihl trimmer (The Toy) worked on the ornamental grasses on the west side that this is the only photo I took there.

I did not ask my phone to make its photo all artsy black and white.

Allan did better with before and after photos on the east side of city hall.

before
after

I channeled Gardeners’ World’s Carol Klein by putting some cuttings of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ into a plastic baggie to keep them fresh till I can pot them up.  I had forgotten to bring a baggie but had fortuitously found one in the gutter (lord knows what was once in it).

Before we had quite finished cleaning up, Allan espied a parking space by the pond, a block away, and hightailed the van over there to snag it, then came back for the wheelbarrow and tools.

While he tidied and weeded and clipped around the pond, I did the same for the north two blocks worth of planters, therefore missing the traditional photo of Allan crossing the little waterfall without falling in.

His work location could have been viewed on the Heron Cam, shown here the following afternoon…

…so someone would surely see if he lost his balance.

My planter photos:

Erysiumum ‘Bowles Mauve’

The Toy works wonderfully at trimming small stems in the planters, and I believe it has already saved me hours of clipping.

Before:

a messy golden oregano

after (with hand clipping around the bulb foliage):

I helped Allan finish the last bit of work around the pond.

our audience

Allan’s Heron Pond photos:

before
after
before
after

before
after

Note how the underwear shows on the way across to the waterfall (and around the edges). I want to avoid this with our pond.

Next came Veterans Field and the Police Station rugosa roses, with only an hour clipping before time to clean up and dump debris.

Neither area allowed for use of The Toy; both required big loppers and the cutting of individual stems.

Police station (Allan’s photos):

before
after

Veterans Field flag pavilion, before…

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies” has very tough stems.

The great big mess (Allan’s photo) had me fearing we would not get done by dark.

We prevailed. (I left the Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ unclipped because we are still due for some cold nights.)

Way over by that white car, below, is the little corner garden.

Because I did not get that far, I cannot erase Vet Field from the work list.  We did make an excellent dent today and also scored a gorgeous bookshelf from a “free” pile on our way home.

This morning:

This evening:

None of these work accomplishments are refined and perfect weeding jobs, just the somewhat rough first clean up.

Tuesday, 19 February 2019

I spent the next day in the greenhouse at home, avoiding the rain by potting up some plants for my sale and rearranging my room to accommodate the new book shelf.  This meant that I actually emptied out my ancient and ugly filing cabinet, the one full of old letters from friends and of sorted articles (on non-gardening topics) that I have been collecting since the 70s.  Putting the files into two cardboard boxes does not mean that I can erase “filing cabinet” from my at home list.

I have a plan for the old filing cabinet.  More on this later.

Allan’s outing included taking some of his boating book to Time Enough Books (where it had sold out!) and a quick tidy of the post office garden.

Ilwaco Post Office, before
after

I even booted up my computer to write this post instead of writing from the depths of my comfy chair.  With rain due tomorrow as well, there may be a blog break.  I feel more comfortable and less pressured when the blog is running at least three days behind.

 

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Thursday, 11 October 2018

Long Beach

At last we had time to do a project that had been weighing on my mind: dig out the wire vine, Muehlenbeckia axillaris, from the planter in front of Stormin’ Norman’s.

I planted it years ago, thinking it was a cute little trailing house plant that would not make it through the winter.  After a very few years, it had done this:

before: a great splodge of Muehlenbeckia axillaris (wire vine)

It had been cute and then had gone suddenly berserk.

We dug it out, but did not take all the soil out because we thought we could control any wire vine that popped out from pieces of root. (And oh, how we had tried to sift through and get all those pieces.)

Today:

before

The wire vine has returned throughout the planter despite semi-diligent attempts at control.

We were incredibly lucky during the digging out stage to get a parking spot right next to the planter.

Allan moves the trailer closer in.

such a lucky spot!

Before:

Allan’s photo

cleaning the perennials

After all the plants were out, as Allan removed the soil in the wire vine planter, I pulled the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from the next planter.

before

after

Most merchants don’t like tall plants in front of their shops. The Wind World Kites guy loves the crocosmia and jokes that he now has nowhere to hide.

After much digging and removing all the soil and the tattered years-old landscape fabric that separates soil from gravel, we found roots down IN the gravel.  This is ominous.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We hauled the heavy debris to city works and dumped it in an inhospitable spot and returned with buckets of the last of the mulch pile and some landscape fabric from the works shop.  It was utterly exhausting, heavy work, especially because this time we had to park half a block away and haul everything

My back was panging, so I answered some garden questions while standing straight against a wall.  Part of the job is to be friendly to tourists.

The woman in blue was from England and had lived there till 1958.  I asked her if she had heard of garden writer Marion Cran.  She had not.

with new fabric to keep the soil from migrating into the rock

I had had rather a stroke of genius; we also brought the last two hanging basket innards and used that soil to extend what we had.

Allan’s photos

putting plants back in

Allan deadheaded a block worth of planters while I re planted.

Allan’s photo

Upon his return, the planter was done.  Many bulbs were also replanted.

Last week:

Stormin’ Norman’s

Today, after:

I was able to salvage all the perennials by carefully inspecting their roots.  I will be watching closely for any sign of wire vine emerging from them; if it does, out they will come.

Across the street is a planter I quite like (even though the matching santolina was stolen).

I have enjoyed Cosmos ‘Xanthos’.

pink gaura

I used the pink gaura to replace the bad agastaches in the Agastache Catastrophe (a batch with diseased leaves).  The gaura has been good and has bloomed longer, with no deadheading, than the agastache does.  I will use it again next year, along with perhaps the shorter white one, ‘So White’.

colourful Long Beach

After our project, we deadheaded and tidied a few more planters.

chrysanthemums

a rogue white flower stem

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and yellow chrysanths

pink chrysanthemums starting to fade

I love the chrysanthemums that have perennialized in some of the planters.  They take up too much room to have them in every one.

The Shelburne Hotel

We had time to tidy up the back garden at the Shelburne.  Chef Casey had found akebia fruits on the south fence.  I sought them out under cover of the vine.

the akebia vine that I planted years ago

akebia fruits…I saved one to try out but I have forgotten to do so.

(I did try it a couple of days later.  The insides have a sweet pulp that is so full of seeds that there is little food to offer.)

Asian pears on the west fence

Someone had filled the bird bath with bean seeds. (Allan’s photo)

The beans in pots are well past their prime.

I picked off some moldy old beans….

…and then realized I remembered the hotel’s Halloween event and realized I should leave them till after Halloween.   I then decided to leave the old Joe Pye Weed and some other plants to add a spookier ambiance to the front garden.

spooky Joe Pye weed

“Get ready to sit, sip, and talk to the spirits at the Shelburne Hotel. Will be having Chariot reading Tarot cards by appointment (starting at 6pm on 10/26), Adrift Distillers Amaro release (10/27 from 5pm-7pm), seasonal cuisine, and cocktails that represents the spirits at the hotel.

Will be playing the Shining in the Inglenook both nights as well.

COSTUMES ENCOURAGED.

So join us for our haunted gathering at the Shelburne. Dine and drink with the ghost…maybe even say hello?”

The Shelburne’s sister hotel, Adrift, suggests something about a ghost in the garden!

Hmmm.  I’m not saying whether or not I have ever seen Annie May in the garden.

front garden, looking north

and south

Halloween is a good reason to leave the long, draping wisteria till November before a preliminary pruning.

We rewarded ourselves for an exhausting day with a tasty meal and drink in the Shelburne pub.

As diners arrived at the pub, Brian O’ Connor began to sing, as he does every Thursday.  You can sit in the living room to listen and dine, or sit in the pub with the music as ambiance.

His deep and distinctive voice has an emotional quality that draws a regular audience on Thursday nights.

We heard part of the performance during our relaxing meal.

chop salad with fried chicken, fish and chips, cranberry cosmo

The bartender and I agreed that even though we are not usually fans of fried chicken, the version offered at the pub is delectable.  (I get it as a side on the salad.)

so good

fish and chips (Allan’s photo)

My favourite dessert on the peninsula these days is the pub’s cheesecake tart with blackberry topping.

On the way home, we checked out some Halloween decorations in Ilwaco.

Lake Street

Spruce Street

Lake Street (Pirate Lucy Dagger’s house)

We have accomplished all our little work board projects other than mulching.

accomplishments still don’t include the indoor at home projects left over from last winter

I enjoyed the partial emptiness for a moment before adding Bulb Time.

That list is even missing two small job.

Tomorrow, the bulbs come and the sorting begins, a rather dreaded task that hurts my brain.

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 2 October 2018

I had hoped for another reading day.  Sunny weather sent us out to work, thwarting my desire to spend a day reading Marion Cran.

the red rain gauge

the very big spider

Long Beach

Writing up the September planter reference post over the weekend had filled me with desire to clip back the tatty looking Geranium ‘Rozanne’. Like this one:

I did not get an after, but I did get a photo of the Salvia leucantha:

And the smoke shop:

smoke shop, before

after

Not every Rozanne needed clipping, just maybe half of them. Probably depends on how much wind each planter gets.

one of many wheelie carts of Rozanne debris for my compost bins

Meanwhile, Allan had been digging the big old lavender out of the planter we redid last week.  It had looked just awful in the planter reference post:

last week: Fifth Street Park NE, just redone, big lavender has to go

after, today

Allan’s photo, not easy to dig out

new soil and planting

after

We did a bit of clipping and deadheading in Fifth Street Park.  It is looking at its best now—after the tourists have mostly gone home.

NW corner

I love the purple aster.

I divided that aster from the boatyard; I wish I could remember its name.  The tall asters are the ones I like, and I must collect more.

I hope planty people notice my Melianthus major.

SW corner of park

South side; these grasses (which a landscape architect chose years ago for this spot) will flop forward over the lawn soon.

corner

Each street corner had a supposed dwarf pine, chosen by the same landscape architect.  This side it is indeed dwarf, and the other side is huge!

I got to pet these darlings.

We saw Scott and Tony walking Bailey and Rudy through town, two more dogs to pet.

Scott and Bailey

Tony and Rudy

It was past time to dig the dangity blang non blooming cosmos out of the welcome sign—AND the one that was blooming, because it could not stay there all by itself.

before, back

after

both sides, before

after

front, before

after

We saw a big frog, a medium frog, and a little baby frog.

big

medium

little (Allan’s photos)

I am sure they had a bad day, with their shelter being almost all removed.

The debris looked more impressive before Allan walked on it. (This is after).

Well.  That was my worst failure of a garden bed in long time.  I picked Cosmos ‘Sensation’, even though I knew it gets tall, because I thought the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ would grow vigorously and swamp a shorter cosmos.  So the cosmos was too tall for the sign.  Even where I did not have to clip it, it did not bloom, perhaps because the conditions there are too lush.  It is one of the few gardens that has an irrigation system.  I hope that next year will be better.

I kept the non weedy debris for my compost bins.  The cosmos root balls would get dumped at city works because they have horsetail in them. On the way, we did some clean up at city hall.

clipping back floppy Miscanthus ‘Variegata’, west side

after (Allan’s photo)

City Hall, west side

I noticed that the baskets were down!

I am happy to say I snagged all four baskets (minus the basket) out of the debris pile when we went to dump.

On the way home, we pulled Gladiolus papilio out of one last planter.

Last week: Vacant lot, too much running Gladiolus papilio, Rozanne is tired

today

We got home in time to deal with the vast amount of compost.

clipping into smaller pieces and layering green and brown

We had found one dramatically fasciated cosmos:

It was not till a few days later that I read that fasciation may be caused by a virus and such material should not be composted.  Oh well.  I LIKE fasciated stems.

I enjoy fall clean up and composted and petting dogs, so this was a good work day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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24 September 2018

Long Beach, Washington

My monthly planter reference post.  Pretty dull for anyone other than me.

Six blocks of planters, going north to south

 

Block one, east side

law office (just Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and golden oregono)

law office

Dennis storage lot

Dennis storage lot

Block one, west side

Dennis Co north (lots of Knautia that used to be variegated, reverted to green)

Dennis Co north, Rozanne is too far gone to look good but still blooming

Dennis Co south

Dennis Co south, my favourite

Block two, east side

Elks. Rozanne still good here

Elks

NIVA green with old dwarf rhodie

NIVA green

Block two, west side

Scoopers north

Scoopers north, escallonia left from volunteer days, green santolina

Scoopers south

Scoopers south also has old dwarf rhodie

Block three, east side

Pharmacy parking lot

LB Pharmacy parking lot, finally started pulling the mint

Cottage Bakery

Cottage Bakery, Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ reverted to green

Funland

Funland, where someone stole the north side santolina 😦

Police Station

Police Station

Block three, west side

SW of stoplight corner

SW of stoplight corner, has old rose reverted to root stock that I want out

Wind World Kites

Wind World Kites

Stormin’ Norman’s

Stormin’ Norman, needs total dig out because of wire vine, pink gaura has been rather fragile

I put in pink gauras to replace the bad agastaches that were diseased.  Semi-successful, people admire them, but they are brittle.

Third Street Park (Gazebo)

Gazebo

Block four, east side

Lewis and Clark Square

Lewis and Clark Square

Carnival Gifts, shrubby, and with mint

Carnival Gifts, shrubby from volunteer days

Carousel, must pull crocosmia, and oh! the horses have been taken in for the winter

Carousel

Fifth Street Park NE

Fifth Street Park NE, shrubby from volunteer days, giant hebe, running rose, woody old lavenders, should at least get the lavenders out

Block four, west side

Third Street Park

Third Street Park, tired Rozanne needs clipping

Hungry Harbor

Hungry Harbor, has a good very dark leaved phygelius but too much golden oregano

Sweet Phees with excessive golden oregano

Sweet Phees, more interesting from the inside with heuchera and astilbe

Fifth Street Park NE, just redone, big lavender has to go soon

Fifth Street Park NW

Block five, east side

Fifth Street Park SE with Salvia leucantha

Fifth Street Park SE, Rozanne is tired, will clip next time

Oceanic RV Park

Oceanic RV Park, Crocosmia trying to come back, must pull

Coastal inn with great zauchsneria in the middle

Coastal Inn, all in a boring muddle from the other side

Block five, west side

Fifth Street Park SW, where the veronica redeemed itself with a rebloom along the edge

Fifth Street Park SW

smoke shop, tired Rozanne needs clipping

Smoke shop has nice yellow dahlias. Rozanne looks good from inside

Streetside Tacos, love the very old santolina, Rozanne still good

Streetside Tacos, this was one of my four original volunteer planters so those santolinas are about 20 years old

Block six, east side

vacant lot

Vacant lot, too much running Gladiolus papilio on south end, must pull!, and Rozanne is tired

Paws by the Sea pet shop

pet shop, escallonias from volunteer days

Powell and Seillor accounting

Powell and Seillor, very windy planter

Block six, west side

Credit union

credit union, has good pink dahlias

bus stop, boring but ok, just took out and replaced old lavender

bus stop, boring low cranesbill geranium of some sort from volunteer

First Place Mall, the parsley amuses me

First Place Mall with parsley

 

 

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Tuesday, 25 September 2018

Being the social director of yesterday’s tour, arranging to visit each private garden (all but one at a time when the gardeners would be home), trying to set a date when all who wanted to could attend, fretting over social anxiety and feeling out of my league with two Big Name Gardeners, turned out to be well worth it as everyone agreed it had been a wonderful tour day.  However, both Allan and I slept extra late this morning! I had planned an easy work day, mostly watering, with two small projects (or so I thought).

I met two darling dogs over the fence next door to the post office.

I don’t normally put my hand into a dog’s yard.  This one was clearly friendly with a happy circling tail.  I wish they were there every day; I have only seen them the once. The dog’s affection for its ball reminded me of Monty Don’s dog, Nigel, star of Gardeners’ World.

Long Beach

We removed a very woody and tatty lavender from one of the planters.  Its inside was dark and gloomy and devoid of foliage.

before

after, with replacement soil and lavender

Helichrysum italicam

I have told people that although this plant smells strongly of curry, it is not edible.  It appears I am wrong about that, according to this article.  Although it smells of the strongest curry, the taste is said to be not like curry.  The flowers are inconsequential yellow things that I usually trim off.  I love the smell of the plant and its silver foliage. The linked article says that the flowers taste of bleu cheese, which I also love!

We added two curry plants to the planter we had redone last week.

The Shelburne Hotel

75 degrees F as we arrived at the Shelburne.

Speaking of curry plants, here is one we recently added to a planter on the room four deck.  The dahlia is out of scale but it requested that I not move it to the garden till later because it is quite happy in the pot.

Allan’s photo

center deck nandina, Allan’s photo

room 11 deck (Allan’s photo)

We watered and weeded. I trimmed tall non blooming cosmos to better reveal the signage.

front garden, looking north in shadow

the back garden

wedding candles still hanging in the laurel

the pub deck

the back garden

The candles were the battery powered ones.  I did not know that would work in jars of water.  I googled; they seem to be a special floating kind.  That would be great Halloween decor.

Ilwaco

After the Shelburne, we tried clearing a small garden on Howerton Avenue at the port of the roots  where the port crew had pulled out a sightline-blocking escallonia with a backhoe.  Or maybe pulled it out by truck, with a chain.  I had a few plants ready to plant, but was thwarted by the job being harder than I expected.  The root mass was especially  thick around a CoHo Charters sign that had been skillfully undamaged.

roots and black plastic under the soil and lava rock

Although we got it almost done, my anxiety level was high because Allan had to water the Ilwaco planters, a two hour job from start to finish (including watering our two volunteer pocket gardens).  A friend stopped to give us a political campaign sign (the wonderful Carolyn Long for Congress!) and we ran out of time and had to stop the Howerton bed before we were done.

Allan took the water trailer and watered the planters.

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’ at city hall before he deadheaded…

and after.

I walked the planters, checking on them for weeds (mostly chickweed) and deadheads. I finished at the planters by the boatyard…

Aster ‘Harrington’s Pink’

…and then walked home, looking for the feral cats along Main Street.  I felt bad that I scared them off a chicken dinner that someone had left on a plate.

one of three storage lots where the wild cats live

waiting for me to leave so that dinner could resume

In the book I’ve been reading, Wind-Harps by Marion Cran, she learns that her new Siamese cat is actually related by blood to her beloved Tatty-Bogle, a Siamese whose death she still mourned.  I realized then that perhaps the soft looking and so shy grey cat who lives in the feral colony would perhaps be related to my late much lamented Smoky, who was born wild in Ilwaco just a couple of blocks from there.  I have only seen grey cat twice; he may be the shyest of all.

I deadheaded in the almost dusk at the volunteer Post Office and Fire Station gardens.  Allan was not happy that he finished up in almost darkness, dangerous in traffic.  The day ended on a stressful note. More like a medley of stress.  I will be so glad when watering season is over.  It is the one task that creates the most pressure because when the plants are dry, it must be done.  Shorter days make it harder to fit in an evening watering job like Ilwaco planters.

Allan has decided that he will participate in a local book fair with his self published guide to paddle trips in SW Washington and NW Oregon.  You can find him on Saturday, Oct 6th, at this event:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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